Tag Archives: wheelchair vans

What is A New/Used Wheelchair van?

When shopping for a new or pre-owned wheelchair van at a mobility dealership, you may hear or read the term “New/Used”. Sounds confusing, right? The term New/Used describes an accessible vehicle for sale that has a new conversion added to a pre-owned used minivan. These vehicles tend to have less than 40,000 miles and are only 2-3 years old. The reason they tend to be newer and with very few miles is that conversion manufacturers want quality vans that are going to provide reliable transportation for many years to come. New/Used van conversions can be side entry or rear entry, with most having a fold-out ramp (vs. an in-floor ramp). A VMI Summit on a Dodge Grand Caravan is just one example of a fold-out ramp conversion. Folding wheelchair ramps on a minivan can be powered or manual. Powered ramps are operated with a push-button inside the vehicle, a key fob or both.

Deciding whether to buy a new or used wheelchair van can be a difficult decision. Your choice may depend on how often or how far you plan to travel every year, whether you are the driver (with the use of hand controls) or passenger, and your preferences for a specific conversion, make or color. A lot of people want all of the latest electronic accessories and gadgets that can only be found in a new vehicle — but they also want something in a used vehicle’s price range. New/Used vehicles provide an “almost new” vehicle at significant cost savings – and may have all of the amenities that you’re are looking for.

Side Entry Versus Rear Entry Wheelchair Vans

The question of a Rear Entry wheelchair van versus a Side Entry van often comes up in conversation when a first time buyer enters the accessible van market. There are several things to consider; first, the family or care giver needs to decide on where the wheelchair user is going to sit. If the person in the wheelchair is able to drive and will be independent there are other things to consider, but for now, let us stay with an assisted member of the family.

Door height is an issue. For that we need to know how tall the person sits in their wheelchair.

Scooter or Power chair is next. Size and weight combination will come into play as we move along in the discovery process.

Will the person transfer into a  seat or will they remain in their wheelchair while traveling?

Okay, now we get into seating. The side entry offers both mid-section and front seat options with tie-downs located throughout. In a rear entry van, the mid-section to rear of the vehicle, are the only seating options while remaining in the wheelchair.

There are five passenger seats available for family members in a side entry van versus six available seats in a rear entry. Both are in addition to whoever is in the wheelchair, which gives a total of six people in a side entry and up to seven in a rear entry.

For folks with a long wheelchair or scooter the rear entry is ideal. Over six feet of space is afforded to tie down the wheelchair and no turning to forward face is necessary.

A side entry requires up to eight feet accommodating the lowering of the ramp allowing access into your van. This may prohibit the use of the ramp while inside a garage or if someone parks to close while at the mall or a doctor’s appointment.

The rear entry does not have the blocked in problem, you are always accessing your van from the aisle.

In summation, like anything else, it is best to try before you buy. Our Mobility Center has both styles of wheelchair vans. See which style suits your lifestyle and then consider the purchase of either a new or used mobility equipped van. Always consult with your mobility product specialist for any additional questions you may have.

October Is Car Care Month: Is your vehicle prepared for winter driving?

Is your car ready to handle freezing conditions? Frigid temps can take a toll on your car and make winter driving even more hazardous than usual.
Here are a few tips to adapt to winter roads and preparing your car for the extreme cold.

Check the car’s battery
Cold weather takes a toll on batteries and requires a full charge. A battery is 35 percent weaker at 32 degrees and 60 percent weaker at zero degrees.

A load test by a qualified technician can determine whether a car’s battery is strong enough for winter. Keep in mind that if the car started with a jump start, the problem is not fixed and the battery most likely needs replacing.

Starting
Avoid excessive cranking. If the car doesn’t start after 20 seconds of cranking, wait a couple of minutes to let the battery recover.

Tire preparation
Tires should have sufficient tread depth that can handle New England’s winter weather. All-season tires are adequate for most vehicles but to get the greatest traction for both starting and stopping, snow tires are recommended. When considering snow tires, they should be installed on all four wheels

See and be seen
Clear windows, mirrors, and lights with an ice scraper, brush, or a spray de-icer. Driving with a snow-covered windshield, windows, side-view mirrors or lights invites a crash.

Completely clean snow from the roof, hood, and trunk. Windshield wipers and defrosters should be in good working order and washer reservoirs should be filled with no-freeze windshield washer fluid.

Consider specially designed winter wiper blades that prevent snow and ice buildup and improve visibility.

Reduce speeds
Most winter crashes happen from driving too fast for the weather conditions. Remember, everything takes longer on snow-covered roads, including accelerating, stopping, and turning.

Nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement so allow time to maneuver by driving slowly.

All-wheel drive is best
All-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive will help to get a car moving, but bear in mind it does little to improve braking. Don’t become overconfident and drive too fast for winter road conditions.

Anticipate stopping distance
In temperatures at or just above 32 degrees, a thin layer of water can cover the ice and cause slippery conditions, especially at intersections where snow and ice tend to melt first. The distance needed to stop on ice at 32 degrees is twice as long as at zero degrees.

Keep the engine cool
Mix certain cooling system antifreeze with an equal portion of water for maximum protection.

The Benefits of Owning a Wheelchair Van

Even though wheelchair-accessible minivans can offer greater independence, many wheelchair users are afraid to switch from their car to a mobility vehicle. For some, a car is more fun and the idea of driving a minivan is not all that appealing. Cars also offer a bit of a challenge and are generally less expensive than wheelchair vans, so there is often hesitation to make the change.

Unfortunately, wheelchair users and their caretakers usually have to deal with the hassles of transfers and chair loading when they use a car to get around. This can cause back or shoulder pain for those having to make the transfer and after a while, this can be quite physically taxing.

For those dealing with these daily struggles or those who want to prevent them, switching to a wheelchair-accessible van becomes an easy choice. Take a look at the following benefits and see why you might want to buy a wheelchair van.

Reduced Pain and Fatigue
When a car is the main vehicle used to transport someone in a wheelchair, pain and fatigue can be a serious problem caused by frequent seat transfers. It’s hard to get close enough to a car to make a smooth transfer and if the height of the car seat doesn’t match that of the wheelchair, it can put a lot of stress on the shoulders, back and neck. What could result is joint and muscle pain and eventually arthritis and tendinitis. If getting into your vehicle is too much work or too painful, you might give up doing the things you love to do after a while.

Fortunately, a wheelchair-accessible van can give you your freedom back so you can do all of your favorite things. Because a wheelchair van uses a ramp for entry, there are no transfers from outside of the vehicle and you don’t have to separately load your chair. Once inside the vehicle, the transfer from your wheelchair to the driver or passenger position is much easier since you can pull right up to the seat. Plus, some wheelchair vans even let you drive or sit in the front from your wheelchair, completely removing any need to transfer.

Greater Freedom and Independence
While many people may argue driving a minivan isn’t the “coolest” thing you can do, sometimes other things are more important than image. A mobility van may not always be sporty, fun or stylish, but it offers maximum freedom and independence. Actually getting where you need to go without too much assistance or a physical struggle is more important than how you are able to do it.

Helpful Financing Options
A converted van will most likely cost several thousand dollars more than a standard car, as the conversion price plus higher fuel and insurance costs increase your total spend. While this might deter many people from making the switch to a van, it’s important to consider what you get for the price – greater health, happiness and overall well-being.

Even though a wheelchair-accessible van may seem out of reach, there are programs available that can help you pay for a mobility vehicle. Government programs like Worker’s Compensation, Medicaid Waivers, Vocational Rehabilitation and those with the VA may all be able to help with funding. There are also charities or nonprofits that may be able to help provide fund raising opportunities and some banks or Independent Living Centers offer extended loans or lower interest rates. Used vehicles are an option as well, as many dealers sell old rental vans after a year of use.

People will always have a reason to avoid buying a mobility van, but it might be worth serious consideration. Think about your quality of life and whether easier mobility may improve it. If so, it might be time to make the change.

Everyday Mobility Aids

Having a disability can make getting around and doing everyday activities difficult. Simple things like taking a shower, going to the store or even moving around your house can be a challenge for someone with limited mobility.

Getting a wheelchair or scooter is usually the first step, but there are several other mobility aids that either work in tandem or in addition to those to help you do the things you need to do. Once you have a wheelchair or scooter, there are upgrades you can make to your home to increase wheelchair accessibility there, but those don’t necessarily give you additional mobility. If you are looking to gain better mobility both inside and outside of your house, try any of the mobility equipment options below.

Transfer Board or Slider
While going out is often a major challenge, sometimes getting around within your house may be even more difficult. Getting onto a bed from a wheelchair, for example, requires strength, time and often another person. Luckily, there are transfer boards or sliders available to help facilitate the process. Wheelchair users place one end of the board under them on their wheelchair seat and slide across to the other end, which is set on their destination.

Bath Lifts
Bath lifts help those with limited leg mobility get into the bathtub. They attach to the tub and act as a seat for the wheelchair user to transfer to when they are ready to bathe. Once the user is sitting on the lift, it swings around and lowers within the tub. When the user is ready to get out, the seat can raise back up and out, preventing dangerous slipping. Other, simpler bath accessories include bath chairs, which act more as transfer seats that extend past the tub so the wheelchair user can safely slide across and under a shower head without using too much strength.

While living with a disability may make performing certain tasks more difficult, mobility equipment is available to help ease these challenges. Check online or with a mobility equipment dealer to find out where you can get these mobility aids.

Mobility Vehicles
If you use a wheelchair and don’t have a mobility vehicle, going anywhere can be a challenge. These are more expensive than many other types of mobility equipment, but there are plenty of options — and you may even be eligible for financial assistance. If you can’t afford to purchase a vehicle of your own, many dealers also offer rentals for much less.

Steering Aids
Whether you buy a mobility vehicle or simply transfer from your wheelchair to a car seat, you may need the ability to drive. There are different steering aids available to help you do so, depending on your abilities, including:

  • Steering Attachments: Extensions, such as knobs, gloves or balls, attach to the steering wheel to make it easy for those with limited arm function to turn the wheel with one hand or arm.
  • Foot Controls: Attachments on the ground give those with limited use of their hands the ability to steer and control the vehicle with their feet.
  • Loosened Steering: Drivers without adequate upper body strength can turn the wheel without requiring much effort with a simple steering modification.
  • Automatic Controls: A driver with limited leg mobility can steer, accelerate and brake with their hands using one piece of equipment that can be mounted in the driver’s area.

Teens with Disabilities: Learning to Drive A Handicap Accessible Vehicle

The majority of teenage kids will assert that learning to drive not only makes for an exciting experience but also marks a very important moment in life – moving a step closer towards achieving independence. Teens living with a disability are not exempt from this feeling. When it’s time to teach your child to drive, there are a few important things to keep in mind to ensure your child’s safety and the safety of others on the road.

Regardless of your age, preparedness is essential when it comes to driving. For those living with disabilities, the process of how you prepare can be slightly different, but it is certainly equally as important. Teens and new drivers with disabilities must complete a drivers’ assessment prior to beginning lessons in order to determine what sort of adaptive equipment or techniques he or she must use while driving. Steering aids, hand controls, or ramps/lifts may be necessary for your teen to be ready to get behind the wheel and recommendations will be made by the assessment administrator (most often by a certified driver rehabilitation specialist) after a proper exam.

While some teens will require little additional equipment in order to operate a vehicle, others may need more thorough vehicle conversions. If purchasing a new handicap accessible vehicle is not in your budget, there are used options available to suit your child’s needs, as well as rentals and loaners made available by some driving schools.

Qualified driving specialists will be able to relay information on your state’s driving laws for people with disabilities, how to operate the vehicle, as well as how to get in and out of the car without additional assistance, should they need to do so.

Throughout this journey towards adulthood, it’s vital that you remain your teen’s number one fan. A supporting and encouraging environment can dramatically improve your child’s outlook on taking on the road, raising their self-confidence and making them an overall better driver. Remember, learning how to drive takes time, but with your support, the expertise of driving coaches and the accessibility of a modified vehicle, your teen will be on his or her way to being a licensed driver!

Adaptive Q&A

With such a wide variety of adaptive vehicle equipment available, selecting the appropriate features or modifications can become big task. In an effort to facilitate this process, here are the responses to some of the most frequently asked mobility equipment questions.

Are ramps difficult to operate?
Most vans equipped with side-entry mobility equipment are fully automatic. The seamless loading and unloading process can be as simple as pushing a button. Vans can be converted to automatically open their doors, lower to the curb and deploy or stow a ramp without the driver or passengers needing to work with any equipment. Manual options are also available, however these are also very easy to use. Built with springs that carry most of the ramp’s weight, manual ramp options are also quick, safe and simple to use solutions.

Can I drive from my wheelchair?
In many cases, it is possible for drivers with disabilities and the need for a wheelchair to avoid transferring by properly securing their chair and themselves within the vehicle. With the use of both a wheelchair tie-down system and occupant restraints, driving from a wheelchair can be a safe and convenient option.

Can I drive from my scooter?
Operating or riding a vehicle from scooter is not recommended. In order to remain safe while traveling, passengers or drivers in scooters should always transfer into vehicle seating. Turning or swivel seats can make the transfer process easier and less demanding on those with limited mobility or access to caregiver assistance. Scooters should also be properly secured with a tie-down system to prevent movement in case of a sudden stop or turn.

Side entry vs. rear entry – which is best for me?
There are a few things to consider when deciding between a side entry and a rear entry vehicle. Passengers who are not going to be driving the vehicle typically use rear entry vehicles. Side entry vehicles work well for drivers and co-pilots getting in to the front of the vehicle, as well as passengers. Depending on the parking conditions of your regularly visited establishments, your vehicle’s entry points may need to be redefined. If you often need to parallel park or live in a region that experiences recurring inclement weather, a side-entry vehicle will prove to be a better option for your needs. These are only a few of the deciding factors when it comes to choosing between side and rear-entry.

Can someone else drive my vehicle if I install hand controls?
In most cases, both able-bodied drivers and those with disabilities can comfortably operate vehicles adapted with hand controls. Most hand controls do not interfere with the way a manufacturer intended the vehicle to be driven.

When is Renting a Wheelchair Van Right for You?

To Fill a Gap During Repairs
When you need to make repairs to your wheelchair accessible vehicle or wheelchair van it is more difficult for you than the average car owner. What do you do when you don’t have the vehicle? Most of us don’t have a second wheelchair van we can use. When the repair is unexpected or more serious than anticipated, how do you manage? Do you cancel and reschedule all your doctors’ visits and planned activities for you and the people you care for? No! Simply make arrangements for a rental van so you can get yours repaired and still go on with your life.

To Accommodate a Visitor Using a Wheelchair
Are you or a wheelchair user you know flying into our area and need to have access to a wheelchair van rental? Would you like to have a grandmother or grandfather or other wheelchair-using relative come and spend some time with you and your family? A wheelchair van rental can give the freedom to come and stay without unnecessary barriers to family fun and mobility.

To Bring a Loved One Out From a Care Facility
For those in a nursing facility for an extended time-whether that is for a week, month or years-and those of us that care for them-visits and outings are critical for keeping spirits up and connections alive. A wheelchair van rental can make these outings better for everyone.

Wheelchair vans are much easier to use and enable most of us to handle getting someone in and out of the vehicle easily and without risk of injury or inconvenience.

Ease of use makes us all more likely to set aside the time and know that we can have a successful outing without the struggle of getting into and out of vehicles that are not wheelchair accessible

To Try a Wheelchair Van Before You Buy One
Buying a wheelchair van is a big decision and requires considerable care in making sure that the vehicle you choose will work for your particular situation. While all wheelchair vans have similarities, the differences are significant. The differences in height, width and shape may not seem like much to some. However, when you are in a wheelchair and have special equipment or physical limitations to accommodate, a couple of inches on one side or the other can be the key to complete happiness with your wheelchair van.

Maybe you think a wheelchair van would help your life but you have not been able to justify the expense. Sometimes trying it out can help you to feel that you are making the right decision. Maybe you will find that a wheelchair van is not right for you because of the fit, your family size or the conditions you drive in. Regardless, renting a wheelchair van can help you to assess that far better than a simple test drive.

When Your Disability is Only Temporary
Access to a wheelchair van can be a lifesaver when you are recovering from an injury or medical procedure that forces you to use a wheelchair for a limited period of time. Whether you have had surgery, or have suffered a broken bone or other injury, even an illness that limits your mobility, having to be in a wheelchair is not easy. Wheelchair van rentals can ensure that this temporary problem does not keep you restricted in your ability to make the most of the situation.

Having a wheelchair van rental accessible during your recovery means that the van is there when you need it. When you want to go for a ride, visit a friend or run to the store…

Using public transportation or medical transportations services limits your convenience and easy access to mobility

When you have recovered and no longer need the vehicle, simply return it to us and go on with your recovery and normal life.

For Doctor’s Visits and Medical Transportation
For the occasional doctor’s visit, using a transportation service may be a reasonable choice. However, when you are going through periods of multiple visits, testing, etc over several days or weeks or have a condition that requires regular, frequent appointments, the convenience of a wheelchair accessible van rental cannot be beat. Financially it will also work out to be less expensive in many situations.

When medical visits have got you running ragged, take some of the load off with a wheelchair van rental scheduled around your needs with the built in flexibility that comes with having it dedicated to you.

Do you want to take a detour on the way home from the doctor? Go out to lunch or do a little shopping? This is the kind of convenience that wheelchair accessible van rentals can provide.

For Special Occasions and Outings
Don’t let access to convenient wheelchair van transportation keep you from bringing your wheelchair-using loved ones to special events like weddings, birthdays, retirements and other “can’t miss” occasions. Wheelchair accessible van rentals enable you or that special person to attend significant occasions in the most convenient, comfortable and affordable manner possible.

For Road Trips and Vacations
Many people take rental wheelchair vans on long trips and vacations. Often, the wheelchair van or handicapped van they have is not large enough or dependable enough for their needs. Even with the excess mileage charges, the overall rental cost can fit into the vacation budget.

Are You Looking To Sell Your New or Used Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle?

If you’re looking to sell a wheelchair van that is no longer being used or looking to trade in your current one, contact us today!  Live on-site inspections and a test drive by one of our technicians may be required before a final assessment and offer can be made.

Vehicle Requirements
We will accept virtually all modified (Braun, VMI, Rollx, even AMS) and non-modified vehicles that are preferably under 10 years old  with odometers at 100,000 miles or less. Since we are a full service mobility dealer and wheelchair van restoration center will even accept rusted out vehicles.

Submit Your Vehicle’s Information
The first step is to call or email us about your vehicle. The basic information you provide helps our mobility consultants create the best  deal possible for you. Be sure you include the correct VIN and mileage along with some pictures of your vehicle.

Inspection
A mobility consultant will typically give a quote as soon as your vehicle is brought in for inspection. After a price is agreed upon, we will write you a check.

All offers are based on a first hand inspection, and if a vehicle isn’t represented accurately, we reserve the right to withdraw the offer once the vehicle is personally inspected by our evaluator.

Government Grants for People with Disabilities

Find government grants and financing for handicap vehicles for people with disabilities nationwide. Money can be located with a little patience and a lot of research through various government programs. We’ve compiled a list of the most well-known government grant programs to assist your search for help funding a wheelchair van.When paying for a handicap van, you can use money from government grant programs for people with disabilities, as well other funding resources like disability grants, loans, fundraiser money, foundation endorsements, or any other funding source. We’ll work with your chosen foundations or any government grant program, after they verify financial assistance, to get you on the road!

To learn more about applying for wheelchair van grant funding to buy a handicap van or convert a pre-owned minivan, read “How to Apply for a Grant for Wheelchair Vans, Mobility Equipment, or Minivan Conversions.”

Government Wheelchair Van Financing Resources
Fund your wheelchair van with these government grant programs provided by the U.S. government and locally in your state.

Administration for Children & Families
On this website, new funding opportunities are displayed as they become available.

Grants.gov
The U.S. government resource listing federal grants available.

Medicaid
Sometimes provides assistance when children or other special circumstances are involved.

Medicaid/Department of Human Services (DHS)
Children are screened as part of the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program of Medicaid. Under Medicaid’s “rehabilitative services,” people often receive handicap van or lift funding to achieve their “best possible functional levels.”

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)
Located within each state’s Department of Human Services (per state), helps you prepare for work, train for a job, find a job, or keep a job as early as high school. Services are prioritized according to the severity of the disability.

Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)
Check your state’s branch for grant availability.

Division of Developmental Services (DDS)
Check your state’s branch for grants.Those with Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits from the Social Security Administration can contact the agency about its Plan to Achieve Self Support(PASS). A PASS plan sets aside income to buy equipment or services in a way that keeps income, as well as resources, below the SSI eligibility cut-off so there are no reductions in benefits. The emphasis is on whether the handicap van or equipment will help the SSI recipient become vocationally self-sufficient. It’s important for an individual to contact and receive the approval of Social Security before setting up a PASS plan. Once money has been set aside for a PASS, spending it on something else can result in the loss of SSI benefits.Please note: You can use multiple sources of funding that include grants, loans, and other funding assistance. If you’re unable to find government grants for people with disabilities or need to acquire more money to help pay for your wheelchair van and/or mobility needs, check out more opportunities at our mobility finance page.

Full Sized Accessible Wheelchair Vans

Ask people with disAbilities—when purchasing a handicap or accessible van—size matters. The full-sized van is a good option for those with a large family, those who travel often, those with additional equipment and accessories, those who need to tow large loads, or big or tall passengers or drivers.

Most minivans do not have roof modifications so you don’t have as much interior space.  Roomy full-size vans gain space by raising the roof, lowering the floor or both, and also have the advantage of more power and load carrying capacity.

Full-sized van:

  • Its weight-carrying capacity is significantly more than a minivan’s. It can hold the weight of a power wheelchair and even accommodate two individuals in wheelchairs.
  • It offers a lowered floor for the center, passenger or driver position; raised roof, raised doors; lifts and adaptive driving aids.
  • A raised roof makes it easy for someone to enter the van seated in a wheelchair or for a caretaker to tend to them or walk in and out of the entrance.
  • Doors are raised in conjunction with a roof to enable a person in a wheelchair to enter without having to bend over or have a caretaker tilt the wheelchair back.
  • Larger wheelchairs or motorized wheelchairs require floor-lowering or roof-raising modifications that a full-size van allows.

Find Financial Resources for Your Mobility Needs

Far too often, you find it hard to afford many of the tools and resources that you need in everyday life. For that reason, there are several alternative ways to get funding that will ensure that you get the assistance you need to live a hassle-free life without worrying about breaking the bank.

Here are a few sources of financial assistance to look into if you are finding it hard to cover all of your mobility expenses.

Medicare:
Usually offered only through private companies, Medicare can be a good option for certain medical devices and equipment and is based on your medical necessity for the goods or services you may need help with.

Medicaid:
While there is no exclusive list in terms of medical equipment covered, cases are approved on a case-by-case basis. Medicaid is a great option to look into if your expenses and needs aren’t covered by Medicare.

The IRS:
Did you know that certain mobility aids such as adaptive driving equipment can be deducted from your federal taxes? Contact your local tax adviser to see what equipment and supplies you use regularly to see if they can be deducted.

State Programs:
Check with your state’s vocational rehabilitation agencies to see if your mobility needs are approved for financial assistance. If any of it helps you get to work or perform your job efficiently, you may be covered here. Aside from that, you may also want to check out your local Center for Independent Living to see if they have any other resources that you can look into for financial assistance.

Vehicle-Related:
If you’ve recently had any adaptive equipment or ramps installed in your vehicle—or, for that matter, if you’ve recently purchased wheelchair van—there are some dealerships that will reimburse you for such things. Check with your local mobility-friendly dealership to learn more.

With these resources at your disposal, you can hopefully stop worrying about money and focus more on living a stress-free life where your mobility needs are easily met.

Benefits Of Owning A Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle

With adaptive technologies emerging each year, mobility vehicles have become more powerful than ever before. These handicap solutions have changed the lives of countless persons with disAbilities and helped alleviate some of the everyday challenges of just as many caregivers. If you’ve been considering the addition of a wheelchair accessible vehicle to your family, here are three ways in which owning a handicap van or car can empower you and transform your entire life.

Safety
Whether you’re a person with a disAbility, a dedicated caregiver or an able-bodied family member, safety is a universal concern and one of the main benefits of owning a vehicle designed for adaptive use. Besides power wheelchair lifts and transfer seating options, these vehicles are built to be used by persons with limited mobility, meaning they have been modified to be a secure transportation solution. Additionally, the high-quality equipment used in handicap van conversions reduces the risk of injury while getting in and out of the vehicle, as well as transferring from a wheelchair to a built-in seat. With wheelchair ties, in-floor ramps and alternative restraint options, a wheelchair accessible van can provide the added safety you need to feel confident on the road.

Freedom
For many people, owning a mobility vehicle means having the freedom to be able to go anywhere, any time. Often, persons with physical disAbilities are able to operate a handicap accessible car or van independently, without the need to have a caregiver help them in and out of the vehicle. Thanks to lifts, ramps and transfer seats, as well as hand controls and other conversion options, wheelchair vans have helped countless individuals regain their freedom after an injury or due to a medical condition, transforming their lives for the better.

Accessibility and Ease of Use
Automatic ramp systems, in-floor ramp technology, low-effort steering and many other adaptive conversion possibilities make operating mobility vehicles simple and convenient. This accessibility not only makes these vehicles easy to grow accustomed to, it also prevents injuries that can occur if the proper equipment is not utilized. Practicality and usability are two huge benefits of owning a wheelchair accessible vehicle, as they make getting from point A to point B a seamless and enjoyable process.

Ready to begin your search for the perfect wheelchair accessible vehicle? Contact us or your local NMEDA dealer today to discuss the purchasing process and the best options for your needs.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #10

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #10

Tip 10: Keep an Emergency Kit Inside Your Car

The simplest thing you can do to combat the cold weather is to keep a few essential supplies and tools with you as you drive. You’ll obviously want a spare tire and the tools to change out a flat, but it’s a good idea to keep some extra material in the trunk as well. Bottles of engine oil, washer fluid and coolant all come in handy. An ice scraper is a necessity, since you and your car won’t be going anywhere with frozen snow blocking your view.

Flashlights and flares are helpful if you’re stuck on the road late at night when visibility levels are low. Even if you’re wearing a coat, an extra pair of gloves, boots or even a blanket can keep you warm and dry if your heating unit isn’t working properly.

 

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #9

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #9

Tip 9: Make Sure You Rust Proof Your Vehicle

Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your Vehicle. If neglected, the damages can make your vehicle investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your vehicle from falling apart.

Rust is a serious problem and spreads like a rash. It can shorten the lifespan and value of any vehicle.

The best time to prevent rust damage to your vehicle is in Autumn: before the first snowflake falls and Spring: after the first heavy rain fall; a little vehicle maintenance will help keep the rust away.

 

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #8

Tip 8: Check Your Vehicle’s Belts and Hoses

The belts and hoses under your car’s hood are typically checked when the car is due for a tune-up (usually every 30,000 miles). Even if you’re not getting a tune-up this winter, it doesn’t hurt to have a mechanic take a look at how everything is holding up around your engine. Cold temperatures can weaken belts and hoses, and if something snaps or breaks while you’re out on the road, a tow truck will be the only way to get moving again.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #7

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #7

Tip 7: Replace Windshield Wipers and Wiper Fluid

Low visibility can make driving in cold weather extremely dangerous, so it’s important to make sure the wiper blades are up to par. Your wiper blades are made out of rubber, and with time they’ll crack, split and deteriorate. It’s suggested that you replace your windshield wipers every six to 12 months. Keeping your wiper fluid filled up is also a plus, as fluid can assist in breaking up snow and ice on the windshield.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #6

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #6

Tip 6: Check Your Defrosting and Heating Units

When our windshields fog up in the winter, it’s because moisture from inside the car condenses on the glass and makes it very difficult to see. Water vapor coming in from an open window — or even from your own breathing — can fog up a window. Defrosters solve this problem by blowing warm, dry air over the glass. If you’re sure your defroster unit is functioning properly but there’s still a problem with too much fogging, have your car checked for air leaks around the doors and windows bringing in extra moisture.

It’s also important to stay warm and comfortable while driving, since shivering makes it difficult to steer or pay attention to the road. If your heater isn’t working, you may have a faulty heater coil. Although heater coils are expensive to replace, it will be worth it during cold winter mornings if you don’t want to freeze behind the wheel.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #5

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #5

Tip 5: Keep Your Fuel Tank Full

Do you ever let your gas tank run on fumes until the very last moment, only to fill it up with about $15 worth of gas? Although it’s never a great idea to do this any time of the year because you run the risk of getting stranded, the damage you might inflict on your car with a near-empty tank during winter is much worse. Cold and constantly shifting temperatures can cause condensation to form on the walls of a gas tank in the red, and soon water will drip down and into the gas. It will eventually sink to the bottom, since water is heavier than gas, which is bad news — if water finds its way into the fuel lines, it will freeze up, blocking any flow of gas to the engine and effectively halting your travel plans. Any repairs that have to be made can be costly, too, so despite gas prices, keeping your tank full will help both your car and your wallet.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #4

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #4

Tip 4: Put in the Right Amount of Antifreeze

Antifreeze protects your engine from both freezing in cold weather and heating up on hot days, and it also cuts back on corrosion. It’s important to keep equal parts antifreeze and water in your radiator — a 50:50 ratio is considered the norm and will keep fluids from freezing at temperatures as low as -34 degrees Fahrenheit. Fortunately, you won’t have to stand over your engine with a measuring cup — you can buy pre-mixed bottles of antifreeze and water at gas stations. If you don’t pay attention to the amount of antifreeze, the coolant can freeze, and the engine will get extremely hot. Chances are you’ll blow a gasket or two, and the cost of replacing them with labor can be expensive.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #3

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #3

Check Your Oil

Oil lubricates the metal surfaces of your engine and stops them from grinding together and causing a lot of damage. The viscosity — or thickness — of the oil greatly affects your engine’s performance. If the oil is too thick, it will flow too slowly between parts and your engine will get too hot. In the winter time, cold temperatures cause oil to thicken, but you can overcome this problem by filling your engine with an oil of a lower viscosity. Your owner’s manual should tell you the ideal type of oil you should use, and it also might specifically suggest a thinner oil type depending on the season. Remember, most technicians recommend that you change your oil every 3,000 miles or once every three months.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #2

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Tip 2: Check Your Battery

Car batteries last for about three to five years, so it’s best to keep track of how old yours is. If it’s time to get a new one, you can replace it in the fall when batteries typically go on sale. Winter months are tough on your engine and cause it to work harder, and this puts more pressure on the battery.

If your battery isn’t that old, it’s still good to take a look and make sure nothing’s wrong. Check the battery cables and clamps for fraying or corrosion. If there’s a white, powdery substance around the clamps, that’s corrosion from battery acid — you can clean it off easily with baking soda, water and a toothbrush. Your battery is also filled with fluid, so make sure it has enough inside. Most batteries have caps on top, and you can check the level by removing the caps. If it’s low, fill the holes with distilled water, being careful not to fill past the bottom of the cap.

Trade-In or Sell Your Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle

If you’re looking to trade in your current wheelchair van or looking to sell one that is no longer being used, contact us today!  Live on-site inspections and a test drive by one of our technicians may be required before a final assessment and offer can be made.

Trade In Vehicle Requirements
We will accept virtually all non-modified vehicles that are preferably under 10 years old with odometers at 100,000 miles or less. You can also trade in a converted mobility vehicle from Braun, VMI, Rollx, and, even a AMS converted handicap vans.

Submit Your Vehicle’s Information
The first step is to call or email us about your trade. The basic information you provide helps our mobility consultants create the best trade-in deal possible for you. Be sure you include the correct VIN and mileage, and submit photos of your vehicle.

Trade-in Inspection
A mobility consultant will typically give a trade-in quote as soon as your vehicle is brought in for inspection. After a price is agreed upon, we will write you a check.

All trade-in offers are based on a first hand inspection, and if a vehicle isn’t represented accurately, we reserve the right to withdraw the offer once the vehicle is personally inspected by our evaluator.

VMI’s End Of 2014 Sale!

VMI's End Of 2014 Sale!

