Tag Archives: resources

Caregiver Support

Whether you are caring for the elderly or a loved one with a disAbility, most every caregiver should surround their life with resources and relief.

These resources will not only keep you feeling refreshed and renewed, but they’ll help you connect with others, who may have, or be currently experiencing similar lifestyles. In recognizing the different support options available, you’ll find yourself actively combating the chances of caregiver burnout and achieving the best quality care possible for your loved one.

Support is within reach. You just have to know where to look.

Caregiver Support Groups
You may be surprised to learn that a quick internet search can connect you with entire communities of caregivers. Sure, there are plenty of self-help articles and tips and tricks out there, but the value of an honest forum and communal support goes miles.

Find a caregiver forum in your state or region and consider the benefits of sounding off with other members. Bounce ideas and successes off of one another. Share your wisdom and experiences. Ask questions and seek answers.

Forums:

  • provide perspective
  • highlight industry products
  • connect like-minded individuals
  • create a canvas for ongoing conversation
  • offer new tips and tricks
  • and so much more

A forum is a great foundation to replenish your optimism and hope as a caregiver. You may even turn online connections into real life friendships and accountability. And what better way to grow as a caregiver than to do it in the company and strength of a community of caregivers?

Financial Aid
Many caregivers spend upwards of 20 hours per week giving care. It’s no wonder finances and employment opportunities can sometimes be difficult to balance. Don’t count yourself out, though.

Seek education on grants and financial aid. There are many benefits for caregivers such as mobility vehicle loans and income tax return incentives. A little homework can save you money in the long run. Getting ahead on your finances can provide tremendous relief.

Fitness
Explore activities you can experience with your loved one. From adaptive sports to a traditional walk around the block, exercise is a great way to proactively deal with stress and clear the mind.

To take it one step further, consider joining a league in your area. If you’ve become a member of an online forum, ask around about local gatherings and activities or take initiative to start one on your own. The positivity and energy can be contagious for all involved.

Family and Friends
Don’t go it alone. The strongest caregivers know when it’s time to ask for help.

It’s healthy to reach out to those you trust and your family and friends can be awesome support groups. Invite them to step up and come beside you as you provide care for your loved ones and don’t be afraid to walk them through a day in your life. The more they know about your situation and your needs the better they’ll be able to assist in the journey of you and your loved one.

Managing your own stress can make the ultimate difference in the life of the loved one you care for. In caring for you, you’re caring for them.

Recreation Opportunities For People With Disabilities

All Out Adventures
All Out Adventures provides outdoor accessible recreational opportunities throughout Massachusetts for people of all abilities, their families and friends. Summer programs include accessible kayaking, canoeing, hiking and cycling. Winter programs include snowshoeing, x-country skiing & sit-skiing, ice skating, sled skating and snowmobile rides.

Accessible Swimming Pools
Accessible Swimming Pools outdoor swimming pool lifts are available at all of the State Parks and Recreation Department’s 20 swimming pools. The pools are free. Contact pool directly for information about other site factors affecting accessibility.

AccesSport America
AccesSport America is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the discovery of higher function, fitness, and fun for children and adults with disabilities through high-challenge sports, which include kayaking, windsurfing and water skiing.

Arcs.
Local Arcs provide a variety of social and recreational activities for children and teens with developmental disabilities.

Bostnet / Guide to Boston’s Before & After School Programs
Build the Out-of-School Time Network (BOSTnet) has built a network of out-of-school time (OST) resources and opportunities for all children and youth, including those from low-income families and youth with disabilities.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary offers nine miles of walking trails guiding through a variety of field, woodland, and wetland habitats. A quarter-mile, handicap accessible trail and boardwalk along the bank of Indian Brook. Universally accessible facilities: Nature Center, Restrooms, All Persons Trail.

BSC (Boston Sports Club) Adaptive Swim Program
On Monday and Wednesday evening, between 6:30pm and 7:30pm, BSC Waltham (840 Winter Street) offers an adaptive swim program for children, youth, adolescents and adults with disabilities in our 93 degree therapy pool. Volunteers between the ages of 16-20 from neighboring schools and organizations offer their time to pair with an individual seeking to increase range of motion, flexibility, and strength but most importantly to socialize with other individuals and families. Our adaptive swim program is offered during the school year (September thru May) in 8-week sessions at a cost of $200 per session. Our 120,000 square foot, state of the art facility can accommodate families in our men’s, women’s or family changing rooms, fully equipped with showers, lockers, restrooms, towels, and other amenities.

  • 781-522-2054
  • 781-522-2512

CAPEable Adventures
offers adaptive sports & therapeutic recreation activities to local residents and vacationers to the Cape.


Cape Cod Challenger Club

Cape Cod Challenger Club offers noncompetitive sports and recreation opportunities for children with disabilities.

Challenger Sport League
Some towns have challenger teams. The goal of the challenger team is to play with no pressure and to educate typical peers and their parents about sportsmanship. The program is available for boys and girls, ages 3 – 19 with all types of physical and developmental disabilities. Call your local town recreation department to find out if they offer challenger sports.

Children’s Physical Developmental Clinic at Bridgewater State University
BSC students from all majors have opportunities to volunteer as clinicians and work with children and youth with disabilities, ages 18 months to 18 years. Clinic dates are to the right on website’s homepage.

Choral / Community Voices
Open to individuals 16 years of age and older. Must be willing to be committed for 12 weeks. Provides a choral opportunity for adults and young adults with developmental delays. Singing in an ensemble, individuals will have the opportunity to develop and refine vocal technique, listening skills, and team-work. Repertoire will include songs from the masters, traditional and folk favorites, as well as pop and Broadway tunes. Performances are scheduled in December and June. Fee $156/fall, $243/spring.

Compelling Fitness
Compelling Fitness in Hanover provides group and / or individual physical fitness training for children and adults with special needs.

Fitness Program / Special Needs Training
Call your local YMCA.

Horseback Riding – PATH International Centers in Massachusetts
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, PATH International was formally known as North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA). Though PATH Intl. began with a focus on horseback riding as a form of physical and mental therapy, the organization and its dedicated members have since developed a multitude of different equine-related activities for therapeutic purposes, collectively known as equine-assisted activities and therapies (or EAAT).

JF&CS Sunday Respite Program
JF&CS Sunday Respite Program for Children with Developmental Disabilities including those on the Autism Spectrum. Program includes swimming, music and art therapy. The program meets at the Striar JCC in Stoughton from 1:00 -4:00. This program is run by JF&CS with additional funding from Eastern Bank.


Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S)

  • Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S) Thirteen specialized athletic programs are available. K.I.D.S. hosts dances, sports banquets, social activities and recreational events throughout the year. Serves individuals and families throughout Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. Participants range in age 5-40 and have varying disabilities. http://www.kidsinc.us/
  • info@kidsinc.us
  • 1-866-712-7799

LIAM Nation Athletics (formerly known as FOSEK, Friends of Special Education Kidz)
sports leagues for special needs children in Tewksbury and surrounding communities in Merrimack Valley. Accomodates athletes of all abilities. Bombers Baseball, Striker Soccer, Little Reds Basketball.

Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program
Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program provides outdoor recreation opportunities in Massachusetts State Parks for visitors of all abilities. Accessibility to Massachusetts State Parks is achieved through site improvements, specialized adaptive recreation equipment, and accessible recreation programs.

Massachusetts Hospital School Wheelchair Recreation & Sports Program
Wheelchair sports and recreation program for children ages 9 to 21. Horseback riding, swimming and , Wheelchair Athletes Program.

Miracle League of Massachusetts
Miracle League of Massachusetts provides baseball for special needs children. Free to participate (includes uniform). Located at Blanchard Memorial Elementary School Ball Field in Boxborough.

New England Wheelchair Athletic Association (NEWAA)
Volunteer organization that helps individuals with physcial disabilities participate in recreational
and sports activities. The NEWAA provides opportunities for athletic competition by sponsoring
regional and local meets.

Partners for Youth With Disabilities Provides mentoring programs that assist young people reach their full potential. Partners provides several types of mentoring programs including one-to-one, group mentoring and e-mentoring.

Piers Park Sailing
Piers Park Sailing provides programs for disabled youth and adults aboard 23-foot sonar sailboats on a no charge basis. Serves those with amputations, paralysis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, autism, hearing impaired, sight impaired and other disabilities. Successfully integrates youth with disabilities into summer youth sailing programs. Scholarships are available for all Adaptive sailing programs. “Yes You Can Sail” program Friday eves for $35.

  • (617) 561-6677

Senseability Gym
Senseability Gym serves special needs children in greater Hopedale area. Our mission is to provide a parent-led sensory gym, giving children with special needs a safe, fun, indoor area where they can play and accommodate their sensory needs.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports
Spaulding Adaptive Sports offers adaptive sports and recreation activities in Boston, Cape Cod and the North Shore. Includes wheelchair tennis, hand cycling, adaptive rowing, waterskiing or windsurfing.

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA)
Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) provides year round sports training and athletic competition for all persons with intellectual disabilities. Minimum age requirement is eight years of age. There is no maximum age requirement. SOMA summer games offers aquatics, athletics, gymnastics, sailing, tennis and volleyball. Go to above link to search SOMA region that covers your town.

Sudbury Adaptive Sports & Recreation
Programs for all ages and abilities.

Super Soccer Stars Shine
Our unique program uses soccer as a vehicle to teach life skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. Our innovative curriculum, designed by licensed educators and therapists, promotes the complete growth and development of each player. Our low player-to-coach ratios encourage and empower players to increase social potential with teammates, build self-awareness and confidence and advance gross and fine motor skills — all while each individual improves at his or her own pace! Located at 1 Thompson Square, Suite 301 in Charlestown. Call for information. Low pricing options and scholarship applications available.

Therapy and the Performing Arts – Cape Cod
Provides children and young adults with physical and intellectual disabilities the opportunity to enjoy various arts and recreational programs in addition to receiving therapeutic benefits from their participation. Children gain new and rewarding experiences from which they develop self-confidence, increase motor function, and have fun. Offers age appropriate programming on Cape Cod for children and young adults diagnosed with down syndrome, chromosomal abnormalies, cerebral palsy, genetic disorders and othe cognitive and physical disabilities. Classes are taught by certified instructors/ therapists with expertise in various disciplines. Programs are offered on a sliding scale fee based on the family’s ability to pay.


TILL Autism Support Center

TILL Autism Support Center has social programs for those with autism spectrum disorders. Programs include exciting Family Fun Days that include apple picking, rock climing, sledding, in-door gym time, zoo trips, holiday parties and much more.

Town Recreation Departments
Most programs are open to participants from neighboring towns. Call area town recreation department to find out if it has special programming for children with disabilities.

Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn.
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn. offers information about beach wheelchairs, biking, boating and more!

TopSoccer Program / Outreach Program for Soccer
is a community-based training and team placement program for young athletes with a mental or physical disability. For additional information or would like to start a TOPSoccer Program in your community contact:

YMCAs
YMCAs are accessible and offer a range of classes. Call your local YMCA to find out what programs are available.

The Lowell YMCA “Adaptive Aquatics Program” accommodates children with mild to moderate neurological, physical, or social challenges.

  • (978) 454-7825.

Oak Square YMCA of Greater Boston at 615 Washington St, Brighton has a new adaptive fitness room & offers Adapted Adult Speciality Fitness Partnership Program on Wednesday and Saturday 11AM – 12:30PM on the Fitness Floor.

Hopkinton YMCA offers seasonal specialized programs. “Aim High” archery program and “Rock On!” is an outdoor ropes course and rock climbing for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related social communication disorders.

  • 45 East Street in Hopkinton.

WaterFire Access Program
A water-taxi program at Dyer Street Dock in Providence Rhode Island which provides an unforgettable experience of the art work for children and adults with disabilities to assure that they can join in the most popular arts event in the state and share the experience with their families and friends. Reservations are required. Each Water Fire Access passenger can bring along one companion.

Waypoint Adventures
Adventures for people of all ages and abilities

Whole Children offers movement, art, recreation and music programs for infants, children and teens of all abilities. Located in Hadley.

Government Grants for People with Disabilities

Find government grants and financing for handicap vehicles for people with disabilities nationwide. Money can be located with a little patience and a lot of research through various government programs. We’ve compiled a list of the most well-known government grant programs to assist your search for help funding a wheelchair van.When paying for a handicap van, you can use money from government grant programs for people with disabilities, as well other funding resources like disability grants, loans, fundraiser money, foundation endorsements, or any other funding source. We’ll work with your chosen foundations or any government grant program, after they verify financial assistance, to get you on the road!