Get up to $3,000.00 in rebates on new 2014 Toyota and Honda VMI Conversion Minivans

This Deal is Limited to the following Vehicle Conversions:

  • New 2014 Honda Odyssey Northstar Conversion
  • New 2014 Honda Odyssey Summit Conversion
  • New 2014 Toyota Sienna Northstar Conversion
  • New 2014 Toyota Sienna Summit Conversion

Promotion Timeline:
The Promotion Started on Oct. 13, 2014
The Promotion expires on Dec. 31, 2014

The Possible Rebates Include:

VMI's 2014 Year-End Sale -- Possible RebatesVMI also offers a Rebate for disabled veterans, The Operation Independence Rebate, which is for $1,000.00

Terms and Conditions:
Final rebate amount is subject to dealer participation. Promotion runs from 10/13/14 through 12/31/14. Retail delivery must be made between 10/13/14 and 12/31/14, no exceptions. VMI will contribute $1,000.00 end user rebate on a new 2014 Honda or a new 2014 Toyota Northstar/Summit conversion minivan. Rebate offer is not applicable toward the purchase of Toyota Northstar E360. Rebate will be issued from VMI after retail delivery. Dealer must fax completed form to VMI at 602-304-3290 within 10 days of retail delivery. This rebate offer cannot be combined with any other offer except VMI Operation Independence Rebate. Restrictions apply. Promotion is subject to change without notice.

**VMI Mobility Dealer must buy replacement 2014 Honda or Toyota from VMI PDN inventory for end user to be eligible for the $1,000 VMI rebate. Dealer stipulations apply for rebate eligibility from VMI. Replacement VIN must be supplied when rebate form is submitted and is subject to verification.

*Participating dealers only.

***Honda or Toyota mobility rebate must meet eligibility requirements for Honda or Toyota conversion minivan purchases.

October Is Car Care Month: Is your vehicle prepared for winter driving?

October Is Car Care Month- Is your vehicle prepared for winter driving

Is your car ready to handle freezing conditions? Frigid temps can take a toll on your car and make winter driving even more hazardous than usual.
Here are a few tips to adapt to winter roads and preparing your car for the extreme cold.

Check the car’s battery
Cold weather takes a toll on batteries and requires a full charge. A battery is 35 percent weaker at 32 degrees and 60 percent weaker at zero degrees.

A load test by a qualified technician can determine whether a car’s battery is strong enough for winter. Keep in mind that if the car started with a jump start, the problem is not fixed and the battery most likely needs replacing.

Starting
Avoid excessive cranking. If the car doesn’t start after 20 seconds of cranking, wait a couple of minutes to let the battery recover.

Tire preparation
Tires should have sufficient tread depth that can handle New England’s winter weather. All-season tires are adequate for most vehicles but to get the greatest traction for both starting and stopping, snow tires are recommended. When considering snow tires, they should be installed on all four wheels

See and be seen
Clear windows, mirrors, and lights with an ice scraper, brush, or a spray de-icer. Driving with a snow-covered windshield, windows, side-view mirrors or lights invites a crash.

Completely clean snow from the roof, hood, and trunk. Windshield wipers and defrosters should be in good working order and washer reservoirs should be filled with no-freeze windshield washer fluid.

Consider specially designed winter wiper blades that prevent snow and ice buildup and improve visibility.

Reduce speeds
Most winter crashes happen from driving too fast for the weather conditions. Remember, everything takes longer on snow-covered roads, including accelerating, stopping, and turning.

Nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement so allow time to maneuver by driving slowly.

All-wheel drive is best
All-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive will help to get a car moving, but bear in mind it does little to improve braking. Don’t become overconfident and drive too fast for winter road conditions.

Anticipate stopping distance
In temperatures at or just above 32 degrees, a thin layer of water can cover the ice and cause slippery conditions, especially at intersections where snow and ice tend to melt first. The distance needed to stop on ice at 32 degrees is twice as long as at zero degrees.

Keep the engine cool
Mix certain cooling system antifreeze with an equal portion of water for maximum protection.

The Benefits of Owning a Wheelchair Van

Even though wheelchair-accessible minivans can offer greater independence, many wheelchair users are afraid to switch from their car to a mobility vehicle. For some, a car is more fun and the idea of driving a minivan is not all that appealing. Cars also offer a bit of a challenge and are generally less expensive than wheelchair vans, so there is often hesitation to make the change.

Unfortunately, wheelchair users and their caretakers usually have to deal with the hassles of transfers and chair loading when they use a car to get around. This can cause back or shoulder pain for those having to make the transfer and after a while, this can be quite physically taxing.

For those dealing with these daily struggles or those who want to prevent them, switching to a wheelchair-accessible van becomes an easy choice. Take a look at the following benefits and see why you might want to buy a wheelchair van.

Reduced Pain and Fatigue
When a car is the main vehicle used to transport someone in a wheelchair, pain and fatigue can be a serious problem caused by frequent seat transfers. It’s hard to get close enough to a car to make a smooth transfer and if the height of the car seat doesn’t match that of the wheelchair, it can put a lot of stress on the shoulders, back and neck. What could result is joint and muscle pain and eventually arthritis and tendinitis. If getting into your vehicle is too much work or too painful, you might give up doing the things you love to do after a while.

Fortunately, a wheelchair-accessible van can give you your freedom back so you can do all of your favorite things. Because a wheelchair van uses a ramp for entry, there are no transfers from outside of the vehicle and you don’t have to separately load your chair. Once inside the vehicle, the transfer from your wheelchair to the driver or passenger position is much easier since you can pull right up to the seat. Plus, some wheelchair vans even let you drive or sit in the front from your wheelchair, completely removing any need to transfer.

Greater Freedom and Independence
While many people may argue driving a minivan isn’t the “coolest” thing you can do, sometimes other things are more important than image. A mobility van may not always be sporty, fun or stylish, but it offers maximum freedom and independence. Actually getting where you need to go without too much assistance or a physical struggle is more important than how you are able to do it.

Helpful Financing Options
A converted van will most likely cost several thousand dollars more than a standard car, as the conversion price plus higher fuel and insurance costs increase your total spend. While this might deter many people from making the switch to a van, it’s important to consider what you get for the price – greater health, happiness and overall well-being.

Even though a wheelchair-accessible van may seem out of reach, there are programs available that can help you pay for a mobility vehicle. Government programs like Worker’s Compensation, Medicaid Waivers, Vocational Rehabilitation and those with the VA may all be able to help with funding. There are also charities or nonprofits that may be able to help provide fund raising opportunities and some banks or Independent Living Centers offer extended loans or lower interest rates. Used vehicles are an option as well, as many dealers sell old rental vans after a year of use.

People will always have a reason to avoid buying a mobility van, but it might be worth serious consideration. Think about your quality of life and whether easier mobility may improve it. If so, it might be time to make the change.

How to Choose the Right Mobility Vehicle for You

With several mobility vehicle options available, how do you know which one is going to be the best fit for you?

Most vehicles can be modified with hand controls, foot pedals and adaptive equipment to make driving easier for someone who has limited mobility. While those modifications help you drive, they don’t actually help you get into the vehicle. Picking the right mobility vehicle should start with entry.

When you use a wheelchair to get around, it’s important you have a vehicle that allows you to get in and out in the most convenient way possible. If you have good upper-body strength and can’t stand the thought of driving a van, you may be able to get by using a sedan or coupe – at least for a little while. If you use a large power chair that won’t fit in the back seat of a car or have no one to help you get it there even if it could, a full-size or minivan might be more appropriate.

To find out the differences between mobility vehicles so you can pick the right one for you, consider the benefits and disadvantages of each type below.

Sedans and Coupes
Having a sedan or coupe usually means you have to transfer from your wheelchair to the car seat, which can put a lot of strain on your arms and shoulders – or those of your caregiver. When you think about a long-term solution, having to transfer and load a wheelchair for many years may not be practical. Not only that, but if the weather isn’t ideal (snow, rain, excessive heat), this all becomes even more difficult. Standard cars can have motorized lifts or platforms attached to them, but those are generally just for loading a wheelchair in the back or trunk and don’t help with your transfer.

While cars might not be the most practical solution for all wheelchair users, many people still choose them because they are more stylish than a van and tend to be less expensive. The cost of the vehicle with gas is generally less on an unconverted sedan or coupe than a converted van. Plus, if you already own a car, getting assistive equipment is cheaper than buying a brand new mobility vehicle.

SUVs
SUVs are similar to sedans and coupes in that they usually require a transfer from the wheelchair to the car seat. That means they don’t work for wheelchair users without much upper-body strength or strong caregivers, especially since SUVs sit higher and the transfer involves more lifting. SUVs also don’t have a lot of interior space and may not fit larger wheelchairs – even in the trunk.

One of the major benefits of having an accessible SUV is the All-Wheel Drive feature, which makes driving in inclement weather a little bit safer, especially when hand controls are used.

Minivans
Wheelchair-accessible minivans are one of the most practical options for someone with limited mobility. Converted minivans usually come with a ramp system and automatic sliding door to make entry and exit into the vehicle easy – without having to leave your wheelchair. This makes getting in and out much quicker and puts almost no stress on the body of the wheelchair user or caregiver. In addition, some wheelchair-accessible minivans offer different seating options so you can sit in the front and avoid feeling like cargo.

Converted minivans are one of the most convenient options, as they are large enough to fit a wheelchair user, but not so large they may be hard to drive and park for if you have limited mobility. While these might be the perfect solution for many wheelchair users, some people don’t like the idea of driving a minivan and you always have to park with enough space on the side to lower the ramp.

Full-Size Vans
Full-size mobility vans are a great option for larger wheelchair users or those in heavy power chairs. While these vehicles offer the most space, having a full-size van also usually means you use a lift, which takes up space inside the vehicle and may rattle around when you drive. Lift operation may also take longer than that of a ramp and often requires the assistance of another person. Having a lift, however, does make loading and unloading possible without having to transfer from the wheelchair.

While each type of mobility vehicle has its perks and drawbacks, it’s important to find the one that works best for you. It is critical to find a reliable wheelchair-accessible vehicle or adaptive equipment manufacturer so you get a product that will last. If you need additional assistance in determining which option is ideal for you, talk to an authorized mobility dealer and ask for a demo of the vehicles that interest you.

Teens with Disabilities: Learning to Drive A Handicap Accessible Vehicle

The majority of teenage kids will assert that learning to drive not only makes for an exciting experience but also marks a very important moment in life – moving a step closer towards achieving independence. Teens living with a disability are not exempt from this feeling. When it’s time to teach your child to drive, there are a few important things to keep in mind to ensure your child’s safety and the safety of others on the road.

Regardless of your age, preparedness is essential when it comes to driving. For those living with disabilities, the process of how you prepare can be slightly different, but it is certainly equally as important. Teens and new drivers with disabilities must complete a drivers’ assessment prior to beginning lessons in order to determine what sort of adaptive equipment or techniques he or she must use while driving. Steering aids, hand controls, or ramps/lifts may be necessary for your teen to be ready to get behind the wheel and recommendations will be made by the assessment administrator (most often by a certified driver rehabilitation specialist) after a proper exam.

While some teens will require little additional equipment in order to operate a vehicle, others may need more thorough vehicle conversions. If purchasing a new handicap accessible vehicle is not in your budget, there are used options available to suit your child’s needs, as well as rentals and loaners made available by some driving schools.

Qualified driving specialists will be able to relay information on your state’s driving laws for people with disabilities, how to operate the vehicle, as well as how to get in and out of the car without additional assistance, should they need to do so.

Throughout this journey towards adulthood, it’s vital that you remain your teen’s number one fan. A supporting and encouraging environment can dramatically improve your child’s outlook on taking on the road, raising their self-confidence and making them an overall better driver. Remember, learning how to drive takes time, but with your support, the expertise of driving coaches and the accessibility of a modified vehicle, your teen will be on his or her way to being a licensed driver!

Adaptive Q&A

With such a wide variety of adaptive vehicle equipment available, selecting the appropriate features or modifications can become big task. In an effort to facilitate this process, here are the responses to some of the most frequently asked mobility equipment questions.

Are ramps difficult to operate?
Most vans equipped with side-entry mobility equipment are fully automatic. The seamless loading and unloading process can be as simple as pushing a button. Vans can be converted to automatically open their doors, lower to the curb and deploy or stow a ramp without the driver or passengers needing to work with any equipment. Manual options are also available, however these are also very easy to use. Built with springs that carry most of the ramp’s weight, manual ramp options are also quick, safe and simple to use solutions.

Can I drive from my wheelchair?
In many cases, it is possible for drivers with disabilities and the need for a wheelchair to avoid transferring by properly securing their chair and themselves within the vehicle. With the use of both a wheelchair tie-down system and occupant restraints, driving from a wheelchair can be a safe and convenient option.

Can I drive from my scooter?
Operating or riding a vehicle from scooter is not recommended. In order to remain safe while traveling, passengers or drivers in scooters should always transfer into vehicle seating. Turning or swivel seats can make the transfer process easier and less demanding on those with limited mobility or access to caregiver assistance. Scooters should also be properly secured with a tie-down system to prevent movement in case of a sudden stop or turn.

Side entry vs. rear entry – which is best for me?
There are a few things to consider when deciding between a side entry and a rear entry vehicle. Passengers who are not going to be driving the vehicle typically use rear entry vehicles. Side entry vehicles work well for drivers and co-pilots getting in to the front of the vehicle, as well as passengers. Depending on the parking conditions of your regularly visited establishments, your vehicle’s entry points may need to be redefined. If you often need to parallel park or live in a region that experiences recurring inclement weather, a side-entry vehicle will prove to be a better option for your needs. These are only a few of the deciding factors when it comes to choosing between side and rear-entry.

Can someone else drive my vehicle if I install hand controls?
In most cases, both able-bodied drivers and those with disabilities can comfortably operate vehicles adapted with hand controls. Most hand controls do not interfere with the way a manufacturer intended the vehicle to be driven.

Attention Toyota Owners: Read This & Save Money!

Toyota Motor Company Sienna Door Defects for 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 Minivans, Wheelchair vans, IMS Mobility vans & Braun Ability Accessible Ramp vans

Toyota Sienna minivans have an engineering flaw with the design of the plate welded to the door that causes the door strap welds to break loose, typically just outside of warranty for many owners.

From the reports of other owners, it is not a matter of IF you will experience this door failure, but WHEN! This appears to be an issue with all Toyota Sienna 2004-2008 models.

Although Toyota has issued a Technical Service Bulletin, they refuse to issue a recall to fix the issue. Repairs typically cost around $2,000.00 for owners outside of warranty with the replacement of the doors. Re-welding the failure points is not recommended as they are prone to fail again sooner than replacing the door.

What to do?

YOU DON’T HAVE TO REPLACE YOUR TOYOTA SIENNA DOOR AND SPEND THOUSANDS!

We have figured out a way to reinforce the defective welded door check mounting panels that will fix all of you issues at a low cost!

Call the Toyota wheelchair van repair experts in Bridgewater, MA
508-697-6006

 

 

 

NEMEDA: Play It Forward For a Chance to Win $500!

NMEDA has started another contest on Facebook!!!!

Play It Forward For a Chance to Win $500! banner

They wants to hear how you are keeping “Life Moving Forward” through our Play It Forward Video Contest.

The Mission: The NMEDA team wants to encourage the community living with disabilities to keep Life Moving Forward through your favorite activity. Become a “NMEDA Player” by following the simple video instructions below, and upload it to our Play It Forward App on the NMEDA Facebook Page. Let your friends and family know about your entry in the contest and encourage them to vote for your video. The Player with the most votes will becoming the Fan Favorite.

It’s as easy as 1, 2, and 3!

Play It Forward For a Chance to Win $500!

The Reward:  MULTIPLE NMEDA PLAYERS HAVE THE CHANCE to be featured in our upcoming promotions. Those entrants selected by NMEDA for video use will receive a cash prize of $500. The Fan Favorite – the Player who receives the most votes through the app by August 30th – is guaranteed to be featured, and will also receive a $500 cash prize.

Required Video Specs:

  • Your high-quality video must not exceed 2 minutes.
  • It must be shot horizontally and the NMEDA Player must be positioned in the center of the video.

Preferred Video Specs:

  • 1080p (1920×1080) at 30fps or 720p (1280×960) at 30fps

The following link leads to a sample video of our local hero, Courtney Boyll, sharing how she plays it forward.
*Note: Players only need to use their first name.

Click here to view Courtney’s video: http://bit.ly/NMEDAPlayItForward

Air Conditioning Issues In Wheelchair Vans

Why does the A/C in my wheelchair van have a weak airflow?
We understand the discomfort caused by weak airflow. The sweat alone is enough to drive anyone crazy. However, there are a lot of factors at play. If you notice reduced airflow early on –rather than later– take the right step and have it looked at before other fatal A/C system damage can occur.

Main causes of weak airflow:

  • Mold or mildew may have accumulated in the evaporator core from residual moisture that occurs during the cooling process. When this happens, air will have trouble reaching your air vents.
  • A hose could have come loose. This usually happens with the blower hose that supplies air to the blower unit.
  • Ventilation fan is fried. If the fan’s not blowing, air won’t be flowing very well.
  • Seals. Core case seals, blower house seals or evaporator core case seals; All can open up and diminish air flow. A/C ventilation systems are very sensitive and must remain sealed. Once they’re opened, the whole system is compromised.

Whatever A/C problems you might be having, we have the answer. Schedule an A/C performance check.

 

Are there any system warning lights to alert me to an A/C problem in my accessible vehicle?
Typically, no, but some vehicles have Driver Information Centers (DIC) that may display the status of many vehicle systems. Refer to your Owner’s Manual for more information.

 

My A/C isn’t as cold as it used to be, what’s going on?
There are several reasons an A/C system can lose its cool. Bring your mobility van to us as soon as you start noticing this symptom, it could mean the difference between needing a small repair, or worse, a large one. Here’s what can cause your cold air to lose its cool.

The lack of precious cold air could be caused by:

  • A Freon leak caused by a failed o-ring, seal, hose or component
  • A clogged expansion tube or refrigerant charging hose
  • Failed compressor or compressor clutch
  • Failed blower motor or blower motor resistor
  • Damaged or failed condenser or evaporator
  • Vacuum leaks
  • Failed switch, fuse, relay, control module, blend door or solenoid

Leaks can be devastating. When an A/C system develops a leak, you have what’s called an “open system.” If you or your technician discovers the leak early, your repair will be less expensive. Unfortunately, if a leak has been affecting your cold air for a while, moisture will most likely have entered your A/C system and may have damaged other vital and expensive parts. Stay cool and schedule an A/C performance check.

The A/C starts out cool then starts getting warm, what’s happening?
Well, like many complicated stories, there’s never one simple answer. A/C systems are a fickle breed. Your best bet is to have us inspect your system for any of the following listed symptoms.

From cold to hot and all the symptoms in between:

  • The clogged expansion valve: The expansion valve distributes the proper amount of refrigerant to your evaporator. If the valve is blocked, the refrigerant can’t flow into the evaporator. With the valve clogged, the refrigerant will start to freeze the valve altogether if moisture is present.
  • Faulty compressor clutch: If the clutch is not engaging with your compressor, than your compressor can’t maintain the correct pressure. Hot air will result.
  • The blown fuse scenario: Fuses sometimes short out. If the fuse associated with your A/C system goes, the power to certain parts will stop.
  • Leaks are an A/C system’s worst friend: Leaks are the result of damage or the presence of moisture. When moisture and refrigerant mix, nasty corrosive acids will eat away at seals and components, causing a leak.

What is the smelly, gym locker odor coming from my A/C vents?
Sounds like you have an odor problem on your hands. There are a few issues that may be causing this smell.

Potential causes of nasty “gym locker” odors:

  • Dirty and old air cabin filter.
  • Moldy evaporator case. A problem for many vehicles when water sits in the evaporator case because the case’s drain is blocked. Mold will accumulate.

How do you test for an A/C system leak?
The ways to detect an A/C system leak are not far off from an episode of an investigation show.

Detecting leaks:

  • Black light enabled dyes. You read that right. A lot of refrigerants are pre-mixed with a special U.V. dye that shows up under black light. We’ll run a black light over your A/C system to see if any dye shows up.
  • Bring in the “sniffer.” A sniffer is a special device that hones in on the refrigerant’s chemical components. If there’s a leak, our sniffer will sniff it out.

What causes an A/C system leak?

Age and moisture. Plain and simple. Rubber seals and hoses can also lose their elasticity over time and breakdown allowing Freon to escape and moisture to enter your vehicle’s A/C system. Moisture is the kiss of death for your A/C system, mixing with refrigerant and creating a system destroying corrosive acid.

Quick fact: If moisture is present, it could damage your accumulator, receiver or drier. Remember, these devices are responsible for removing moisture from the A/C system and will eventually stop functioning once they are exposed to an open system (leak or crack).

Everyday Mobility Aids

Having a disability can make getting around and doing everyday activities difficult. Simple things like taking a shower, going to the store or even moving around your house can be a challenge for someone with limited mobility.

Getting a wheelchair or scooter is usually the first step, but there are several other mobility aids that either work in tandem or in addition to those to help you do the things you need to do. Once you have a wheelchair or scooter, there are upgrades you can make to your home to increase wheelchair accessibility there, but those don’t necessarily give you additional mobility. If you are looking to gain better mobility both inside and outside of your house, try any of the mobility equipment options below.

Transfer Board or Slider
While going out is often a major challenge, sometimes getting around within your house may be even more difficult. Getting onto a bed from a wheelchair, for example, requires strength, time and often another person. Luckily, there are transfer boards or sliders available to help facilitate the process. Wheelchair users place one end of the board under them on their wheelchair seat and slide across to the other end, which is set on their destination.

Bath Lifts
Bath lifts help those with limited leg mobility get into the bathtub. They attach to the tub and act as a seat for the wheelchair user to transfer to when they are ready to bathe. Once the user is sitting on the lift, it swings around and lowers within the tub. When the user is ready to get out, the seat can raise back up and out, preventing dangerous slipping. Other, simpler bath accessories include bath chairs, which act more as transfer seats that extend past the tub so the wheelchair user can safely slide across and under a shower head without using too much strength.

While living with a disability may make performing certain tasks more difficult, mobility equipment is available to help ease these challenges. Check online or with a mobility equipment dealer to find out where you can get these mobility aids.

Mobility Vehicles
If you use a wheelchair and don’t have a mobility vehicle, going anywhere can be a challenge. These are more expensive than many other types of mobility equipment, but there are plenty of options — and you may even be eligible for financial assistance. If you can’t afford to purchase a vehicle of your own, many dealers also offer rentals for much less.

Steering Aids
Whether you buy a mobility vehicle or simply transfer from your wheelchair to a car seat, you may need the ability to drive. There are different steering aids available to help you do so, depending on your abilities, including:

  • Steering Attachments: Extensions, such as knobs, gloves or balls, attach to the steering wheel to make it easy for those with limited arm function to turn the wheel with one hand or arm.
  • Foot Controls: Attachments on the ground give those with limited use of their hands the ability to steer and control the vehicle with their feet.
  • Loosened Steering: Drivers without adequate upper body strength can turn the wheel without requiring much effort with a simple steering modification.
  • Automatic Controls: A driver with limited leg mobility can steer, accelerate and brake with their hands using one piece of equipment that can be mounted in the driver’s area.

Low Maintenance/Easy-to-Repair Wheelchair Vans

A new or used handicap van engineered with a simple design means infrequent and easy maintenance. Taking care of your accessible wheelchair van, especially performing recommended maintenance on your accessibility ramp, is as uncomplicated as following routine vehicle maintenance. The process of caring for your wheelchair ramp is so simple, just make sure you bring it in twice a year (we recommend Spring and Fall) for a service check up and rust treatment. Before you make any repairs to the conversion, we request that you call us.

 

What is A New/Used Wheelchair van?

VMi New England Wheelchair vans & ramp:Lift options
When shopping for a new or pre-owned wheelchair van at a mobility dealership, you may hear or read the term “New/Used”. Sounds confusing, right? The term New/Used describes an accessible vehicle for sale that has a new conversion added to a pre-owned used minivan. These vehicles tend to have less than 40,000 miles and are only 2-3 years old. The reason they tend to be newer and with very few miles is that conversion manufacturers want quality vans that are going to provide reliable transportation for many years to come. New/Used van conversions can be side entry or rear entry, with most having a fold-out ramp (vs. an in-floor ramp). A VMI Summit on a Dodge Grand Caravan is just one example of a fold-out ramp conversion. Folding wheelchair ramps on a minivan can be powered or manual. Powered ramps are operated with a push-button inside the vehicle, a key fob or both.

Deciding whether to buy a new or used wheelchair van can be a difficult decision. Your choice may depend on how often or how far you plan to travel every year, whether you are the driver (with the use of hand controls) or passenger, and your preferences for a specific conversion, make or color. A lot of people want all of the latest electronic accessories and gadgets that can only be found in a new vehicle — but they also want something in a used vehicle’s price range. New/Used vehicles provide an “almost new” vehicle at significant cost savings – and may have all of the amenities that you’re are looking for.

NEMEDA Local Hero Contest – Enter or Vote Today!

NEMEDA Local Hero Contest – Enter or Vote Today!
May 2014 is National Mobility Awareness Month

National Mobility Awareness Month is dedicated to showing the world how people with disabilities can live active, mobile lifestyles.

Did you know?

  • Over 18 million people in the U.S. and Canada have mobility issues
  • People with disabilities constitute the largest minority group in the United States and the only group anyone can become a member of at anytime
  • One in five elderly have mobility issues
  • There are mobility equipment manufacturers, dealers and certified driver rehabilitation specialists in your community dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities
  • Automotive mobility solutions are available for people with disabilities, enabling them to enjoy active, mobile lifestyles

Who Is A Local Hero?

  • Local Heroes can be Defined as People who Volunteer, Educate, Advocate, Achieve, and Persevere.

Whether you are living with a disability or have dedicated your time to helping someone who is, we want to hear what makes you/them a Local Hero.

How To Enter

  1. Get the Promo Code From your Local Dealer (including us: 508-697-6006)
  2. Complete the Local Hero Entry Form and include either a written story or a video.
    • Written: Write up to 400 words with a picture of the local hero (1MB or less).
    • Video: Make a YouTube video that is no longer than 2 minutes.
  3. Preview your Story and Submit your Local Hero Entry Form here

Important Dates

  • February 25, 2014 – NMEDA will begin accepting Local Hero entries
  • March 11, 2014 – Public voting begins — Click here to vote
  • May 9, 2014 – Local Hero entries and voting end
  • May 30, 2014 – The Local Hero Winners are contacted
  • June 2014 – Local Heroes will publicly be announced
  • June/August 2014 – Wheelchair Accessible vehicles will be delivered

The Importance of Servicing Your Wheelchair Van and Adaptive Equipment

The Importance of Servicing Your Wheelchair Van and Adaptive Equipment
Owning any type of vehicle means that you have to commit to regular service and maintenance to keep it in good condition. Owning a wheelchair van and adaptive equipment is no different – you still need regular service to keep everything operating the way it should. However, it comes with some additional caveats – you can’t just go to any service center and ensure that you’re maintaining your wheelchair van or mobility equipment correctly.

Here at our Mobility Center, not only do we understand the importance of maintaining your mobility vehicle and adaptive equipment, but we take the needed steps to ensure that everything is always in top condition. No other mobility dealer (that we know of) offers the level of maintenance offered by us.

For example, we can maintain primary and secondary driving controls, as well as providing service for wheelchair ramps and scooter lifts. Along with power seat bases, power door operators, wheelchair securement systems and other adaptive equipment. Those are only a few of the areas that our certified technicians can service and maintain. We also have a rust prevention/treatment that we highly recommend.

You’ll also find that we offer installation as well as service for a range of adaptive equipment like lowered floors, raised doors, adaptive steering controls, turning automotive seats and hand controls. All of our technicians are fully certified in mobility equipment so that you always know you’re in good hands with us.

Automotive Innovations has also created a innovative and ever evolving maintenance program over the past 25 years for our customers. We know that making sure your vehicle and adaptive equipment is in good condition is important to you, but we also understand that it can be difficult for you to tell when or if something needs service or repair. That’s why we started our operational preventative maintenance program over 20 years ago. This program ensures that your wheelchair van or mobility equipment is always in the best operational condition possible, but also assesses the need for repairs or replacement most of the time before anything happens.

We’re dedicated to giving you the peace of mind that you deserve and the maintenance you need to maintain your freedom at all times.

 

NEMEDA Local Hero Contest – Enter Today!

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to expanding mobility options for people with disabilities.

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to expanding mobility options for people with disabilities.

May 2014 is National Mobility Awareness Month
National Mobility Awareness Month is dedicated to showing the world how people with disabilities can live active, mobile lifestyles.

Did you know?

  • Over 18 million people in the U.S. and Canada have mobility issues
  • People with disabilities constitute the largest minority group in the United States and the only group anyone can become a member of at anytime
  • One in five elderly have mobility issues
  • There are mobility equipment manufacturers, dealers and certified driver rehabilitation specialists in your community dedicated to improving the lives of people with disabilities
  • Automotive mobility solutions are available for people with disabilities, enabling them to enjoy active, mobile lifestyles

Who Is A Local Hero?

  • Local Heroes can be Defined as People who Volunteer, Educate, Advocate, Achieve, and Persevere.

Whether you are living with a disability or have dedicated your time to helping someone who is, we want to hear what makes you/them a Local Hero.

How To Enter

  1. Get the Promo Code From your Local Dealer (including us: 508-697-6006)
  2. Complete the Local Hero Entry Form and include either a written story or a video.
    • Written: Write up to 400 words with a picture of the local hero that is 1MB or less.
    • Video: Make a YouTube video that is no longer than 2 minutes.
  3. Preview your Story and Submit your Local Hero Entry Form here

 

Important Dates

  • February 25, 2014 – NMEDA will begin accepting Local Hero entries
  • March 11, 2014 – Public voting begins
  • May 9, 2014 – Local Hero entries and voting end
  • May 30, 2014 – The Local Hero Winners are contacted
  • June 2014 – Local Heroes will publicly be announced
  • June/August 2014 – Wheelchair Accessible vehicles will be delivered

Electronic Parking Brake

Electric Parking Brake push button control to set the parking brake with ease.

Our design is long lasting and has been in use for more than 20 years. With a unique electronic and compact design allowing for easy installation by our certified technicians. Usually required when driving from a wheelchair or power-chair. Conveniently located touch control.
Our EPB works on most vehicles with ABS Brakes.

Easy to use
To set simply press the button until the Parking Brake is applied to the desired amount.

EPB Features

  • Unique and compact design
  • Directly interfaces with mechanical parking brake system.
  • Compact enough for custom mounting and applications.
  • Mounts inside the vehicle no part of the EPB is outside of the vehicle so it’s protected from the elements.

Did You Know
Setting your parking brake daily, will help you lower your maintenance costs on your parking brake cable. More importantly, it helps retain braking power for when you need it.

Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit Conversion – More Information


Culmination of Wheelchair Accessible Vans

The folding wheelchair ramp on the Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit wheelchair vehicle conversion features a new and improved design. For disabled customers searching for a fold-out handicap ramp system on one of the finest minivans available, look no further.

In a recent focus group, the Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit wheelchair vans were preferred by more than 4 to 1 when compared to the leading competitor’s folding mobility ramp van.

The VMI Summit on a Honda Odyssey wheelchair conversion van is a folding wheelchair ramp alternative to the Vantage Mobility International Northstar mobility vehicle conversion. VMI Summit handicap van conversions are one of the most popular means of travel for the disabled community due to their easy wheelchair access and affordability.

VMI Summit handicap vehicle conversions offer wheelchair access via a folding mobility ramp at the side passenger sliding door. But the accessible features go much further. Once inside, a person with a disability can choose where to position. The front seat bases are removable, which means riding in the front passenger position, or even driving with the assistance of a mobility driving control or device.

Different Wheelchair Van Models Available
The VMI Summit mobility conversion van is available on the Honda Odyssey EX, EX-L, Touring, and Touring Elite minivans. No matter your situation or budget, be sure to test drive a VMI Summit on the Honda Odyssey wheelchair conversion vehicle before deciding which accessible vehicle to buy.

More Information-Compatible Wheelchair Van Accessories
Hand controls or other handicap driving aids can also be added for a completely independent driving solution in Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit wheelchair vehicle conversions.

Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit Conversion – Specifications

Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit Conversion - More Information

Description
Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit Only

  • 2” side rails help wheelchair users stay on the accessible ramp when entering/exiting mobility vehicle
  • With a simple push outward, ramp can be deployed manually for a quick exit in the event of a power or mechanical failure
  • Perforated handicapped ramp surface allows debris to fall through before it is brought into accessible vehicle interior
  • Handicap ramp equipped with anti-rattle mechanism for a quiet vehicle cabin
  • 600lb. wheelchair ramp load capacity

Honda Odyssey with VMI Northstar AND Summit

  • Full-power mobility ramp and conversion
  • 12.75” FLEX Floor maximizes headroom & interior space
  • Patented independent rear suspension designed to preserve Honda Odyssey ride quality and performance
  • E-coated floor for maximum corrosion resistance
  • NEW, ultra-reliable hydraulic PowerKneel system lowers the minivan to reduce ramp angle
  • Seamless integration with Honda vehicle electronics prevents damage to vehicle/conversion
  • Mobility van conversion control through Honda keyfob and interior sliding-door switches
  • Halo-lit, one-touch interior conversion button
  • Ramp ON/OFF switch allows users to disable all conversion features for guest drivers/passengers without deploying the ramp
  • NEW lightweight, removable front seats are easier to install or remove from handicap vehicle
  • NEW quick-release straps allow users to remove front seats in seconds without removing plastic covers or searching for handles/pedals beneath the seat
  • Non-skid accessible ramp surface
  • Fully crash-tested &compliant with all government safety standards
  • 3-year/36,000-mile warranty

Specifications

  • Door Opening Height – 55″
  • Door Opening Width – 30.75″
  • Ramp Length (angled ramp & transition plate) – 49.5″
  • Wheelchair Ramp Length (distance ramp protrudes from mobility vehicle) – 39″
  • Usable Mobility Ramp Width – 28.9″
  • Overall Floor Length – 91.5″
  • Length (from back of seat bases to kickplate) – 61.75″
  • Floor Width at B Pillar – 60″
  • Floor Width at Front Doors – 60.5″
  • Interior Height at Center Position – 60″
  • Interior Height at Driver’s Position – 57.25″ Without Sunroof
  • 
Standard Features
  • FLEX Floor – E-coated for Corrosion Resistance
  • 12.75″ Lowered Floor Drop
  • Most Floor Length of Any VMI handicap van conversion
  • Most Floor Width of Any VMI wheelchair conversion van
  • Power Kneel Optimized for Reliability and Noise Reduction
  • Patented Independent Rear Suspension
  • FMVSS 301R Compliant
  • Power Folding Handicap Ramp with Non-skid Surface
  • Power Door with Easy Manual Operation
  • Removable Front Seat Bases
  • Mobility Conversion Warranty
  • Manual Wheelchair Tie-down System
  • Fully Crash Tested
  • Remote Control Entry
  • 600 Pound Load Rating for Mobility Ramp
  • 10 Degree Wheelchair Ramp Angle


Optional Features

  • Durafloor (rubberized flooring)

Honda Odyssey with VMI Summit Conversion – Information

Honda Odyssey VMi Summit Conversion
The Summit accessible fold-out ramp van conversion on a Honda Odyssey is a basic, economical alternative to VMI’s best-selling Northstar in-floor ramp system. Fold-out wheelchair ramps sit inside the handicapped vehicle cabin and extend outward when deployed. Summit fold-out ramp conversions do include 2” ramp side rails, which are ideal for those customers who sometimes have difficulty navigating their handicap ramps. This is VMI’s most advanced fold-out conversion. It shares many new features with the Northstar conversion. Other manufacturers offer fold-out accessible ramps, but none can offer the reliability or ease-of-use of the VMI Summit.

Toyota Sienna with VMI Summit Conversion – More Information


Toyota Sienna access360
Access 360
Vantage Mobility’s most advanced fold-out ramp, the Summit is stronger than ever with stainless steel ramp hardware and FLEX Floor E-coating that resists corrosion. The Summit Access 360 conversion offers your customers ease-of-use superior to that of any other Toyota Sienna fold-out ramp conversion, but with a price that appeals to budget-conscious import buyers. The Summit Access360 conversion for the Toyota Sienna is ideal for customers in large power chairs who need additional space for maneuverability as well as tall individuals who need additional door opening and interior height. A 3-year/36,000-mile conversion warranty provides customers added peace of mind.

Toyota Sienna with VMI Summit Conversion – Specifications

Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Ramp
Description
Toyota Sienna with VMI Summit Only

  • NEW – Ramp design improved to accommodate large power chairs with a ramp load capacity of 750lb.
  • 2″ siderails help wheelchair users stay on the accessible ramp when entering/exiting mobility vehicle
  • With a simple push outward, ramp can be deployed manually for a quick exit in the event of a power or mechanical failure
  • Perforated handicapped ramp surface allows debris to fall through before it is brought inot accessible vehicle interior
  • Ramp equipped stainless steel for superior corrosion resistance

Toyota Sienna with VMI Northstar AND Summit

  • NEW-Access360 design has more space to enter & maneuver inside
  • NEW – Access360 design allows for more flexibility & ease of use
  • Obstruction-free doorway allows access for able-bodied passengers
  • Clean, uncluttered handicapped vehicle interior
  • Greater safety in the event of a collision
  • Less dirt & debris from in-floor ramp into vehicle interior
  • Wider usable accessible wheelchair ramp surface
  • No interference with factory seats or controls
  • Full use of passenger seat
  • Obstacle-free front row floor
  • 9″ more floor length than any other conversion on the market today

Specifications

  • Door opening height – 57″
  • Door opening width – 30.5″
  • Interior height at center position – 61.8″
  • Interior height at driver/passenger position – 60.5″ w/o sunroof and 58.25″ w/sunroof
  • Length (from back of seat bases to kickplate) – 65.5″
  • Overall floor length – 95″
  • Floor width at B pillar – 61.5″
  • Floor width at front doors – 60.3″
  • Ramp length (angled ramp and transition plate) – 54.5″
  • Usable ramp width – 28.9″
  • Maximum floor drop – 14 7/8″
  • Ramp angle – 9º
  • Ramp capacity – 750 lbs

Standard Features
Toyota Sienna with VMI Summit only

  • Ultra-low 9.0° accessible ramp angle
  • 750lb. wheelchair ramp capacity
  • Features stainless steel hardware for superior corrosion resistance

Toyota Sienna with Northstar AND Summit

  • Full-power ramp and conversion
  • 12.75” drop FLEX Floor maximizes headroom & interior space
  • Independent rear suspension preserves ride quality/performance
  • E-coated floor for maximum corrosion resistance
  • NEW, ultra-reliable hydraulic PowerKneel system lowers the minivan to reduce ramp angle
  • Seamless integration with the electronics prevents damage to vehicle/conversion
  • Conversion control through keyfob & interior sliding-door switches
  • Halo-lit, one-touch interior conversion button
  • Ramp ON/OFF switch allows users to disable all conversion features for guest drivers & open sliding doors for able-bodied passengers without deploying the ramp
  • NEW lightweight, removable front seats are easier to install or remove
  • NEW-quick-release straps easily removes front seats in seconds
  • Non-skid handicapped ramp surface
  • Fully crash-tested and compliant with all government safety standards
  • 3-year/36,000-mile warranty


Optional Features

  • Durafloor (rubberized flooring)

Toyota Sienna with VMI Summit Conversion – Information

Toyota Sienna with VMI Summit Conversion

The Summit accessible fold-out ramp van conversion on a Toyota Sienna is a basic, economical alternative to VMI’s best-selling Northstar in-floor ramp system. Fold-out wheelchair ramps sit inside the handicapped vehicle cabin and extend outward when deployed. Summit fold-out ramp conversions do include 2″ ramp side rails, which are ideal for those customers who sometimes have difficulty navigating their handicap ramps.

The Summit mobility van conversion on the Toyota Sienna is VMI’s most advanced fold-out conversion to date. In fact the Summit conversion shares many new features with the all-new VMI Northstar conversion. While other manufacturers offer fold-out accessible ramps, none can offer the reliability or ease-of-use of the VMI Summit on a Toyota Sienna minivan.

How To Really Move On When You Can No Longer Walk

There are a lot of nightmare scenarios no one wants to personally experience. One is getting a phone call that someone you love is hurt and another — permanently ending up in a wheelchair. Many people say they’d rather be dead if this happened to them, but oh how things change when you actually find yourself in this situation.

Keep Newey Mobile - VMi New England Wheelchair Vans

Simply put people don’t want to die, so they deal with it and move on, but it’s never that easy.  And for some even, they’re never able to, so forever languishing in a living hell.

To truly see how it is possible to move on after becoming a wheelchair-user and be enlightened, read on for seven awesome insights.

Accept that you must reinvent yourself.

One of the first things to know when you become a wheelchair-user is that you are no longer who you were before.  If your body is different after going through such a dramatic injury. A lot of people fight against this, wanting to hold onto their previous able-bodied self, but the fact is they will never be that person again.

Instead of desperately holding onto someone you once were, embrace this as an opportunity to reinvent yourself.  If you no longer do tree work, get that engineering degree you always wanted and finally feed that part of your brain from here on out.  A serious bodily injury can really open new doors.

Find out how to still use your body as much as possible.

It can be so difficult no longer being able to use your body like before, but don’t give up on moving your body just because you can’t use it 100 percent.  Instead, push yourself as much as possible.  If you can’t move your legs, you can try electrical stimulation to the legs.  If you can’t transfer yourself but you get really close, try for years until you finally get it.  Never give up on your body’s strength and pushing it (safely of course).  Even if you move your body involuntarily, knowing you’re still utilizing all four limbs in some way is a must for the soul long-term.

You should also be working out on a regular basis. Serious cardio and strength training is a must when you use a wheelchair since getting your heart rate can be a great way to boost endorphins in the brain.  When you’re not getting the cardio you would otherwise get from regular able-bodied activities, like walking all the time, you must find another way to get it. It’s a huge must.

Develop a negative thinking coping mechanism.

It can be almost too easy getting into a negative train of thought when things aren’t going well as a wheelchair-user.  The tendency to blame the wheelchair for all of your problems is almost too easy.  Whenever you find yourself angry because you need a wheelchair, try to click your mind into a positive place; a place you’ve created just for this.  Maybe it’s a happy memory or a place you absolutely love.

Take on the “survivor success” mentality. 

I love this one. Never forget that you are a survivor for living life sitting-down.  This is an existence that challenges a human both mentally and physically.  Whenever you feel empty inside because you can’t use your god-given legs, remind yourself that you are a  survivor in the exact sense, and let that feed your ego if you must.  Not many people can do what you do and do it so well. Yes, you do rock.

Learn to love yourself.

It can be easy being jealous of everyone that can walk when you can’t, but if you learn to love yourself completely, you’ll be a lot happier.

If you have a hard time finding things you absolutely love about yourself, make a list and ask friends and family their input.  You’ll be surprised at what you hear and chances are it will make you feel awesome.

Appreciate your unique perspective.

It can take several years to get to the mindset of enjoying the interesting perspective of  living life sitting down —  the people we meet, the lessons we’ve learned through our struggles, the way it helps us look at life differently, perhaps even better.  When you have a body that doesn’t respond like it once did, you have no choice but to look at the world differently. This without question, sharpens the mind.

Be grateful for what you still have.

Each moment you’re able to breathe is a gift whether you believe it or not, and when you use a wheelchair this is even more true since so many of us have had near death experiences. It may sound cliche, but yes, do count your blessings. 

Life is too short to wish for unicorns and golden tickets in chocolate bars. The here and the now is all we got. Enjoy your ice cream before it melts.

How have you been able to move on after becoming a wheelchair-user?

 

 

Tips to Save Money When Converting Honda Wheelchair Vans

New and Used Honda Odyessey wheelchair accessible vans for sale at VMi New England Mobility Center
Transforming a Honda Odyssey into an ideal wheelchair accessible van can be an overwhelming experience. Not only are you making important decisions, you are also confronting hefty price tags.

Conversions are not cheap. That is not just true with Honda vehicles either. The process involved in taking a “factory” vehicle and transforming it into safe, smart, reliable wheelchair transportation vehicle is a major undertaking. You will be dealing with skilled professionals who use the best possible equipment–and who expect to be compensated accordingly.

Fortunately, you can do a few things to keep your bill down. Your Honda wheelchair van will never be a “steal,“ but it can feel like a bargain if you follow these recommendations.

Proper Needs Assessment
You should undergo an evaluation from a licensed professional before making a purchase. They will give you a full report of the adaptations you will need in a wheelchair vehicle. They will also talk with you about those different options and what you must have, comparing that to other options.

In some cases, that report may say you will need a ramp. Obviously, you should follow the recommendation. However, the report may leave some discretion in terms of what ramp you will want to buy. Do you really need a full power option or could you function with a spring-assisted ramp? The goal here is to select adaptations that meet your needs while avoiding overspending on those that exceed your actual needs.

Remember, the average wheelchair van may only last ten years. That means you are buying the Odyssey you need now. You are not trying to “have all the bases covered” for your later years. This is not a lifetime decision.

Understanding Funding and Financing Options
You should look for every available source of funding assistance for your Honda wheelchair van. Are you eligible for a federal or state program that can help reduce costs? Is there a mobility rebate available? Did you serve in the military and follow-up on potential Veteran’s Administration assistance? Will your health insurance or worker’s compensation coverage help with the conversion bill? You may or may not find ways to decrease costs, but it is definitely worth a long look.

If you are financing, you should be certain you are getting the best possible deal on your loan. You can get financing for a Honda wheelchair van from your bank, an auto finance company, a home equity loan or a variety of other sources. You should be choosing the best option available. If you have not yet purchased your Odyssey, talk with your Honda wheelchair van dealer. They may be able to bundle the price of your conversions into your auto loan.

Shop Wisely
You should do extensive comparison shopping before making decisions about your disability equipment dealer and conversion manufacturer. You do not want to cut corners on quality or safety to save money, but you do want to be sure that you are getting the best possible deal from qualified professionals.

Making wise equipment selections based on your actual needs, investigating all funding and financing options and being a motivated, well-informed shopper who’s willing to negotiate can help you find the best possible deal.

With a little extra effort, you may be able to dramatically decrease the amount of money you spend on your Honda wheelchair van.

Adaptive Driving Aids: Advanced Driving Controls

Experienced users of adaptive driving aids, as well as those who have just been introduced to them, will appreciate the depth of experience and the number of options available to them here at VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations, Inc.

Adaptive driving aids are as diverse as the people who use them, but they do fall into several distinct categories; basic driving aids, reduced effort modifications and advanced driving controls.

advanced driving system

Advanced Driving Controls

Advanced driving controls, or “high-tech driving systems” have advanced tremendously over the years, thus creating options for drivers with higher levels of disability. Advanced driving controls are truly a custom solution. As a result, the key components of these systems are combined, fitted and installed based on an extremely thorough process of evaluation, prescription and fine-tuning.

Hand Controls
Hand Controls in the advanced driving aid category are of course more advanced and are typically for individuals with very limited mobility and strength for operating a vehicle. A slight touch of various adaptive devices allow the car to accelerate and brake with ease.

  • Electric Gas and Brakes are operated from an electric servo in the form of a joystick or lever input device. Individuals can then use their hands to control their speed and to brake.
  • Pneumatic Gas and Brakes are operated from an air pressure system and controlled by an easy joystick, foot pedal or other device.

Steering Controls

  • Horizontal Steering accommodates a limited range of motion when the driver cannot use a conventional steering wheel.
  • Reduced and Zero Effort steering is for users who do not have adequate strength to operate the vehicle with factory resistance levels.
  • Electric steering allows the steering control to be located almost anywhere to assist the operator. They can be operated in the forms of miniature steering wheels or joysticks.

Electronic Gear Selection
Electronic Gear Selection allows the operator to push a button for a gear selection.

Remote Accessory Controls

  • Voice Scan uses one to two targets or buttons to operate a multitude of functions within the vehicle while utilizing a verbal audible menu.
  • Single Touch allows vehicle functions to be moved to a different location in order to fit the needs of the disabled driver.

Adaptive Driving Aids: Basic Driving Aids

Experienced users of adaptive driving aids, as well as those who have just been introduced to them, will appreciate the depth of experience and the number of options available to them here at VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations, Inc.

Adaptive driving aids are as diverse as the people who use them, but they do fall into several distinct categories; basic driving aids, reduced effort modifications and advanced driving controls.

Basic Driving Aids

2013 Toyota Tacoma Hand Controls installed at VMi New England Mobility Center Automotive Innovations, Inc.
Basic driving aids are adaptations which are engineered to allow you to utilize the more “able” aspects of your body in order to operate your vehicle. Hand controls, left foot gas pedals and pedal extensions are among the many options that fall into this category.

Hand Controls
Hand Controls allow you to use the upper part of your body to do what might be difficult for the lower parts – such as braking and accelerating. A variety of hand control options are available to fit your needs and preferences.

  • A Push/Pull is the basic of hand controls allowing you to push forward to brake and pull back to accelerate.
  • A Push Right Angle is a hand control where you push forward to brake and pull down towards your lap to accelerate.
  • A Push/Twist is a hand control where you push forward to brake and twist similar to a motorcycle grip to accelerate.

Steering Controls
Steering Controls are adaptations added to the steering wheel of a vehicle. Steering controls make steering for those with limited grip or strength an easier task.

  • A Spinner Knob is a small knob that presses firmly in the palm of your hand. A spinner knob gives the operator a steady grip and the ability to steer with one hand.
  • A Palm Grip is made only by MPD and allows your hand to comfortably sit in a lightweight aluminum wrap with sheepskin liner. The Palm Grip allows firm steering control for those who have little or no gripping ability. The Palm Grip is ideal for those with arthritis.
  • A Tri-Pin is a steering grip that comfortably rests your hand in-between three pins. The pins are adjustable and can be used to accelerate, brake or be used on the steering wheel instead of a spinner knob. If need be, they can also be custom fitted to operate the turn signal, horn and dimmer.

Extension Controls
Extension Controls are driving aids that give users the extra inch they need to be comfortable in their accessible vehicle. Whether they are shorter than average or have limited strength in their arms these adaptations can make all the difference in driving.

  • Pedal Extensions are for vehicle operators who can not reach the gas or brake pedal. Pedal extensions give the driver the inches they need to sit and drive comfortably at a safe distance from the airbags.
  • Turn Signal Extensions consist of a simple rod to the right side of the steering wheel that can be adjusted appropriately to meet the needs of the driver.
  • Key Extensions are available for those who have trouble with the turning motion of starting their vehicle. The additional leverage is adjustable to fit the needs of the operator.
  • Steering Column Extensions allow up to six inches between the operator and the steering column.

Foot Controls
Foot Controls are for individuals who have zero to limited feeling in their feet. Foot controls are also valuable to those who may have a prosthetic limb and need to use their left foot to drive.

  • Left Foot Gas Pedals allow drivers to accelerate using their left foot. A pedal is attached to the accelerator that is located on the left side of the brake. A guard is then placed over the original accelerator so that the right foot does not inadvertently rest on the factory installed pedal.
  • An Accelerator & Brake Guard is a shield that goes over the accelerator, brake or both when the operator is using hand controls to operate the vehicle. An accelerator and brake guard is a safety feature that prevents operators from accidentally resting their foot on the brake or accelerator.

Winter-Maintenance Tips for Your Wheelchair Van

Winter Driving
Maintain Your Mobility Equipment

We recommend keeping the bottom door track of your handicapped van clear of any debris by vacuuming out the track every 2 or 3 weeks. Debris in the bottom track will cause the door motor to work harder and even weaken or burn out prematurely. Such problems will only be more of an inconvenience in cold weather.

Check Your Brakes
Make sure your brakes are in good working condition. You should never postpone having brake work done because you never know when you might have to drive on snowy or icy roads.

Check Your Lights
Headlights are essential in snowy weather; not only do they help you see clearly, but they also help others see you. So you make sure your lights are clean and that all bulbs and fuses are working properly.

Remember Your Fluids
We advise having all fluids (including brake fluid, antifreeze, washer fluid, transmission fluid, power-steering fluid, etc.) checked and “topped off.” In addition, we also recommend that you consider keeping a half tank of gas in your accessible vehicle at all times–you don’t want to run out of gas in an emergency.

Don’t Forget Your Battery
Having your battery checked is especially crucial for handicapped accessible vans. The cold weather is strenuous on any battery but even more so on an accessible van’s battery. An accessible van has to power ramps, lifts, and doors, so it uses more battery power than other minivans. A common problem we see at our Mobility Center is customers who do not drive their accessible van enough to keep the battery charged and healthy. You can keep the battery charged by driving your vehicle more than 3 hours a week or by using a battery charger. Under normal conditions, batteries will typically last for 3½ years, so if your battery is older than that, we recommend that you make sure that it’s in good condition or think about replacing it.

Good Tire Maintenance Is Crucial
Good tires might be one of the most essential driving tools in winter weather. Worn, bald, badly aligned, or badly balanced tires can cause accidents in any type of slippery weather. You’ll need to test the air pressure and tread on your tires and have your tires rotated so that the better ones are in the front for more traction and control. If you need new tires soon, don’t wait, get them now! If you have snow tires and live in areas with heavy and frequent snowfall, don’t hesitate to use them.

Don’t Forget Your Windshield
Taking care of the windshield on your wheelchair van entails more than having good wipers. Windshields on minivans and full-sized vans are large, so having good wipers and properly functioning rear and front defrosters are musts. Also, small dings in a windshield can become large cracks when it’s cold. Cracks are a result of the stress of having freezing temperatures on the outside of the windshield and the warm heater on the interior of the windshield. If this occurs, fix the ding and avoid the risk of replacing a costly van-sized windshield!

Snow Equipment
If you ever get stuck or break down in snow or other inclement winter weather, having the appropriate equipment to get yourself out of your vehicle is important. We recommend keeping a shovel, sidewalk salt, snow scraper/brush, jumper cables, spare tire, jack, and flares in your vehicle during the winter months. Also, if you live in an area with frequent and/or heavy snowfall, keep tire chains in your vehicle for extra traction.

Emergency Kit
Another recommendation is keeping a snow emergency kit in your car. Your emergency kit should include a cell phone, a cell-phone car charger, a blanket, a flashlight with good batteries, hand warmers, snacks, and water. Your kit should be able to keep you relatively comfortable while waiting in your vehicle for assistance to arrive. Please remember, if you’re waiting in your vehicle for assistance, make sure your exhaust pipe is clear of any snow or ice so carbon monoxide won’t enter the vehicle.

Lastly, we always recommend that, if you can, you stay in when the road conditions are bad. However, if you need to venture out, here are some precautions to remember when driving in bad weather:

Clear All Snow Off Your Vehicle
Make sure that you clear all of the snow and ice off of your vehicle before you go anywhere. Ice and snow clumps that aren’t cleared off can be very dangerous because they can suddenly shift and obstruct your view or fly off your vehicle into another driver’s view. Allow yourself extra time before venturing out to take the steps needed to clear all of the snow off your accessible vehicle—even if it includes asking a friend or neighbor for assistance.

Slow Down
Reducing your speed by 50% allows more control over your vehicle in the event that you begin to skid or hydroplane. However, slowing down too much or stopping on heavy snow-filled roads can cause a vehicle’s tires to spin and get stuck in the snow. While driving in snow, you should keep some momentum so that your tires are continuously moving and you don’t lose traction.

Recovering From a Skid
If you’re driving in inclement weather and your vehicle starts to skid, the best thing to do is to steer in the direction you want the front of the vehicle to go—and not hit your brakes. Your normal reaction might be to brake, but that can make the wheels lock up, making steering difficult. Driving in the snow can be dangerous, so if you aren’t comfortable, try to avoid the roads in severe weather.

Rust Prevention
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast, but our rust prevention processes, product, plan and application has been found to be most effective. Our rust proofing is ever evolving and has been for over the past 25 years.

  • Our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required, we apply it as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your handicap accessible vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

 

As seen in the picture below this van has heavy rust and metal fatigue due to a lack of maintenance.
IMG_0697Once the rust is this bad there’s not much we can do other than replace the van.
So call us or come in today to rust proof your van before it’s too late.

How Ford Wheelchair Van Insurance Really Works

If you’re ever in a accident in your wheelchair van and have insurance questions or need your to have repairs made contact the experts at the Mobility Center in Bridgewater, MA with your questions 508-697-6006

2013 Ford Tuscany Wheelchair Van

Buying insurance can be a complicated process. For those of us who haven’t spent a great deal of time thinking about insurance and how it works, purchasing insurance for a wheelchair van can be rather intimidating. So here is a little information about the way Ford wheelchair van insurance really works.

Information about Coverage
Your Ford wheelchair van insurance is made up of individual elements. When one talks about vehicle insurance, they’re actually referring to a combination of different forms of insurance with different purposes.

For example, you can buy liability insurance. That will pay for any damage you might cause if you have an accident. Liability insurance is a legal requirement. Bodily injury liability coverage will defray the medical expenses of anyone who may be injured by your vehicle in an accident.

Due to the high number of people who fail to meet their state-mandated legal obligations, many Ford wheelchair van drivers purchase uninsured or underinsured motorist insurance. This feature of a policy will protect you in the event that another driver collides with you and doesn’t have adequate coverage.

There is insurance designed to cover all of our own medical expenses if you’re in an accident and most new vehicle buyers purchase comprehensive policies that cover damage caused by vandalism, weather, and virtually any other mishap. If you are still making payments on a financed vehicle, the lender will generally require proof of comprehensive coverage as a term of the loan.

Those are only a few of the different forms of coverage that may be involved in covering your Ford. Different policies have different benefits and various insurance companies offer variations on the same theme. You may be interested in hearing about some of the other forms of protection they offer when insuring your wheelchair van.

Information of Rate Determinations
Now that we’ve discussed what you’re buying, we can explore why it costs so much! Most of us find insurance rather expensive and many wonder why different people may be subject to wildly different rates. There are a number of factors at play.

The most significant factor in setting insurance rates is the driver. Insurance companies evaluate data and look at multiple variables to determine how likely you are to be in an accident or to file a claim.

That’s why a 45-year old with a perfect driving record pays less for the same coverage than an 18-year old who’s already collected numerous. Your age is just one example of the many demographic variables influencing your rates. Your driving history is another.

Unfortunately, that means you’ll pay more than most people when you insure your Ford wheelchair van. Even if you are a fantastic driver, the overall statistics do indicate that drivers with disabilities are more likely to be involved in claims and accidents. US federal law prohibits insurance companies from discrimination based on disability, but they can consider those statistics when determining rates.

Your Ford wheelchair van will also influence how much you pay for your insurance. Again, the insurance companies base their rates on all available data and they have a very good idea of how much different vehicle types cost to repair and how likely they are to be involved in a claim. That’s why a sports car will cost more to insure than a dull four-door sedan.

It’s also another reason while you will be paying more than the average for your wheelchair van insurance. Wheelchair vans tend to cost a great deal to repair and data does indicate that they are more likely than many vehicle types to be involved in insurance claims. Additionally, wheelchair van owners need to be certain that their special equipment and modifications are insured. That drives up the price of their policies even more.

Insurance can be complicated and you need to be considerate when making decisions. Having at least a basic understanding of coverage types and the factors influencing the price of insurance should help.

Massachusetts Mobility Resources

Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)
Description:
The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is the state advocacy agency for people with disabilities. MOD’s goal is to make sure that people with disabilities have the legal rights, opportunities, support services, and accommodations they need to take part in all aspects of life in Massachusetts. MOD helps people of all ages.

One of MOD’s main duties is to make sure that the state government, the local governments, and private organizations comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD informs residents about their rights under the law, investigates complaints, and works to correct any violations. MOD services are free.

Services: The Massachusetts Office of Disability has three main programs:

  • The Government Services Program provides technical assistance and advice to state and local governments on all disability-related issues. MOD makes sure that government regulations and policies meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD offers guidance to public service agencies and makes public policy recommendations on behalf of residents with disabilities.
  • The Client Services Program helps individuals who need help with disability-related problems. MOD operates an information and referral system to help residents find the services they need and learn about their legal rights. MOD also investigates complaints and helps correct civil rights violations. MOD’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) helps residents who are having problems with federally funded vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs.
  • The Community Services Program helps communities become more responsive to the needs of residents with disabilities. MOD trains individuals and community organizations to advocate for the rights of the disabled. MOD offers technical assistance and information about accessibility laws. The goal is to improve access to public and private places, programs, and services for people with all types of disabilities.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place, Room 1305
Boston, MA 02108
Telephone:617-727-7440
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 800-322-2020
Fax: 617-727-0965
Web site: Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)
Description:
The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC) helps people with disabilities find employment and live independently. The MRC serves Massachusetts residents age 18 and older. The MRC helps people with all types of disabilities except blindness. Legally blind residents can get services from the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.

Services:

  • The MRC is the state agency in Massachusetts responsible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Community Services (CS), and Disability Determination Services (DDS). The MRC also assists with public benefit programs, housing, transportation, and consumer issues. Some MRC programs and services have specific eligibility requirements. Most are free.
  • The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program helps people with disabilities find work or go back to work. The VR program works with various organizations in the community to help create jobs for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.
  • The Office of Community Services (CS) offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities live independently in their communities:
  1. The Brain Injury and Statewide Specialized Community Services (BISSCS) program helps Massachusetts residents who have externally caused traumatic brain injuries.
  2. Protective Services tries to prevent the physical, emotional, or sexual abuse of people with disabilities by their caregivers.
  3. Independent Living Centers provide advocacy, personal care management, and independent living skills training.
  4. The T22 (Turning 22) Independent Living Support Program helps young people with physical mobility disabilities who want to live independently in their communities.
  5. The Home Care Assistance Program for disabled adults under age 60 provides help with homemaking tasks (see Home Care Assistance Program).
  6. Other in-home and community living support services are also available.
  7. The Assistive Technology (AT) Program buys and installs assistive devices and provides training and follow-up for users.
  • Disability Determination Services (DDS), funded by the Social Security Administration (SSA), determines medical eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Disability examiners use medical and vocational information to make their decisions.

MassMATCH
MassMATCH is a statewide program to help Massachusetts residents with disabilities find, pay for, and use assistive technology (AT) that can make a difference in their lives. The MassMatch web site offers information and advice about:

  • assistive technology (AT) products
  • AT demonstration centers
  • AT funding sources (insurance, loans, government assistance, private charities)
  • where to buy, borrow, swap, and sell AT equipment

MassMATCH (Maximize Assistive Technology in Consumers’ Hands) is a partnership between the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, other state human services agencies, and community-based organizations.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission
Fort Point Place, Suite 600
27 Wormwood Street
Boston, MA 02210-1616
Telephone: Voice/TTY: 617-204-3600
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 1-800-245-6543
Web site: MassMATCH

Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)
Description
:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB) provides rehabilitation and social services to legally blind Massachusetts residents of all ages. These services help people who are legally blind live independently as active members of their communities. The MCB contacts all legally blind people in the state to offer support services.

Eye care providers in Massachusetts are required by law to report all cases of legal blindness to the MCB. The MCB keeps a confidential registry of all legally blind people in the state. The Commission issues Certificates of Legal Blindness to people on its register. These certificates allow legally blind residents to get exemptions and deductions on income tax, property tax, and auto excise tax. The Commission also issues an identification card, similar to a driver’s license, for personal identification and proof of legal blindness.