To learn more about applying for wheelchair van grant funding to buy a handicap van or convert a pre-owned minivan, read “How to Apply for a Grant for Wheelchair Vans, Mobility Equipment, or Minivan Conversions.”

Government Wheelchair Van Financing Resources
Fund your wheelchair van with these government grant programs provided by the U.S. government and locally in your state.

Administration for Children & Families
On this website, new funding opportunities are displayed as they become available.

Grants.gov
The U.S. government resource listing federal grants available.

Medicaid
Sometimes provides assistance when children or other special circumstances are involved.

Medicaid/Department of Human Services (DHS)
Children are screened as part of the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program of Medicaid. Under Medicaid’s “rehabilitative services,” people often receive handicap van or lift funding to achieve their “best possible functional levels.”

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)
Located within each state’s Department of Human Services (per state), helps you prepare for work, train for a job, find a job, or keep a job as early as high school. Services are prioritized according to the severity of the disability.

Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)
Check your state’s branch for grant availability.

Division of Developmental Services (DDS)
Check your state’s branch for grants.Those with Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits from the Social Security Administration can contact the agency about its Plan to Achieve Self Support(PASS). A PASS plan sets aside income to buy equipment or services in a way that keeps income, as well as resources, below the SSI eligibility cut-off so there are no reductions in benefits. The emphasis is on whether the handicap van or equipment will help the SSI recipient become vocationally self-sufficient. It’s important for an individual to contact and receive the approval of Social Security before setting up a PASS plan. Once money has been set aside for a PASS, spending it on something else can result in the loss of SSI benefits.Please note: You can use multiple sources of funding that include grants, loans, and other funding assistance. If you’re unable to find government grants for people with disabilities or need to acquire more money to help pay for your wheelchair van and/or mobility needs, check out more opportunities at our mobility finance page.

World Autism Awareness Day: Light It Up Blue

Light It Up Blue - World Autosm Awareness Day

Every April 2, Autism Speaks celebrates World Autism Awareness Day with a global autism awareness campaign called Light It Up Blue. It’s easy (and fun!) to be a part of it — you can do anything from wearing blue to lighting your whole office or school up blue.

Add your name to say you’ll be a part of it, and we’ll be in touch with resources and ideas to get your friends involved. Thanks for helping shine a light on autism.

World Autism Awareness Day - Light It Up Blue

What Is Autism?
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and autism are both general terms for a group of complex disorders of brain development. These disorders are characterized, in varying degrees, by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. With the May 2013 publication of the DSM-5 diagnostic manual, all autism disorders were merged into one umbrella diagnosis of ASD. Previously, they were recognized as distinct subtypes, including autistic disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) and Asperger syndrome.

ASD can be associated with intellectual disability, difficulties in motor coordination and attention and physical health issues such as sleep and gastrointestinal disturbances. Some persons with ASD excel in visual skills, music, math and art.

Autism appears to have its roots in very early brain development. However, the most obvious signs of autism and symptoms of autism tend to emerge between 2 and 3 years of age. Autism Speaks continues to fund research on effective methods for earlier diagnosis, as early intervention with proven behavioral therapies can improve outcomes. Increasing autism awareness is a key aspect of this work and one in which our families and volunteers play an invaluable role.

Semper Fi Fund: Our mission is crucial. Our duty is clear.

About The SEMPER FI FUND (SFF):
The Semper Fi Fund, and its program America’s Fund, provide immediate financial assistance and lifetime support to post 9/11 wounded, critically ill and injured members of all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces, and their families, ensuring that they have the resources they need during their recovery and transition back to their communities. Since establishing the Semper Fi Fund in 2004, they’ve issued more than 86,000 grants, totaling more than $102 million in assistance to over 13,300 of our heroes and their families.

Who Are They?:
The Semper Fi Fund was created by a group of Marine Corps spouses nine years ago, and those same women run the Fund today alongside other spouses from all service branches, retired service members, all of whom intimately know the needs of our military families. They have been by our injured and ill service members’ sides from day one, helping them as they navigate lengthy recoveries and rejoin their communities.

How They Help:
Financial, emotional, and tiered support for our injured/ill service members and their families through the following programs: Family Support, Adaptive Housing, Adaptive Transportation, Specialized Equipment, Education and Career Transitioning, Rehabilitative Sports programs, and more.

Who They Help:
Qualifying post 9/11 Marines, Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen, Coast Guardsmen, and reservists with amputations, spinal cord injuries, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), severe Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), burns, blindness, other physical injuries, or those suffering from life-threatening illnesses. We also help spouses and children of active duty service members who face a life threatening illness or injury.

How Are They Unique:
The Semper Fi Fund has been awarded the highest ratings from watch dog groups: A+ Top Rated Charity from CharityWatch, and we are one of only three veteran nonprofits to receive this rating in recent years; and 4 Stars from Charity Navigator a rating only given to 4% of all charities. They maintain an extremely low overhead – 6% and provide rapid assistance with no red tape.

How They Raise Funding:
The Semper Fi Fund relies completely on donations from generous individuals, corporations, foundations, and community groups. In an effort to keep their fundraising and administrative costs low, they do not receive government funding or use direct mail campaigns. Their communities across the country host fundraising and awareness events for their mission, both big and small: golf tournaments, motorcycle poker runs, 5/10K races, dinners, and contests – whatever their passion may be! Their are members of the Combined Federal Campaign, through which federal, civilian, postal, and military donors can support us. They encourage all citizens across America to join them in their quest to support our military members who have sacrificed so much in the service to our country.

Their Philosophy:
The basic ideal that drives our efforts is simple: for as much as our heroes have sacrificed, they deserve the best care and support available in their hour of need. They are committed to being there at the time of injury or illness and for a lifetime if needed.

Looking Forward:
The Semper Fi Fund has been successful over the years thanks to their loyal supporters, both individuals and corporations. Yet our challenges continue to intensify due to the level of severity of injury, illness, and post-traumatic stress unique to the length of war on terrorism. These critical injuries are brought home and often call for a lifetime of assistance.

Tax-deductible contributions from people like you make up our lifeblood; whether donations are large or small, a one-time gift or ongoing endowment, every individual or corporation has the power to make a real difference, here and now, no matter where they are in the world.

The Semper Fi Fund is forever grateful to each of their supporters who share in their ongoing mission.

Please help them help those who have given so much in the name of freedom.

Find Financial Resources for Your Mobility Needs

Far too often, you find it hard to afford many of the tools and resources that you need in everyday life. For that reason, there are several alternative ways to get funding that will ensure that you get the assistance you need to live a hassle-free life without worrying about breaking the bank.

Here are a few sources of financial assistance to look into if you are finding it hard to cover all of your mobility expenses.

Medicare:
Usually offered only through private companies, Medicare can be a good option for certain medical devices and equipment and is based on your medical necessity for the goods or services you may need help with.

Medicaid:
While there is no exclusive list in terms of medical equipment covered, cases are approved on a case-by-case basis. Medicaid is a great option to look into if your expenses and needs aren’t covered by Medicare.

The IRS:
Did you know that certain mobility aids such as adaptive driving equipment can be deducted from your federal taxes? Contact your local tax adviser to see what equipment and supplies you use regularly to see if they can be deducted.

State Programs:
Check with your state’s vocational rehabilitation agencies to see if your mobility needs are approved for financial assistance. If any of it helps you get to work or perform your job efficiently, you may be covered here. Aside from that, you may also want to check out your local Center for Independent Living to see if they have any other resources that you can look into for financial assistance.

Vehicle-Related:
If you’ve recently had any adaptive equipment or ramps installed in your vehicle—or, for that matter, if you’ve recently purchased wheelchair van—there are some dealerships that will reimburse you for such things. Check with your local mobility-friendly dealership to learn more.

With these resources at your disposal, you can hopefully stop worrying about money and focus more on living a stress-free life where your mobility needs are easily met.

Caregiver Support

Whether you are caring for the elderly or a loved one with a disAbility, most every caregiver should surround their life with resources and relief.

These resources will not only keep you feeling refreshed and renewed, but they’ll help you connect with others, who may have, or be currently experiencing similar lifestyles. In recognizing the different support options available, you’ll find yourself actively combating the chances of caregiver burnout and achieving the best quality care possible for your loved one.

Support is within reach. You just have to know where to look.

Caregiver Support Groups
You may be surprised to learn that a quick internet search can connect you with entire communities of caregivers. Sure, there are plenty of self-help articles and tips and tricks out there, but the value of an honest forum and communal support goes miles.

Find a caregiver forum in your state or region and consider the benefits of sounding off with other members. Bounce ideas and successes off of one another. Share your wisdom and experiences. Ask questions and seek answers.

Forums:

  • provide perspective
  • highlight industry products
  • connect like-minded individuals
  • create a canvas for ongoing conversation
  • offer new tips and tricks
  • and so much more

A forum is a great foundation to replenish your optimism and hope as a caregiver. You may even turn online connections into real life friendships and accountability. And what better way to grow as a caregiver than to do it in the company and strength of a community of caregivers?

Financial Aid
Many caregivers spend upwards of 20 hours per week giving care. It’s no wonder finances and employment opportunities can sometimes be difficult to balance. Don’t count yourself out, though.

Seek education on grants and financial aid. There are many benefits for caregivers such as mobility vehicle loans and income tax return incentives. A little homework can save you money in the long run. Getting ahead on your finances can provide tremendous relief.

Fitness
Explore activities you can experience with your loved one. From adaptive sports to a traditional walk around the block, exercise is a great way to proactively deal with stress and clear the mind.

To take it one step further, consider joining a league in your area. If you’ve become a member of an online forum, ask around about local gatherings and activities or take initiative to start one on your own. The positivity and energy can be contagious for all involved.

Family and Friends
Don’t go it alone. The strongest caregivers know when it’s time to ask for help.

It’s healthy to reach out to those you trust and your family and friends can be awesome support groups. Invite them to step up and come beside you as you provide care for your loved ones and don’t be afraid to walk them through a day in your life. The more they know about your situation and your needs the better they’ll be able to assist in the journey of you and your loved one.

Managing your own stress can make the ultimate difference in the life of the loved one you care for. In caring for you, you’re caring for them.

Recreation Opportunities For People With Disabilities

All Out Adventures
All Out Adventures provides outdoor accessible recreational opportunities throughout Massachusetts for people of all abilities, their families and friends. Summer programs include accessible kayaking, canoeing, hiking and cycling. Winter programs include snowshoeing, x-country skiing & sit-skiing, ice skating, sled skating and snowmobile rides.

Accessible Swimming Pools
Accessible Swimming Pools outdoor swimming pool lifts are available at all of the State Parks and Recreation Department’s 20 swimming pools. The pools are free. Contact pool directly for information about other site factors affecting accessibility.

AccesSport America
AccesSport America is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the discovery of higher function, fitness, and fun for children and adults with disabilities through high-challenge sports, which include kayaking, windsurfing and water skiing.

Arcs.
Local Arcs provide a variety of social and recreational activities for children and teens with developmental disabilities.

Bostnet / Guide to Boston’s Before & After School Programs
Build the Out-of-School Time Network (BOSTnet) has built a network of out-of-school time (OST) resources and opportunities for all children and youth, including those from low-income families and youth with disabilities.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary offers nine miles of walking trails guiding through a variety of field, woodland, and wetland habitats. A quarter-mile, handicap accessible trail and boardwalk along the bank of Indian Brook. Universally accessible facilities: Nature Center, Restrooms, All Persons Trail.

BSC (Boston Sports Club) Adaptive Swim Program
On Monday and Wednesday evening, between 6:30pm and 7:30pm, BSC Waltham (840 Winter Street) offers an adaptive swim program for children, youth, adolescents and adults with disabilities in our 93 degree therapy pool. Volunteers between the ages of 16-20 from neighboring schools and organizations offer their time to pair with an individual seeking to increase range of motion, flexibility, and strength but most importantly to socialize with other individuals and families. Our adaptive swim program is offered during the school year (September thru May) in 8-week sessions at a cost of $200 per session. Our 120,000 square foot, state of the art facility can accommodate families in our men’s, women’s or family changing rooms, fully equipped with showers, lockers, restrooms, towels, and other amenities.