Services: The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind provides the following services:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), including diagnostic studies, counseling and guidance, individual plans for employment (IPE), restorative and training services, rehabilitation and mobility instruction, assistive technology, adaptive housing, job placement, and post-employment services
  • Assistive technology
  • Independent living social services, including homemaking assistance, assistive devices, mobility instruction, and peer support groups
  • Specialized services for blind seniors (BRIDGE program)
  • Specialized services for blind children, including referrals for early intervention, public benefits, respite care, and socialization and recreation programs
  • Specialized services for blind/deaf individuals and others with multiple disabilities
  • Rehabilitation instruction, including Braille and typing, use of low-vision devices, labeling and record keeping, food preparation, home safety, and self-care techniques
  • Orientation and mobility instruction, including guide dogs
  • MassHealth services for financially eligible people who are legally blind, including long-term care services, hospital services, personal care attendants, private duty nursing, and transportation services
  • Consumer assistance and advocacy for issues related to blindness such as housing and job discrimination, guide dog issues, or transportation problems

Most services are offered free of charge to all registered legally blind Massachusetts residents. Some services have additional eligibility requirements.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind
48 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02111
Toll-free Voice: 800-392-6450
Toll-free TDD: 800-392-6556
Fax: 617-626-7685
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)
Vocational Rehabilitation Client Services Manual
Technology for the Blind
Laws and Regulations
Locations of MCB offices

Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH) is the state government agency that works on behalf of Massachusetts residents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. The MCDHH serves as an advocate to make sure that deaf and hard-of-hearing residents have the same access to information, services, education, and other opportunities as the hearing population.

Services: Some of the services that the MCDHH provides are:

  • Communication access, training, and technology services
  • Case management services, including specialized services for children
  • Interpreter and CART translation services
    Note: CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) service translates spoken words into a visual print display that can be read on a computer monitor or other display device.
  • Independent Living Programs, including peer mentoring, assistive technology, consumer education, self-advocacy, and other independent living skills

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
600 Washington Street
Boston, MA 02111
Telephone: 617-740-1600 / TTY: 617-740-1700
Toll-free: Voice: 1-800-882-1155 / TTY: 1-800-530-7570
Fax: 617-740-1880
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
The Savvy Consumer’s Guide to Hearing Loss
MCDHH Resource Directory
Regional Offices of the MCDHH
Interpreter and CART Services
Independent Living Services

Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health is the state agency that oversees treatment programs, support services, regulations, and public policy for Massachusetts residents with mental illness. The DMH supports a community-based system of care.

The Department of Mental Health serves adults with long-term or serious mental illness, and children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbances. For adults, the mental disorder must be persistent and must interfere with the ability to carry out daily life activities. For children, the disorder must limit the child’s ability to function in family, school, or community activities.

Residents must file an application and get DMH approval before they can get services. Applications are available on the DMH web site at DMH Service Application Forms and Appeal Guidelines. Applicants can get short-term services while waiting for DMH approval for continuing care.

Services:
The DMH provides continuing care services to Massachusetts residents who cannot get needed services from other agencies or programs. DMH services include:

  •  continuing care inpatient facilities
  • residential treatment centers
  • in-home treatment
  • outpatient services
  • skills training
  • supported employment
  • case management

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Central Office
25 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114
Telephone: 617-626-8000
TTY: 617-727-9842
E-mail: DMH Email
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Mental Health
DMH Local Offices: DMH Offices

Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
Description
:
The Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is the state agency that provides support services to Massachusetts residents with intellectual disabilities. The DDS works with many provider agencies throughout the state to offer services to adults and children and their caregivers. Individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families play an active role in making decisions about their lives and in choosing the support services they want and need.

The DDS has an application for services that must be completed before services can be approved. The application is available on the DDS web site: Application for DDS Eligibility

Services: The DDS offers a wide range of support services for adults, including:

  • Service coordination
  • Housing options
  • Employment skills training and transportation to work
  • Non-work related skills training
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Life skills training and support (food shopping, cooking, etc.)

DDS’s services for children include:

  • Service coordination
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Partnership program for families of children with significant health care needs
  • Autism support centers
  • After-school and summer camp programs

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services
Central Office
500 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
Telephone: Voice: 617-727-5608
TTY: 617-624-7783
Fax: 617-624-7577
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
Local DDS offices: DDS Area Office Locator

Disability Law Center (DLC)
Description:
The Disability Law Center (DLC) is a private non-profit law firm that gives free legal assistance to Massachusetts residents with disabilities who have been discriminated against because of their disability.

The Disability Law Center helps people with all types of disabilities, including physical, psychiatric, sensory, and cognitive. The DLC provides legal help with problems such as discrimination, abuse or neglect, or denial of services, when they are related to a person’s disability.

Services:
Services include information and referral, technical assistance, legal representation for individuals and groups, and advocacy. The Disability Law Center helps with disability-related legal problems in these areas:

  • Access to community services
  • Special education
  • Health care
  • Disability benefits
  • Rights and conditions in facilities

The DLC does not have the resources to help everyone who has a disability-related legal problem. The DLC sets priorities each year based on the needs of the community. See DLC Priorities. The DLC chooses cases that will have the most impact on the lives of people with disabilities.

Contact Information:
Disability Law Center (DLC)
11 Beacon Street, Suite 925
Boston, MA 02108
Voice telephone: 617-723-8455 / 800-872-9992
TTY: 617-227-9464 / 800-381-0577
Web site: Disability Law Center

DisabilityInfo.org
Description:
The DisabilityInfo.org web site helps people with disabilities, their families, and service providers find disability-related resources in Massachusetts. It has information on a wide variety of programs, agencies, and services for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The site is maintained by New England INDEX, a nonprofit technology group. New England INDEX collects information from over 100 members of the Massachusetts Network of Information Providers for People with Disabilities (MNIP) and puts the information on one web site for easy access.

Services:
On the DisabilityInfo.org web site, you can find:

  • disability programs, services, and agencies in Massachusetts
  • disability consultants, including advocates, educators, therapists, counselors, and other specialists
  • physicians and dentists with experience working with people with disabilities
  • local and regional offices for human service agencie
  • local disability agencies that you can call for help
  • fact sheets about many different types of disabilities
  • disability-related laws and regulations
  • disability news
  • information about assistive technology
  • other resources for people with disabilities

Contact Information:
Web site: DisabilityInfo.org
Database search
Get help from a local agency
Fact sheet library
Contact us
New England INDEX
200 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02452-6319
Telephone: 781-642-0248
Toll-free: Voice: 800-642-0249
Toll-free: TTY: 800-764-0200
E-mail: info@DisabilityInfo.org

Mobility Resources For Massachusetts Residents

How do I get a disabled parking placard?
If you are legally blind or cannot walk more than 200 feet without rest or assistance, you can get a disabled parking placard from the Registry of Motor Vehicles. Your doctor or other medical professional must certify your medical condition. You can get a temporary placard or a permanent placard depending on how long your condition will last. The placard is free.

You can get an application for a disabled parking placard at any RMV Branch Office or from the RMV web site: Medical Affairs Forms. You should complete and sign the first page of the application, then have your health care provider complete and sign the second page. Mail or bring the completed application to the RMV.

  • If you mail your application, allow 30 days for the Medical Affairs office to process it. Send your application to:
    Medical Affairs/ RMV
    P.O. Box 55889
    Boston, MA 02205
  • If you bring your application to the office, Medical Affairs will process it the same day. The walk-in address is:
    Medical Affairs/ RMV Office
    25 Newport Ave EXT
    Quincy MA

You are allowed to use the placard only when you are in the vehicle, or when you are being dropped off or picked up. For more information, see Disabled Parking FAQs on the RMV web site.

If you lose your placard, you can apply for a duplicate. For instructions, see Applying for a Duplicate Placard on the RMV web site.

How do I find adaptive driver’s education classes?
If you need specialized driver’s education because of your disability, you can get adaptive driving lessons at one of the schools listed on the Registry of Motor Vehicles web site at Specialized Driver’s Education Programs (at the bottom of the page). Programs are customized to meet your needs, and can be adapted for a wide range of physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities. Vehicles with hand controls and other specialized equipment are available.

Adaptive driving programs include:

How do I get a health care proxy?
A health care proxy is a simple legal document that allows you to choose someone to make medical decisions for you, if, for any reason, you are unable to make these decisions yourself.

You can find information about health care proxies on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I get a health care proxy?

How do I make a living will?
A living will is a document in which you describe the type of medical treatment you want if you become terminally ill or permanently unconscious. It allows you to make end-of-life decisions while you are physically and mentally competent to do so.

You can find information about living wills on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I make a living will?

How do I get a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order?
You have the right to decide if you want medical workers to use CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) to try to save your life if your heart stops or if you stop breathing. This is a decision you should make with your doctor, family members, and other people you trust. If you do not want CPR to be used, you must get a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order from your doctor.

You can find information about DNRs on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I get a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order?

How do I give someone permission to see my medical records?
A federal law known as HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) protects the privacy of your medical information. HIPAA limits the ways doctors, pharmacies, other health care providers, health insurance companies, nursing homes, and Medicaid/Medicare can share your personal health information.

You can find out how to give health care providers permission to share your medical information on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I give someone permission to see my medical records?

How do I get a power of attorney?
A power of attorney is a legal document in which you give another person (your “agent”) the right to handle financial and legal matters for you.

You can find information about naming a power of attorney on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link:How do I get a power of attorney?

How do I get a Massachusetts ID card?
If you do not have a driver’s license and you are a resident of Massachusetts, you can get a Massachusetts ID card to use as official identification and proof of age. You can get an ID card at any full-service Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) office.

You can find information about Massachusetts ID cards in our “How Do I …? section for seniors. Please follow this link:How do I get a Massachusetts ID card?

How do I get a service animal?
A service animal is a dog or other animal that has been specially trained to provide assistance to a person with a disability. A service animal performs tasks that the person with the disability cannot do independently. For example, service animals can be trained to help people who are blind or deaf, are mobility impaired, have diabetes or seizure disorders, are autistic, or have other physical or mental disabilities.

For a list of organizations that provide service dogs, see:

Eligibility requirements and costs vary from one organization to another. Many organizations provide service animals for free, but ask you to pay your own expenses while attending training sessions. An interview is usually required before you are accepted into a program.

Massachusetts Disability Grants Handicap Funding MA
People with disabilities in Massachusetts can solve their lack of funding for handicap needs, such as a wheelchair van, through disability grants, financing programs, loans, and more. Browse the largest resource for Massachusetts disability grants to help pay for new wheelchair vans or handicap accessible van conversions. AMS Vans will deliver handicap vans to Massachusetts or nationwide.

Disability Grants in Massachusetts
The handicap funding for the disabled listed below may or may not assist in financing a handicap van. Check with the local Massachusetts grant provider for a complete list of requirements.

The Massachusetts Assistive Technology Loan Program: The Massachusetts ATLP provides people with disabilities access to low-interest cash loans to purchase handicap vans and vehicle modifications to accommodate a wheelchair.

How to Apply for Massachusetts Grants or Mobility Funding
Massachusetts residents seeking assistance with the purchase of handicap vans for sale should contact the mobility funding programs listed above about disability grants offered. We are delighted to accept all funding assistance programs to ensure your handicap needs are met. If we missed a grant program you’re familiar with, please let us know and we will add it to our list of mobility funding sources in Massachusetts.

Rust Proof Your Wheelchair Van Before It’s Too Late

Winter is Coming
De-Icing the roads
Rust Proof Your Wheelchair Van Before the Road Salt Hits the Streets!

We can’t live without salt. It’s a necessary nutrient, it’s used to seed rain clouds, soften household tap water, make chemicals and is used to make ice cream!

In parts of the country with freezing winter temperatures, drivers know that warming the cars up in the morning isn’t the only inconvenience. Icy roads are, too. The same chemical reaction between ice and salt that creates creamy, delicious ice cream also keeps our roads and sidewalks free of dangerous ice during the cold winter months.

A salt and sand mixture is frequently spread over roads before or after a snow or ice storm. Salt lowers water’s freezing point, causing any ice already formed to melt even though the air temperature remains well below freezing. The sand helps keep the salt in place, plus it adds a bit of traction to wet and often slushy roads.

While road salting helps people travel safely, it has drawbacks. It can cause major body and undercarriage damage to your Wheelchair accessible vehicle unless you take extra care and precaution.

If you’re one of the many who must travel the saline streets in the land of the ice and snow, we have some great tips to help protect your mobility vehicle from the ravages of road salt.

Plan Ahead
The best time to prevent salt damage to your conversion van is in Autumn,before the first snowflake falls; a little car maintenance will help keep the rust away.

Prevent
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast, but our rust prevention processes, product, plan and application has been found to be most effective. Our rust proofing is ever evolving and has been for over the past 25 years.

  • Our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required, we apply it as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your handicap accessible vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

As seen in the picture below this van has heavy rust and metal fatigue due to a lack of maintenance.

IMG_0697

Once the rust is this bad there’s not much we can do other than replace the van.
So call us or come in today to rust proof your van before it’s too late.

 

 

Side Entry Versus Rear Entry Wheelchair Vans

2013 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT rear entry wheelchair van newenglandwheelchairvan.com12 VS 2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Northstar

The question of a Rear Entry wheelchair van versus a Side Entry van often comes up in conversation when a first time buyer enters the accessible van market. There are several things to consider; first, the family or care giver needs to decide on where the wheelchair user is going to sit. If the person in the wheelchair is able to drive and will be independent there are other things to consider, but for now, let us stay with an assisted member of the family.

Door height is an issue. For that we need to know how tall the person sits in their wheelchair.

Scooter or Power chair is next. Size and weight combination will come into play as we move along in the discovery process.

Will the person transfer into a  seat or will they remain in their wheelchair while traveling?

Okay, now we get into seating. The side entry offers both mid-section and front seat options with tie-downs located throughout. In a rear entry van, the mid-section to rear of the vehicle, are the only seating options while remaining in the wheelchair.

There are five passenger seats available for family members in a side entry van versus six available seats in a rear entry. Both are in addition to whoever is in the wheelchair, which gives a total of six people in a side entry and up to seven in a rear entry.

For folks with a long wheelchair or scooter the rear entry is ideal. Over six feet of space is afforded to tie down the wheelchair and no turning to forward face is necessary.

A side entry requires up to eight feet accommodating the lowering of the ramp allowing access into your van. This may prohibit the use of the ramp while inside a garage or if someone parks to close while at the mall or a doctor’s appointment.

The rear entry does not have the blocked in problem, you are always accessing your van from the aisle.

In summation, like anything else, it is best to try before you buy. Our Mobility Center has both styles of wheelchair vans. See which style suits your lifestyle and then consider the purchase of either a new or used mobility equipped van. Always consult with your mobility product specialist for any additional questions you may have.

VETERANS FIELD GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN – Field guide 20130927

Oh No! Our Government has shut down!!

veterans-field-guide-to-government-shutdown-field-guide-20130927

What now? We have been flooded with this exact question.

Here is the response given by the VA for all Veterans who are in the process of getting a wheelchair van:

It’s simple; business as usual.

For a complete guide to ‘what now’ during this Government shutdown:

VETERANS FIELD GUIDE TO GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

All VA medical facilities and clinics will remain  fully operational,  including:
1. In patient Care
2. Out patient Care
3. Prescriptions
4. Surgeries
5. DentalTreatment
6. ExtendedCare
7. MentalHealthCare
8. NursingHomeCare
9. SpecialHealthCare Services
forWomenVeterans
10. VetCenters

• Military Sexual TraumaCounseling
• Readjustment Counseling Services(VetCenters)
• Interments in National Cemeteries will continue,but may be on a reduced schedule.
Contact NCA’s Scheduling Office at 1-800-535-1117
• MyHealtheVet–All Services

IMPORTANT

Claims processing and payments in the compensation,pension, education, and vocational rehabilitation programs are anticipated to continue through late October.
However, in the event of a prolonged shutdown, claims processing and payments in these programs would be suspended when available funding is exhausted. NCA will process applications for headstones, markers, medallions.

• Insurance Processing
• Home Loan Processing
• NCA will notify VBAof death for benefit actions
• VBA Call Centers will be operational except for education
• Acquisitions Logistics Center will accept and fill prosthetics supply orders
• Office of Small and Disadvantaged Small Businesses
• VeteransCrisis Line

Operational National Phone Numbers for Veterans
• VA National Call Center: 1-800-827-1000
• All VA Medical Facilities & Services: (411 or http://www2.va.gov/directory/guide/division_flsh.asp?dnum=1 )
• Coaching into Care Call Center for Family Members of Veterans: 1-888-823-7458
• Debt Management Center: (Collection of NonMedical Debts): 1-800-827-0648
• Homeless Prevention Line:
1-877-4AID VET (877-424-3838)
• Home Loans: 1-888-244-6711
• Insurance: 1-800-669-8477
• Mammography Helpline: 1-888-492-7844
• Meds by Mail: 1-888-385-0235 (or) 1-866-229-7389
• National Caregiver Support Line:1-855-260-3274
• NCA’s Scheduling Office: 1-800-535-1117
• Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
• Women Veterans Call Center: 1-855-VA-WOMEN (1-855-829-6636)
• Federal Service for the Deaf: 711
• Vet Center Combat Call Center: 1-877-WAR-VETS
• Discrimination: 1-888-737-3361
• Denver Acquisition and Logistics Center: 1-303-273-6200
• Health Benefits Customer Service: 1-877-222-VETS (8387).
• CHAMPVA: 1-800-733-8387
• Children of Women Vietnam Veterans; Foreign Medical Program; Spina Bifida Health Care Program: 1-877-345-8179 (or) 1-888-820-1756

So there you have it folks, for now it is business as usual! Please share this with your friends.

Companion dogs help veterans heal

Companion dogs help veterans heal

Companion dogs help veterans heal.
A program that pairs four-legged friends with disabled veterans is providing a life-changing addition to many military families. “They’re our heroes,” said one veteran. TODAY’s Dylan Dreyer reports. Featured is  former tank commander ‘Ski’ and his service dog ‘Steve’ of http://abesnet.com–and a cherished client of ours. We have helped Ski repair his current side entry wheelchair van and are currently working with VISIN 1 Brockton Veterans Administration (VA) Center to deliver him a new 2013 Toyota Sienna side entry from Vantage Mobility (VMI). The best part; Steve LOVES riding  up front in Ski’s wheelchair van. Hoorah!

 

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

source: http://www.today.com/video/today/53128477#53128477

Additional Mobility Resources in Massachusetts

Additional Mobility Resources in Massachusetts

additional-mobility-resources-in-massachusetts newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Non-Profit Organizations

Independent Living Centers

  • Center for Living and Working – Worcester, MA
  • Independent Living Center of the North Shore & Cape Ann, Inc. – Salem, MA
  • Kennedy Donovan Center – Foxboro, MA
  • Northeast Independent Living – Lawrence, MA

Veteran Administration Hospitals/Organizations

Rehabilitation Centers/Hospitals

  • Center for Comprehensive Services – Braintree, MA
  • Health South – Woburn, MA
  • Spaulding Rehab – Boston, MA

Adaptive Driver Evaluators

  • Adaptive Driving Programs – Dedham, MA

 

New York Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the Center for Personal Assistance Services, about 2,537,000 individuals living in New York were considered to have a disability in 2005. Specifically, about 2.8% of the population of New York have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

 new-york-disability new-york-commercial-wheelchair-vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the country of New York; the Metropolitan New York and Hudson Valley areas, including Suffolk, Nassau, Dutchess, Orange and Ulster counties.

If your business needs a new or used accessible van, bus, shuttle or other commercial vehicle in New York, look through our online inventory to find the vehicle that’s right for you. View our commercial accessible vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and accessories or visit our commercial wheelchair van and bus inventory.

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, New York state regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to New York, to your business. We often make deliveries to Kingston, Poughkeepsie, as well as Suffolk County, Nassau County, and New York City, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs, so contact us today.

Learn more about delivery information for New York wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the country of New York City, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs.

It’s all about choices

It’s all about choices wheelchair vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

The theme of the website revolves around choice and making a knowledgeable decision. The site has reviews on manual rigid frame models, folding wheelchairs and power chairs. They even have a section on all-terrain wheelchairs and sports wheelchairs. Just about every type of mobility device is represented. One of the more popular wheelchairs in the rigid frame section is the Ti Lite ZRA with 42 user postings. Overall, they have a 3.76 end user rating. Among the highest rated rigid frames with a 5.0 rating, but with only 10 user reviews is the Lasher Sport, Llc BT-Mg.

To see what people are saying about your wheelchair or one that you may be looking at getting in the future, go to wheelchair reviews.

Scooter Reviews for Three and Four Wheeled Models

The website also has reviews and ratings for scooters. These include 3-wheel scooters, 4-wheel scooters, and lightweight scooters. Among the top reviewed in the lightweights is the Pride Mobility Go Go. To see the scooters listed and which one sounds like the right fit for your needs, go to scooter reviews.

About United Spinal

United Spinal was founded in 1946 by a group of paralyzed WWII veterans in New York City who advocated for greater civil rights and independence for themselves and their fellow veterans. Today, United Spinal is the largest non-profit organization dedicated to helping people living with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D). Its 35,000 members are of all ages and backgrounds and membership is free.

Other Resources

Other online websites for learning about different wheelchair makes and models include Spin Life and Disabled World. Getting as many opinions as you can from friends and support groups is highly suggested to find the right chair to meet your needs and personal preferences. Making a knowledgeable decision by doing a little research online may save you time and money.

Buy my wheelchair van in new england

Buy my wheelchair van in new england

buy my wheelchair van in new england newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Do you have a clean late model VMI, Braun or Eldorado wheelchair van you want to sell?

Bring it to us and if it’s in good shape and we can agree on a price we’ll write you a check for it

Photos
You’ve got photos so make the most of them! Assuming your Handicap Van is in good condition, you should take pictures of the handicap van to show us how clean it is both inside and out.

Exterior
Given that you can email us photos a good idea is to allocate at least 3 to the exterior of the handicap van you want to buy, taken from angles that reveal the handicap van in its best light. I.e. rear ¾ shot, full side shot, full front of ¾ front/side shots – what ever angles suit your Handicap Van best.

Interior
A good interior shot that shows the condition of the dash board and front seats as a minimum is highly recommended. If the wheelchair van has a clean, well presented interior you will want us to see it, as this is an area where wear and tear will be evident on the handicap van if not looked after. If the interior is damaged then it is up to you wether to photograph it, if you are selling a handicap van as is at a corresponding price and wish to give buyers a realistic appraisal of the handicap vans condition then yes, other wise it might be best to focus the camera on some of the handicap vans better attributes.

Accessories 
If the handicap van is fitted with after-market or factory accessories that will enhance the handicap van in the eyes of the buyer then ensure these are obvious in the exterior and interior photos. It may be a good idea to have a close up shot of a certain handicap accessible modification such lowered floors and handicap ramps.

Pre-existing damage/scratches 
If your handicap van has dents or scratches on the body work it is probably a good idea to show them in photos as they will then have a good idea of the Handicap Vans condition.

VIN Number: Include the VIN so we can run a Carfax on it.

Buyer / Seller Scams
We’ve been alerted to a scam which operates in the following way: An overseas buyer offers to buy your car. They will want to send you a cheque for an amount in excess of the purchase price of your car and will ask you to send the change back to them or to pay the change to a local shipping agent. There are several variations on the theme. If you get an offer like this from overseas, we recommend that you be alert to a possible scam.
Another scam operates as follows: Typically a car/bike/boat, etc will be offered for sale at a very low price. The seller will say that the item is located overseas or in a location that makes it difficult to inspect the item. The seller will ask you to send them a deposit or pay for the item before they will arrange to send it to you. If you get an offer like this, we recommend that you be alert to a possible scam.

We wish you the best of luck in selling us your handicap van!

Commercial Use Wheelchair Vans And Buses

commercial-use-wheelchair-vans-and-buses  newenglandwheelchairvan.com

VMi New England Mobility Center provides commercial wheelchair vans and buses, shuttle vans, shuttle buses and specialized conversions such as ambulettes and non-emergency medical transportation vehicles. We provide sales, service, rentals and all necessary replacement parts and accessories.

Many commercial wheelchair van, bus and shuttle floorplans are available. Call for up to date  commercial wheelchair van, bus and shuttle inventory. Call 508-697-6006 to speak to one of our commercial wheelchair van specialists right now.

Commercial Vans, Buses and Shuttles

Whether your clients are wheelchair users, ambulatory patients, school students, nursing homes, group homes, rehab centers, or extended care facilities, all have unique commercial handicap accessible van with commercial wheelchair lift transportation needs.

Some questions you’ll want to consider:

  • How many wheelchair passengers will you transport?
  • How many ambulatory/walking passengers will you transport?
  • What will be the typical combination?
  • Do you have to meet ADA or other regulatory requirements?

Whether it is maximizing client capacity, choosing a style that will blend in a neighborhood setting, or maximizing headroom for client and staff comfort, we provide wheelchair accessible vans, buses, and shuttles that balance those needs with the same great quality the industry has come to expect.

  • View our Commercial Accessible Vehicles
  • Find out about Used Vans and Buses

Commercial Vehicle Inventory

We carry both new and used wheelchair vans, buses and shuttle vans. We also list wheelchair van conversion “shells” that have been mostly completed and are only waiting for wheelchair position, seating instructions and other final details. We do our best to seek out quality used vehicles and make all necessary repairs and modifications before offering them for sale.

Van and Bus Modifications and Accessories

Wheelchair vans, buses and shuttles must work in numerous industries, applications and working conditions while serving people who are equally diverse. The number of clients and staff that must be transported, their age and abilities, regulations and corporate image are all major factors that influence and are affected by the modifications available. To make this possible, there are many modifications and accessories that can be added to wheelchair vans buses and shuttles to customize them for the end-user’s needs. Among the van and bus modifications available are wheelchair tie-downs, lifts and entryways.

  • See what Modifications and Accessories are available

Commercial Help and Resource Center

Our Commercial Help and Resource Center will help to answer many of your most common questions. The Commercial Help and Resource Center includes resources that we feel could provide benefit to our customers. Service tips, new product information, regulatory changes and many other subjects are covered on a regular basis. Our sales, service and management teams, as well as a few “industry expert” guests, put their thoughts and experiences to work for you. We are available for any questions you may have! At VMi New England Mobility Center, we strive to ensure that our customers and dealers get the results they value the most.

Commercial Warranty Information

Warranties on commercial wheelchair vans, buses and shuttle vans can sometimes be complicated because components such as the base chassis, heating and air conditioning, body modifications and other modifications come from different manufacturers and have varying lengths and depths of warranty coverage.  Our goal is to save you time and effort and keep your costs low.

adaptive mobility equipment financing options

Adaptive equipment describes an installed device, in addition to a structural modification, that is necessary for a person with a permanent physical disability to drive or be transported in a vehicle.

adaptive mobility equipment financing options wheelchair vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Some equipment not thought of as typical adaptive equipment, or equipment which is not available from the factory, that serves a need to operate or ride in a vehicle for persons with disabilities such as but not limited to: assist handles, keyless entry, keyless ignition switch, lumbar support, headrest adjustment, pedal extensions power seats, remote liftgate opener, running boards, seat belt extenders, seat modifications, and special mirrors may be eligible for reimbursement and require additional documentation. You will be notified if additional documentation is needed such as a letter or prescription clearly describing the permanent physical disability requiring this equipment, prepared by a licensed or certified medical professional.

Factory installed options such as air conditioning, running boards, lumbar seats and power windows are not considered eligible under the terms of the program.

Driving is a privilege for people stroke survivors with limited mobility; it provides a sense of stability in their lives so they can regain their independence. They love the flexibility their adaptive mobility equipment provides, but they often face exorbitant costs when it comes to financing the purchase of the equipment.

“The number one reason people with disabilities don’t have access to adequate transportation is because they cannot afford it.” The good news is that funding assistance to purchase adaptive equipment is becoming increasingly available.

Sources of funding determine a person’s “buying power.” Unlike the financing options provided by original equipment manufacturers, Mobility Equipment Dealers, such as Vmi New England Mobility Center, have access to financing options specifically for adaptive equipment purchases; they offer options and solutions for the customer.

Veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers grants enabling 100% service related disabled veterans to purchase a new or used modified vehicle and adaptive equipment. Automobile grants are available once in the service member’s lifetime and adaptive equipment grants are available for special equipment that may used more than once.  For more information, call 1-800-827-1000 or read the VA’s “Automobile and Special Adaptive Equipment Grants” fact sheet.

State Programs

  • State Vocational Rehabilitation (Voc Rehab) Agencies may be able to assist with the costs associated with purchasing an adaptive vehicle (or adding adaptive equipment to an existing one) if the vehicle is necessary in order for a person to get to and from work.
  • State Assistive Technology Loan Programs may also be able to provide assistance to help pay for modifications to the vehicle.
  • Center for Independent Living (CIL) can provide additional information on programs that may be available in your state.

Government Programs

  • Medicaid: Medicaid is a jointly administered federal and state program that helps with medical costs for some people with limited income and resources. Medicaid benefits differ by state and are approved on a case-by-case basis when a request for funding is presented through a prior approval.
  • Medicare: Medicare is a federal program and in some instances they will pay for adaptive equipment following a specialty evaluation performed by a qualified practitioner. For more information, call 1-800-633-4227.
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI): SSI offers a Plan to Achieve Self-Support program, or PASS, which helps those with disabilities pay for items or services needed to achieve a specific employment goal – to ultimately return to work.
  • Internal Revenue Service (IRS): Often sales-tax exemptions on equipment purchases and other out-of-pocket costs can qualify for tax deductions as medical expenses. Contact a tax adviser or get literature from the IRS that outlines the tax code for medical equipment by calling 1-800-829-1040 and asking for publications with extensions 3966, 907 and 502.

Workman’s Compensation:

Your insurance or workman’s compensation policies may also pay for vehicle adaptation. Check with your HR department or workman’s comp. organization for more information.

Fundraisers, Charitable Organizations/Churches

These may not be for everyone, but they can be effective and many people have successfully raised the money to pay for a wheelchair accessible vehicle and adaptive equipment using these options.

Automakers Rebate Programs

Many automobile makers are providing people with disabilities a wide range of rebates and incentive programs to cover adaptive equipment installation. Below is an overview of some programs offering rebates or reimbursements for adaptive mobility equipment.

  • Ford Motor Company: The Ford Mobility Motoring adaptive equipment reimbursement offers up to $1,000 off for a vehicle modification. You may also qualify for up to $200 for alert hearing devices, lumbar support, or running boards installed on any new Ford or Lincoln vehicle purchased or leased from a U.S. Ford or Lincoln dealer during the program period.
  • Daimler Chrysler Corporation: Once you have a 2010-2013 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle that fits your transportation needs, contact a reputable and qualified adaptive equipment installer to ensure that it can be adapted to meet your needs.
  • General Motors Company Reimbursement Program:  New vehicle purchasers/lessees who install eligible adaptive mobility equipment on their new Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicles can receive up to a $1,000 reimbursement for the cost of the equipment.
  • Toyota: The Toyota Mobility Assistance Program provides cash reimbursement of up to $1,000 of the cost of any aftermarket adaptive equipment or conversion, for drivers and/or passengers, when installed on any eligible purchased or leased new Toyota vehicle within 12 months of vehicle purchase or lease.

The decision to purchase adaptive mobility equipment stems from a need for mobility freedom for people with disabilities, including stroke survivors. The purchase process begins with selecting a reputable dealer to provide the adaptive equipment and installation, locating options to finance the purchase, and ends with insuring the adaptive equipment.

Make sure the after-market mobility modifications are professionally installed by a NMEDA mobility dealer. Once the adaptive mobility equipment is financed and installed, notify your insurance agent with a full disclosure of all adaptive mobility equipment installed in the vehicle.

Make sure your auto insurance company provides coverage for the conversion and adaptive equipment. Make sure you request coverage for “special” equipment, not just “handicapped” equipment.

  • “Handicapped equipment” covers only basic equipment such as the ramp or lift, not the lowered floor, kneeling system, lockdown system or other adaptive equipment.
  • “Special equipment” covers the conversion in its entirety. Be sure and send your insurance company an itemized list of every modification (which you can get from the mobility dealership that performed the conversion).

VMi New England Mobility Center is an advocate for mobility and accessibility for drivers with disabilities. If you need help with converting or buying a wheelchair accessible car, truck or van, please contact us at 508-697-6006  info@newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Vans and Accessible Vehicles in Massachusetts

Vans and Accessible Vehicles in Massachusetts

boston vans-and-accessible-vehicles-in-massachusetts

You can have the wheelchair accessible van you want delivered straight to your home. VMi New England Mobility Center, Inc. provides nationwide sales and delivery services to our customers across the United States from our mobility headquarters in Bridgewater, MA. Our mobility consultants can help you find the handicap van that fits your individual needs, so you can gain the mobility you desire.

VMi New England Mobility Center sells new and certified pre-owned handicap vans and accessible vehicles that have been hand-picked to ensure our customers receive a wheelchair van that will last. Each new mobility vehicle comes with a brand-new conversion and warranty. Our inspection process and safety features make our handicapped vans ideal for individuals, families, and commercial businesses. You can browse our showroom first hand and see our selection of wheelchair vans for sale to find the one you want.

Delivery of your handicap van is as easy as the selection process. VMi New England Mobility Center delivers to any Massachusetts city. You can be in Boston, Cambridge, Foxboro, or Wilmington, and we will deliver your handicap accessible van direct to your driveway. Depending on the mobility vehicle you choose, we can deliver your accessible van within 48 hours. It’s just that easy.

Once you find the new or used wheelchair van you like, the next step is to contact a mobility consultant via email or telephone. He or she will take the time to explain the process and answer any questions you may have about van selection and safety features. We are proud of our customer service and glad to say we offer our customers a low price guarantee on all newly modified mobility center conversions. You can check out the competition, and you will find that we not only have best value in wheelchair vans, but our vans last longer. Give us a call today and learn how we can help you gain freedom and independence at 508-697-6006.

 

Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Accessible Van Conversions

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

There are so many ways to configure the Toyota Sienna to meet your individual transportation needs. Toyota’s expanding selection of partner conversion companies allows for confident choices based upon your lifestyle and preference.

These lowered-floor wheelchair accessible Siennas allow users to travel in the front, center passenger positions or rear. Removable seating can be configured to allow individuals to either transfer into the driver’s seat or drive from their wheelchair. Choosing the option that’s right for you means less compromise, greater mobility.

This conversion includes a complete reconstruction of the van’s floor by cutting out the original and replacing it with a purpose-built floor that adds inches to the height of the door opening for easy entry and exit. As the door opens, the vehicle also kneels to make the ramp angle as low as possible, making it easier for those in a manual wheelchair to get into their van. The fold-out ramp is an industry standard and has been proven safe over years of service. When deployed, the ramp is perfectly flat, then folds in half and stores against the curb-side door for travel.

Fold-out ramp Siennas are available from BraunAbility and Vantage Mobility International (VMI)

Siennas featuring an in-floor ramp represent an interesting twist on the traditional fold-out ramp by storing the one-piece ramp under the floor. Just like the fold-out, this conversion includes a complete reconfiguration of the chassis and has the kneeling feature. The in-floor configuration means the floor stays hidden until needed, allowing you to choose the style that suits your taste.

In-floor ramp Siennas are available from BraunAbility and Vantage Mobility International (VMI).

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

 

An economical solution for many families is the rear-entry wheelchair accessible option. The front of the Sienna chassis remains intact and a path is formed into the rear of the van for access. Additional folding passenger seats can be added to the middle row position to accommodate larger families or for use in taxi service where the wheelchair accommodation may not be consistently used. The rear entry configuration allows entry and exit even when parked in a standard parking space or in a one-car garage.

Rear entry Siennas are available from VMi New England Mobility Center.

New Toyota Siennas converted for wheelchair access are warranted under the same terms and conditions as Toyota’s New Vehicle Limited Warranty; conversion-related modifications are warranted by Toyota’s conversion partner. Your wheelchair accessible Sienna also comes standard with Toyota Care, the complimentary car maintenance plan that includes 24-hour roadside assistance for 2 years or 25,000 miles, whichever comes first. Siennas converted for wheelchair access also qualify for Toyota Mobility Assistance; details on reimbursement submission are available through your local mobility dealer.

Where to buy

For wheelchair accessible vans, visit your local Toyota Mobility Dealer to select the Sienna model grade, color combination and equipment you like best, the Toyota mobility sales professional will assist you in locating the Sienna you prefer.

Massachusetts Wheelchair Accessible Transportation Services

 

VMi New England wheelchair vans Boston, MA

Massachusetts Wheelchair Accessible Transportation Services

Contact our certified mobility consultants at the mobility center with any questions about purchasing wheelchair accessible vehicles.
Links to ADA Paratransit, Wheelchair Accessible Taxi, and Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Services available in Massachusetts.

 
– ADA PARATRANSIT –
– REGULAR & WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TAXI SERVICES –

Beverly – Tri-City Taxi – Peabody, Danvers, Beverly, Salem, Marblehead

Boston – Boston Cab Dispatch – Boston
Boston – Brain Tree Taxi – Boston
Boston – Charlestown Taxi – Boston
Boston – Chelsea Taxi – Boston

Boston – East Boston Taxi – Boston
Boston – Hello Taxi – Brookline, Allston, Brighton, Boston
Boston – Hyde Park Taxi – Boston
Boston – Malden Cab – Boston
Boston – Massachusetts Cab – Boston

Boston – Metro-Cab – Wheelchair accessible vans available
Boston – Sharon Taxi – Boston
Boston – Somerville Cab – Boston
Boston – South Cab – South Boston
Cambridge – Cambridge Cab – Cambridge

Cape Cod – Cape Cab – Provincetown, Wellfleet, Chatham, Orleans
Cape Cod – Mercedes Cab – Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham
Falmouth – Falmouth Taxi – Falmouth
Hudson – Sunshine Taxi – Hudson, Westborough, Concord, London Black Cabs
Ipswich – Ipswich Taxi – Ipswich

Newton – Veterans Taxi – Newton, Needham, Weston, Wellesley, Waltham
Newton – Yellow Cab – West Newton
Plymouth – Mayflower Taxi – Plymouth
Quincy – Yellow Cab – Quincy
South Yarmouth – Barnstable Taxi – South Yarmouth

Waltham – Checker Cab – Waltham
Waltham – Patriot Taxi – Waltham
Watertown – Watertown Taxi – Watertown
Worburn – Checker Cab – Worburn
Worcester – Worcester Red Cabs – Wheelchair accessible vans available
Worcester – New Worcester Yellow Cab – Worcester
 

– NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION –

AMR – Attleboro/Taunton/Dartmouth, Brockton, Dedham, Haverhill/Hampstead, Milford, Newburyport, Plymouth, Springfield, & Worchester
CRT Cabulance – Pittfield, Berskhire County
LifeLine Ambulance Service – Arlington, Brighton, Concord, Framingham, Milford, Needham, Norwood,  Peabody, Woburn, Worchester + New Hampshire Locations
People Movers STS – Throughout New England – Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut

 

Contact our certified mobility consultants at the New England mobility center with any questions about purchasing wheelchair accessible vehicles.

history of toyota mobility solutions

Toyota wheelchair vans, cars and trucks new england mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.comare-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

History of Toyota Mobility:
Toyota began providing mobility solutions back in 2001 by introducing the Tundra pick-up truck with a wheelchair lift installed by local mobility centers like VMi New England. Since then they have continued to expand our vehicle lines that offer mobility assistance products and partnered with some of the best conversion companies in the market today: Vantage Mobility International has been converting Sienna ramp vans and VMi New England has been installing hand controls, spinner knobs, left foot gas pedals and lift-up seats in just about every popular sport utility vehicles including RAV4 and Highlander models. Wheelchair lifts, scooter lifts and hand controls are can be installed in most Toyota models.

Our commitment to you is to continue to provide some of the best mobility solutions on the market today.

Fold-out ramp Siennas are available from Vantage Mobility International and BraunAbility

Siennas featuring an in-floor ramp represent an interesting twist on the traditional fold-out ramp by storing the one-piece ramp under the floor. Just like the fold-out, this conversion includes a complete reconfiguration of the chassis and has the kneeling feature. The in-floor configuration means the floor stays hidden until needed, allowing you to choose the style that suits your taste.

In-floor ramp Siennas are available from BraunAbility and Vantage Mobility International (VMI).

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

An economical solution for many families is the rear-entry wheelchair accessible option. The front of the Sienna chassis remains intact and a path is formed into the rear of the van for access. Additional folding passenger seats can be added to the middle row position to accommodate larger families or for use in taxi service where the wheelchair accommodation may not be consistently used. The rear entry configuration allows entry and exit even when parked in a standard parking space or in a one-car garage.

Rear entry Siennas are available from VMi New England Mobility Center.

New Toyota Siennas converted for wheelchair access are warranted under the same terms and conditions as Toyota’s New Vehicle Limited Warranty; conversion-related modifications are warranted by Toyota’s conversion partner. Your wheelchair accessible Sienna also comes standard with Toyota Care, the complimentary car maintenance plan that includes 24-hour roadside assistance for 2 years or 25,000 miles, whichever comes first. Siennas converted for wheelchair access also qualify for Toyota Mobility Assistance; details on reimbursement submission are available through your local mobility dealer.

Where to buy

For wheelchair accessible vans, visit your local Toyota Mobility Dealer to select the Sienna model grade, color combination and equipment you like best, the Toyota mobility sales professional will assist you in locating the Sienna you prefer.

Does Toyota offer any special incentives, etc., for disabled veterans?

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

Will you have any special incentives, etc., for disabled veterans?

Toyota customers can receive $1,000 Toyota Mobility Customer Assistance. Furthermore, a Sienna wheelchair van conversion may be eligible for other incentives provided by State and Federal programs made available to disabled veterans.

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

Do Toyota Mobility reimbursements apply to leased vehicles?

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

 

Do reimbursements apply to leased vehicles?

Usually. Reimbursements can apply to leased vehicles when a written letter of authorization for the installation of adaptive equipment is obtained from the lessor is submitted with the Reimbursement Application Form. Please note: Not all leasing companies will approve the installation of adaptive equipment, so be sure to check and obtain written approval first. Toyota Financial Services (TFS) will approve only the following types of adaptive equipment on a TFS leased vehicle:

  • Hand controls
  • Left foot accelerator
  • Wheelchair/scooter lift
  • Turning automotive seating

 

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

Can I get assistance for financing my Toyota mobility equipment?

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

Can I get assistance for financing my mobility equipment?

Yes, assistance is available through Toyota Financial Services and participating Toyota dealers upon credit approval. Toyota Financial Services provides flexible, extended-term financing for persons with physical disabilities, or their families, for purchasing a new Toyota vehicle with the installed adaptive equipment (including installation costs). Please contact your local Toyota dealer for details.

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

Who has access to Toyota Mobility?

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

Customers may visit any of the over 1200+ Toyota dealers in the continental USA (including Alaska) or VMi New England Mobility Center for more information on Toyota Mobility. Toyota Mobility assistance is provided to any original purchaser or lessee of any new Toyota vehicle and applies to adaptive mobility equipment purchased within the first 12 months of the customer’s vehicle delivery date.

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

What is Toyota Mobility?

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

Toyota mobility is a program designed to address the transportation needs of people who have a disability or who have a family member with a mobility issue. The program provides both financial assistance and a variety of mobility solutions to meet your needs. Financial assistance includes customer cash assistance up to $1,000 to supplement the cost of required adaptive equipment and extended-term financing up to 96 months for the vehicle and adaptive equipment through Toyota Financial Services. Toyota Mobility solutions fall into different categories: Like Wheelchair accessible Sienna Northstar and Summit Rampvans, and other adaptive mobility equipment which can be installed on other Toyota Cars, SUVs, and Trucks. Please contact the Mobility Center @ 508-696-6006  for more information.

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

Are mobility ramp vans available at Toyota dealerships?

are-mobility-ramp-wheelchair-vans-available-at-toyota-dealerships

Are mobility ramp vans available at Toyota dealerships?

No

toyota mobility center newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Toyota Mobility ramp vans are sold through specialized mobility facilities like the VMi New England Mobility Center.

They are not sold through local Toyota dealerships.

newenglandwheelchairvan.com Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van New England

ON THE ROAD TO INDEPENDENCE By Lori A. Frankian 5/5/1997

 

ON THE ROAD TO INDEPENDENCE

By Lori A. Frankian 5/5/1997

Can you imagine waiting 14 years to get behind the wheel of your very first vehicle?  If you are physically challenged you may know what “waiting” is all about.  I am 30 years old and confined to an electric wheelchair due to Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a fabulous little disease that affects my muscles and nerve cells.  Why did I wait so long to get my license you ask? In all honesty, there was no real effort made to raise the money for a new van when I reached legal age to drive.  A year later at 17, I moved to Boston to attend Northeastern University and who needs a car while attending college in the city?  I attended the five year school, graduated and decided to remain in the city and establish a career for myself as an theatre / film administrator.  The years passed and my patience for traveling out of my way to find an accessible train station with operating elevators began wearing thin. It was definitely time to pursue the options available to me towards purchasing a van.  I had been missing out on so very much and I needed to move forward in my life.

 

After years of saving every penny that entered my pocket, I finally received the green light for modifications funding from the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. It was time to purchase my van.  I bought a red Plymouth Voyager in June of 1994, and in a few months was driving on my own!

 

I no longer have to haul groceries home from the store in the pouring rain, losing half of them as they spill over the arms of my wheelchair.   I can drive my van home with as many bags as I want.  I do not have to struggle in 25 inches of snow when trying to get to work.  I now have my van to guide me wherever I want to go with ease.  I can travel to the most beautiful locations within the US for the very first time on my own.  Nobody will ever tell me that, “there isn’t time to stop.”  I am driving now and if want to stop, I am going to stop!  I could go on and on sharing the wonderful changes

that my new found independence allows but I am sure you get the picture.

 

I am so very thankful and appreciative of the people in my life that made it possible for me to get behind the wheel.  For starters, I thank my father for handling the constant wheelings and dealings between the car dealership and outside vendors.  He was very protective of my hard earned money and made sure that I got exactly what I was paying for and then some!

I thank Bob Sondheim at the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission for making sure that the funding was granted for the  modifications that allow me to operate my van.  Without my Dad or the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission,  I would not have had a van or modifications that would allow me to drive.

 

Last but not least, an enormous thank you goes to Jim Sanders at Automotive Innovations in Bridgewater, Massachusetts.  Jim and his wonderfully trained staff are responsible for building my van, putting every crucial piece of technology in its proper place and for making it operate with grace and efficiency. Automotive Innovations specializes in vehicle modifications and adaptive technology including high tech vans for physically challenged drivers. They are leaders in New England, known and respected for their quality, commitment and innovation. It’s the 90′s and technology is beyond our wildest dreams.  Automotive Innovations knows their stuff.

 

At first, I was intimidated by the electronic hand controls and the tiny steering wheel that I would drive with. I wondered, “will everything operate safely?” “Will my steering system fail to operate as I am driving down the highway?”  “What if my door jams and doesn’t allow the ramp to open, trapping me inside?”  These are a few of the questions that ran through my mind before Jim gave me a thorough explanation on all operation procedures and back up system functions.

 

Jim and his staff have been there for me from the get-go and I know they always will be.  I have called him on many occasions with questions and he was ready and willing to help me at a moments notice.   If it wasn’t for their high quality workmanship, I wouldn’t have the reliable form of transportation that I have today.  For that I will always be grateful.

 

Every time I get behind the wheel I am thankful that I have such an amazing form of independence to experience.  If independence is foreign to you, then I am sure you know where I am coming from.  If not, I ask that you appreciate the little things in life such as walking up steps and entering a public bathroom, finding it ready and willing to accept you.  Life should never be taken for granted.  It’s the little things in life that should be treasured because they can be taken away within an instant.  Even if it is as simple as driving down the street to pick up a cup of coffee!  Appreciate your freedom, I know I do!

Lori A. Frankian Boston, MA

 

Why a Toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in New England

Toyota offers some of the best options on the market when it comes to wheelchair accessible vans.  Each van offers comfort, reliability, and reasonable pricing for its conversion.   Choosing a new wheelchair van isn’t always as easy as choosing a traditional car.  There isn’t a particular one-size-fits-all van that covers every need or preference. As you make your choice, keep in mind a few practical reasons to choose an accessible Toyota.

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in new england

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in new england

Variety

Toyota’s wheelchair accessible minivan is a modified version of the Toyota Sienna and is the most popular Toyota vehicle that is converted for accessibility.  Overall, it’s an easy vehicle for the major wheelchair accessible vehicle manufacturers to convert. Toyota currently produces five different models of the Sienna that are available for modification:

  • Sienna L- the L model is the most basic model of Sienna.  It includes all the standard features and will often be the lowest priced model.
  • Sienna LE- the LE is still a fairly basic model but includes a rear-view camera and enhanced climate controls.
  • Sienna SE- Sienna SE is a mid-level option that offers enhanced navigation displays, rear-view cameras, and cross-traffic controls for ease and maneuverability.
  • Sienna XLE- Sienna XLE is outfitted with leather-trimmed driver and front passenger seats.  It also features a blind spot monitor and a power lift gate with jam guard.
  • Sienna Limited- The Sienna Limited is the final and most luxurious model of Sienna.  The Limited features many of the standard and upgraded features of the other models while offering more extras like a JBL sound system, driver and passenger leather- trimmed seats, and a dual moon roof.

Any one of these models of the Sienna can be easily modified to accommodate your specific needs.  Budgetary constraints and your individual situation will play a major part in which model you decide to purchase.  Once you’ve made that decision, VMi New England Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center will help you find a Toyota wheelchair van that combines Toyota’s infamous quality with comfort and accessibility.

Adaptability

Toyota’s wheelchair accessible vans don’t start out being adapted for accessibility.  These vans start as traditional vehicles without any modifications before being converted to accommodate individuals with disabilities.  Toyota relies on certified wheelchair conversion manufacturers, such as VMI, to fit the vehicles with lowered floors, kneeling systems, ramps, and more.

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in new england

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center

After the initial conversion is made the vehicle is sent to our Bridgewater, MA Mobility center where we can make even more adaptations to your vehicles. Mobility seating, hand controls, and pedal extensions are all available and fit beautifully inside the modified Toyota Sienna. There are even products that allow users to control the vehicle by pressing a few key buttons or by simply flipping a switch on the vehicle.

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

2013 Toyota Sienna XLE VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Though the middle row of seats is removed to accommodate a wheelchair, there are still plenty of options to satisfy your needs. Both front seats can be removed to allow the wheelchair user to ride up front and there is a full bench seat in the back for children or guests. There is also a large trunk to accommodate groceries or additional supplies.

Safety locks and straps are installed into the floor of the van to keep wheelchair passengers in place and prevent any excess movement during transit.  The lowered floors help to compensate for a wheelchair passenger’s added height.  There are countless additional features and add-ons, so it is clear that the Toyota Sienna’s adaptability and flexibility are two key factors that make it a good choice for an accessible vehicle.

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England Mobility Center

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England Mobility Center

Style

When it comes to the Sienna, you’ll be hard pressed to find a vehicle as stylish. This Toyota is available in a rainbow of colors from a vibrant cherry red to a subtle sage green. Its sleek exterior is curvier and more modern than that of some types of minivans.

The interior is stunning, and the more customizations you make, the more personal and warm the vehicle feels. Its spaciousness accommodates passengers for a ride to the store or a road trip to Disney World with the same comfort and style you’d get from a luxury vehicle. If you’re looking for an accessible vehicle that is practical and attractive, be sure to consider the Toyota Sienna for its superior style.

 

Why Choose a Toyota?

A Toyota Sienna with a VMI Northstar 360 is one of best wheelchair accessible vans on the market. The variety of options means there’s really one for everyone. It’s able to be adapted with ease and features many options to suit all your needs. And, to top it all off, it’s a beautiful vehicle that will provide its purchaser’s with a long life and a lot of fun. It has, without a doubt, cemented its place as a top-rated accessible van that will retain its value and perform under the most rigorous conditions.  If the Toyota Sienna fits what you’re looking for in an accessible van, then come take it for a spin! Contact VMi New England today to schedule a test drive by filling out our online contact form or by giving us a call at 508-697-6006.

Wheelchair Accessible Van Conversion Options New England Mobility Center

wheelchair accessible van conversion options new england mobility center

Wheelchair Accessible Van Conversion Options

We know that each individual person has their own personal desires and requirements in a wheelchair accessible van. At VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer a variety of conversion options in order to best fit your individual needs. Whether you need hand controls or an under vehicle lift (UVL), our highly trained Mobility Center Consultants are here to listen to your needs, educate you on the safest/best products available, and deliver the highest quality service in the vehicle modification industry.

VMi New England Mobility Center has access to hundreds of new and used wheelchair accessible vans ready for immediate delivery. We carry everything from minivans, to full-size vans, to commercial paratransit vans and ambulette vans, in Dodge, Chrysler, Chevrolet, Buick, Toyota, Honda, and Ford models. Our large inventory and unmatched mobility facility enables our customers to get the wheelchair accessible van they want, when they want it.

If you want to learn more about our wheelchair accessible van conversion options, contact us for a free in house consultation.

wheelchair accessible van conversion options new england mobility center

expert adaptive mobility equipment installations bridgewater, ma mobility center

adaptive-mobility-van-equipment-center-bridgewater-ma
if you are you looking for a wheelchair accessible minivan for your transportation requirements? VMi New England is you one stop for adaptive mobility equipment and offers a wide selection of quality new and used wheelchair vans designed to accommodate your individual needs.
Our team of mobility consultants will help to explain the different styles of ramps and minivans available to you.
No matter what your driving preferences, we’ll find the right vehicle and adaptive equipment. We also take non-accessible trade-ins.  We sell the best quality new and used wheelchair vans in RI or MA.
Call us for info on adaptive mobility equipment veterans resources.

Grants through the Veterans Association for Disabled Veterans

Get help with a disabled veterans grant toward the sale price or conversion of a handicap accessible minivan. This grant is available for disabled veterans with service-related disabilities including:
•loss, or permanent loss of use, of one or both feet
•loss, or permanent loss of use, of one or both hands
•permanent loss or impairment of vision in both eyes
•ankylosis (immobility) of one or both knees, or one or both hips

Disabled Veterans Loan Program:

Loans for disabled veterans are available by seeking funds through other outlets. It is advised that you search for veterans loan programs by seeking out loans available for your specific disability.

You can also find loans to help pay for adapted vehicles by searching for money based on your disability instead of purely focusing on veterans benefits. Search through our Wheelchair Van Loans section to find other loans that apply to you.

We are always seeking to expand funding opportunities for the disabled to help pay for a handicap accessible minivan. If you know of other disability grant and loan programs for disabled veterans, please let us know.

——————————————————————————–

Automobile Adaptive Equipment Program-

The Automobile Adaptive Equipment (AAE) program permits physically challenged persons to enter, exit and/or operate a motor vehicle or other conveyance. The VA also provides necessary equipment such as platform wheelchair lifts, Under Vehicle Lifts (ULV), power door openers, lowered floors/raised roofs, raised doors, hand controls, left foot gas pedals, reduced effort and zero effort steering and braking, air conditioning and digital driving systems.

Eligibility

Veterans who are service connected for the loss, or loss of use of one or both feet or hands, or service connected ankylosis of one or both knees or hips.

Veterans who are service connected for permanent impairment of vision of both eyes that have a central acuity of 20/200.

NSC veterans are eligible for equipment/ modifications that will allow ingress and egress from a vehicle only.

Note: Eligible service connected veterans who are non-drivers are not eligible for reimbursement for operational equipment.

nes apply for leased vehicles just as if the veteran purchased a new or used vehicle.

Lease must be to the veteran and he/she be responsible for the repairs and maintenance of the vehicle, and not to any business.

Cost limitations will not exceed the allowable reimbursable amounts.

Conversions

– Mini- Van

Reimbursement for mini-van conversions will be made in an amount equal to or less than the average cost of a conventional van modification, plus 25% (SC only).

VA will reimburse for the cost of transporting/delivery of the vehicle.

– Full Size Van

This type of conversion is considered comfort, far exceeds the space required for transportation

The amount should not exceed conventional van conversion

– Pick-up Trucks

The space modified about half that of a mini van

The dollar amount should not exceed mini van conversion

– Motor Homes

All modifications must be pre-authorized.

Only VA approved add-on equipment may be authorized.

Maximum reimbursable amounts established for automobile adaptive equipment will not be exceeded for similar items authorized as adaptive equipment in a motor home.

Amount authorized and the purchase and installation of an approved lift in a motor home will not exceed the average amount authorized for purchase and installation of similar lifts installed in vans by the authorizing VA facility.

VA is not responsible for the removal, modification or reinstallation of any convenience items contained in the motor home, e.g., cabinets, stoves, showers, refrigerators, etc.

– Repairs

Routine service to items is not considered a repair e.g., brake shoes, drums & pads or other adjustments (only the power booster). Power Steering and Automatic Transmission service or fluid refills are not authorized (only the transmission itself, or the power steering components).

Maximum reimbursement is for the total amount of the certified invoice.

Repairs, cost of parts and labor, is listed in thee current Mitchell Mechanical Parts and Labor Estimating Guide for Domestic Cars.

Towing is not normally an authorized repair.

Exceptions to the 2 vehicles in a 4 year period rule

Normally only allowance can be provided for 2 vehicles in a 4 year period.

Exceptions to this rule are:
Theft
Fire
Accident
Court of legal actions
Costly Repairs
Changes in the drivers medical requirements necessitating a different type of vehicle

Required documentation to remove a vehicle of record

Important Note: These vehicles may not be sold or given to family members or any other party residing in the same household of the veteran, or transferred to a business owned by the veteran.
Proof of trade-in
Proof of sale
Proof of other means of disposal, e.g., total loss by accident , act of God, fire, theft, etc.

How to Apply

Please contact your local PVA National Service Officer for assistance with the application.

The information provided above was found in The Newsletter of New England Chapter Paralyzed Veterans of America.

Financing OptionsDID YOU KNOW? In most towns you are exempt from excise tax if you don’t pay state sales tax on your mobility van. See the bottom of this page for a list of most cities and towns in MA and RI for you to check on your options. 

Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund – The Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund (CICRF) helps families bear the excessive financial burdens associated with the care of children with special health care needs and disabilities. more info

CONSUMER LOANS – New England Mobility Center has banking programs that can offer up to 10 years financing on a wheelchair handicap van. Even if your credit is less than perfect we will work hard to get you financed!!

INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS – A nonprofit organization that helps grant people money so they can maintain an independent lifestyle.

INDEPENDENT MOBILITY SYSTEMS – IMS offers long-term financing on all new purchases. All loan transactions are done on-site and guaranteed to help fit your needs.

INSURANCE COMPANIES – We will help you work with your insurance company to make sure you are receiving the maximum your benefits allow.

MANUFACTURERS’ REBATES – Major manufacturers often offer rebates. We’ll help you process all paperwork. more info

MEDICAID – In certain instances, Medicaid will pay for vehicle adaptive equipment. This falls under the “Medicaid waiver” and each state administers this program differently. We will be able to process you Medicaid claims for you as of January 2003.

PFS – Patient Financing offers long-term financing fit for your budget. PFS will finance any medical related equipment up to $25,000.00.

TOYOTA FINANCING- We can now get up 10 year financing on Toyota Sienna Rampvans.

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION – Provides help for veterans.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION – A State funded organization that’s goal is to provide individuals with the means they need to get back into the workforce.
If you are located in Seekonk Massachusetts we are close by and worth the drive from anywhere in New England.

——————————————————————————–

Massachusetts City and Town Directory

ABINGTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
500 GLINIEWICZ WAY
02351
Phone: (781) 982-2112
Fax: (781) 982-2138
Email: ladams@abingtonmass.com
Website: www.abingtonmass.com
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

ACTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
472 MAIN STREET
01720
Phone: (978) 929-6620
Fax: (978) 264-9630
Email: clerk@acton-ma.gov
Website: www.acton-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

ACUSHNET
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
122 MAIN STREET
02743
Phone: (508) 998-0215
Fax: (508) 998-0216
Email: plabonte@acushnettown.mec.edu
Website: www.acushnet.ma.us
Hours: M, W-F: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-8p

ADAMS
TOWN CLERK
8 PARK ST
01220
Phone: (413) 743-8320
Fax: (413) 743-8316
Email: hmeczywor@town.adams.ma.us
Website: www.town.adams.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

AGAWAM
TOWN HALL
36 MAIN STREET
01001
Phone: (413) 786-0400
Fax: (413) 786-9927
Email: clerk@agawam.ma.us
Website: www.agawam.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

ALFORD
TOWN HALL
5 ALFORD CENTER RD
01230
Phone: (413) 528-4536
Fax: (413) 528-4581
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: townofalford.org
Hours: Th: 8a-11a

AMESBURY
TOWN CLERK
62 FRIEND ST.
01913
Phone: (978) 388-8100
Fax: (978) 388-8150
Email: bonnijo@amesburyma.gov
Website: www.amesburyma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

AMHERST
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
TOWN HALL
4 BOLTWOOD AVE
01002
Phone: (413) 259-3035
Fax: (413) 259-2401
Email: burgesss@amherstma.gov
Website: www.amherstma.gov
Hours: M-W & F: 8a-4:30p; Th: 12p-4:30p

ANDOVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
TOWN OFFICES
36 BARTLET STREET
01810
Phone: (978) 623-8255
Fax: (978) 623-8260
Email: lmurphy@andoverma.gov
Website: www.andoverma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

AQUINNAH
TOWN CLERK
65 STATE RD
02535
Phone: (508) 645-2304
Fax: (508) 645-2310
Email: aqhcp@comcast.net
Website: www.aquinnah-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 9:30a-1:30p & By appointment

ARLINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
730 MASS. AVE.
02476
Phone: (781) 316-3070
Fax: (781) 316-3079
Email: crainville@town.arlington.ma.us
Website: www.arlingtonma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

ASHBURNHAM
TOWN CLERK
32 MAIN ST
01430
Phone: (978) 827-4102
Fax: (978) 827-4105
Email: townclerk@ashburnham-ma.gov
Website: www.ashburnham-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; M 1st & 3rd: 5p-7p

ASHBY
TOWN CLERK
895 MAIN ST
01431
Phone: (978) 386-2424
Fax: (978) 386-2490
Email: tclerk@ci.ashby.ma.us
Website: www.ci.ashby.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12p; W: 5p-8p

ASHFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
412 MAIN STREET
PO BOX 560
01330
Phone: (413) 628-4441 x 5
Fax: (413) 628-0228
Email: TOWNHALL@ASHFIELD.ORG
Website: WWW.TOWNOFASHFIELD.ORG
Hours: M & Tu: 9a-3p; W: 9a-11a

ASHLAND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
101 MAIN ST
TOWN HALL
01721
Phone: (508) 881-0100 x 601
Fax: (508) 231-1503
Email: townclerkoffice@ashlandmass.com
Website: www.ashlandmass.com
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8a-3:30p; W: 8a-7p

ATHOL
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
584 MAIN STREET
01331
Phone: (978) 249-4551
Fax: (978) 249-2491
Email: townclerk@townofathol.org
Website: www.athol-ma.gov
Hours: M,W & Th: 8a-5p;Tu: 8a-8p

ATTLEBORO
BOARD OF ELECTION CMMSSNR
77 PARK ST
02703
Phone: (508) 223-2222
Fax: (774) 203-1805
Email: elections@cityofattleboro.us
Website: www.cityofattleboro.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

AUBURN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
104 CENTRAL ST
01501
Phone: (508) 832-7701
Fax: (508) 832-7702
Email: clerk@town.auburn.ma.us
Website: www.auburnguide.com
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

AVON
TOWN CLERK
65 EAST MAIN ST
BUCKLEY CENTER
02322
Phone: (508) 588-0414
Fax: (508) 559-0209
Email: jkopke@avonmass.org
Website: www.avonmass.org
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

AYER
TOWN CLERK
1 MAIN ST
PO BOX 308
01432
Phone: (978) 772-8215
Fax: (978) 772-8222
Email: clerk@ayer.ma.us
Website: www.ayer.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

BARNSTABLE
TOWN CLERK & BD OF REGIS.
367 MAIN ST./1ST FL.
HYANNIS, MA
02601
Phone: (508) 862-4044
Fax: (508) 790-6326
Email: linda.hutchenrider@town.barnstable.ma.us
Website: www.town.barnstable.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BARRE
TOWN CLERK
40 WEST ST
PO BOX 418
01005
Phone: (978) 355-5003
Fax: (978) 355-5025
Email: clerk@townofbarre.com
Website: www.townofbarre.com
Hours: M & W: 7p-9p; Tu-Wed-Th: 9a-12p, 1p-4p