  • 781-522-2054
  • 781-522-2512

CAPEable Adventures
offers adaptive sports & therapeutic recreation activities to local residents and vacationers to the Cape.


Cape Cod Challenger Club

Cape Cod Challenger Club offers noncompetitive sports and recreation opportunities for children with disabilities.

Challenger Sport League
Some towns have challenger teams. The goal of the challenger team is to play with no pressure and to educate typical peers and their parents about sportsmanship. The program is available for boys and girls, ages 3 – 19 with all types of physical and developmental disabilities. Call your local town recreation department to find out if they offer challenger sports.

Children’s Physical Developmental Clinic at Bridgewater State University
BSC students from all majors have opportunities to volunteer as clinicians and work with children and youth with disabilities, ages 18 months to 18 years. Clinic dates are to the right on website’s homepage.

Choral / Community Voices
Open to individuals 16 years of age and older. Must be willing to be committed for 12 weeks. Provides a choral opportunity for adults and young adults with developmental delays. Singing in an ensemble, individuals will have the opportunity to develop and refine vocal technique, listening skills, and team-work. Repertoire will include songs from the masters, traditional and folk favorites, as well as pop and Broadway tunes. Performances are scheduled in December and June. Fee $156/fall, $243/spring.

Compelling Fitness
Compelling Fitness in Hanover provides group and / or individual physical fitness training for children and adults with special needs.

Fitness Program / Special Needs Training
Call your local YMCA.

Horseback Riding – PATH International Centers in Massachusetts
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, PATH International was formally known as North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA). Though PATH Intl. began with a focus on horseback riding as a form of physical and mental therapy, the organization and its dedicated members have since developed a multitude of different equine-related activities for therapeutic purposes, collectively known as equine-assisted activities and therapies (or EAAT).

JF&CS Sunday Respite Program
JF&CS Sunday Respite Program for Children with Developmental Disabilities including those on the Autism Spectrum. Program includes swimming, music and art therapy. The program meets at the Striar JCC in Stoughton from 1:00 -4:00. This program is run by JF&CS with additional funding from Eastern Bank.


Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S)

  • Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S) Thirteen specialized athletic programs are available. K.I.D.S. hosts dances, sports banquets, social activities and recreational events throughout the year. Serves individuals and families throughout Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. Participants range in age 5-40 and have varying disabilities. http://www.kidsinc.us/
  • info@kidsinc.us
  • 1-866-712-7799

LIAM Nation Athletics (formerly known as FOSEK, Friends of Special Education Kidz)
sports leagues for special needs children in Tewksbury and surrounding communities in Merrimack Valley. Accomodates athletes of all abilities. Bombers Baseball, Striker Soccer, Little Reds Basketball.

Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program
Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program provides outdoor recreation opportunities in Massachusetts State Parks for visitors of all abilities. Accessibility to Massachusetts State Parks is achieved through site improvements, specialized adaptive recreation equipment, and accessible recreation programs.

Massachusetts Hospital School Wheelchair Recreation & Sports Program
Wheelchair sports and recreation program for children ages 9 to 21. Horseback riding, swimming and , Wheelchair Athletes Program.

Miracle League of Massachusetts
Miracle League of Massachusetts provides baseball for special needs children. Free to participate (includes uniform). Located at Blanchard Memorial Elementary School Ball Field in Boxborough.

New England Wheelchair Athletic Association (NEWAA)
Volunteer organization that helps individuals with physcial disabilities participate in recreational
and sports activities. The NEWAA provides opportunities for athletic competition by sponsoring
regional and local meets.

Partners for Youth With Disabilities Provides mentoring programs that assist young people reach their full potential. Partners provides several types of mentoring programs including one-to-one, group mentoring and e-mentoring.

Piers Park Sailing
Piers Park Sailing provides programs for disabled youth and adults aboard 23-foot sonar sailboats on a no charge basis. Serves those with amputations, paralysis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, autism, hearing impaired, sight impaired and other disabilities. Successfully integrates youth with disabilities into summer youth sailing programs. Scholarships are available for all Adaptive sailing programs. “Yes You Can Sail” program Friday eves for $35.

  • (617) 561-6677

Senseability Gym
Senseability Gym serves special needs children in greater Hopedale area. Our mission is to provide a parent-led sensory gym, giving children with special needs a safe, fun, indoor area where they can play and accommodate their sensory needs.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports
Spaulding Adaptive Sports offers adaptive sports and recreation activities in Boston, Cape Cod and the North Shore. Includes wheelchair tennis, hand cycling, adaptive rowing, waterskiing or windsurfing.

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA)
Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) provides year round sports training and athletic competition for all persons with intellectual disabilities. Minimum age requirement is eight years of age. There is no maximum age requirement. SOMA summer games offers aquatics, athletics, gymnastics, sailing, tennis and volleyball. Go to above link to search SOMA region that covers your town.

Sudbury Adaptive Sports & Recreation
Programs for all ages and abilities.

Super Soccer Stars Shine
Our unique program uses soccer as a vehicle to teach life skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. Our innovative curriculum, designed by licensed educators and therapists, promotes the complete growth and development of each player. Our low player-to-coach ratios encourage and empower players to increase social potential with teammates, build self-awareness and confidence and advance gross and fine motor skills — all while each individual improves at his or her own pace! Located at 1 Thompson Square, Suite 301 in Charlestown. Call for information. Low pricing options and scholarship applications available.

Therapy and the Performing Arts – Cape Cod
Provides children and young adults with physical and intellectual disabilities the opportunity to enjoy various arts and recreational programs in addition to receiving therapeutic benefits from their participation. Children gain new and rewarding experiences from which they develop self-confidence, increase motor function, and have fun. Offers age appropriate programming on Cape Cod for children and young adults diagnosed with down syndrome, chromosomal abnormalies, cerebral palsy, genetic disorders and othe cognitive and physical disabilities. Classes are taught by certified instructors/ therapists with expertise in various disciplines. Programs are offered on a sliding scale fee based on the family’s ability to pay.


TILL Autism Support Center

TILL Autism Support Center has social programs for those with autism spectrum disorders. Programs include exciting Family Fun Days that include apple picking, rock climing, sledding, in-door gym time, zoo trips, holiday parties and much more.

Town Recreation Departments
Most programs are open to participants from neighboring towns. Call area town recreation department to find out if it has special programming for children with disabilities.

Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn.
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn. offers information about beach wheelchairs, biking, boating and more!

TopSoccer Program / Outreach Program for Soccer
is a community-based training and team placement program for young athletes with a mental or physical disability. For additional information or would like to start a TOPSoccer Program in your community contact:

YMCAs
YMCAs are accessible and offer a range of classes. Call your local YMCA to find out what programs are available.

The Lowell YMCA “Adaptive Aquatics Program” accommodates children with mild to moderate neurological, physical, or social challenges.

  • (978) 454-7825.

Oak Square YMCA of Greater Boston at 615 Washington St, Brighton has a new adaptive fitness room & offers Adapted Adult Speciality Fitness Partnership Program on Wednesday and Saturday 11AM – 12:30PM on the Fitness Floor.

Hopkinton YMCA offers seasonal specialized programs. “Aim High” archery program and “Rock On!” is an outdoor ropes course and rock climbing for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related social communication disorders.

  • 45 East Street in Hopkinton.

WaterFire Access Program
A water-taxi program at Dyer Street Dock in Providence Rhode Island which provides an unforgettable experience of the art work for children and adults with disabilities to assure that they can join in the most popular arts event in the state and share the experience with their families and friends. Reservations are required. Each Water Fire Access passenger can bring along one companion.

Waypoint Adventures
Adventures for people of all ages and abilities

Whole Children offers movement, art, recreation and music programs for infants, children and teens of all abilities. Located in Hadley.

Connecticut Mobility Rebate Resources

Connecticut Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for Connecticut (CT) Residents
Welcome to your page for discovering disability grant possibilities for Connecticut residents. The organizational bodies below were carefully accumulated by The Mobility Resource as places for you to find funding or to receive assistance in finding funding for your new or used wheelchair van. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking to buy or to install accessibility equipment like a wheelchair or scooter ram, lift, outwardly pivoting seats, or adaptive driving controls. Disability grants can help with the cost of any of it.

As you set out to uncover Connecticut-based financial aid resources, start with the state government agencies and other groups listed below. All can help with your dream of acquiring a handicap van for increased independence, self-determination, freedom and standard of living.

Remember, too, that there are foundations and organizations dedicated to your disability. Most are national, but maintain chapters in Connecticut. Contact these branches to learn about their disability grants and other funding sources they may know of.

Sources for Connecticut Disability Grants and Assistance:

Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS), State of Connecticut

Connecticut’s BRS is funded federally by the US Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and the Rehabilitation Services Administration. Its goal is to help the state’s disabled find and maintain employment. It offers disability grants for those requiring special transportation to go into work and other support.

Department of Social Services
25 Sigourney Street, 11th Floor
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 424-4844 or toll free (800) 537-2549
brs.dss@ct.gov

Connect-Ability

Connect-Ability uses federal funds to improve access to employment for Connecticut’s disabled population. It works to break down the barriers that stand between the disabled and a rewarding job. This includes helping with transportation hurdles, and the group can help you get a handicapped-accessible van if you need it.

(866) 844-1903
info@connect-ability.com
Connecticut Aging and Disabilities Resource Centers (ADRCs)
ADRCs, operated jointly by the US Administration on Community Living and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, are major resources for senior citizens and persons with disabilities across the country. Offices are located all around the state.

Connecticut Association of Area Agencies on Aging (C4A)

C4A is comprised of five offices serving Connecticut’s elderly population. Direct funding tends to go to groups, not individuals, but the Agency can steer you toward appropriate funding sources for your accessible vehicle.

Connecticut Council on Developmental Disabilities (CDD)
The Connecticut CDD works tirelessly to provide access to education, meaningful work and community life for people with developmental disabilities. If you or a family member has a condition classified as a developmental disability, the Council may help fund your wheelchair van with a grant.
460 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106-1308
(860) 418-6160 or  (800) 653-1134

Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA)
VAs around the nation work to support our veterans. If you’re a disabled veteran living in Connecticut, this is your source for help. The VA often awards grants to meet the mobility needs of veterans injured in the line of duty. Money may also be available if you have a disability that was only aggravated during service, or if it came about during (or was exacerbated by) VA care.

287 West Street
Rocky Hill, CT 06067
(860) 616-3600

Connecticut Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)

This is Connecticut’s branch of a nationwide organization set up by law to promote the principles of equal access and independent living for Americans with disabilities. The 23-member Council is appointed by the Governor, and consists of a majority of disabled Connecticut residents. This is a good resource when looking for sources of financial aid for your wheelchair van.

Suites 132 & 134,
151 New Park Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106

Connecticut Tech Act Project (CTTAP)
CTTAP is dedicated to getting assistive technology to the disabled and elderly Connecticut residents who need it for full participation in school, work and community life. They teach you how to use equipment and even lend it out temporarily, and they can help you secure financial aid for the assistive technologies you could benefit from.

25 Sigourney Street, 11th Floor
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 424-4881 or (800) 537-2549

New England Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center
Persons with disabilities in Connecticut are served by The New England ADA Center, the area’s chapter of the National Network of ADA Centers. It endeavors to promote and strengthen the independence, self-determination, rights and quality of life of all state residents with a disability. This is an essential source of information and assistance while trying to locate all the disability grants for which you might qualify for acquiring a wheelchair van.
180-200 Portland Street

Suite 1
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 695-1225 or (800) 949-4232

Obie Harrington-Howes Foundation (OHHF)

OHHF is a nonprofit that awards grant money to Connecticut residents who have suffered a spinal cord injury. Disability grants are given to promote mobility, independence and access to education.

P.O.Box 2221
Darien, CT 06820
(888) 265-5859

These are only some of the resources available for Connecticut disability grants and assistance.
If you work with or know of another Connecticut agency or organization that should be listed here, please let us know.
Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Connecticut Disability Grants Handicap Funding CT
Buying a wheelchair van in Connecticut can be made financially easier through handicap funding, loans for the disabled, mobility finance programs, government assistance, and other accessible funding sources. Discover the largest directory of Connecticut disability grants to help cover the cost of buying a handicap van. AMS Vans is happy to deliver your handicap van to Connecticut and nationwide. Check Connecticut delivery prices for more details.

Disability Grants in Connecticut (CT)
The handicap grant foundations listed below may or may not provide funding for wheelchair vans to individuals. We have gathered this information from their respective websites as we work on building a list of disability grants and mobility resources. Please check with your local Connecticut disability funding program for complete details.

Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation
Awards hundreds of competitive grants and scholarships each year. In fact, in 2008, they distributed $8.9 million to hundreds of non-profit groups and students. Whether you’re seeking funding as an individual or on behalf of a non-profit organization, they welcome your interest in these opportunities.

How to Apply for Connecticut Disability Grants or Mobility Funding
Connecticut residents in search of handicap grants, mobility financing, disabled loans, government assistance, or other disability programs to buy a wheelchair van should contact any of the foundations listed. AMS Vans will work with one or more financial providers toward funding your wheelchair accessible van or vehicle conversion.

If you know of additional resources for Connecticut residents to find disability grants or other types of mobility funding, submit a foundation to AMS to help others who seek financing assistance.

The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Connecticut Disability Grants Handicap Funding CT
Buying a wheelchair van in Connecticut can be made financially easier through handicap funding, loans for the disabled, mobility finance programs, government assistance, and other accessible funding sources. Discover the largest directory of Connecticut disability grants to help cover the cost of buying a handicap van. AMS Vans is happy to deliver your handicap van to Connecticut and nationwide. Check Connecticut delivery prices for more details.

Disability Grants in Connecticut (CT)
The handicap grant foundations listed below may or may not provide funding for wheelchair vans to individuals. We have gathered this information from their respective websites as we work on building a list of disability grants and mobility resources. Please check with your local Connecticut disability funding program for complete details.

Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation
Awards hundreds of competitive grants and scholarships each year. In fact, in 2008, they distributed $8.9 million to hundreds of non-profit groups and students. Whether you’re seeking funding as an individual or on behalf of a non-profit organization, they welcome your interest in these opportunities.

How to Apply for Connecticut Disability Grants or Mobility Funding
Connecticut residents in search of handicap grants, mobility financing, disabled loans, government assistance, or other disability programs to buy a wheelchair van should contact any of the foundations listed. AMS Vans will work with one or more financial providers toward funding your wheelchair accessible van or vehicle conversion.

If you know of additional resources for Connecticut residents to find disability grants or other types of mobility funding, submit a foundation to AMS to help others who seek financing assistance.

Maine Mobility Rebate Resources

Maine Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for Maine (ME) Residents
If you reside in Maine, there is an array of available sources for disability grants. Money may be applied to various aspects of independence and living, including toward purchasing a new or used wheelchair van. Funds can also often be applied to buying and installing vehicle modifications for handicapped accessibility, including lowered floors and equipment that facilitates entry and exiting in a wheelchair or scooter, mobility equipment lifts and hand controls for adaptive driving capabilities.
Persons with physical disabilities in Maine can contact the following nonprofits and state government agencies for help. Some provide disability grants themselves, while others will point you in the right directions for financial aid. A handicap van is well within reach once you investigate assistance options.

In addition to the resources below, contact state branches of groups dedicated to helping people with your particular disability.

Sources for Maine Disability Grants and Assistance:
Alpha One

Alpha One is a Maine Center for Independent Living. It helps state residents with a variety of mobility impairments and other special needs achieve a more self-reliant lifestyle. The organization provides grants directly and serves as an essential information resource.

South Portland Office:
127 Main Street
South Portland, ME 04106
(207) 767-2189 or (800) 640-7200
Bangor Office:
11 Bangor Mall Blvd., Unit A
Bangor, ME 04401
 (207) 941-6553

Bureau of Maine Veterans Service
This is the Maine state government’s resource for veterans of a branch of the US military. Disabled veterans are entitled to numerous benefits, often including grants toward wheelchair vans or handicap accessibility equipment and conversions.

Veterans in Maine may also find their local US Department of Veterans Affairs, based in Togus at their website.

Maine Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)
Maine’s ADRCs are scattered across the state, serving residents on a county-by-county basis. Use the link above to find your local office’s website and contact information. These Centers provide assistance and information to the elderly and people with disabilities.

Maine Association of Area Agencies on Aging (AAA)

AAA is a national program providing aid on a state-by-state basis. Local chapters serve groupings of counties. Maine’s Agencies assist the elderly with a variety of needs, including securing vans for people who rely on scooters or wheelchairs. Use the provided website to locate your branch’s website and contact information.

Maine CITE

This agency is run by the Maine Department of Education and funded by the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. They facilitate the acquisition of all types of assistive technology for state residents with disabilities.

University College
46 University Drive
Augusta, Maine 04330 USA
(207) 621-3195
iweb@mainecite.org

Maine Developmental Disabilities Council (MDDC)
Like all national DDCs, MDDC uses the Federally established definition of developmental disabilities. This group, a collection of individuals, families and agencies, is focused on promoting self-determination among state residents with developmental disabilities. Its services, assistance and information resources are many and varied.

139 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0139

(207) 287-4213 or (800) 244-3990

Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)

This sub-agency of the State of Maine’s Department of Labor, helps residents with disabilities secure employment. They can provide financial assistance and information for people with limited mobility who need a handicap van to hold down a job.

New England Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Centers

ADA Centers around the country help citizens with disabilities become more independent and fight to uphold their rights and quality of life. The New England chapter serves residents in this geographical area, including people in Maine.
180-200 Portland St., Suite 1
Boston, MA 02114

(617) 695-1225 or (800) 949-4232
ADAinfo@NewEnglandADA.org

Pine Tree Society (PTS)
PTS is a Maine-based nonprofit formed in 1936. It serves state residents with disabilities in many ways, including with the acquisition of assistive technologies.

P.O. Box 518
149 Front Street
Bath, Maine 04530
(207) 443-3341
info@pinetreesociety.org

These are only some of the resources available for Maine disability grants and assistance.
If you work with or know of another agency or organization in Maine that should be listed here, please let us know.
Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Maine Disability Grants Handicap Funding ME
In order to receive handicap funding in Maine, many residents use multiple sources of mobility funds available in Maine, such as disability grants, handicap loans, government assistance, and other help. Discover the largest source of Maine disability grants to help cover some or all of the money to fund handicap vans or wheelchair van conversions. AMS Vans can provide delivery of your handicap van to Maine and nationwide.

Disability Grants in Maine (ME)
Maine disability grants may or may not allocate funding for wheelchair vans. Check with the local Maine grant provider for more details.

mPower Loans
The mPower loan fund, also known as the Kim Wallace Adaptive Equipment Loan Program, is a citizen-funded loan program offering low-interest loans of $240 to $100,000 to assist in purchasing a handicap van.

Maine Cite 
The Maine Cite provides information on benefits disabled people can receive, as well as a few resources to find financing for citizens of Maine interested in buying a wheelchair accessible van.

How to Apply for Maine Grants or Mobility Funding
Maine residents seeking assistance with the purchase of mobility van conversions should contact one or more mobility funding programs listed above about disability grants offered. Once complete, AMS Vans is happy to work with one or all mobility funding sources such as grants for the disabled, church money, government funds, veterans’ programs or other financial outlets you have acquired to aid in the purchase of your wheelchair van. Please submit any other mobility funding resources for Maine residents or nationwide to AMS, so we can build the most comprehensive database of financial assistance programs for people with disabilities.

New Hampshire Mobility Rebate Resources

New Hampshire Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for New Hampshire (NH) Residents
For elderly and disabled people in New Hampshire, grants are readily available from a variety of sources to fund—in part or in its entirety—a wheelchair van. Perhaps you’re looking to purchase or lease a used or new handicap van or perhaps you’re hoping to install conversions like a wheelchair ramp, a scooter lift or adaptive driving controls to make a van more handicapped friendly.

Whatever the case may be, numerous New Hampshire agencies, organizations and foundations are standing by to provide financial aid or to help you locate sources for which you qualify. We’ve done the preliminary research for you. Peruse the resources below and contact any and all that are applicable to you.

We’d also like to remind you that disability-specific groups are a prime source for grants and other help. Find local New Hampshire chapters and inquire within.

Sources for New Hampshire Disability Grants and Assistance


Bureau of Elderly and Adult Services (BEAS)
BEAS serves New Hampshire residents over the age of 60 and residents over the age of 18 who suffer from a chronic illness or disability. This is an excellent resource for information and all sorts of services and support.
129 Pleasant Street
Concord, NH 03301
(603) 271-9203 or (800) 351-1888

Governor’s Commission on Disability
This is an agency of the State of New Hampshire’s government. It is devoted to removing barriers from the lives of the state’s disabled population. Contact this body with your questions about securing disability grants you can put toward a wheelchair van.
57 Regional Drive, Suite 1
Concord, NH 03301
(603) 271-2773 or (800) 852-3405

The Harry Gregg Foundation
This is a cross-disability charitable foundation providing direct financial aid to New Hampshire residents. It began in 1989, created in memory of its namesake, the founder of the Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center.
1 Verney Drive
Greenfield, NH 03047
(603) 547-3311 ext. 1490 or (800) 394-3311 ext. 1490
hgf@crotchedmountain.org

Institute on Disability (IOD)
IOD works to improve access to assistive technologies for disabled people living in New Hampshire. This is a good source of information about acquiring and using such technology in the state. It is affiliated with the University of New Hampshire.
Assistive Technology
Institute on Disability
10 West Edge Drive
Suite 101
Durham, NH 03824
(855) 374-9969

New England Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center
The New England ADA Center serves persons with disabilities in New Hampshire. It works to preserve and increase the rights, independence, self-determination and quality of life of the state’s disabled population. Use this key resource to locate an array of disability grants to apply toward a wheelchair van.
180-200 Portland Street
Suite 1
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 695-1225 or (800) 949-4232
ADAinfo@NewEnglandADA.org

New Hampshire Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)
For the elderly and disabled living in New Hampshire, the state’s ADRCs are available to provide information and assistance. Talk to a representative to learn about funding options for your handicapped-accessible vehicle. You can find your local office using the link above.

The New Hampshire Council on Developmental Disabilities (NHCDD)
NHCDD offers disability grants to individuals and organizations, along with many other types of assistance. State residents with a condition meeting the Federal guidelines for a developmental disability are eligible for help from the Council.
21 Fruit Street, Suite #22
Concord, NH 03301-2451
(603) 271-3236

New Hampshire State Offices of Veterans Services
U.S. veterans who become disabled in the course of active duty or Veterans Affairs-sanctioned services, or whose disabilities are thus made worse, qualify for all manner of support and disability grants. New Hampshire veterans can often receive the full cost of a wheelchair van in financial aid.
275 Chestnut Street
Room 517
Manchester, NH 03101-2411
(603) 624-9230 or (800) 622-9230

New Hampshire Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)
This is New Hampshire’s chapter of the country’s SILCs. It is dedicated to helping the disabled lead more independent lives. It furthers this goal by providing reliable information, services and aid to state residents with disabilities.
Paula Ninivaggi
Statewide Independent Living Council
c/o Governor’s Commission on Disability
57 Regional Drive
Concord, NH 03301
(603) 271-0476 or (800) 852-3405 ext. 0476
info@silcnh.org

New Hampshire Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)
Check in with the New Hampshire VR agency, which operates under the auspices of the state’s Department of Education. It assists disabled state residents in securing employment. If a handicap van is necessary for you to find or to get to work, financial aid is available.
101 Pleasant Street
Concord, NH 03301-3860
(603) 271-3494
Lori.Temple@doe.nh.gov

These are only some of the resources available for New Hampshire disability grants and assistance.
If you work with or know of another New Hampshire agency or organization that should be listed here, please pass along any pertinent information to: Jim Sanders, Director of Interactive Marketing, Jims@abilityvan.info

Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Funding wheelchair vans through New Hampshire disability grants can significantly reduce your out-of-pocket expense for new and used handicap van or a van conversion to be wheelchair accessible. We’ve gathered several resources for disability grants to aid you in your quest to buy a handicap van or convert a van to be wheelchair accessible. Once you’ve secured the handicap funding for your wheelchair van, AMS Vans is happy to deliver your handicap van to New Hampshire or nationwide.

Disability Grants in New Hampshire (NH)
The organizations listed below may or may not provide mobility funding for wheelchair van loans. For more details, check with the foundation and local New Hampshire grants providers.

AT in NH
Assistive Technology in New Hampshire is a program that provides access to assistive technology solutions through equipment re-use, explorations, loans and low-cost funding alternatives.

How to Apply for New Hampshire Grants or Mobility Funding
New Hampshire residents are welcome to submit all disability grants, handicap loans, government programs, fundraisers, or other mobility funds. We accepts all funding assistance programs to ensure your handicap needs are met. Help build the most complete list of grant information for the disabled by submitting any disability grants or mobility programs specific to the area of New Hampshire or nationwide.

New York Mobility Rebate Resources

New York Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for New York (NY) Residents
New York disability grants are readily available to residents from various sources. Many are applicable to buying or leasing new or used wheelchair vans, or to handicap van conversions. The latter includes lowered flooring, access ramps, different styles of wheelchair or scooter lifts, turning automotive seating systems, adaptive driving hand controls and other equipment and modifications.

If you need help affording your handicapped-friendly ride, the following New York-based groups are the place to start. Contact any and all that sound relevant to your circumstances. You’ll find that many allow you to apply for financial aid; the others are willing and able to direct you toward sources of disability grants for which you or a family member may be eligible.

Also, contact state branches of nationwide organizations and foundations devoted to your specific cause of limited mobility. These are excellent sources of funding assistance and useful information.

Sources for New York Disability Grants and Assistance

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)
ACCESS-VR is a primary resource for disabled New York State residents seeking or trying to hold down a job. It offers an array of services and support to help you get back to work. If this means you need a wheelchair van, a disability grant may be available to you through this agency.
One Commerce Plaza, Room 1609
Albany, New York 12234
(800) 222-5627
accesadm@mail.nysed.gov

Center for Assistive Technology (CAT)
CAT is run by the University of Buffalo’s School of Public Health and Health Professionals. It strives to educate people about assistive technologies and to increase access among those who need it. The Center does not directly provide disability grants or other funding, but its variety of services and resources make it a go-to reference for information about help affording a handicap van.
100 Sylvan Parkway, Suite 400
Amherst, NY 14228
(716) 204-8606 ext. 200

New York Aging and Disabilities Resource Centers (ARDCs)
ADRCs are some of the best sources for information and assistance available to persons with disabilities and senior citizens. Offices are all around the state, serving residents in their immediate vicinity.

New York State Association of Area Agencies on Aging (NYSAAAA)
NYSAAAA upholds the independence and dignity of New York’s elderly. It coordinates for dozens of offices all around the state. Your local branch can assist you with securing the handicapped-accessible vehicle you or an aging loved one needs.

New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC)
The New York DDPC works to further the self-determination and full participation of state residents with a developmental disability. To this end, they assist such people and their families with acquiring the information, services, technologies and other support they require. You may qualify for a disability grant from the council.
99 Washington Avenue, 12th Floor, Suite 1230
Albany, New York 12210
(518) 486-7505 or (800) 395-3372
ddpc@ddpc.ny.gov

New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs (VA)
The VA in New York is dedicated to providing prompt, comprehensive support to in-state US veterans and their families. For veterans who became disabled while on active military duty or while receiving VA services, or for those whose existing disabilities were aggravated under these circumstances, disability grants are available.
5 Empire State Plaza, 17th Floor
Albany, NY 12223-1551
(888) 838-7697
DVAInfo@veterans.ny.gov

New York State Independent Living Council (NYSILC)
NYSILC is a nonprofit, non-governmental group formed under federal mandate. The majority-disabled council is appointed by the Governor to further the cause of independent living among New York’s disabled population. The body supports statewide Independent Living Centers, and may be able to direct you toward financial aid for your mobility needs.
111 Washington Avenue, Suite 101
Albany, NY 12210
(518) 427-1060 or (877) 397-4126

 

Northeast Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center
Among the National Network of ADA Centers, the Northeast branch serves persons with disabilities residing in New York state. It is one of the single best resources for information and assistance. Get in touch to learn about many disability grants for which you may qualify that can be put toward your wheelchair van, accessibility equipment or other modifications.
Employment and Disability Institute
Cornell University
ILR School
201 Dolgen Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-6686 or (800) 949-4232
northeastada@cornell.edu

Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), New York State
The State of New York’s OTDA provides financial assistance and a variety of other services to people with disabilities. It is also a good place to check in with to find other sources of funding if you’re trying to buy or lease a wheelchair van or to have accessibility conversions installed.
40 North Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12243
(518) 473-1090
nyspio@otda.ny.gov

Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Links

New York Disability Grants Handicap Funding NY
Funding handicap needs, like wheelchair vans for people with disabilities, is possible through grants, financing loans, and other funds. Find a handicap van for sale then browse the largest resource for New York disability grants for the disabled to help pay for new wheelchair vans or handicap accessible van conversions.

Disability Grants in New York (NY)
The handicap funding organization(s) provided may or may not allocate financing for handicap vans. Refer to your local New York grants providers and foundations for complete details.

Equipment Loan Fund for the Disabled
The New York State Office of Children and Family Services provides assistance and loans to help in the purchase of wheelchair vans.

How to Apply for New York Grants or Mobility Funding
New York residents seeking disability grants or other mobility finance assistance should contact the grant provider(s) listed above. We will work with any mobility financing services or other sources of funding to help you purchase a handicap van. Contribute to the largest list of New York mobility grant resources by telling us your favorite programs.

Vermont Mobility Rebate Resources

Vermont Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for Vermont (VT) Residents
If you’re a resident of Vermont wondering how you’re going to afford a wheelchair van, you’ve come to the right page. We’ve gathered lots of information on resources for disability grants in your state. Whether you aspire to own a handicap van or to outfit one with accessibility conversions including: scooter or wheelchair lifts to turning automotive seating systems  to adaptive driving controls and everything in between, we’ve got you covered.

Below is a compilation of the primary Vermont-based sources of disability grants and other aid for individuals. A few of the resources don’t provide grants to individuals themselves, but they will prove enormously useful in locating financial aid options for a handicap van you might not uncover yourself during research.

In addition, contact Vermont-based branches of disability specific foundations and other groups that work with people who have a disability. They often offer grants themselves or they can help you locate some to apply for.

Sources for Vermont Disability Grants and Assistance:

Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living (DAIL)
DAIL is an important contact in the Vermont state government for elderly and disabled residents. They provide information, services and other assistance. Get in touch for help locating available disability grants for which you may qualify.

103 South Main Street
Weeks Building
Waterbury, VT 05671-1601
(802) 871-3350

New England Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center
Vermont residents looking for disability grants to apply toward a wheelchair van should definitely contact their branch of the National Network of ADA Centers, the New England ADA Center. It strives to preserve and further the independence, self-determination, rights and quality of life of the state’s disabled population.

180-200 Portland Street
Suite 1
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 695-1225 or (800) 949-4232
ADAinfo@NewEnglandADA.org

Office of Veterans Affairs (VA), State of Vermont
Vermont’s VA is your go-to place if you’re an in-state disabled US veteran. Along with the many other types of support, services and aid offered through the VA, disability grants are available to be applied to a wheelchair van or handicapped accessibility modifications. Grants are regularly awarded to veterans who become disabled in the line of duty or as a result of VA medical services.

118 State Street
Montpelier, Vermont 05620-4401
(802) 828-3379 or (888) 666-9844

Vermont Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC)
ADRCs are joint efforts of the US Administration on Community Living and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Each state has its own division, with multiple offices serving different counties. Elderly and disabled Vermont residents will find this to be an exceptionally useful resource when trying to acquire a wheelchair van. Follow the link to find your county office’s contact information.

Vermont Area Agencies on Aging (AAA)
If you’re a senior citizen living in Vermont, this is a key resource for you. Through a variety of services and support, your state’s AAA helps you remain as independent and comfortable as possible during your later years.

30 Washington St.
Barre, VT 05641
(802) 479-0531 or (800) 642-5119
info@cvaa.org

Vermont Assistive Technology Program (ATP)
Vermont’s ATP provides support to disabled state residents who require assistive technology, including handicapped-friendly transportation. They offer training, information, technical assistance and more. They also loan out some assistive technology for short-term trials. Ask about where you can get disability grants to apply toward your wheelchair van.

Vermont Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC)
The National Association of DDCs operates state-based branches in most states. This Council is available to all Vermont residents who meet the definition of a person with a developmental disability as spelled out by federal law. They work tirelessly to protect and promote a high quality of life for people with these afflictions. This includes offering individual grants to help maintain mobility and other aspects of independence.

103 South Main Street
One North, Suite 117
Waterbury VT 05671-0206
(802) 828-1310 or (888) 317-2006
vtddc@state.vt.us

Vermont Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
Vermont’s DVR is dedicated to keeping the state’s disabled residents gainfully employed. Through a variety of hands-on approaches, the agency helps ensure you can find and keep a job. If this requires getting a handicap van, disability grants may be available to you. Search for an office location by city at the DVR website or reach the main office at:

103 South Main Steet, Weeks 1A
Waterbury, VT 05671-2303
(866) 879-6757

Vermont Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)
Like its counterparts in all other states, the Vermont SILC is a legally mandated, nonprofit, non-governmental organization controlled by consumers. It is run by a council of 21 disabled members. It endeavors to promote the independence, self-determination and equality of persons with disabilities.

P.O. Box 56
Winooski, VT 05404
(802) 233-4908

Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Links

Vermont Disability Grants Handicap Funding VT
Get handicap funding such as grants, disabled loans, mobility finance options, government programs, and other funds for accessible transportation. Find the largest source of grants for the disabled to cover some or all the costs associated with funding new or used handicap vans or wheelchair van conversions. Once you’ve secured the funding for your wheelchair van, AMS Vans is happy to deliver your handicap van to Vermont or nationwide.

Disability Grants in Vermont (VT)
Vermont disability grant programs may or may not provide funding for a handicap van. Check with the local Vermont grant provider for a complete list of requirements.

Opportunities Credit Union
The Opportunities Credit Union provides affordable financing and terms for disabled people living in Vermont to purchase a wheelchair van.

How to Apply for Vermont Grants or Mobility Funding
Vermont residents in search of handicap grants, mobility financing, disabled loans, government assistance, or other disability programs to buy a wheelchair van should contact the foundations listed. We will work with all approved grants and funding resources you’ve received to get you your handicap van or accessible conversion as soon as possible. If we missed a grant program you’re familiar with, please let us know so we can add it to our list of mobility funding sources in Vermont.

Rhode Island Mobility Van Resources

Vocational Rehabilitation Program

What is the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program?
The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program is the public state and federally funded program that assists individuals with disabilities to choose, prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Employment being the successful outcome of services provided through the public vocational rehabilitation program. It is expected that individuals with disabilities who apply for services are interested in becoming employed and understand that this is the focus of the VR program.

Who is Eligible for VR Services?

Do you want to work?
Do you have a condition that limits your job opportunities?
To be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, you must – 1) have a physical, intellectual or emotional impairment which is a substantial barrier to employment, and 2) require vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain employment, and 3) be able to benefit from vocational rehabilitation services in terms of an employment outcome. If you are receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), your vocational rehabilitation office will presume that you are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services.

How Do You Obtain Services Through the Vocational Rehabilitation Program?

Individuals with disabilities must first apply for the VR program and be determined eligible before services can be provided. Individuals with significant disabilities are presumed eligible for the program if an application is completed and there is documentation of disability. All applicants for the VR program are encouraged to present documentation of their disability and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) to speed up the eligibility process.

Employment Plan
(Individualized Plan for Employment)

The eligible individual with a disability and a Qualified Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work together to develop an employment plan called the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The Employment Plan considers the individual’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, skills, abilities, preferences, capabilities, interests, and values, as well as the barriers to employment. The Employment Plan identifies the employment goal that the individual has chosen, the time it is expected to reach the goal, the services that the individual chooses as necessary to reach the employment goal, and how the services will be provided. Some of the services may be provided directly by the VR Counselor, others may be available through other public sources such as netWORKri (One Stop Career Centers), and others may be purchased with funds provided by the VR agency. The individual may develop the Employment Plan with the assistance of the VR Counselor, another individual, or by him or herself. The VR Counselor is always available to provide assistance in this process, and a Qualified Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor who works for the public VR program must approve the Employment Plan before any services are provided through the VR agency. The partnership between each individual with a disability and their Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is a key component in the Vocational Rehabilitation process.

What Are Some of the Services that can be Included in an Employment Plan?

Vocational rehabilitation services that may be included in an Employment Plan are:

  • Counseling and Guidance to help plan vocational goals and services
  • Transition Services from School to Career
  • Rehabilitation Technology Services
  • Assistive Technology Services
  • Diagnostic Evaluations
  • College or Vocational Training
  • Job Training and Job Supports
  • Job Development and Placement Services
  • Vehicle Modifications
  • Housing Modifications
  • Post-Employment Services

What Are Some Services After an Employment Goal is Achieved?