BECKET
TOWN CLERK
557 MAIN ST
01223
Phone: (413) 623-8934
Fax: (413) 623-6036
Email: townclerk@townof becket.org
Website: www.townofbecket.org
Hours: M & Tu: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 11:30a-8:30p

BEDFORD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
10 MUDGE WAY
01730
Phone: (781) 275-0083
Fax: (781) 275-5757
Email: doreent@town.bedford.ma.us
Website: www.town.bedford.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

BELCHERTOWN
TOWN CLERK
2 JABISH ST, RM 201
P.O. BOX 629
01007
Phone: (413) 323-0281
Fax: (413) 323-0107
Email: clerk@belchertown.org
Website: www.belchertown.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

BELLINGHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
10 MECHANIC ST
02019
Phone: (508) 657-2830
Fax: (508) 657-2832
Email: aodabashian@bellinghamma.org
Website: www.bellinghamma.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; T-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

BELMONT
BELMONT TOWN CLERK
455 CONCORD AVE
02478
Phone: (617) 993-2600
Fax: (617) 993-2601
Email: ecushman@belmont-ma.gov
Website: www.belmont-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

BERKLEY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 NORTH MAIN ST
02779
Phone: (508) 822-3348
Fax: (508) 822-3511
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 9:30a-2:30p

BERLIN
TOWN CLERK
23 LINDEN ST. #8
01503
Phone: (978) 838-2931
Fax: (978) 838-0014
Email: townclerk@townofberlin.com
Website: www.townofberlin.com
Hours: Tu & Th: 11a-2p; W: 7p-9p

BERNARDSTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O.BOX 504
01337
Phone: (413) 648-5408
Fax: (413) 648-9318
Email: bernardstontownclerk@crocker.com
Website: www.town.bernardston.ma.us
Hours: M-Tu & Th: 9a-12p; W: 4p-7p

BEVERLY
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
191 CABOT ST
01915
Phone: (978) 605-2326
Fax: (978) 921-8511
Email: kconnolly@beverlyma.gov
Website: www.beverlyma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

BILLERICA
TOWN CLERK
365 BOSTON RD
01821
Phone: (978) 671-0926
Fax: (978) 671-0908
Email: sschult@town.billerica.ma.us
Website: www.town.billerica.ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

BLACKSTONE
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
15 ST. PAUL ST.
01504
Phone: (508) 883-1500
Fax: (508) 883-4953
Email: mstaples@townofblackstone.org
Website: www.townofblackston.org
Hours: M-F: 9a-4:30p; Tu: 5:30p-7:30p

BLANDFORD
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 101
102 MAIN STREET
01008
Phone: (413) 848-0054
Fax: (413) 848-2216
Email: clerk@townofblanford.com
Website: www.townofblandford.com
Hours: M: 6p-9p & By appointment

BOLTON
TOWN CLERK
P.O.BOX 278
663 MAIN ST.
01740
Phone: (978) 779-2771
Fax: (798) 779-5461
Email: townclerk@townofbolton.com
Website: www.townofbolton.com
Hours: M-Th: 9a-4p; Tu: 6p-8p

BOSTON
BOSTON ELECTION DEPT.
ONE CITY HALL SQUARE
ROOM 241
02201
Phone: (617) 635-3767
Fax: (617) 635-4483
Email: Maryanne.Marrero@cityofboston.gov
Website: WWW.CITYOFBOSTON.GOV/ELECTIONS
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p

BOURNE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
24 PERRY AVENUE
BUZZARDS BAY
02532
Phone: (508) 759-0600
Fax: (508) 759-7980
Email: wchapman@townofbourne.com
Website: www.townofbourne.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BOXBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
29 MIDDLE RD
01719
Phone: (978) 263-1116
Fax: (978) 264-3127
Email: elizabeth.markiewicz@town.boxborough.ma.us
Website: www.town.boxborough.ma.us/
Hours: M: 10a-2p & 7p-9p; Tu-F: 9a-2p

BOXFORD
TOWN CLERK
7A SPOFFORD RD
01921
Phone: (978) 887-6000 x 151
Fax: (978) 887-0943
Email: rphelan@town.boxford.ma.us
Website: www.town.boxford.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p

BOYLSTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
221 MAIN ST
01505
Phone: (508) 869-2234
Fax: (508) 869-6210
Email: SBOURASSA@BOYLSTON-MA.GOV
Website: www.boylston-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-2p; M: 6p-8p

BRAINTREE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
1 J.F.K. MEMORIAL DR
02184
Phone: (781) 794-8240
Fax: (781) 794-8259
Email: jpowers@braintreema.gov
Website: www.townofbraintreegov.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BREWSTER
TOWN CLERK
2198 MAIN ST
02631
Phone: (508) 896-4506
Fax: (508) 896-8089
Email: cwilliams@town.brewster.ma.us
Website: www.town.brewster.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

BRIDGEWATER
TOWN CLERK & BR OF REGIS.
64 CENTRAL SQUARE
02324
Phone: (508) 697-0921
Fax: (508) 697-0941
Email: clerk@bridgewaterma.org
Website: www.bridgewaterma.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p

BRIMFIELD
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 508
01010
Phone: (413) 245-4100
Fax: (413) 245-4107
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.brimfieldma.org
Hours: Tu: 6:30p-8p; Sat: 9a-11a

BROCKTON
ELECTION COMMISSION
45 SCHOOL ST
02301
Phone: (508) 580-7117
Fax: (508) 583-6424
Email: jmcgarry@cobma.us
Website: www.brockton.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BROOKFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
6 CENTRAL STREET
01506
Phone: (508) 867-2930
Fax: (508) 867-5091
Email: mseery@brookfieldma.us
Website: www.brookfield@ma.us
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 9a-3p; W: 9a-6p

BROOKLINE
TOWN CLERK
333 WASHINGTON ST
02445
Phone: (617) 730-2010
Fax: (617) 730-2043
Email: pward@brooklinema.gov
Website: www.brooklinema.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-5p; Th: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12:30p

BUCKLAND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 159
01338
Phone: (413) 625-8572
Fax: (413) 625-8570
Email: twnclerk@crocker.com
Hours: M-Th: 7:30a-3p

BURLINGTON
TOWN CLERK
29 CENTER STREET
01803
Phone: (781) 270-1660
Fax: (781) 238-4692
Email: clerk@burlmass.org
Website: www.burlington.org/clerk
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

CAMBRIDGE
ELECTION COMMISSION
51 INMAN ST
FIRST FLOOR
02139
Phone: (617) 349-4361
Fax: (617) 349-4366
Email: elections2@cambridgema.gov
Website: www.cambridgema.gov/election
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; T-Th: 8:30a-5p; F: 8:30a-12p

CANTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
801 WASHINGTON ST
02021
Phone: (781) 821-5013
Fax: (781) 821-5016
Email: tkenney@town.canton.ma.us
Website: www.town.canton.ma.us
Hours: M, W-F: 9a-5p; Tu: 9a-7p

CARLISLE
TOWN HALL
66 WESTFORD STREET
01741
Phone: (978) 369-6155
Fax: (978) 371-0594
Email: chinton@carlisle.mec.edu
Website: www.carlislema.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-3p & By appointment

CARVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
108 MAIN ST
02330
Phone: (508) 866-3403
Fax: (508) 866-3408
Email: jean.mcgillicuddy@carverma.org
Website: www.carverma.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

CHARLEMONT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 605
01339
Phone: (413) 339-4335
Fax: (413) 339-0320
Email: SELECT@BCN.NET
Website: www.charlemont-ma.us
Hours: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8:30 A.M. TO 4:00 P.M.

CHARLTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
37 MAIN ST
01507
Phone: (508) 248-2249
Fax: (508) 248-2381
Email: darlene.tully@townofcharlton.net
Website: www.townofcharlton.net/
Hours: M,Th: 7:30a-3:30p; Tu: 7:30a-7p; W: 8a-3:30p; F: 7:30a-12p

CHATHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
549 MAIN STREET
02633
Phone: (508) 945-5101
Fax: (508) 945-0752
Email: jsmith@chatham-ma.gov
Website: www.chatham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

CHELMSFORD
TOWN CLERKS OFFICE
50 BILLERICA RD
01824
Phone: (978) 250-5205
Fax: (978) 250-5208
Email: bdelaney@townofchelmsford.us
Website: www.townofchelmsford.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

CHELSEA
CITY CLERK
500 BROADWAY
02150
Phone: (617) 466-4050
Fax: (617) 466-4059
Email: DClayman@chelseama.gov
Website: www.ci.chelsea.ma.us/
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

CHESHIRE
TOWN CLERK
80 CHURCH ST BOX S
01225
Phone: (413) 743-1690
Fax: (413) 743-0389
Email: townclerk@cheshire-ma.gov
Hours: Tu: 9a-9p; W & Th:9a-3p

CHESTER
TOWN CLERK
15 MIDDLEFIELD RD
01011
Phone: (413) 354-6603
Fax: (413) 354-2268
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofchester.net/chestermass
Hours: M: 6p-8p

CHESTERFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 13
01012
Phone: (413) 296-4741
Fax: (413) 296-4394
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofchesterfieldma.com/
Hours: M: 7p-9p; Sat: 1st & 3rd of month 9a-11a; By appointment

CHICOPEE
CITY CLERK
17 SPRINGFIELD ST
01013
Phone: (413) 594-1466
Fax: (413) 594-1469
Email: krattell@chicopeema.gov
Website: www.chicopeema.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p (Clerk); M-F 9a-5p (Registrars)

CHILMARK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 119
02535
Phone: (508) 645-2107
Fax: (508) 645-2110
Email: townclerk@chilmarkma.gov
Website: www.chilmarkma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-12p

CLARKSBURG
CLARKSBURG TOWN HALL
111 RIVER RD
01247
Phone: (413) 663-8255
Fax: (413) 664-6575
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: W: 9:30a-2p; Th: By appointment

CLINTON
TOWN HALL
242 CHURCH ST
01510
Phone: (978) 365-4119
Fax: (978) 612-0212
Email: pboyce@clintonma.gov
Website: www.clintonma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

COHASSET
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
41 HIGHLAND AVE
02025
Phone: (781) 383-4100
Fax: (781) 383-1561
Email: mdouglas@townofcohasset.org
Website: www.townofcohasset.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-1p

COLRAIN
TOWN HALL
55 MAIN RD
01340
Phone: (413) 624-3454
Fax: (413) 624-8852
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.colrainma.com/
Hours: M-Th: 9a-4p; M Evenings: 6p-8p

CONCORD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
22 MONUMENT SQUARE
P.O. BOX 535
01742
Phone: (978) 318-3080
Fax: (978) 318-3093
Email: townclerk@concordma.gov
Website: www.concordma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p (Sept-June); M-Th: 8:30a-5p; F: 8:30a-12p (July-Aug)

CONWAY
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
32 MAIN ST
P.O. BOX 240
01341
Phone: (413) 369-4235
Fax: (413) 369-4237
Email: clerk@townofconway.com
Website: www.townofconway.com/
Hours: Tu,Th & F: 9a-12p

CUMMINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 128
01026
Phone: (413) 634-5354
Fax: (413) 634-5568
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.cummington-ma.gov/
Hours: Th: 6p-7:30p

DALTON
TOWN CLERK
462 MAIN STREET
01226-1677
Phone: (413) 684-6103
Fax: (413) 684-6129
Email: daltonmc@bcn.net
Website: www.dalton-ma.gov/
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-6p

DANVERS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 SYLVAN ST
01923
Phone: (978) 777-0001
Fax: (978) 777-1025
Email: kwoytovich@mail.danvers
Website: www.danvers.govoffice.com/
Hours: M-W: 8a-5p; Th: 8a-7:30p; F: 8a-1:30p

DARTMOUTH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
400 SLOCUM RD
02747
Phone: (508) 910-1853
Fax: (508) 910-1894
Email: lmedeiros@town.dartmouth.ma.us
Website: www.town.dartmouth.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-12:30p & 1:30p-4:30p

DEDHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
26 BRYANT ST
02026
Phone: (781) 751-9200
Fax: (781) 751-9109
Email: pmunchbach@dedham-ma.gov
Website: www.dedham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 4:30p-7p

DEERFIELD
TOWN CLK/TREAS/TAX CLTR.
8 CONWAY ST
SO DEERFIELD
01373
Phone: (413) 665-2130
Fax: (413) 665-5512
Email: town.clerk@town.deerfield.ma.us
Website: www.town.deerfield.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

DENNIS
TOWN CLERK
485 MAIN STREET
P O BOX 2060
02660
Phone: (508) 760-6112
Fax: (508) 394-8309
Email: tbunce@town.dennis.ma.us
Website: www.town.dennis.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

DIGHTON
TOWN CLERK
979 SOMERSET AVE
02715
Phone: (508) 669-5411
Fax: (508) 669-5932
Email: smedeiros@townofdighton.com
Website: www.dighton-ma.gov
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 7:30a-4:30p; W: 7:30a-5:30p

DOUGLAS
TOWN CLERK
29 DEPOT ST
01516
Phone: (508) 476-4000
Fax: (508) 476-4012
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-1p & 1:30p-4p; Tu: 6p-8p

DOVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
5 SPRINGDALE AVE
02030
Phone: (508) 785-0032
Fax: (508) 785-2341
Email: townclerk@doverma.org
Website: www.doverma.org
Hours: M,W & F: 9a-1p; Tu & Th: 9a-4p

DRACUT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
62 ARLINGTON ST.
01826
Phone: (978) 453-0951
Fax: (978) 452-7924
Email: townclerk@dracut-ma.us
Website: www.dracut-ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

DUDLEY
TOWN CLERK
71 WEST MAIN STREET
01571
Phone: (508) 949-8004
Fax: (508) 949-7115
Email: oraf@dudleyma.gov
Website: www.dudleyma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12p & 12:30p-4:30p; Th: 5p-7p; F: 9a-1p

DUNSTABLE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
511 MAIN ST
01827
Phone: (978) 649-4514
Fax: (978) 649-4371
Email: CSkerrett@dunstable-ma.gov
Website: www.dunstable-ma.gov
Hours: M: 6:00pm – 8:00 pm; TWT: 9:00am – 3:00 pm

DUXBURY
TOWN CLERK
878 TREMONT ST
02332
Phone: (781) 934-1100
Fax: (781) 934-9278
Email: oates@town.duxbury.ma.us
Website: www.town.duxbury.ma.us
Hours: M: 8a-7p; T-Th: 8a-12p 1p-4p; F: 8a-12:30p

EAST BRIDGEWATER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
175 CENTRAL ST
BOX 387
02333
Phone: (508) 378-1606
Fax: (508) 378-1638
Email: mweidenfeller@ebmass.com
Website: www.eastbridgewaterma.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12p

EAST BROOKFIELD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 568
01515-0568
Phone: (508) 867-6769
Fax: (508) 867-4190
Email: ebtownclerk301@charterinternet.com
Website: www.eastbrookfieldma.us
Hours: M: 9a-2p & 6p-8p; Tu: 9a-3p; 2nd & 4th Th: 9a-2p

EAST LONGMEADOW
TOWN HALL
60 CENTER SQUARE
01028
Phone: (413) 525-5400
Fax: (413) 525-0022
Email: tflorence@eastlongmeadowma.gov
Website: www.eastlongmeadowma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p

EASTHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
2500 STATE HWY
02642
Phone: (508) 240-5900
Fax: (508) 240-1291
Email: townclerk@eastham-ma.gov
Website: www.eastham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

EASTHAMPTON
OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK
50 PAYSON AVE
STE 100
01027-2260
Phone: (413) 529-1460
Fax: (413) 529-1417
Email: cityclerk@easthampton.org
Website: www.easthampton.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-5p

EASTON
TOWN CLERK
136 ELM ST
02356
Phone: (508) 230-0530
Fax: (508) 230-0539
Email: jgillis@easton.ma.us
Website: www.easton.ma.us
Hours: M: 8:30a-7:30p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

EDGARTOWN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 35
70 MAIN ST
02539
Phone: (508) 627-6110
Fax: (508) 627-6123
Email: wwilliams@edgartown-ma.us
Website: www.ci.edgartown.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-12p & 1p-4p

EGREMONT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 56
01258
Phone: (413) 528-0182
Fax: (413) 528-5465
Email: tegremont@yahoo.com
Website: www.egremont-ma.gov/
Hours: Tu: 7p-9p; By appointment

ERVING
TOWN HALL
12 EAST MAIN STREET
01344
Phone: (413) 422-2800 x 101
Fax: (413) 422-2808
Email: r.newton@umassp.edu
Website: www.erving-ma.org
Hours: M: 6:30p-9p

ESSEX
TOWN CLERK
30 MARTIN STREET
01929
Phone: (978) 768-7111
Fax: (978) 768-2505
Email: CWRIGHT@ESSEXMA.ORG
Website: HTTP://WWW.ESSEXMA.ORG
Hours: M & W: 9a-1p; M: 7p-8:30p

EVERETT
REGISTRARS OF VOTERS
484 BROADWAY,ROOM 10
02149
Phone: (617) 394-2297
Fax: (617) 389-0764
Email: michael.matarazzo@ci.everett.ma.us
Website: www.cityofeverett.com
Hours: M: 8a-7:30p; T-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-11:30a

FAIRHAVEN
TOWN CLERKS OFFICE
40 CENTER ST
02719
Phone: (508) 979-4025
Fax: (508) 979-4079
Email: elowney@fairhaven-ma.gov
Website: www.fairhaven-ma.gpv
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

FALL RIVER
BOARD OF ELECTIONS
1 GOVERNMENT CENTER
RM 636
02722
Phone: (508) 324-2630
Fax: (508) 324-2633
Email: lcamara@fallriverma.org
Website: www.fallriverma.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-5p

FALMOUTH
REGISTRAR OF VOTERS
59 TOWN HALL SQ
02540
Phone: (508) 495-7357
Fax: (508) 457-2511
Email: mpalmer@falmouthmass.us
Website: www.town.falmouth.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

FITCHBURG
CITY CLERK
718 MAIN STREET
01420
Phone: (978) 345-9592
Fax: (978) 345-9595
Email: afarrell@ci.fitchburg.ma.us
Website: www.fitchburgma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

FLORIDA
TOWN CLERK
20 SOUTH ST
01343
Phone: (413) 664-6685
Fax: (413) 664-8640
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: W: 5:30p-7:30p; By appointment

FOXBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
40 SOUTH STREET
02035
Phone: (508) 543-1208
Fax: (508) 543-6278
Email: bcutler@mail.town.foxborough.ma.us
Website: www.townfoxborough.us
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; Tu: 5p-8p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

FRAMINGHAM
TOWN CLERK
150 CONCORD STREET
ROOM 105
01702
Phone: (508) 532-5520
Fax: (508) 628-1358
Email: valerie.mulvey@framinghamma.gov
Website: www.framinghamma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

FRANKLIN
TOWN CLERK
355 EAST CENTRAL ST.
MUNICIPAL BUILDING
02038
Phone: (508) 520-4900
Fax: (508) 520-4903
Email: townclerk@franklin.ma.us
Website: http://franklinma.virtualtownhall.net/Pages/index
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-6p; F:8a-1p

FREETOWN
TOWN CLERK
P O BOX 438
02702
Phone: (508) 644-2203
Fax: (508) 644-9826
Email: townclerk@town.freetown.ma.us
Website: www.town.freetown.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

GARDNER
CITY CLERK
CITY HALL, ROOM 121
95 PLEASANT STREET
01440
Phone: (978) 630-4058
Fax: (978) 630-2589
Email: aagnelli@gardner-ma.gov
Website: www.gardner-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

GEORGETOWN
TOWN CLERK
1 LIBRARY ST
01833
Phone: (978) 352-5711
Fax: (978) 352-5725
Email: jmcgrane@georgetownma.gov
Website: www.georgetown.gov
Hours: M & W: 8:30a-12:30p

GILL
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
325 MAIN RD
01354
Phone: (413) 863-8103
Fax: (413) 863-7775
Email: townclerk@gillmass.org
Website: www.gillmass.org/
Hours: M-Th: 1p-4p; M: 5:30p-6:30p

GLOUCESTER
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
9 DALE AVE
01930
Phone: (978) 281-9720
Fax: (978) 282-3051
Email: llowe@gloucester-ma.gov
Website: www.ci.gloucester.ma.us/
Hours: M: 8:30a-4p; Tu-W: 10:30a-4p; Th: 10:30a-6:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

GOSHEN
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 124
01032
Phone: (413) 268-8236
Fax: (413) 268-8237
Email: d.polwrek@egoshen.com
Hours: M: 6p-8:30p

GOSNOLD
TOWN HALL
PO BOX 28
CUTTYHUNK
02713
Phone: (508) 990-7408 x 106
Fax: (508) 990-3318
Email: gosnoldtownclerk@yahoo.com
Website: http://egoshen.net/
Hours: Varies, call first

GRAFTON
TOWN CLERK
30 PROVIDENCE RD
01519
Phone: (508) 839-5335
Fax: (508) 839-4602
Email: clerks@grafton-ma.gov
Website: www.grafton-ma.gov
Hours: M, W-F: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p

GRANBY
TOWN CLERK
215 B WEST STATE ST
TOWN OFFICES
01033
Phone: (413) 467-7178
Fax: (413) 467-3101
Email: Kathykr@granbyma.org
Website: www.granbyma.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-3p; F: 9a-12p; By appointment

GRANVILLE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 247
01034
Phone: (413) 357-8585 x 3
Fax: (413) 357-6002
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: http://townofgranville.net
Hours: M: 9a-12p & 7:30p-9p

GREAT BARRINGTON
TOWN CLERK
334 MAIN ST
01230
Phone: (413) 528-1619
Fax: (413) 528-2290
Email: mryan@townofgb.org
Website: www.townofgb.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

GREENFIELD
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
14 COURT SQUARE
01301
Phone: (413) 772-1555
Fax: (413) 772-1542
Email: townclerk@greenfield-ma.gov
Website: www.townofgreenfield.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

GROTON
TOWN CLERK
173 MAIN STREET
01450
Phone: (978) 448-1100
Fax: (978) 448-2030
Email: townclerk@townofgroton.org
Website: www.townofgroton.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 9a-4p

GROVELAND
TOWN CLERK
183 MAIN STREET
01834
Phone: (978) 469-5005
Fax: (978) 469-5006
Email: abrodie@grovelandma.com
Website: www.grovelandma.com
Hours: M-Th: 9a-4:30p; M: 6p-8p; F: 9a-2p

HADLEY
TOWN CLERK
100 MIDDLE STREET
01035
Phone: (413) 584-1590
Fax: (413) 586-5661
Email: clerk@hadleyma.org
Website: www.hadleyma.org/
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

HALIFAX
TOWN CLERK
499 PLYMOUTH ST
02338
Phone: (781) 293-7970
Fax: (781) 294-7684
Email: bgaynor@town.halifax.ma.us
Website: www.town.halifax.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; 2nd Tu: 6p-8p

HAMILTON
TOWN CLERK
577 BAY ROAD
01936
Phone: (978) 468-5570
Fax: (978) 468-2682
Email: jwetson@hamiltonma.gov
Website: www.hamiltonma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p

HAMPDEN
TOWN CLERK
625 MAIN STREET
01036
Phone: (413) 566-2151
Fax: (413) 566-3513
Email: townclerk@hampden.org
Website: www.hampden.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-3p

HANCOCK
TOWN CLERK
3650 HANCOCK RD
01237
Phone: (413) 738-5225
Fax: (413) 738-5310
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: Th: 8a-1p; 1st Sat of the month 9a-11a

HANOVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
550 HANOVER STREET
02339
Phone: (781) 826-2691
Fax: (781) 826-5950
Email: clerk@hanover-ma.gov
Website: www.hanover-ma.gov/
Hours: M, T & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

HANSON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
542 LIBERTY STREET
02341
Phone: (781) 293-2772
Fax: (781) 294-0884
Email: bsloan@hanson-ma.gov
Website: www.hanson-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-8p

HARDWICK
TOWN CLERK
307 MAIN ST
BOX 575
01031
Phone: (413) 477-6700
Fax: (413) 477-6703
Email: clerk@townofhardwick.com
Website: www.townofhardwick.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-4p & 6:30-8p; Tu-W: 8:30a-12p; 3rd Sat of month 9a-12p

HARVARD
TOWN CLERK
13 AYER RD
01451-1458
Phone: (978) 456-4100
Fax: (978) 456-4113
Email: jvellante@harvard.ma.us
Website: www.harvard.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; Tu: 8:30a-7p

HARWICH
TOWN CLERK
732 MAIN ST
02645
Phone: (508) 430-7516
Fax: (508) 430-7617
Email: adoucette@town.harwich.ma.us
Website: www.harwich-ma.gov
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4p; F: 8:30a-12p

HATFIELD
TOWN CLERK
59 MAIN ST
01038
Phone: (413) 247-0492
Fax: (413) 247-5029
Email: lslysz@townofhatfield.org
Website: www.townofhatfield.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

HAVERHILL
CITY CLERK
4 SUMMER ST ROOM 118
01830
Phone: (978) 374-2312
Fax: (978) 373-8490
Email: mtoomey@cityofhaverhill.com
Website: www.ci.haverhill.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

HAWLEY
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
8 PUDDING HOLLOW RD
01339
Phone: (413) 339-5518
Fax: (413) 339-4959
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: By appointment

HEATH
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
1 EAST MAIN STREET
HEATH
01346
Phone: (413) 337-4934
Fax: (413)-337-8540
Email: townclerk@townofheath.org
Website: www.townofheath.org/
Hours: M: 5:30p-7:30p; By appointment

HINGHAM
TOWN CLERK
210 CENTRAL STREET
02043
Phone: (781) 741-1410
Fax: (781) 740-0239
Email: townclerk@hingham-ma.com
Website: www.hingham-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-1p

HINSDALE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 803
01235
Phone: (413) 655-2301
Fax: (413) 655-8807
Email: frissell1@msn.com
Website:
Hours: M: 10:30a-12:30p; W: 6:30p-8p; By appointment

HOLBROOK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
50 N FRANKLIN STREET
02343
Phone: (781) 767-4314
Fax: (781) 767-9054
Email: town_clerk@holbrookmassachusetts.us
Website: http://holbrookma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

HOLDEN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1196 MAIN STREET
01520
Phone: (508) 829-0265
Fax: (508) 829-0281
Email: cjenkins@townofholden.net
Website: www.townofholden.net
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

HOLLAND
TOWN CLERK
27 STURBRIDGE RD
01521
Phone: (413) 245-7108
Fax: (413) 245-7037
Email: hollandtowncler@gmail.com
Website: http://town.holland.ma.us
Hours: Tu: 9a-8p; S: 10a-12p

HOLLISTON
TOWN CLERK
703 WASHINGTON ST.
01746
Phone: (508) 429-0601
Fax: (508) 429-0684
Email: greendalee@holliston.k12.ma.us
Website: www.townofholliston.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

HOLYOKE
REGISTRAR OF VOTERS
536 DWIGHT ST
RM# 9
01040
Phone: (413) 322-5540
Fax: (413) 322-5541
Email: egans@ci.holyoke.ma.us
Website: www.holyoke.org/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

HOPEDALE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 7
78 HOPEDALE STREET
01747
Phone: (508) 634-2203
Fax: (508) 634-2200
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.hopedale-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 9a-12p & 1p-4p; M: 5p-7p

HOPKINTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
18 MAIN STREET
01748
Phone: (508) 497-9710
Fax: (508) 497-9702
Email: annc@hopkinton.org
Website: www.hopkinton.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

HUBBARDSTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
7 Main St., Unit 12
01452
Phone: (978) 928-1400 x 202
Fax: (978) 928-1402
Email: tclerk@hubbardstonma.us
Website: www.hubbardstonma.us
Hours: M: 2p-8p; Tu-Th: 8a-4p

HUDSON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
78 MAIN ST
01749
Phone: (978) 568-9615
Fax: (978) 562-8508
Email: jwordell@townofhudson.org
Website: www.townofhudson.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

HULL
TOWN CLERK
253 ATLANTIC AVE
02045
Phone: (781) 925-2262
Fax: (781) 925-0224
Email: jbennett@town.hull.ma.us
Website: www.town.hull.ma.us
Hours: M & W: 8a-4p; Tu & Th: 8a-7:30p

HUNTINGTON
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 523
01050
Phone: (413) 667-3186
Fax: (413) 667-3507
Email: huntingtonclerk@comcast.net
Website: www.huntingtonma.us
Hours: M: 9a-12p; 1st & 3rd W: 6p-8p

IPSWICH
TOWN CLERK
25 GREEN STREET
01938
Phone: (978) 356-6600 x 1015
Fax: (978) 356-6021
Email: pamc@ipswich-ma.gov
Website: www.ipswich-ma.gov
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

KINGSTON
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
26 EVERGREEN STREET
02364
Phone: (781) 585-0502
Fax: (781) 585-0542
Email: mlmurzyn@kingstonmass.org
Website: www.kingstonmass.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-12p & 1p-4:30p

LAKEVILLE
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
346 BEDFORD ST
02347
Phone: (508) 946-8814
Fax: (508) 946-3970
Email: town.clerk@lakevillema.org
Website: www.lakevillema.org
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-5p

LANCASTER
TOWN HALL
695 MAIN ST, SUITE 2
01523
Phone: (978) 365-2542
Fax: (978) 368-4011
Email: sthompson@lancasterma.net
Website: www.ci.lancaster.ma.us
Hours: M: 9a-6p; T-Th: 9a-4p; F: By appointment

LANESBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 1492
01237
Phone: (413) 442-1351
Fax: (413) 443-5811
Email: tcmum@verizon.net
Website: M-Th: 8a-1p
Hours: M-Th: 7:30a-12:30p

LAWRENCE
ELECTION DIVISION
200 COMMON ST RM 4
01840
Phone: (978) 620-3290
Fax: (978) 722-9230
Email: rtejada@cityoflawrence.com
Website: www.cityoflawrence.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

LEE
TOWN CLERK
32 MAIN ST
01238
Phone: (413) 243-5505
Fax: (413) 243-5507
Email: sscarpa@town.lee.ma.us
Website: www.town.lee.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

LEICESTER
TOWN CLERK
3 WASHBURN SQUARE
01524
Phone: (508) 892-7011
Fax: (508) 892-7070
Email: davisd@leicesterma.org
Website: www.leicesterma.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:00a-5p; Tu: 8a-7p

LENOX
TOWN CLERK
6 WALKER ST
01240
Phone: (413) 637-5506
Fax: (413) 637-5518
Email: clerktreas@townoflenox.com
Website: www.townoflenox.com/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

LEOMINSTER
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
25 WEST ST
ROOM 5
01453
Phone: (978) 534-7536
Fax: (978) 534-7546
Email: lbouchard@leominster-ma.gov
Website: www.leominster-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p; Th Evenings till 5:30p

LEVERETT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
9 MONTAGUE RD
PO BOX 300
01054
Phone: (413) 548-9150
Fax: (413) 458-9150
Email: townclerk@leverett.ma.us
Website: www.leverett.ma.us
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 9:30a-2:30p

LEXINGTON
TOWN CLERK
1625 MASS. AVE
02420
Phone: (781) 862-0500
Fax: (781) 861-2754
Email: townclerk@lexingtonma.gov
Website: www.lexingtonma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

LEYDEN
TOWN HALL
16 WEST LEYDEN RD
01337
Phone: (413) 774-7769
Fax: (413) 772-0146
Email: leydenselectmen@live.com
Website: www.townofleyden.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-12:30p; W: 6p-7:30p

LINCOLN
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
16 LINCOLN ROAD
01773
Phone: (781) 259-2607
Fax: (781) 259-1677
Email: brookss@lincoltown.org
Website: www.lincolntown.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; July-Aug M-Th : 8a-5p

LITTLETON
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
37 SHATTUCK STREET
01460
Phone: (978) 540-2401
Fax: (978) 952-2321
Email: crory@littletonma.org
Website: www.littletonma.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-3p; Tu: 5p-8p; F: 9p-12p

LONGMEADOW
TOWN CLERK
20 WILLIAMS STREET
01106
Phone: (413) 565-4103
Fax: (413) 565-4130
Email: kingram@longmeadow.org
Website: www.longmeadow.org
Hours: M-Th: 8:15a-4:30p; F: 8:15a-12p