Employment is the successful outcome for the individual with a disability and the VR program. Once employed, however, the VR agency may assist with post-employment services to assist the individual to retain or advance in employment.

If you are interested in applying for services, please fill out and sign the completed Application (Espanol) and return to Intake, Office of Rehabilitation Services, 40 Fountain Street, Providence, RI 02903.

Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Links

  • Office of Rehabilitation Services
    • (401) 421-7005 (voice)
    • 
(401) 421-7016 (TDD)
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Program
  • Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
  • Disability Determination Services
  • Assistive Technology Access Partnership

Rhode Island Disability Grants Handicap Funding RI

Buying a wheelchair van can be easier through handicap grants, loans for the disabled, mobility finance programs, government assistance, and other handicap funding sources. Get some or all the cost funded with Rhode Island disability grants for a wheelchair van or vehicle conversion. Delivery of handicap vans in Rhode Island or nationwide is fast and convenient.

Disability Grants in Rhode Island (RI)
The grants listed below may or may not provide funding for handicap vans to individuals. Please contact your local Rhode Island grant provider for a detailed list of requirements.

TechACCESS of Rhode Island

TechACCESS provides a list of resources that can help disabled persons living in Rhode Island purchase a handicap van with supplemental funding.

How to Apply for Rhode Island Grants or Mobility Funding
Help us build the largest Rhode Island directory of handicap grants, loans, and other mobility funding sources by contributing your favorite mobility funding programs. Rhode Island residents can find disability grants, wheelchair van loans, or other financing options to help pay for a wheelchair van by contacting one or several disabled funding programs. We will helps you find a used wheelchair van for sale and gladly accept all funding assistance programs to ensure your handicap needs are met.

Massachusetts Mobility Van Resources

Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Description:
The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is the state advocacy agency for people with disabilities. MOD’s goal is to make sure that people with disabilities have the legal rights, opportunities, support services, and accommodations they need to take part in all aspects of life in Massachusetts. MOD helps people of all ages.

One of MOD’s main duties is to make sure that the state government, the local governments, and private organizations comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD informs residents about their rights under the law, investigates complaints, and works to correct any violations. MOD services are free.

Services: The Massachusetts Office of Disability has three main programs:

  • The Government Services Program provides technical assistance and advice to state and local governments on all disability-related issues. MOD makes sure that government regulations and policies meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD offers guidance to public service agencies and makes public policy recommendations on behalf of residents with disabilities.
  • The Client Services Program helps individuals who need help with disability-related problems. MOD operates an information and referral system to help residents find the services they need and learn about their legal rights. MOD also investigates complaints and helps correct civil rights violations. MOD’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) helps residents who are having problems with federally funded vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs.
  • The Community Services Program helps communities become more responsive to the needs of residents with disabilities. MOD trains individuals and community organizations to advocate for the rights of the disabled. MOD offers technical assistance and information about accessibility laws. The goal is to improve access to public and private places, programs, and services for people with all types of disabilities.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place, Room 1305
Boston, MA 02108

Telephone: 617-727-7440
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 800-322-2020
Fax: 617-727-0965

Web site: Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)

Description:
The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC) helps people with disabilities find employment and live independently. The MRC serves Massachusetts residents age 18 and older. The MRC helps people with all types of disabilities except blindness. Legally blind residents can get services from the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.

Services:
The MRC is the state agency in Massachusetts responsible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Community Services (CS), and Disability Determination Services (DDS). The MRC also assists with public benefit programs, housing, transportation, and consumer issues. Some MRC programs and services have specific eligibility requirements. Most are free.

The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program helps people with disabilities find work or go back to work. The VR program works with various organizations in the community to help create jobs for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The Office of Community Services (CS) offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities live independently in their communities:

  1. The Brain Injury and Statewide Specialized Community Services (BISSCS) program helps Massachusetts residents who have externally caused traumatic brain injuries.
  2. Protective Services tries to prevent the physical, emotional, or sexual abuse of people with disabilities by their caregivers.
  3. Independent Living Centers provide advocacy, personal care management, and independent living skills training.
  4. The T22 (Turning 22) Independent Living Support Program helps young people with physical mobility disabilities who want to live independently in their communities.
  5. The Home Care Assistance Program for disabled adults under age 60 provides help with homemaking tasks (see Home Care Assistance Program).
  6. Other in-home and community living support services are also available.
  7. The Assistive Technology (AT) Program buys and installs assistive devices and provides training and follow-up for users.
  • Disability Determination Services (DDS), funded by the Social Security Administration (SSA), determines medical eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Disability examiners use medical and vocational information to make their decisions.

MassMATCH

Web site: MassMATCH

MassMATCH is a statewide program to help Massachusetts residents with disabilities find, pay for, and use assistive technology (AT) that can make a difference in their lives. The MassMatch web site offers information and advice about:

  • assistive technology (AT) products
  • AT demonstration centers
  • AT funding sources (insurance, loans, government assistance, private charities)
  • where to buy, borrow, swap, and sell AT equipment

MassMATCH (Maximize Assistive Technology in Consumers’ Hands) is a partnership between the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, other state human services agencies, and community-based organizations.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission
Fort Point Place, Suite 600
27 Wormwood Street
Boston, MA 02210-1616

Telephone: Voice/TTY: 617-204-3600
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 1-800-245-6543
Disabled Persons Protection Hotline: 1-800-426-9009
Ombudsman: 617-204-3603
Fax: 617-727-1354

Web site: Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)

Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)

Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB) provides rehabilitation and social services to legally blind Massachusetts residents of all ages. These services help people who are legally blind live independently as active members of their communities. The MCB contacts all legally blind people in the state to offer support services.

Eye care providers in Massachusetts are required by law to report all cases of legal blindness to the MCB. The MCB keeps a confidential registry of all legally blind people in the state. The Commission issues Certificates of Legal Blindness to people on its register. These certificates allow legally blind residents to get exemptions and deductions on income tax, property tax, and auto excise tax. The Commission also issues an identification card, similar to a driver’s license, for personal identification and proof of legal blindness.

Services: The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind provides the following services:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), including diagnostic studies, counseling and guidance, individual plans for employment (IPE), restorative and training services, rehabilitation and mobility instruction, assistive technology, adaptive housing, job placement, and post-employment services
  • Assistive technology
  • Independent living social services, including homemaking assistance, assistive devices, mobility instruction, and peer support groups
  • Specialized services for blind seniors (BRIDGE program)
  • Specialized services for blind children, including referrals for early intervention, public benefits, respite care, and socialization and recreation programs
  • Specialized services for blind/deaf individuals and others with multiple disabilities
  • Rehabilitation instruction, including Braille and typing, use of low-vision devices, labeling and record keeping, food preparation, home safety, and self-care techniques
  • Orientation and mobility instruction, including guide dogs
  • MassHealth services for financially eligible people who are legally blind, including long-term care services, hospital services, personal care attendants, private duty nursing, and transportation services
  • Consumer assistance and advocacy for issues related to blindness such as housing and job discrimination, guide dog issues, or transportation problems

Most services are offered free of charge to all registered legally blind Massachusetts residents. Some services have additional eligibility requirements.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind
48 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02111

Toll-free Voice: 800-392-6450
Toll-free TDD: 800-392-6556
Fax: 617-626-7685

Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)

Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)

Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH) is the state government agency that works on behalf of Massachusetts residents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. The MCDHH serves as an advocate to make sure that deaf and hard-of-hearing residents have the same access to information, services, education, and other opportunities as the hearing population.

Services: Some of the services that the MCDHH provides are:

  • Communication access, training, and technology services
  • Case management services, including specialized services for children
  • Interpreter and CART translation services
Note: CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) service translates spoken words into a visual print display that can be read on a computer monitor or other display device.
  • Independent Living Programs, including peer mentoring, assistive technology, consumer education, self-advocacy, and other independent living skills

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
600 Washington Street 
Boston, MA 02111
Telephone: 617-740-1600 / TTY: 617-740-1700
Toll-free: Voice: 1-800-882-1155 / TTY: 1-800-530-7570
Fax: 617-740-1880
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)

The Savvy Consumer’s Guide to Hearing Loss
 MCDHH Resource Directory
Regional Offices of the MCDHH
Interpreter and CART Services
Independent Living Services

Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)

Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health is the state agency that oversees treatment programs, support services, regulations, and public policy for Massachusetts residents with mental illness. The DMH supports a community-based system of care.

The Department of Mental Health serves adults with long-term or serious mental illness, and children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbances. For adults, the mental disorder must be persistent and must interfere with the ability to carry out daily life activities. For children, the disorder must limit the child’s ability to function in family, school, or community activities.

Residents must file an application and get DMH approval before they can get services. Applications are available on the DMH web site at DMH Service Application Forms and Appeal Guidelines. Applicants can get short-term services while waiting for DMH approval for continuing care.

Services:
The DMH provides continuing care services to Massachusetts residents who cannot get needed services from other agencies or programs. DMH services include:

  • continuing care inpatient facilities
  • residential treatment centers
  • in-home treatment
  • outpatient services
  • skills training
  • supported employment
  • case management

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Central Office
25 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114

Telephone: 617-626-8000
TTY: 617-727-9842
E-mail: DMH Email
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Mental Health
DMH Local Offices: DMH Offices

Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)

Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is the state agency that provides support services to Massachusetts residents with intellectual disabilities. The DDS works with many provider agencies throughout the state to offer services to adults and children and their caregivers. Individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families play an active role in making decisions about their lives and in choosing the support services they want and need.

The DDS has an application for services that must be completed before services can be approved. The application is available on the DDS web site: Application for DDS Eligibility

Services: The DDS offers a wide range of support services for adults, including:

  • Service coordination
  • Housing options
  • Employment skills training and transportation to work
  • Non-work related skills training
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Life skills training and support (food shopping, cooking, etc.)

DDS’s services for children include:

  • Service coordination
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Partnership program for families of children with significant health care needs
  • Autism support centers
  • After-school and summer camp programs

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services
Central Office
500 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118

Telephone: Voice: 617-727-5608
TTY: 617-624-7783
Fax: 617-624-7577

Web site: Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)

Local DDS offices: DDS Area Office Locator

Disability Law Center (DLC)

Description:
The Disability Law Center (DLC) is a private non-profit law firm that gives free legal assistance to Massachusetts residents with disabilities who have been discriminated against because of their disability.

The Disability Law Center helps people with all types of disabilities, including physical, psychiatric, sensory, and cognitive. The DLC provides legal help with problems such as discrimination, abuse or neglect, or denial of services, when they are related to a person’s disability.

Services:
Services include information and referral, technical assistance, legal representation for individuals and groups, and advocacy. The Disability Law Center helps with disability-related legal problems in these areas:

  • Access to community services
  • Special education
  • Health care
  • Disability benefits
  • Rights and conditions in facilities

The DLC does not have the resources to help everyone who has a disability-related legal problem. The DLC sets priorities each year based on the needs of the community. See DLC Priorities. The DLC chooses cases that will have the most impact on the lives of people with disabilities.

Contact Information:
Disability Law Center (DLC)
11 Beacon Street, Suite 925
Boston, MA 02108

Voice telephone: 617-723-8455 / 800-872-9992
TTY: 617-227-9464 / 800-381-0577

Web site: Disability Law Center

DisabilityInfo.org

Description:
The DisabilityInfo.org web site helps people with disabilities, their families, and service providers find disability-related resources in Massachusetts. It has information on a wide variety of programs, agencies, and services for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The site is maintained by New England INDEX, a nonprofit technology group. New England INDEX collects information from over 100 members of the Massachusetts Network of Information Providers for People with Disabilities (MNIP) and puts the information on one web site for easy access.

Services:
On the DisabilityInfo.org web site, you can find:

  • disability programs, services, and agencies in Massachusetts
  • disability consultants, including advocates, educators, therapists, counselors, and other specialists
  • physicians and dentists with experience working with people with disabilities
  • local and regional offices for human service agencies
  • local disability agencies that you can call for help
  • fact sheets about many different types of disabilities
  • disability-related laws and regulations
  • disability news
  • information about assistive technology
  • other resources for people with disabilities

Contact Information:
Web site: DisabilityInfo.org

New England INDEX
200 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02452-6319

Telephone: 781-642-0248
Toll-free: Voice: 800-642-0249
Toll-free: TTY: 800-764-0200

E-mail: info@DisabilityInfo.org

Veterans Resources

Grants through the Veterans Association for Disabled Veterans
Get help with a disabled veterans grant toward the sale price or conversion of a handicap accessible minivan. This grant is available for disabled veterans with service-related disabilities including:

  • Loss, or permanent loss of use, of one or both feet
  • Loss, or permanent loss of use, of one or both hands
  • Permanent loss or impairment of vision in both eyes
  • Ankylosis (immobility) of one or both knees, or one or both hips

There is a one-time Disabled Veterans Grant payment by the Veterans Association, toward the purchase of a vehicle chassis and/or adaptive equipment. The Veterans Association will pay for adaptive equipment, for repair, replacement, or reinstallation required because of disability, and for the safe operation of a vehicle purchased with the Veterans Association assistance.

Effective October 1, 2011, the amount of money granted to service connected veterans under the one-time VA Auto Grant Program increased from $11,000 to $18,900. The amount that the Veteran receives will depend on the date that the sale was executed and submitted for reimbursement. Not when the 4502 Application was approved.

This means that if a Veteran was approved for the Auto Grant Program Prior to October 1, 2011, but the sale/purchase of the vehicle is executed (date of sale) after October 1, the Veteran is eligible for the $18,900. If the sale was executed prior to October 1, 2011 the Veteran will only receive $11,000 regardless of when the paperwork is submitted. This means that a sale executed in September, and not submitted for reimbursement until after October 1, would only get the $11,000 grant.

To clarify this another way, if the Veteran was approved for an Auto Grant prior to October 1, 2011 and enters into negotiation with a mobility dealer, orders a vehicle, and/or places a deposit on a vehicle, the Veteran would be eligible for the $18,900 as long as the date of sale and submission to the VA for reimbursement is after October 1, 2011.

Disabled Veterans who wish to convert an existing vehicle may also qualify for an Adaptive Equipment Grant. Adaptive equipment includes, but is not limited to, power steering, power brakes, power windows, power seats, and special equipment necessary to assist the eligible person into and out of the vehicle. Contact should be made with your local VA medical center’s Prosthetic Department prior to purchasing any equipment.

The adaptive equipment grant may be paid more than once, and it may be paid to either the seller or the veteran.

Disabled Veterans Loan Program
Loans for disabled veterans are available by seeking funds through other outlets. It is advised that you search for veterans loan programs by seeking out loans available for your specific disability.

You can also find loans to help pay for adapted vehicles by searching for money based on your disability instead of purely focusing on veterans benefits. Search through our Wheelchair Van Loans section to find other loans that apply to you.

We are always seeking to expand funding opportunities for the disabled to help pay for a handicap accessible minivan. If you know of other disability grant and loan programs for disabled veterans, please let us know.


Automobile Adaptive Equipment Program
The Automobile Adaptive Equipment (AAE) program permits physically challenged persons to enter, exit and/or operate a motor vehicle or other conveyance. The VA also provides necessary equipment such as platform wheelchair lifts, Under Vehicle Lifts (ULV), power door openers, lowered floors/raised roofs, raised doors, hand controls, left foot gas pedals, reduced effort and zero effort steering and braking, air conditioning and digital driving systems.

Eligibility

  • Veterans who are service connected for the loss, or loss of use of one or both feet or hands, or service connected ankylosis of one or both knees or hips.
  • Veterans who are service connected for permanent impairment of vision of both eyes that have a central acuity of 20/200.
  • NSC veterans are eligible for equipment/ modifications that will allow ingress and egress from a vehicle only.

Note: Eligible service connected veterans who are non-drivers are not eligible for reimbursement for operational equipment.

Required Documentation to VBA

  • The following must be submitted to the VBA:
  • Completed VAF 10-1394, “Application for Adaptive Equipment”
  • Copy of Valid Driver’s License
  • Bill of sale, Invoice, Lease Agreement or Registration Form
  • Window Sticker

If a window sticker is NOT Available you could:

  • Inspect and document the vehicle and items
  • Use a Comparable Vehicle Listing Guide
  • Get an invoice or bill of sale, it must substantiate the items of adaptive equipment
  • Have proof of ownership (Vehicle Title)
  • Have proof of release of disposal of a previously owned vehicle

If veteran paid sales tax, adjust 10-1394 to reimburse Repairs: Marked PAID and include the certification statement signed by vendor


Used Vehicles
Prorated by reducing the standard equipment reimbursable amount for like items by 10% per year. (This includes any add on adaptive equipment previously installed)

Maximum deduction of 90% of the new reimbursement rate will be allowed for vehicles 10 years or older (Vehicles will have a residual value of 10%)

Leased Vehicles
Same guidelines apply for leased vehicles just as if the veteran purchased a new or used vehicle.

Lease must be to the veteran and he/she be responsible for the repairs and maintenance of the vehicle, and not to any business.

Cost limitations will not exceed the allowable reimbursable amounts.

Conversions
Mini- Van

  • Reimbursement for mini-van conversions will be made in an amount equal to or less than the average cost of a conventional van modification, plus 25% (SC only).
  • VA will reimburse for the cost of transporting/delivery of the vehicle.

Full Size Van

  • This type of conversion is considered comfort, far exceeds the space required for transportation
  • The amount should not exceed conventional van conversion

Pick-up Trucks

  • The space modified about half that of a mini van
  • The dollar amount should not exceed mini van conversion

Motor Homes

  • All modifications must be pre-authorized.
  • Only VA approved add-on equipment may be authorized.
  • Maximum reimbursable amounts established for automobile adaptive equipment will not be exceeded for similar items authorized as adaptive equipment in a motor home.
  • Amount authorized and the purchase and installation of an approved lift in a motor home will not exceed the average amount authorized for purchase and installation of similar lifts installed in vans by the authorizing VA facility.
  • VA is not responsible for the removal, modification or reinstallation of any convenience items contained in the motor home, e.g., cabinets, stoves, showers, refrigerators, etc.

Repairs
Routine service to items is not considered a repair e.g., brake shoes, drums & pads or other adjustments (only the power booster). Power Steering and Automatic Transmission service or fluid refills are not authorized (only the transmission itself, or the power steering components).

Maximum reimbursement is for the total amount of the certified invoice.

Repairs, cost of parts and labor, is listed in thee current Mitchell Mechanical Parts and Labor Estimating Guide for Domestic Cars.

Towing is not normally an authorized repair.

Exceptions to the 2 vehicles in a 4-year period rule
Normally only allowance can be provided for 2 vehicles in a 4-year period.

Exceptions to this rule are:

  • Theft
  • Fire
  • Accident
  • Court of legal actions
  • Costly Repairs
  • Changes in the drivers medical requirements necessitating a different type of vehicle

Required documentation to remove a vehicle of record
Important Note: These vehicles may not be sold or given to family members or any other party residing in the same household of the veteran, or transferred to a business owned by the veteran.

  • Proof of trade-in
  • Proof of sale
  • Proof of other means of disposal, e.g., total loss by accident , act of God, fire, theft, etc.

How to Apply
Please contact your local PVA National Service Officer for assistance with the application.

Massachusetts Mobility Resources

Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)
Description:
The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is the state advocacy agency for people with disabilities. MOD’s goal is to make sure that people with disabilities have the legal rights, opportunities, support services, and accommodations they need to take part in all aspects of life in Massachusetts. MOD helps people of all ages.

One of MOD’s main duties is to make sure that the state government, the local governments, and private organizations comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD informs residents about their rights under the law, investigates complaints, and works to correct any violations. MOD services are free.

Services: The Massachusetts Office of Disability has three main programs:

  • The Government Services Program provides technical assistance and advice to state and local governments on all disability-related issues. MOD makes sure that government regulations and policies meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD offers guidance to public service agencies and makes public policy recommendations on behalf of residents with disabilities.
  • The Client Services Program helps individuals who need help with disability-related problems. MOD operates an information and referral system to help residents find the services they need and learn about their legal rights. MOD also investigates complaints and helps correct civil rights violations. MOD’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) helps residents who are having problems with federally funded vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs.
  • The Community Services Program helps communities become more responsive to the needs of residents with disabilities. MOD trains individuals and community organizations to advocate for the rights of the disabled. MOD offers technical assistance and information about accessibility laws. The goal is to improve access to public and private places, programs, and services for people with all types of disabilities.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place, Room 1305
Boston, MA 02108
Telephone:617-727-7440
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 800-322-2020
Fax: 617-727-0965
Web site: Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)
Description:
The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC) helps people with disabilities find employment and live independently. The MRC serves Massachusetts residents age 18 and older. The MRC helps people with all types of disabilities except blindness. Legally blind residents can get services from the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.

Services:

  • The MRC is the state agency in Massachusetts responsible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Community Services (CS), and Disability Determination Services (DDS). The MRC also assists with public benefit programs, housing, transportation, and consumer issues. Some MRC programs and services have specific eligibility requirements. Most are free.
  • The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program helps people with disabilities find work or go back to work. The VR program works with various organizations in the community to help create jobs for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.
  • The Office of Community Services (CS) offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities live independently in their communities:
  1. The Brain Injury and Statewide Specialized Community Services (BISSCS) program helps Massachusetts residents who have externally caused traumatic brain injuries.
  2. Protective Services tries to prevent the physical, emotional, or sexual abuse of people with disabilities by their caregivers.
  3. Independent Living Centers provide advocacy, personal care management, and independent living skills training.
  4. The T22 (Turning 22) Independent Living Support Program helps young people with physical mobility disabilities who want to live independently in their communities.
  5. The Home Care Assistance Program for disabled adults under age 60 provides help with homemaking tasks (see Home Care Assistance Program).
  6. Other in-home and community living support services are also available.
  7. The Assistive Technology (AT) Program buys and installs assistive devices and provides training and follow-up for users.
  • Disability Determination Services (DDS), funded by the Social Security Administration (SSA), determines medical eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Disability examiners use medical and vocational information to make their decisions.

MassMATCH
MassMATCH is a statewide program to help Massachusetts residents with disabilities find, pay for, and use assistive technology (AT) that can make a difference in their lives. The MassMatch web site offers information and advice about:

  • assistive technology (AT) products
  • AT demonstration centers
  • AT funding sources (insurance, loans, government assistance, private charities)
  • where to buy, borrow, swap, and sell AT equipment

MassMATCH (Maximize Assistive Technology in Consumers’ Hands) is a partnership between the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, other state human services agencies, and community-based organizations.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission
Fort Point Place, Suite 600
27 Wormwood Street
Boston, MA 02210-1616
Telephone: Voice/TTY: 617-204-3600
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 1-800-245-6543
Web site: MassMATCH

Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)
Description
:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB) provides rehabilitation and social services to legally blind Massachusetts residents of all ages. These services help people who are legally blind live independently as active members of their communities. The MCB contacts all legally blind people in the state to offer support services.

Eye care providers in Massachusetts are required by law to report all cases of legal blindness to the MCB. The MCB keeps a confidential registry of all legally blind people in the state. The Commission issues Certificates of Legal Blindness to people on its register. These certificates allow legally blind residents to get exemptions and deductions on income tax, property tax, and auto excise tax. The Commission also issues an identification card, similar to a driver’s license, for personal identification and proof of legal blindness.

Services: The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind provides the following services:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), including diagnostic studies, counseling and guidance, individual plans for employment (IPE), restorative and training services, rehabilitation and mobility instruction, assistive technology, adaptive housing, job placement, and post-employment services
  • Assistive technology
  • Independent living social services, including homemaking assistance, assistive devices, mobility instruction, and peer support groups
  • Specialized services for blind seniors (BRIDGE program)
  • Specialized services for blind children, including referrals for early intervention, public benefits, respite care, and socialization and recreation programs
  • Specialized services for blind/deaf individuals and others with multiple disabilities
  • Rehabilitation instruction, including Braille and typing, use of low-vision devices, labeling and record keeping, food preparation, home safety, and self-care techniques
  • Orientation and mobility instruction, including guide dogs
  • MassHealth services for financially eligible people who are legally blind, including long-term care services, hospital services, personal care attendants, private duty nursing, and transportation services
  • Consumer assistance and advocacy for issues related to blindness such as housing and job discrimination, guide dog issues, or transportation problems

Most services are offered free of charge to all registered legally blind Massachusetts residents. Some services have additional eligibility requirements.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind
48 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02111
Toll-free Voice: 800-392-6450
Toll-free TDD: 800-392-6556
Fax: 617-626-7685
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)
Vocational Rehabilitation Client Services Manual
Technology for the Blind
Laws and Regulations
Locations of MCB offices

Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH) is the state government agency that works on behalf of Massachusetts residents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. The MCDHH serves as an advocate to make sure that deaf and hard-of-hearing residents have the same access to information, services, education, and other opportunities as the hearing population.