LOWELL
ELECTIONCENSUS DEPT.
375 MERRIMACK ST
RM 5 BASEMENT
01852
Phone: (978) 970-4046
Fax: (978) 970-4089
Email: gcenik@lowellma.gov
Website: www.lowellma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

LUDLOW
TOWN CLERK CMMC
488 CHAPIN ST.
01056
Phone: (413) 583-5600
Fax: (413) 583-5603
Email: clerk@ludlow.ma.us
Website: www.ludlow.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

LUNENBURG
BOARD OF REGISTRAR
17 MAIN ST
PO BOX 135
01462
Phone: (978) 582-4130
Fax: (978) 582-4148
Email: kherrick@lunenburgonline.com
Website: www.lunenburgonline.com
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8:30a-1:30p & 3:30p-6:30p

LYNN
VOTER REGISTRATION OFFICE
3 CITY HALL SQ
ROOM 203
01901
Phone: (781) 586-6805
Fax: (781) 477-7032
Email: maudley@ci.lynn.ma.us
Website: www.ci.lynn.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4p; Tu: 8:30a-8p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

LYNNFIELD
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
55 SUMMER ST
01940
Phone: (781) 334-9400
Fax: (781) 334-9469
Email: asummers@town.lynnfield.ma.us
Website: www.town.lynnfield.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

MALDEN
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
200 PLEASANT ST
ROOM 323
02148
Phone: (781) 397-7116
Fax: (781) 388-0610
Email: kanderson@cityofmalden.org
Website: www.ci.malden.ma.us/
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA
TOWN CLERK
10 CENTRAL ST
01944
Phone: (978) 526-2040
Fax: (978) 526-2001
Email: samolchukd@manchester.ma.us
Website: www.manchester.ma.us
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-5p; Th: 8:30a-8p

MANSFIELD
TOWN CLERK
6 PARK ROW
02048
Phone: (508) 261-7345
Fax: (508) 261-1083
Email: hchristian@mansfieldma.com
Website: mansfieldma.com
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

MARBLEHEAD
TOWN CLERK
188 WASHINGTON ST
01945
Phone: (781) 631-0528
Fax: (781) 631-0561
Email: townclerk@marblehead.org
Website: www.marblehead.org
Hours: M-Tu & Th: 8a-5p; W: 8a-6p; F: 8a-12:30p

MARION
MARION TOWN HALL
2 SPRING STREET
02738
Phone: (508) 748-3502
Fax: (508) 748-3534
Email: mbissonnette@marionma.gov
Website: www.marionma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-3:30p

MARLBOROUGH
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
140 MAIN ST
01752
Phone: (508) 460-3775
Fax: (508) 460-3723
Email: lthomas@marlborough-ma.gov
Website: www.marlborough-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p; Sept-June M: 8:30a-7p

MARSHFIELD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
870 MORAINE ST
02050
Phone: (781) 834-5540
Fax: (781) 834-6289
Email: ppicco@townofmarshfield.com
Website: www.townofmarshfield.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-7:30p; Tu-F: 8:30a-4:30p

MASHPEE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
16 GREAT NECK RD NO
02649
Phone: (508) 539-1400 x 5534
Fax: (508)-539-1428
Email: townclerk@ci.mashpee.ma.us
Website: www.ci.mashpee.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

MATTAPOISETT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
TOWN HALL 16 MAIN ST
BOX 89
02739
Phone: (508) 758-4103
Fax: (508) 758-3030
Email: bsullivan@mattapoisett.net
Website: www.mattapoisett.net
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p; 2nd & 4th Tu: 4p-6p

MAYNARD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
195 MAIN ST
01754
Phone: (978) 897-1000
Fax: (978) 897-8553
Email: msokolowski@townofmaynard.net
Website: www.townofmaynard-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

MEDFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
459 MAIN ST
02052
Phone: (508) 906-3024
Fax: (508) 359-6182
Email: cmayer@medfield.net
Website: www.town.medfield.net
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

MEDFORD
REGISTRARS OF VOTERS
85 GEORGE HASSETT DR
02155
Phone: (781) 393-2491
Fax: (781) 391-1895
Email: jjoyce@medford.org
Website: www.medford.org/Pages/index
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

MEDWAY
TOWN CLERK
155 VILLAGE STREET
02053
Phone: (508) 533-3204
Fax: (508) 533-3201
Email: mwhite@townofmedway.org
Website: www.townofmedway.org/
Hours: M: 8a-7:30p; T-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

MELROSE
MELROSE ELECTION DEPT
562 MAIN ST
02176
Phone: (781) 979-4125
Fax: (781) 979-4149
Email: langiolillo@cityofmelrose.org
Website: www.cityofmelrose.org
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; F 8:30-12:30

MENDON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
20 MAIN ST
PO BOX 54
01756
Phone: (508) 473-1085
Fax: (508) 478-8241
Email: townclerk@mendonma.net
Website: www.mendonma.net
Hours: M: 8a-6p; T-Th: 8a-4p

MERRIMAC
TOWN CLERKS OFFICE
2 SCHOOL STREET
01860
Phone: (978) 346-8013
Fax: (978) 346-7832
Email: townclerk@townofmerrimac.com
Website: www.merrimac01860.info
Hours: M, T & F: 9a-4p; Th: 9a-12p & 1p-7p

METHUEN
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
41 PLEASANT ST
112
01844
Phone: (978) 983-8515
Fax: (978) 983-8977
Email: ctouma-conway@ci.methuen.ma.us
Website: www.ci.methuen.ma.us/
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

MIDDLEBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
20 CENTRE ST 1ST FL
02346
Phone: (508) 946-2415
Fax: (508) 946-2308
Email: aferreira@middleborough.com
Website: www.middleborough.com
Hours: M,Tu & Th, F: 8:45a-5p

MIDDLEFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 265
01243
Phone: (413) 623-2079
Fax: (413) 623-6108
Email: TownClerk@middlefieldma.us
Website: www.middlefieldma.us
Hours: M: 7p-9p; Sat: 9a-12p

MIDDLETON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
48 SOUTH MAIN ST
01949
Phone: (978) 774-6927
Fax: (978) 774-6167
Email: townclerk@townofmiddleton.org
Website: www.townofmiddleton.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 9a-4p; Tu: 9a-8p; F: 9a-1pp

MILFORD
TOWN CLERK
52 MAIN ST
01757
Phone: (508) 634-2307
Fax: (508) 634-2324
Email: rbellaquua@townofmilford.com
Website: www.milford.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

MILLBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
127 ELM ST.
01527
Phone: (508) 865-9110
Fax: (508) 865-0857
Email: jdavolio@townofmillbury.net
Website: www.millbury-ma.org
Hours: M-Fri 8:30-4:30 Tue 4:30 – 7:00

MILLIS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
900 MAIN STREET
MEMORIAL BUILDING
02054
Phone: (508) 376-7046
Fax: (508) 376-7055
Email: psjogren@millis.net
Website: www.millis.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; T-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

MILLVILLE
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
8 CENTRAL STREET
01529
Phone: (508) 883-5849
Fax: (508) 883-2994
Email: townclerk@millvillema.org
Website: www.millvillema.org/
Hours: M-Th: 9a-1p; W: 6p-8p

MILTON
TOWN CLERK
525 CANTON AVENUE
02186
Phone: (617) 898-4859
Fax: (617) 696-6995
Email: jmullen@townofmilton.org
Website: www.townofmilton.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

MONROE
TOWN HALL
102 SCHOOL ST
01350
Phone: (413) 424-5272
Fax: (413) 424-5272
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Tu: 8a-12p

MONSON
TOWN CLERK
110 MAIN STREET
STE 4
01057
Phone: (413) 267-4115
Fax: (413) 267-3726
Email: townclerk@monson-ma.gov
Website: www.monson-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

MONTAGUE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
ONE AVENUE A
01376
Phone: (413) 863-3200
Fax: (413) 863-3224
Email: townclerk@montague-ma.gov
Website: www.montague.net/
Hours: M, T & Th: 8:30a-5:30p; W: 8:30a-6:30p

MONTEREY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 277
01245
Phone: (413) 528-5175
Fax: (413) 528-9452
Email: montclerks@verizon.net
Website: www.montereyma.gov/Public_Documents/index
Hours: W: 4p-6p; Sat: 9:30a-12:30p & By appointment

MONTGOMERY
TOWN CLERK
58 NORTH RD
01085
Phone: (413) 862-3386
Fax: (413) 862-3204
Email: tomfarcht@townofmtwashington.com
Website: www.townofmtwashington.com
Hours: By appointment

MOUNT WASHINGTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
118 EAST ST
01258
Phone: (413) 528-2839
Fax: (413) 528-2839
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M: 7:30p-9p; By appointment

NAHANT
TOWN HALL
334 NAHANT ROAD
01908
Phone: (781) 581-0018
Fax: (781) 593-0340
Email: mbarile@nahant.org
Website: www.nahant.org/default.shtml
Hours: M-F: 8a-12p

NANTUCKET
TOWN & COUNTY CLERK
16 BROAD STREET
02554
Phone: (508) 228-7216
Fax: (508) 325-5313
Email: cstover@nantucket-ma.gov
Website: www.nantucket-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-3:45p

NATICK
TOWN CLERK
13 EAST CENTRAL ST
01760
Phone: (508) 647-6459
Fax: (508) 655-6715
Email: dblatz@natickma.org
Website: www.natickma.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

NEEDHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 920663
1471 HIGHLAND AVENUE
02492
Phone: (781) 455-7510
Fax: (781) 449-4569
Email: Teaton@needhamma.gov
Website: www.needhamma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

NEW ASHFORD
TOWN HALL
188 MALLERY RD
01237
Phone: (413) 458-5461
Fax: (413) 458-5461
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: Hours Vary

NEW BEDFORD
BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISS
133 WILLIAM ST
ROOM 114
02740
Phone: (508) 979-1420
Fax: (508) 979-1422
Email: maria.tomasia@newbedford-ma.gov
Website: www.ci.new-bedford.ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

NEW BRAINTREE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
20 MEMORIAL DRIVE
01531
Phone: (508) 867-4952
Fax: (508) 867-4467
Email: townclerk@newbraintree.org
Website: www.newbraintree.org
Hours: M: 7p-9p; First Sat of Month 9a-11a & By Appointment

NEW MARLBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 99
01244
Phone: (413) 229-8278
Fax: (413) 229-6674
Email: nmtownclerk@yahoo.com
Website: www.new-marlborough.ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

NEW SALEM
TOWN CLERK
24 SOUTH MAIN ST
01355
Phone: (978) 544-2731
Fax: (978) 544-5775
Email: newsalemsclerk@aol.com
Hours: M: 6p-9p

NEWBURY
TOWN CLERK
25 HIGH ROAD
01951
Phone: (978) 465-0862
Fax: (978) 465-3064
Email: townclerk@townofnewbury.org
Website: www.townofnewbury.org
Hours: M,W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p

NEWBURYPORT
CITY CLERK
60 PLEASANT STREET
P.O. BOX 550
01950
Phone: (978) 465-4407
Fax: (978) 462-7936
Email: rjones@cityofnewburyport.com
Website: www.cityofnewburyport.com
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

NEWTON
ELECTION COMMISSION
1000 COMMONWEALTH AV
02459
Phone: (617) 796-1350
Fax: (617) 796-1359
Email: dolson@newtonma.gov
Website: www.ci.newton.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p; Tu until 8p

NORFOLK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 LIBERTY LANE
02056
Phone: (508) 528-1400
Fax: (508) 541-3363
Email: bernardo@virtualnorfolk.org
Website: www.virtualnorfolk.org/public_documents/norfolkma_clerk/index
Hours: M-Th: 9a-5p

NORTH ADAMS
CITY CLERK
10 MAIN STREET
01247
Phone: (413) 662-3015
Fax: (413) 662-3050
Email: city_clerk@northadams-ma.gov
Website: www.northadams-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p; June-Aug M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

NORTH ANDOVER
TOWN CLERK
120 MAIN STREET
01845
Phone: (978) 688-9501
Fax: (978) 688-9557
Email: jbradshaw@townofnorthandover.com
Website: www.townofnorthandover.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
BOARD OF ELECTIONS
43 S WASHINGTON ST
02760
Phone: (508) 699-0106
Fax: (508) 699-0134
Email: boardofelections@north-attleboro.ma.us
Website: www.north-attleboro.ma.us
Hours: M-W, F: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-7p; July-Aug M-F: 8a-4p

NORTH BROOKFIELD
TOWN CLERK
215 NORTH MAIN ST
01535
Phone: (508) 867-0203
Fax: (508) 867-0217
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.northbrookfield.net/
Hours: Tu: 12p-3p & 5p-8p; Th:12p-3p

NORTH READING
TOWN CLERK / REGISTRARS
235 NORTH ST
01864
Phone: (978) 357-5230
Fax: (978) 664-4196
Email: bstats@northreadingma.gov
Website: www.northreadingma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-1p

NORTHAMPTON
REGISTRAR OF VOTERS
210 MAIN STREET RM 8
01060
Phone: (413) 587-1291
Fax: (413) 587-1308
Email: cclerk@northamptonma.gov
Website: www.northamptonma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

NORTHBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
63 MAIN STREET
01532
Phone: (508) 393-5001
Fax: (508) 393-6996
Email: adowd@town.northborough.ma.us
Website: www.town.northborough.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 7a-12p

NORTHBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
7 MAIN STREET
01588
Phone: (508) 234-2001
Fax: (508) 234-0813
Email: dcedrone@northbridgemass.org
Website: www.northbridgemass.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; T-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

NORTHFIELD
TOWN CLERK
69 MAIN ST
01360
Phone: (413) 498-2901
Fax: (413) 498-5103
Email: gzukowski@townnfld.com
Website: www.northfield.ma.us
Hours: M, Tu & 2nd W of Month: 9a-3p; All other W: 9a-12p & 5p-8p

NORTON
TOWN CLERK
70 E MAIN ST
02766
Phone: (508) 285-0230
Fax: (508) 285-0297
Email: townclerk@nortonmaus.com
Website: www.nortonma.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; Th:4:30-7:30p

NORWELL
TOWN CLERK
345 MAIN STREET
P O BOX 295
02061
Phone: (781) 659-8072
Fax: (781) 659-8073
Email: panderson@townofnorwell.net
Website: www.townofnorwell.net/Public_Documents/index
Hours: M-Tu: 8a-4:15p; W: 8a-7:30p; Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

NORWOOD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
566 WASHINGTON ST
02062
Phone: (781) 762-1240
Fax: (781) 278-3018
Email: mfolan@norwoodma.gov
Website: www.norwoodma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

OAK BLUFFS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 2490
56 SCHOOL STREET
02557
Phone: (508) 693-3554
Fax: (508) 693-5124
Email: dratcliff@oakbluffsma.gov
Website: www.oakbluffsma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM

OAKHAM
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
2 COLDBROOK RD
UNIT # 4
01068
Phone: (508) 882-5549
Fax: (508) 882-3060
Email: christine.mardirosian@oakham-ma.gov
Website: www.centralquabbin.org/towns/Oakham/index.shtml
Hours: Mon. evenings: 7pm- 9pm & Wednesdays: 9am-11:30am

ORANGE
TOWN CLERK
6 PROSPECT ST
01364
Phone: (978) 544-1100
Fax: (978) 544-1134
Email: townclerk@townoforange.org
Website: www.townoforange.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p, closed 12:30-1:00; F: 8a-1p

ORLEANS
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
19 SCHOOL RD
02653
Phone: (508) 240-3700
Fax: (508) 240-3388
Email: kdarling@town.orleans.ma.us
Website: www.town.orleans.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

OTIS
TOWN CLERK
1 N.MAIN RD. BOX 237
01253
Phone: (413) 269-0100
Fax: (413) 269-0111
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofotisma.com/Pages/index
Hours: Tu-F: 8a-3p; Sat: 9a-11a

OXFORD
OXFORD TOWN CLERK
325 MAIN ST
01540
Phone: (508) 987-6032
Fax: (508) 987-1804
Email: lkelley@town.oxford.ma.us
Website: www.town.oxford.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-4:30p

PALMER
TOWN CLERK
4417 MAIN ST
01069
Phone: (413) 283-2608
Fax: (413) 283-2637
Email: townclerk@townofpalmer.com
Website: www.townofpalmer.com
Hours: M-F: 9a-4:30p

PAXTON
TOWN CLERK
697 PLEASANT ST
01612
Phone: (508) 799-7347
Fax: (508) 797-0966
Email: sstone@townofpaxton.net
Website: www.townofpaxton.net
Hours: M: 12p-7p; T-Th: 9a-2p

PEABODY
CITY CLERK
24 LOWELL STREET
01960
Phone: (978) 538-5750
Fax: (978) 538-5985
Email: tim.spanos@peabody-ma.gov
Website: www.peabody-ma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4p; Th: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

PELHAM
TOWN CLERK & REGISTRARS
351 AMHERST RD
01002
Phone: (413) 253-0512
Fax: (413) 256-1061
Email: pelhamtownclerk@comcast.net
Website: www.townofpelham.org
Hours: F: 10:30a-1:30p

PEMBROKE
TOWN CLERK
100 CENTER STREET
02359
Phone: (781) 293-7211
Fax: (781) 293-4650
Email: msmith@townofpembrokemass.org
Website: www.pembroke-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; M: 7p-9p

PEPPERELL
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 MAIN STREET
01463
Phone: (978) 433-0339
Fax: (978) 433-0338
Email: jsauer@town.pepperell.ma.us
Website: www.town.pepperell.ma.us
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12:00p

PERU
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
3 EAST MAIN ROAD
01235
Phone: (413) 655-8312
Fax: (413) 655-2759
Email: townclerk@townofperuma.com
Hours: M: 6p-8p & By appointment

PETERSHAM
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
PO BOX 486
01366
Phone: (978) 724-6649
Fax: (978) 724-3501
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.centralquabbin.org/towns/Petersham/index.shtml
Hours: M: 6p-8p

PHILLIPSTON
TOWN CLERK
50 THE COMMON
01331
Phone: (978) 249-1733
Fax: (978) 249-1733
Email: townclerk@phillipston-ma.gov
Website: www.phillipston.gov
Hours: M: 12p-2p & 6p-8p; W: 4p-6p; Sat: 8:30a-10a

PITTSFIELD
REGISTRARS OF VOTERS
70 ALLEN STREET
01201
Phone: (413) 499-9460
Fax: (413) 499-9463
Email: ltyer@pittsfieldch.com
Website: www.pittsfield.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

PLAINFIELD
TOWN HALL
348 MAIN ST
01070
Phone: (413) 634-5582
Fax: (413) 634-5785
Email: thatcher@bcn.net
Website: www.plainfieldmass.us/general.htm
Hours: Th: 6p-8p; By Appointment

PLAINVILLE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 1717
02762
Phone: (508) 695-3010
Fax: (508) 695-1857
Email: erobertson@plainville.ma.us
Website: www.plainville.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; M: 5p-8p

PLYMOUTH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
11 LINCOLN ST
02360
Phone: (508) 747-1620
Fax: (508) 830-4062
Email: lpizer@townhall.plymouth.ma.us
Website: www.plymouth-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 7:30a-5p: Tu: 7:30a-7p

PLYMPTON
TOWN CLERK
5 PALMER ROAD
02367
Phone: (781) 585-3220
Fax: (781) 582-1505
Email: town_clerk@town.plympton.ma.us
Website: http://town.plympton.ma.us/
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 9a-2p; M: 6p-8p

PRINCETON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
6 TOWN HALL DRIVE
01541
Phone: (978) 464-2103
Fax: (978) 464-2106
Email: townclerk@town.princeton.ma.us
Website: www.town.princeton.ma.us
Hours: M-W: 8a-3:30p; Tu: 5p-7p; Th: 8a-12p

PROVINCETOWN
TOWN HALL
260 COMMERCIAL ST
02657
Phone: (508) 487-7013
Fax: (508) 487-9560
Email: djohnstone@provincetown-ma.gov
Website: www.provincetown-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-6p

QUINCY
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
1305 HANCOCK ST
02169
Phone: (617) 376-1131
Fax: (617) 376-1139
Email: ncrispo@quincyma.gov
Website: www.quincyma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

RANDOLPH
TOWN CLERK/REGISTRAR
41 SOUTH MAIN ST
02368
Phone: (781) 961-0900
Fax: (781) 961-0919
Email: bhoward@randolph-ma.gov
Website: www.townofrandolph.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; Tu-F: 8:30a-4:30p

RAYNHAM
TOWN CLERK
558 SOUTH MAIN ST.
02767
Phone: (508) 824-2700
Fax: (508) 823-1812
Email: hlounsbury@town.raynham.ma.us
Website: www.town.raynham.ma.us/Public_Documents/index2
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 7p-9p; F: 8:30a-12p

READING
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
16 LOWELL ST
01867
Phone: (781) 942-9050
Fax: (781) 942-9070
Email: lgemme@ci.reading.ma.us
Website: www.ci.reading.ma.us/Pages/index
Hours: M,W & Th: 7:30a-5:30p; Tu: 7:30a-7p

REHOBOTH
TOWN CLERK
148R PECK ST
02769
Phone: (508) 252-6502
Fax: (508) 252-5342
Email: kconti@town.rehoboth.ma.us
Website: www.town.rehoboth.ma.us/
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

REVERE
ELECTION DEPARTMENT
281 BROADWAY
02151
Phone: (781) 286-8200
Fax: (781) 286-8206
Email: dcolella@revere.org
Website: www.revere.org
Hours: M-Th: 8:15a-5p; F: 8:15a-12:15p; Closed the last Friday of the month.

RICHMOND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1529 STATE RD
01254
Phone: (413) 698-3315
Fax: (413) 698-3272
Email: clerk@richmondma.org
Website: www.richmondma.org/townhall.htm
Hours: Tu-F: 9a-12p; 1st, 2nd, & 4th W: 6p-8p

ROCHESTER
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
1 CONSTITUTION WAY
02770
Phone: (508) 763-3866
Fax: (508) 763-4892
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofrochestermass.com/
Hours: M: 9a-12p & 5p-7p; Tu-F: 9a-12p

ROCKLAND
TOWN CLERK
242 UNION ST
02370
Phone: (781) 871-1892
Fax: (781) 871-0386
Email: clerk@rockland-ma.gov
Website: www.rockland-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; 1st & 3rd M: 7p-8:30p

ROCKPORT
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 429
01966
Phone: (978) 546-6894
Fax: (978) 546-3562
Email: TownClerk@town.rockport.ma.us
Website: www.town.rockport.ma.us/
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-6p; F: 8a-1p

ROWE
TOWN CLERK
34 BROADWAY
01367
Phone: (413) 339-5520
Fax: (413) 339-5316
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.rowe-ma.gov/Pages/index
Hours: Tu: 8:30a-12:00p

ROWLEY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 351
01969
Phone: (978) 948-2081
Fax: (978) 948-2162
Email: townclerk@townofrowley.org
Website: www.town.rowley.ma.us/
Hours: M: 1p-8p; Tu,Th & F: 8a-12p; W: 8a-4:30p

ROYALSTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 127
01368
Phone: (978) 249-0493
Fax: (978) 575-0748
Email: townclerk@royalston-ma.gov
Website: www.royalston.com/
Hours: M 9a.m to 1 p.m, Summer hours June 21-Labor Day M 5-8:30 p.m.

RUSSELL
TOWN CLERK
65 MAIN ST
01071
Phone: (413) 862-3265
Fax: (413) 862-3103
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofrussell.us
Hours: Tu: 5:30p-7:30p; F: 4p-6p

RUTLAND
TOWN CLERK
250 MAIN STREET
01543
Phone: (508) 886-4104
Fax: (508) 886-2929
Email: sallyh@townofrutland.org
Website: www.townofrutland.org/
Hours: M & W: 8a-4:30p; Tu: 8a-7p; Th: 8:30a-1p

SALEM
CITY CLERK
93 WASHINGTON ST
01970
Phone: (978) 745-9595
Fax: (978) 740-9209
Email: clapointe@salem.com
Website: www.salem.com
Hours: M-W : 8a-4p; Th: 8a- 7p; F: 8a-12p

SALISBURY
TOWN CLERK/REGISTRARS
5 BEACH ROAD
01952
Phone: (978) 462-1145
Fax: (978) 462-4176
Email: townclerk@salisburyma.gov
Website: www.salisburyma.gov
Hours: M: 8:30a-6p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4p; F: 8:30a-1p

SANDISFIELD
TOWN HALL
3 SILVERBROOK RD
P O BOX 163
01255
Phone: (413) 258-4711
Fax: (413) 258-4225
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 9a-2p; M: 6p-7p

SANDWICH
TOWN CLERK
145 MAIN ST
02563
Phone: (508) 888-0340
Fax: (508) 888-2497
Email: twhite@townofsandwich.net
Website: www.sandwichmass.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-8p

SAUGUS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
298 CENTRAL ST
01906
Phone: (781) 231-4101
Fax: (781) 231-4109
Email: jrappa@saugus-ma.gov
Website: www.saugus-ma.gov
Hours: M:8:30a-7p;T-Th:8:15a-5p;F:8:15a-12:30p;
June-Aug M:8:30a-7p;T-Th:8:15a-4p;F: 8:15a-12:30p

SAVOY
TOWN HALL
720 MAIN RD
01256
Phone: (413) 743-3759
Fax: (413) 743-4292
Email: townofsavoy@verizon.net
Website: www.townofsavoy.org/
Hours: Tu: 12p-1p; By appointment

SCITUATE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
600 C J CUSHING WAY
02066
Phone: (781) 545-8743
Fax: (781) 545-8704
Email: townclerk@town.scituate.ma.us
Website: www.town.scituate.ma.us/townhall.html
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:45p; Tu: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-11:45a

SEEKONK
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
100 PECK ST
02771
Phone: (508) 336-2920
Fax: (508) 336-0764
Email: jparker@seekonk-ma.gov
Website: www.seekonk.info
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-12p

SHARON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
90 SOUTH MAIN ST
02067
Phone: (781) 784-1505
Fax: (781) 784-1503
Email: mchused@townofsharon.org
Website: www.townofsharon.net/
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-5p; Th: 8:30a-8p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

SHEFFIELD
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 175
01257
Phone: (413) 229-7000
Fax: (413) 229-7010
Email: fjoyce@sheffieldma.gov
Website: www.sheffieldma.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

SHELBURNE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
51 BRIDGE ST
01370
Phone: (413) 625-0300
Fax: (413) 625-0303
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M & Tu: 10a-5p; Th: 10a-4p

SHERBORN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
19 WASHINGTON STREET
01770
Phone: (508) 651-7853
Fax: (508) 651-0407
Email: Carole.Marple@sherbornma.org
Website: www.sherbornma.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12p

SHIRLEY
TOWN CLERK
7 KEADY WAY
01464
Phone: (978) 425-2600
Fax: (978) 425-2681
Email: amcdougall@shirley-ma.gov
Website: www.shirley-ma.gov
Hours: M: 9a-3p & 6p-8:30p; T-Th: 9-3p; By appointment M-Th: 3p-4:30p

SHREWSBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
100 MAPLE AVE
01545
Phone: (508) 841-8507
Fax: (508) 842-0587
Email: swright@th.ci.shrewsbury.ma.us
Website: www.shrewsbury-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

SHUTESBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 COOLEYVILLE ROAD
P.O. BOX 264
01072
Phone: (413) 259-1204
Fax: (413) 259-1107
Email: townclerk@shutesbury.org
Website: www.shutesbury.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-1p & By appointment

SOMERSET
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
140 WOOD STREET
02726
Phone: (508) 646-2818
Fax: (508) 646-2802
Email: dberge@town.somerset.ma.us
Website: www.somersetmass.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p; W: 4p-6p every other Wed, call first

SOMERVILLE
ELECTION COMMISSION
93 HIGHLAND AVE
02143
Phone: (617) 625-6600
Fax: (617) 625-5643
Email: nsalerno@somervillema.gov
Website: www.somervillema.gov
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

SOUTH HADLEY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
116 MAIN ST
01075
Phone: (413) 538-5023
Fax: (413) 538-7565
Email: chamlin@southhadleyma.gov
Website: www.southhadley.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

SOUTHAMPTON
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 276,TOWN HALL
01073
Phone: (413) 527-8392
Fax: (413) 527-1471
Email: townclerk@southampton.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

SOUTHBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
17 COMMON ST
01772
Phone: (508) 485-0710
Fax: (508) 480-0161
Email: townclerk@southboroughma.com
Website: www.southboroughma.com
Hours: M,W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

SOUTHBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
41 ELM ST
01550
Phone: (508) 764-5408
Fax: (508) 764-5425
Email: mdaoust@southbridgemass.org
Website: www.ci.southbridge.ma.us
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

SOUTHWICK
TOWN CLERK
454 COLLEGE HIGHWAY
01077
Phone: (413) 569-5504
Fax: (413) 569-0667
Email: treasurer@southwick.ma.net
Website: www.southwickma.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

SPENCER
TOWN CLERK
157 MAIN ST
01562
Phone: (508) 885-7500
Fax: (508) 885-7528
Email: jmulhall@spencerma.gov
Website: www.spencerma.gov
Hours: M & Tu: 7:30a-4:30p & 6p-8p; W & Th: 7:30a-4:30p, Closed Friday

SPRINGFIELD
ELECTION COMMISSION
36 COURT ST
GROUND FLOOR ROOM 8
01103
Phone: (413) 787-6189
Fax: (413) 787-6186
Email: kkusek@springfieldcityhall.com
Website: www.springfieldcityhall.com
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

STERLING
TOWN CLERK
BUTTERICK, RM 113
1 PARK ST
01564
Phone: (978) 422-8111
Fax: (978) 422-0289
Email: TownClerk@town.sterling.ma.us
Website: www.town.sterling.ma.us
Hours: Open to Public M-Th: 8:30a- 4p; F: 8:30a-11:30a

STOCKBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 417
01262
Phone: (413) 298-4170 x 251
Fax: (413) 298-4344
Email: clerk@townofstockbridge.com
Website: www.townofstockbridge.com/
Hours: M-F: 9a-12p & 1p-4p

STONEHAM
TOWN CLERK
35 CENTRAL ST
02180
Phone: (781) 279-2650
Fax: (781) 279-2653
Email: jhanright@ci.stoneham.ma.us
Website: www.stoneham-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

STOUGHTON
TOWN CLERK
10 PEARL ST.
02072
Phone: (781) 341-1300
Fax: (781) 232-9295
Email: cmooney@stoughton-ma.gov
Website: www.stoughton.org/
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-12p

STOW
TOWN CLERK
380 GREAT ROAD
01775-2127
Phone: (978) 897-4514
Fax: (978) 897-4534
Email: townclerk@stow-ma.gov
Website: www.stow-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12:30p & 1p-4p; F: 8a-1p; No F hours June 1- Sept 1

STURBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
308 MAIN STREET
01566
Phone: (508) 347-2510
Fax: (508) 347-5886
Email: lmurawski@town.sturbridge.ma.us
Website: www.town.sturbridge.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

SUDBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
322 CONCORD RD.
01776
Phone: (978) 639-3351
Fax: (978) 443-0264
Email: clerk@sudbury.ma.us
Website: www.sudbury.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p summer hours (July/Aug) may be different

SUNDERLAND
TOWN CLERK
12 SCHOOL STREET
01375
Phone: (413) 665-1442
Fax: (413) 665-1446
Email: townclerk@townofsunderland.us
Website: www.townofsunderland.us/
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; M: 6p-8p; Th: 8a-12p

SUTTON
TOWN CLERK
4 UXBRIDGE RD
01590
Phone: (508) 865-8725
Fax: (508) 865-8721
Email: l.rodgers@town.sutton.ma.us
Website: www.suttonma.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 9a-12p

SWAMPSCOTT
TOWN CLERK
22 MONUMENT AVE
01907
Phone: (781) 596-8855
Fax: (781) 596-8870
Email: sduplin@town.swampscott.ma.us
Website: www.town.swampscott.ma.us/
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

SWANSEA
TOWN CLERK
81 MAIN ST
02777
Phone: (508) 678-9389
Fax: (508) 324-6700
Email: SWANSEATOWNCLERK@YAHOO.COM
Website: www.swanseamass.org/
Hours: M, Tu, Th & F: 9a-4p; W: 9a-5p