Services: Some of the services that the MCDHH provides are:

  • Communication access, training, and technology services
  • Case management services, including specialized services for children
  • Interpreter and CART translation services
    Note: CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) service translates spoken words into a visual print display that can be read on a computer monitor or other display device.
  • Independent Living Programs, including peer mentoring, assistive technology, consumer education, self-advocacy, and other independent living skills

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
600 Washington Street
Boston, MA 02111
Telephone: 617-740-1600 / TTY: 617-740-1700
Toll-free: Voice: 1-800-882-1155 / TTY: 1-800-530-7570
Fax: 617-740-1880
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
The Savvy Consumer’s Guide to Hearing Loss
MCDHH Resource Directory
Regional Offices of the MCDHH
Interpreter and CART Services
Independent Living Services

Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health is the state agency that oversees treatment programs, support services, regulations, and public policy for Massachusetts residents with mental illness. The DMH supports a community-based system of care.

The Department of Mental Health serves adults with long-term or serious mental illness, and children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbances. For adults, the mental disorder must be persistent and must interfere with the ability to carry out daily life activities. For children, the disorder must limit the child’s ability to function in family, school, or community activities.

Residents must file an application and get DMH approval before they can get services. Applications are available on the DMH web site at DMH Service Application Forms and Appeal Guidelines. Applicants can get short-term services while waiting for DMH approval for continuing care.

Services:
The DMH provides continuing care services to Massachusetts residents who cannot get needed services from other agencies or programs. DMH services include:

  •  continuing care inpatient facilities
  • residential treatment centers
  • in-home treatment
  • outpatient services
  • skills training
  • supported employment
  • case management

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Central Office
25 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114
Telephone: 617-626-8000
TTY: 617-727-9842
E-mail: DMH Email
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Mental Health
DMH Local Offices: DMH Offices

Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
Description
:
The Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is the state agency that provides support services to Massachusetts residents with intellectual disabilities. The DDS works with many provider agencies throughout the state to offer services to adults and children and their caregivers. Individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families play an active role in making decisions about their lives and in choosing the support services they want and need.

The DDS has an application for services that must be completed before services can be approved. The application is available on the DDS web site: Application for DDS Eligibility

Services: The DDS offers a wide range of support services for adults, including:

  • Service coordination
  • Housing options
  • Employment skills training and transportation to work
  • Non-work related skills training
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Life skills training and support (food shopping, cooking, etc.)

DDS’s services for children include:

  • Service coordination
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Partnership program for families of children with significant health care needs
  • Autism support centers
  • After-school and summer camp programs

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services
Central Office
500 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
Telephone: Voice: 617-727-5608
TTY: 617-624-7783
Fax: 617-624-7577
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
Local DDS offices: DDS Area Office Locator

Disability Law Center (DLC)
Description:
The Disability Law Center (DLC) is a private non-profit law firm that gives free legal assistance to Massachusetts residents with disabilities who have been discriminated against because of their disability.

The Disability Law Center helps people with all types of disabilities, including physical, psychiatric, sensory, and cognitive. The DLC provides legal help with problems such as discrimination, abuse or neglect, or denial of services, when they are related to a person’s disability.

Services:
Services include information and referral, technical assistance, legal representation for individuals and groups, and advocacy. The Disability Law Center helps with disability-related legal problems in these areas:

  • Access to community services
  • Special education
  • Health care
  • Disability benefits
  • Rights and conditions in facilities

The DLC does not have the resources to help everyone who has a disability-related legal problem. The DLC sets priorities each year based on the needs of the community. See DLC Priorities. The DLC chooses cases that will have the most impact on the lives of people with disabilities.

Contact Information:
Disability Law Center (DLC)
11 Beacon Street, Suite 925
Boston, MA 02108
Voice telephone: 617-723-8455 / 800-872-9992
TTY: 617-227-9464 / 800-381-0577
Web site: Disability Law Center

DisabilityInfo.org
Description:
The DisabilityInfo.org web site helps people with disabilities, their families, and service providers find disability-related resources in Massachusetts. It has information on a wide variety of programs, agencies, and services for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The site is maintained by New England INDEX, a nonprofit technology group. New England INDEX collects information from over 100 members of the Massachusetts Network of Information Providers for People with Disabilities (MNIP) and puts the information on one web site for easy access.

Services:
On the DisabilityInfo.org web site, you can find:

  • disability programs, services, and agencies in Massachusetts
  • disability consultants, including advocates, educators, therapists, counselors, and other specialists
  • physicians and dentists with experience working with people with disabilities
  • local and regional offices for human service agencie
  • local disability agencies that you can call for help
  • fact sheets about many different types of disabilities
  • disability-related laws and regulations
  • disability news
  • information about assistive technology
  • other resources for people with disabilities

Contact Information:
Web site: DisabilityInfo.org
Database search
Get help from a local agency
Fact sheet library
Contact us
New England INDEX
200 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02452-6319
Telephone: 781-642-0248
Toll-free: Voice: 800-642-0249
Toll-free: TTY: 800-764-0200
E-mail: info@DisabilityInfo.org

Mobility Resources For Massachusetts Residents

How do I get a disabled parking placard?
If you are legally blind or cannot walk more than 200 feet without rest or assistance, you can get a disabled parking placard from the Registry of Motor Vehicles. Your doctor or other medical professional must certify your medical condition. You can get a temporary placard or a permanent placard depending on how long your condition will last. The placard is free.

You can get an application for a disabled parking placard at any RMV Branch Office or from the RMV web site: Medical Affairs Forms. You should complete and sign the first page of the application, then have your health care provider complete and sign the second page. Mail or bring the completed application to the RMV.

  • If you mail your application, allow 30 days for the Medical Affairs office to process it. Send your application to:
    Medical Affairs/ RMV
    P.O. Box 55889
    Boston, MA 02205
  • If you bring your application to the office, Medical Affairs will process it the same day. The walk-in address is:
    Medical Affairs/ RMV Office
    25 Newport Ave EXT
    Quincy MA

You are allowed to use the placard only when you are in the vehicle, or when you are being dropped off or picked up. For more information, see Disabled Parking FAQs on the RMV web site.

If you lose your placard, you can apply for a duplicate. For instructions, see Applying for a Duplicate Placard on the RMV web site.

How do I find adaptive driver’s education classes?
If you need specialized driver’s education because of your disability, you can get adaptive driving lessons at one of the schools listed on the Registry of Motor Vehicles web site at Specialized Driver’s Education Programs (at the bottom of the page). Programs are customized to meet your needs, and can be adapted for a wide range of physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities. Vehicles with hand controls and other specialized equipment are available.

Adaptive driving programs include:

How do I get a health care proxy?
A health care proxy is a simple legal document that allows you to choose someone to make medical decisions for you, if, for any reason, you are unable to make these decisions yourself.

You can find information about health care proxies on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I get a health care proxy?

How do I make a living will?
A living will is a document in which you describe the type of medical treatment you want if you become terminally ill or permanently unconscious. It allows you to make end-of-life decisions while you are physically and mentally competent to do so.

You can find information about living wills on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I make a living will?

How do I get a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order?
You have the right to decide if you want medical workers to use CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) to try to save your life if your heart stops or if you stop breathing. This is a decision you should make with your doctor, family members, and other people you trust. If you do not want CPR to be used, you must get a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order from your doctor.

You can find information about DNRs on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I get a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order?

How do I give someone permission to see my medical records?
A federal law known as HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) protects the privacy of your medical information. HIPAA limits the ways doctors, pharmacies, other health care providers, health insurance companies, nursing homes, and Medicaid/Medicare can share your personal health information.

You can find out how to give health care providers permission to share your medical information on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I give someone permission to see my medical records?

How do I get a power of attorney?
A power of attorney is a legal document in which you give another person (your “agent”) the right to handle financial and legal matters for you.

You can find information about naming a power of attorney on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link:How do I get a power of attorney?

How do I get a Massachusetts ID card?
If you do not have a driver’s license and you are a resident of Massachusetts, you can get a Massachusetts ID card to use as official identification and proof of age. You can get an ID card at any full-service Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) office.

You can find information about Massachusetts ID cards in our “How Do I …? section for seniors. Please follow this link:How do I get a Massachusetts ID card?

How do I get a service animal?
A service animal is a dog or other animal that has been specially trained to provide assistance to a person with a disability. A service animal performs tasks that the person with the disability cannot do independently. For example, service animals can be trained to help people who are blind or deaf, are mobility impaired, have diabetes or seizure disorders, are autistic, or have other physical or mental disabilities.

For a list of organizations that provide service dogs, see:

Eligibility requirements and costs vary from one organization to another. Many organizations provide service animals for free, but ask you to pay your own expenses while attending training sessions. An interview is usually required before you are accepted into a program.

Massachusetts Disability Grants Handicap Funding MA
People with disabilities in Massachusetts can solve their lack of funding for handicap needs, such as a wheelchair van, through disability grants, financing programs, loans, and more. Browse the largest resource for Massachusetts disability grants to help pay for new wheelchair vans or handicap accessible van conversions. AMS Vans will deliver handicap vans to Massachusetts or nationwide.

Disability Grants in Massachusetts
The handicap funding for the disabled listed below may or may not assist in financing a handicap van. Check with the local Massachusetts grant provider for a complete list of requirements.

The Massachusetts Assistive Technology Loan Program: The Massachusetts ATLP provides people with disabilities access to low-interest cash loans to purchase handicap vans and vehicle modifications to accommodate a wheelchair.

How to Apply for Massachusetts Grants or Mobility Funding
Massachusetts residents seeking assistance with the purchase of handicap vans for sale should contact the mobility funding programs listed above about disability grants offered. We are delighted to accept all funding assistance programs to ensure your handicap needs are met. If we missed a grant program you’re familiar with, please let us know and we will add it to our list of mobility funding sources in Massachusetts.

Government Grants for People with Disabilities

Find government grants and financing for handicap vehicles for people with disabilities nationwide. Money can be located with a little patience and a lot of research through various government programs. We’ve compiled a list of the most well-known government grant programs to assist your search for help funding a wheelchair van.When paying for a handicap van, you can use money from government grant programs for people with disabilities, as well other funding resources like disability grants, loans, fundraiser money, foundation endorsements, or any other funding source. We’ll work with your chosen foundations or any government grant program, after they verify financial assistance, to get you on the road!

To learn more about applying for wheelchair van grant funding to buy a handicap van or convert a pre-owned minivan, read “How to Apply for a Grant for Wheelchair Vans, Mobility Equipment, or Minivan Conversions.”

Government Wheelchair Van Financing Resources
Fund your wheelchair van with these government grant programs provided by the U.S. government and locally in your state.

Administration for Children & Families
On this website, new funding opportunities are displayed as they become available.

Grants.gov
The U.S. government resource listing federal grants available.

Medicaid
Sometimes provides assistance when children or other special circumstances are involved.

Medicaid/Department of Human Services (DHS)
Children are screened as part of the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program of Medicaid. Under Medicaid’s “rehabilitative services,” people often receive handicap van or lift funding to achieve their “best possible functional levels.”

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)
Located within each state’s Department of Human Services (per state), helps you prepare for work, train for a job, find a job, or keep a job as early as high school. Services are prioritized according to the severity of the disability.

Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)
Check your state’s branch for grant availability.

Division of Developmental Services (DDS)
Check your state’s branch for grants.Those with Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits from the Social Security Administration can contact the agency about its Plan to Achieve Self Support(PASS). A PASS plan sets aside income to buy equipment or services in a way that keeps income, as well as resources, below the SSI eligibility cut-off so there are no reductions in benefits. The emphasis is on whether the handicap van or equipment will help the SSI recipient become vocationally self-sufficient. It’s important for an individual to contact and receive the approval of Social Security before setting up a PASS plan. Once money has been set aside for a PASS, spending it on something else can result in the loss of SSI benefits.Please note: You can use multiple sources of funding that include grants, loans, and other funding assistance. If you’re unable to find government grants for people with disabilities or need to acquire more money to help pay for your wheelchair van and/or mobility needs, check out more opportunities at our mobility finance page.