TAUNTON
ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS
15 SUMMER ST
02780
Phone: (508) 821-1044
Fax: (508) 821-1202
Email: cityclerk@tmlp.net
Website: www.taunton-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p

TEMPLETON
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
4 ELM STREET
BALDWINVILLE, MA
01436
Phone: (978) 939-8466
Fax: (978) 939-8327
Email: charris@templeton1.org
Website: www.templeton1.org/
Hours: M: 7:30a-5p; Tu-Th: 8a-3p; F: 7:30a-1p

TEWKSBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1009 MAIN STREET
TOWN HALL
01876
Phone: (978) 640-4355
Fax: (978) 851-8610
Email: townclerk@tewksbury-ma.gov
Website: www.tewksbury.info
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p

TISBURY
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 606
51 SPRING ST
02568
Phone: (508) 696-4215
Fax: (508) 693-5876
Email: mmudge@tisburyma.gov
Website: www.tisburyma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

TOLLAND
TOWN HALL
241 W GRANVILLE RD
01034
Phone: (413) 258-4068
Fax: (413) 258-4048
Email: townclerktolland@earthlink.net
Website: www.tolland-ma.gov
Hours: M: 2p-4p & By appointment

TOPSFIELD
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
8 WEST COMMON STREET
01983
Phone: (978) 887-1505
Fax: (978) 887-1502
Email: pburke@topsfield-ma.gov
Website: www.topsfield-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

TOWNSEND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
272 MAIN ST
01469
Phone: (978) 597-1704
Fax: (978) 597-8135
Email: clerk@townsend.ma.us
Website: www.townsend.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p; Tu 9a-8p

TRURO
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 2012
02666-2012
Phone: (508) 349-7004
Fax: (508) 349-5505
Email: caslade@truro-ma.gov
Website: www.truro-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

TYNGSBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
25 BRYANTS LANE
01879
Phone: (978) 649-2300
Fax: (978) 649-2320
Email: jshifres@tyngsboroughma.gov
Website: www.tyngsboroughma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; F: 8a-12:30p

TYRINGHAM
TOWN HALL
P.O. BOX 416
116 MAIN RD
01264
Phone: (413) 243-1749
Fax: (413) 243-4942
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.tyringham-ma.gov/
Hours: By appointment

UPTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 MAIN ST
P. O. BOX 969
01568
Phone: (508) 529-3565
Fax: (508) 529-1010
Email: kmcelreath@upton.ma.us
Website: www.upton.ma.us/pages/town-clerk.php
Hours: M & W: 9a-3p; Tu & Th: 9:15a-1p & 6p-8p

UXBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
21 SOUTH MAIN ST
01569
Phone: (508) 278-3156
Fax: (508) 278-3154
Email: town.clerk@uxbridge-ma.gov
Website: www.uxbridge-ma.gov
Hours: M, T & Th: 7:30a-5p; W: 8a-7p

WAKEFIELD
TOWN CLERK
1 LAFAYETTE ST.
01880
Phone: (781) 246-6383
Fax: (781) 246-4155
Email: mgalvin@wakefield.ma.us
Website: www.wakefield.ma.us/
Hours: M-W: 8:a-4:30p; Th: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12:30p

WALES
TOWN OFFICES
3 HOLLOW ROAD
PO BOX 834
01081-0834
Phone: (413) 245-7571
Fax: (413) 245-3261
Email: townclerk@townofwales.net
Website: www.townofwales.net
Hours: M & Tu: 9a-3p

WALPOLE
TOWN HALL
135 SCHOOL ST
02081
Phone: (508) 660-7296
Fax: (508) 660-7228
Email: rfucile@walpole-ma.gov
Website: www.walpole-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

WALTHAM
DEPARTMENT OF CITY CLERK
610 MAIN STREET
02452
Phone: (781) 314-3120
Fax: (781) 314-3130
Email: rmalone@city.waltham.ma.us
Website: www.city.waltham.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WARE
126 MAIN ST.
01082
Phone: (413) 967-9648
Fax: (413) 967-9638
Email: ntalbot@townofware.com
Website: www.townofware.com/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WAREHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
54 MARION ROAD
02571
Phone: 508-291-3100 x 3143
Fax: 508-291-6511
Email: masilva@wareham.ma.us
Website: www.wareham.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WARREN
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 603
01083
Phone: (413) 436-5702
Fax: (413) 436-9754
Email: warrentownclerk@yahoo.com
Website: www.warren-ma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-3p; Th: 2p-7p

WARWICK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
12 ATHOL RD
01378
Phone: (978) 544-8304
Fax: (978) 544-6499
Email: townclerk@town.warwick.ma.us
Website: www.warwickma.org/
Hours: M: 9a-12p

WASHINGTON
TOWN CLERK
8 SUMMIT HILL RD
PO BOX 98
01223
Phone: (413) 623-8878
Fax: (413) 623-2116
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M: 7p-9p

WATERTOWN
TOWN CLERK
149 MAIN STREET
02472
Phone: (617) 972-6488
Fax: (617) 972-6595
Email: jflynn@watertown-ma.gov
Website: www.watertown-ma.gov
Hours: M, W-Th: 8:30a-5p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-5p; June-Aug F: 8:30a-2p

WAYLAND
TOWN CLERK
41 COCHITUATE ROAD
01778
Phone: (508) 358-3631
Fax: (508) 358-3627
Email: ltoombs@wayland.ma.us
Website: www.wayland.ma.us
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p, F: 8:30a-12:30p

WEBSTER
TOWN CLERK
350 MAIN ST SUITE 3
01570
Phone: (508) 949-3850
Fax: (508) 949-3850
Email: bcraver@webster-ma.gov
Website: www.webster-ma.gov/
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8:30a-12p

WELLESLEY
TOWN CLERK
525 WASHINGTON ST
02482
Phone: (781) 431-1019
Fax: (781) 237-5037
Email: knagle@wellesleyma.gov
Website: www.wellesleyma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

WELLFLEET
TOWN CLERK
300 MAIN STREET
02667
Phone: (508) 349-0301
Fax: (508) 349-0317
Email: dawn.rickman@wellfleet-ma.gov
Website: www.wellfleet-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WENDELL
TOWN CLERK
9 Morse Village Rd
P. O. Box 41
WENDELL DEPOT MA
01380
Phone: 978-544-3395 x 102
Fax: 978-544-7467
Email: townclerk@wendellmass.us
Website: www.wendellmass.us/
Hours: W: 6:30p-8:30p and by appointment

WENHAM
TOWN CLERK
138 MAIN STREET
01984
Phone: (978) 468-5520
Fax: (978) 468-8014
Email: treid@wenhamma.gov
Website: www.wenhamma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 9a-4:30p; Tu: 9a-7p; F: 9a-1p

WEST BOYLSTON
TOWN CLERK
127 HARTWELL ST, 100
01583
Phone: (508) 835-6240
Fax: (508) 835-4102
Email: kim.hopewell@westboylston-ma.gov
Website: www.westboylston.com
Hours: M-W: 9a-4p; Th-F: 9a-2:30p

WEST BRIDGEWATER
TOWN CLERK
65 NORTH MAIN ST
02379
Phone: (508) 894-1200
Fax: (508) 894-1210
Email: nmorrison@wbridgewater.com
Website: www.town.west-bridgewater.ma.us
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-7p; F: 8a-1p

WEST BROOKFIELD
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
2 E. MAIN ST
01585
Phone: (508) 867-1421
Fax: (508) 867-1400
Email: sallen@town.west-brookfield.ma.us
Website: www.wbrookfield.com/
Hours: M-Th: 9a-2p

WEST NEWBURY
TOWN CLERK
381 MAIN ST
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
01985
Phone: (978) 363-1100
Fax: (978) 363-1117
Email: mmccarron@wnewbury.org
Website: www.wnewbury.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

WEST SPRINGFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
26 CENTRAL ST
01089
Phone: (413) 263-3012
Fax: (413) 263-3046
Email: ofrizzell@west-springfield.ma.us
Website: www.west-springfield.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

WEST STOCKBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
21 STATE LINE RD
01266
Phone: (413) 232-0300
Fax: (413) 232-7195
Email: wstnclerk@msn.com
Website: www.weststockbridge-ma.gov
Hours: T & Th: 1:30p-4p

WEST TISBURY
TOWN HALL
BOX 278
02575
Phone: (508) 696-0148
Fax: (508) 696-0103
Email: townclerk@westtisbury-ma.gov
Website: www.westtisbury-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-1:30p

WESTBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
34 WEST MAIN STREET
01581
Phone: (508) 366-3020
Fax: (508) 366-3099
Email: nyendriga@town.westborough.ma.us
Website: www.town.westborough.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-8p; F: 7:30a-12p

WESTFIELD
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
59 COURT STREET
ROOM 211
01085
Phone: (413) 572-6266
Fax: (413) 564-3114
Email: m.colon@cityofwestfield.org
Website: www.cityofwestfield.org
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p

WESTFORD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
55 MAIN STREET
01886
Phone: (978) 692-5515
Fax: (978) 399-2555
Email: ktari@westfordma.gov
Website: www.westfordma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WESTHAMPTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
ONE SOUTH RD
01027
Phone: (413) 527-0463
Fax: (413) 527-8655
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: Every M: 9-5; 7p-8p also by appointment

WESTMINSTER
TOWN CLERK
11 SOUTH STREET
01473
Phone: (978) 874-7406
Fax: (978) 874-7411
Email: dmacaloney@westminster-ma.gov
Website: www.westminster-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

WESTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 378
11 TOWN HOUSE ROAD
02493
Phone: (781) 893-7320
Fax: (781) 529-0106
Email: davenport.d@westonmass.org
Website: www.weston.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

WESTPORT
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
816 MAIN RD
02790
Phone: (508) 636-1001
Fax: (774) 264-5152
Email: clerk@westport-ma.gov
Website: www.westport-ma.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p; 1st M of month: 8:30a-6p

WESTWOOD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
580 HIGH ST
02090
Phone: (781) 326-3964
Fax: (781) 329-8030
Email: dpowers@townhall.westwood.ma.us
Website: www.townhall.westwood.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-1p

WEYMOUTH
TOWN CLERK/REGISTRAR
75 MIDDLE STREET
02189
Phone: (781) 682-6129
Fax: (781) 335-3283
Email: crose@weymouth.ma.us
Website: www.weymouth.ma.us
Hours: M-Tu & Th-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WHATELY
TOWN CLERK
218 CHESTNUT PLAIN R
P. O. BOX 89
01093
Phone: (413) 665-0054
Fax: (413) 665-9560
Email: tclerk2@comcast.net
Website: www.whately.org
Hours: M, W, Th & F: 9a-4p; Tu: 12p-7p

WHITMAN
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
P O BOX 426
54 SOUTH AVENUE
02382
Phone: (781) 618-9710
Fax: (781) 618-9791
Email: pamela.martin@whitman-ma.gov
Website: www.whitman-ma.gov/
Hours: M, W-F: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7:30p

WILBRAHAM
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
240 SPRINGFIELD ST
01095
Phone: (413) 596-2800
Fax: (413) 596-2830
Email: blitchfield@wilbraham-ma.gov
Website: www.wilbraham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WILLIAMSBURG
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 447
01039-0447
Phone: (413) 268-8402
Fax: (413) 268-8409
Email: townclerk@burgy.org
Website: www.burgy.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-3:30p & 5:30p-7p; Tu: 8:30a-3:30p; Th: 9a-2p & 6p-8p

WILLIAMSTOWN
TOWN CLERK
31 NORTH ST
01267
Phone: (413) 458-9341
Fax: (413) 458-4839
Email: mkennedy@williamstown.net
Website: www.williamstown.net
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WILMINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
121 GLEN RD
01887
Phone: (978) 658-2030
Fax: (978) 657-7564
Email: sgeorge@town.wilmington.ma.us
Website: www.wilmingtonma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WINCHENDON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
109 FRONT ST
01475
Phone: (978) 297-2766
Fax: (978) 297-1616
Email: CLERK@TOWN.WINCHENDON.MA.US
Website: www.TOWNOFWINCHENDON.COM
Hours: M: 8a-6p; Tu-Th: 8a-5p

WINCHESTER
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
71 MOUNT VERNON
01890
Phone: (781) 721-7130
Fax: (781) 721-1153
Email: townclerk@winchester.us
Website: www.winchester.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WINDSOR
TOWN CLERK
3 HINSDALE RD
01270
Phone: (413) 684-3977
Fax: (413) 684-1585
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M: 5p-7p & By appointment

WINTHROP
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 METCALF SQUARE
TOWN HALL
02152
Phone: (617) 846-1742
Fax: (617) 539-5814
Email: jdemato@town.winthrop.ma.us
Website: www.town.winthrop.ma.us/Pages/index
Hours: M & W: 8a-4:30p; T & Th: 8a-7p

WOBURN
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
10 COMMON ST
01801
Phone: (781) 897-5850
Fax: (781) 897-5859
Email: wcampbell@cityofwoburn.com
Website: www.cityofwoburn.com
Hours: M-W: 9a-4:30p; Th: 9a-7p; F: 9a-1p

WORCESTER
ELECTION DIVISION
455 MAIN ST RM 208
01608
Phone: (508) 799-1134
Fax: (508) 799-1137
Email: medunaj@worcesterma.gov
Website: www.worcesterma.gov
Hours: M: 8:45a-5p; Tu-F: 8:45a-4:15p

WORTHINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 247
01098
Phone: (413) 238-5577
Fax: (413) 238-5579
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.worthington-ma.us/
Hours: Sat: 10a-12:30p

WRENTHAM
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
79 SOUTH ST
02093
Phone: (508) 384-5415
Fax: (508) 384-5434
Email: cmollica@wrentham.ma.us
Website: www.wrentham.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-1:30p

YARMOUTH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1146 ROUTE 28
SO. YARMOUTH, MA
02664
Phone: (508) 398-2231
Fax: (508) 760-4842
Email: jhibbert@yarmouth.ma.us
Website: www.yarmouth.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

——————————————————————————–

Rhode Island City and Town Directory

Barrington
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-247-1900

Bristol
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-253-7000

Burrillville
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-568-4300

Central Falls
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-727-7400

Charlestown
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-364-1200

Coventry
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-821-6400

Cranston
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-461-1000

Cumberland
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-728-2400

East Greenwich
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-886-8665

East Providence
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-435-7500

Exeter
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-295-7500

Foster
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-392-9200

Glocester
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-568-6206

Hopkinton
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-377-7777

Jamestown
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-423-7200

Johnston
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-351-6618

Lincoln
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-333-1100

Little Compton
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-635-4400

Middletown
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-849-5540

Narragansett
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-789-1044

New Shoreham
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-466-3200

Newport
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City Web site
Phone: 401-846-9600

North Kingstown
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-294-3331

North Providence
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-232-0900

North Smithfield
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-767-2200

Pawtucket
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City Web site
Phone: 401-728-0500

Portsmouth
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-683-3255

Providence
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City Web site
Phone: 401-421-7740

Richmond
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-539-2497

Scituate
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-647-2822

Smithfield
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-233-1000

South Kingstown
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-789-9331

Tiverton
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-625-6700

Warren
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-245-7340

Warwick
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City Web site
Phone: 401-738-2000

West Greenwich
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-392-3800

West Warwick
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Town Web site
Phone: 401-822-9200

Westerly
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-348-2500

Woonsocket
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-762-6400

 

Adapting Motor Vehicles for People with disAbilities

newenglandwheelchairvan.com boston strong

Introduction

A Proven Process for Gaining Freedom on the Road

The introduction of new technology continues to broaden opportunities for people with disabilities to drive vehicles with adaptive devices. Taking advantage of these opportunities, however, can be time consuming and, sometimes, frustrating.

The information in this brochure is based on the experience of driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals who work with individuals who require adaptive devices for their motor vehicles. It is centered around a proven process —evaluating your needs, selecting the right vehicle, choosing a qualified dealer to modify your vehicle, being trained, maintaining your vehicle — that can help you avoid costly mistakes when purchasing and modifying a vehicle with adaptive equipment.

Also included is general information on cost savings, licensing requirements, and organizations to contact for help. Although the brochure focuses on drivers of modified vehicles, each section contains important information for people who drive passengers with disabilities.

 


 

Investigate Cost Saving Opportunities &Licensing Requirements

Cost Saving Opportunities

The costs associated with modifying a vehicle vary greatly. A new vehicle modified with adaptive equipment can cost from $20,000 to $80,000. Therefore, whether you are modifying a vehicle you own or purchasing a new vehicle with adaptive equipment, it pays to investigate public and private opportunities for financial assistance.

There are programs that help pay part or all of the cost of vehicle modification, depending on the cause and nature of the disability. For information, contact your state’s Department of Vocational Rehabilitation or another agency that provides vocational services, and, if appropriate, the Department of Veterans Affairs. You can find phone numbers for these state and federal agencies in a local phone book. Also, consider the following.

  • Many nonprofit associations that advocate for individuals with disabilities have grant programs that help pay for adaptive devices.
  • If you have private health insurance or workers’ compensation, you may be covered for adaptive devices and vehicle modification. Check with your insurance carrier.
  • Many manufacturers have rebate or reimbursement plans for modified vehicles. When you are ready to make a purchase, find out if there is such a dealer in your area.
  • Some states waive the sales tax for adaptive devices if you have a doctor’s prescription for their use.
  • You may be eligible for savings when submitting your federal income tax return. Check with a qualified tax consultant to find out if the cost of your adaptive devices will help you qualify for a medical deduction.

Licensing Requirements

All states require a valid learner’s permit or driver’s license to receive an on–the–road evaluation. You cannot be denied the opportunity to apply for a permit or license because you have a disability. However, you may receive a restricted license, based on your use of adaptive devices.

 


 

Evaluate Your Needs

Driver rehabilitation specialists perform comprehensive evaluations to identify the adaptive equipment most suited to your needs. A complete evaluation includes vision screening and, in general, assesses:

  • Muscle strength, flexibility, and range of motion
  • Coordination and reaction time
  • Judgment and decision making abilities
  • Ability to drive with adaptive equipment

Upon completion of an evaluation, you should receive a report containing specific recommendations on driving requirements or restrictions, and a complete list of recommended vehicle modifications.

Finding a Qualified Evaluator

To find a qualified evaluator in your area, contact a local rehabilitation center or call the Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED). The phone number is in the resource section. The Association maintains a data base of certified driver rehabilitation specialists throughout the country. Your insurance company may pay for the evaluation. Find out if you need a physician’s prescription or other documen-tation to receive benefits.

Being Prepared for an Evaluation

Consult with your physician to make sure you are physically and psychologically prepared to drive. Being evaluated too soon after an injury or other trauma may indicate the need for adaptive equipment you will not need in the future. When going for an evaluation, bring any equipment you normally use, e.g., a walker or neck brace. Tell the evaluator if you are planning to modify your wheelchair or obtain a new one.

Evaluating Passengers with Disabilities

Evaluators also consult on compatibility and transportation safety issues for passengers with disabilities. They assess the type of seating needed and the person’s ability to exit and enter the vehicle. They provide advice on the purchase of modified vehicles and recommend appropriate wheelchair lifts or other equipment for a vehicle you own. If you have a child who requires a special type of safety seat, evaluators make sure the seat fits your child properly. They also make sure you can properly install the seat in your vehicle.

 


 

Select the Right Vehicle

Selecting a vehicle for modification requires collaboration among you, your evaluator, and a qualified vehicle modification dealer. Although the purchase or lease of a vehicle is your responsibility, making sure the vehicle can be properly modified is the responsibility of the vehicle modification dealer. Therefore, take the time to consult with a qualified dealer and your evaluator before making your final purchase. It will save you time and money. Be aware that you will need insurance while your vehicle is being modified, even though it is off the road.

The following questions can help with vehicle selection. They can also help determine if you can modify a vehicle you own.

  • Does the necessary adaptive equipment require a van, or will another passenger vehicle suffice?
  • Can the vehicle accommodate the equipment that needs to be installed?
  • Will there be enough space to accommodate your family or other passengers once the vehicle is modified?
  • Is there adequate parking space at home and at work for the vehicle and for loading/unloading a wheelchair?
  • Is there adequate parking space to maneuver if you use a walker?
  • What additional options are necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle?

If a third party is paying for the vehicle, adaptive devices, or modification costs, find out if there are any limitations or restrictions on what is covered. Always get a written statement on what a funding agency will pay before making your purchase.

 


 

Choose a Qualified Dealer to Modify Your Vehicle

Even a half inch change in the lowering of a van floor can affect a driver’s ability to use equipment or to have an unobstructed view of the road; so, take time to find a qualified dealer to modify your vehicle. Begin with a phone inquiry to find out about credentials, experience, and references. Ask questions about how they operate. Do they work with evaluators? Will they look at your vehicle before you purchase it? Do they require a prescription from a physician or other driver evaluation specialist? How long will it take before they can start work on your vehicle? Do they provide training on how to use the adaptive equipment?

If you are satisfied with the answers you receive, check references; then arrange to visit the dealer’s facility. Additional information to consider is listed below.

  • Are they members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has vehicle conversion standards?
  • What type of training has the staff received?
  • What type of warranty do they provide on their work?
  • Do they provide ongoing service and maintenance?
  • Do they stock replacement parts?

Once you are comfortable with the dealer’s qualifications, you will want to ask specific questions, such as:

  • How much will the modification cost?
  • Will they accept third party payment?
  • How long will it take to modify the vehicle?
  • Can the equipment be transferred to a new vehicle in the future?
  • Will they need to modify existing safety features to install the adaptive equipment?

While your vehicle is being modified, you will, most likely, need to be available for fittings. This avoids additional waiting time for adjustments once the equipment is fully installed. Without proper fittings you may have problems with the safe operation of the vehicle and have to go back for adjustments.

Some State Agencies specify the dealer you must use if you want reimbursement.

 


 

Obtain Training on the Use of New Equipment

Both new and experienced drivers need training on how to safely use new adaptive equipment. Your equipment dealer and evaluator should provide information and off-road instruction. You will also need to practice driving under the instruction of a qualified driving instructor until you both feel comfortable with your skills. Bring a family member or other significant person who drives to all your training sessions. It’s important to have someone else who can drive your vehicle in case of an emergency.

Some state vocational rehabilitation departments pay for driver training under specified circumstances. At a minimum, their staff can help you locate a qualified instructor. If your evaluator does not provide on-the-road instruction, ask him or her for a recommendation. You can also inquire at your local motor vehicle administration office.

 


 

Maintain Your Vehicle

Regular maintenance is important for keeping your vehicle and adaptive equipment safe and reliable. It may also be mandatory for compliance with the terms of your warranty. Some warranties specify a time period during which adaptive equipment must be inspected. These “check ups” for equipment may differ from those for your vehicle. Make sure you or your modifier submits all warranty cards for all equipment to ensure coverage and so manufacturers can contact you in case of a recall.

For additional copies of this brochure and other important vehicle safety information, you can contact DOT’s web site at www.nhtsa.dot.gov and the DOT Auto Safety Hotline: 888-DASH-2-DOT (888-327-4236).

 


 

Resources

The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED)
2425 N. Center Street # 369, Hickory, NC 28601
(866) 672-9466
www.driver-ed.org
www.aded.net

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA)
11211 N. Nebraska Ave., Suite A5, Tampa, FL 33612
(800) 833-0427 
www.nmeda.org

AAA
1000 AAA Drive, Heathrow, FL 32746-5063
(404) 444-7961
www.aaa.com

Department of Veteran Affairs
(800) 827-1000
www.va.gov

State Departments of Vocational Rehabilitation
Listed in telephone book.


The following manufacturers offer rebates or reimbursements on new vehicle modification.

Daimler Chrysler Corporation
(800) 255-9877
(TDD Users: (800) 922-3826)
www.automobility.daimlerchrysler.com

Ford Motor Company
(800) 952-2248
(TDD Users: (800) TDD-0312)
www.ford.com/mobilitymotoring

General Motors Corporation
(800) 323-9935
(TDD Users: (800) TDD-9935)
www.gmmobility.com

Saturn
(800) 553-6000, Prompt 3
(TDD Users: (800) 833-6000)
www.saturn.com

Volkswagen
(800) 822-8987
www.vw.com

Audi
(800) 822-2834
www.audiusa.com

2012 Dodge Grand Caravan Information · For Sale

Our New 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Mobility minivan has a New VMI Northstar conversion

Additional Information

20 miles
 3.6L V6 DOHC 24V
 Fuel Type: Gasoline
 MPG City/Hwy: 17 city/25 hwy

Pictures
VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com  VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com  VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com  VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.comVMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com VMi New England 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan VMiNewEngland.com

Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar Conversion

VMI first developed the Northstar handicap van conversion in the early 1990′s to meet customer preferences for increased interior space. To this day, the VMI Northstar on the Dodge Grand Caravan minivan remains one of the best mobility ramp vans in America.

By sliding out of a space below the floor, the Northstar mobility ramp maximizes space inside the accessible vehicle. There are so many benefits of an in-floor wheelchair ramp, it is easily understood why its so popular.

Description
Interior handles, and switches, buttons are easily accessed
Front passenger seat retains regular functions
No additional noise from handicap ramp
In the event of an accident, the accessible ramp is under the floor-not inside the mobility van
Works on curbs up to 10 inches tall
Increased maneuverability due to greater space inside the accessible van
Ramp-free doorway allows easy entry/exit for ambulatory passengers
Minimized conversion wear and tear (fewer ramp cycles to load/unload additional passengers)
Uncluttered and clean wheelchair vehicle interior
Mobility vehicle interior gets less dirt inside
Increased handicapped ramp width

Specifications
Maximum Floor Drop – 11″
Handicap Vehicle Ground Clearance – 5.5″
Door Opening Width – 30.75″
Door Opening Height – 55.125″
Usable Mobility Ramp Width – 29.25″
Wheelchair Ramp Length – 45.75″
Length from Back Seats to Kickplate – 58.25″
Overall Floor Length – 86″
Floor Width at Front Doors – 61″
Interior Height at Driver & Passenger Positions (Without Sunroof) – 58″
Interior Height at Center Position – 57.63″
Steering Wheel Bottom to Floor – 29.5″
Measured Down from Front Edge of Steering Wheel to Front Kick-Up – 16.25″

Standard Features
Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar only
Extremely-low 8.0° handicapped ramp angle
Sure Deploy backup system leaves accessible van conversion usable even with power failure
Manual secondary backup system for additional peace of mind
800lb. handicap ramp weight capacity

Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar AND Summit
Fully-powered accessible van ramp
11” drop FLEX Floor maximizes interior space and headroom for better maneuverability
Complete undercoating and rust proofing
PowerKneel system lowers the minivan to reduce ramp angle
Seamless integration with Dodge Grand Caravan vehicle electronics
Complete control through Dodge keyfob and interior switches
Removable front passenger and driver seat bases
No-skid wheelchair ramp surfacing
Complete crash testing and compliance with all government safety standards
3-year/36,000-mile warranty

Optional Features
Durafloor (rubberized flooring) to match Dodge Grand Caravan interiors

wheelchair lifts: automatic and semiautomatic MA, RI, CT, VT, NH & ME

wheelchair lifts automatic and semiautomatic newenglandwheelchairvan.com

TYPES OF WHEELCHAIR LIFTS

Usage of wheelchair lift can facilitate everyday functioning, eliminating the need to lift the wheelchair and place it into the vehicle with just pulling up to the platform of the lift and be lifted up or down. It is extremely convenient, giving confidence to wheelchair users to go to the places they want to. Wheelchair lifts made a significant and positive change compared to the previous experiences when they didn’t exist.

Wheelchair lifts are advanced mobility systems that have changed the way the disabled move, work and live, being a blessing for users and caregivers equally. They are used for wheelchair accessible vans and other mobility vehicles, known also by the name platform lift, making the travel of wheelchair user much easier and more pleasant. Wheelchair lifts have multiple purposes and can help people with disabilities in many ways, even being adapted according to individual needs in as many ways you need.

Usage of wheelchair lift can facilitate everyday functioning, eliminating the need to lift the wheelchair and place it into the vehicle with just pulling up to the platform of the lift and be lifted up or down. It is extremely convenient, giving confidence to wheelchair users to go to the places they want to. Wheelchair lifts made a significant and positive change compared to the previous experiences when they didn’t exist.

They can be automatic and semi-automatic, electric and hydraulic. Automatic one takes care of the folding, unfolding, lowering and raising, while semi-automatic one needs manual operating. Electric wheelchair lifts are easier to maintain than hydraulic ones. They are flexible and easy to install and come with battery back-up. The full benefit of electric wheelchair lift can be felt together with stair and automobile lifts and van ramps. Hydraulic ones don’t need electricity and can function in the case of power failure. However, they require constant maintenance and care.

Wheelchair lifts that are usually used for vans and minivans are called rotary or “swing” lifts because their method of operation involves moving the wheelchair by swinging it up-and-down or inside and outside. There is a great choice of wheelchair lifts, so you should consider all the options, with the respect for your needs and wants, including the decision about whether you want to travel in the wheelchair or in the vehicle seat, which will also mean the difference between installing it inside or outside the van. Both options have advantages and disadvantages.

An outside wheelchair lift is intended for your personal mobile device to be installed outside of the car or wheelchair vans. It will be carried behind, but the way that the driver will have complete road visibility. If you choose an outside lift, it will require very small modifications of the vehicle. The lift is usually attached to a trailer hitch on the rear.

The type of the wheelchair lifts has to be compatible with your van. There are some special features that can make a difference in your everyday functioning, for example having a back-up lifting or lowering mechanism if the main drive system fails. When you sort out your needs, it’s easier to make a decision about the choice of the corresponding advanced mobility system.

Lifts

In this section we explain the various types of lifts available on the market. There are advantages and disadvantages to all of these lifts. It is highly recommended that you get to know the lifts available, the product lines, your nearest dealers and their qualifications. If you purchase a lift only to find that there is no one within a reasonable distance to provide service and repairs you will soon regret that purchase. Always consult experts at VMi New England Mobility Center BEFORE you buy.

There are basically two types of wheelchair lifts:

  1. Platform Lift
  2. Rotary (or Swing) Lift

In addition, these two lifts come in various types. Hydraulic, electrical mechanical, gravity and those that combine hydraulic and electrical.

The hydraulic lift uses a pump and a cylinder filled with fluid pressure, which enables the pump to raise and lower the lift along with the power from the van’s battery.

The electricall mechanical lift operates either by chain or screw rod, with power provided solely by the battery.

The gravity lift has power to lift and fold, while gravity lowers the lift platform to ground level.

All of these lifts depend, at least in part, on the battery. If your battery is weak or dead, the lifts will not work.

If you are a scooter user, measure your scooter’s length. Some scooters are longer than the standard platform on lifts. An extended platform is available to accommodate these longer scooters. Be aware, though, that this could require a raised roof, too.

Platform Lift
This lift is stored either in the side, the rear, or under the floor of a van. The lift requires two doors or a sliding door on the side of a van. The platforms have expanded metal in the upper half of the platform for better visibility when the lift is folded and the van is being driven.

Lifts stored under the van require modifications to the exhaust system, gas tank, etc., depending on the make of the van. Only the pump and motor are located inside vans using under-the-floor lifts.

Platforms may also be different, depending on the lift. There are both solid and fold-in-half platforms.  The fold-in-half platform folds to give better accessibility to the doors. Some fold-in-half platform lifts are mounted on a single post.

Be aware of the differences between automatic and semi-automatic lifts. A fully automatic lift will fold, unfold, lower and raise by operating a switch located inside (on the side of the lift) or outside (on the side of the van), and, in most cases, on the dash. A semi-automatic lift requires manual folding and unfolding of the platform. Using a hand-held pendant switch, the platform can be mechanically lowered and raised. You MUST have assistance with this type of lift, as it is designed for passengers who will not be riding alone.

Rotary Lift (or “Swing Lift”)
The platform of this type of lift never folds. Instead it “swings” inside, outside and up-and-down. The rotary lift swings into the van and the lift platform sits on the floor in the middle of the van.

Some individuals like the rotary lift because of the parking convenience. Less room is needed to enter or exit the van. Also, this lift is mounted on one post inside the van. The post controls the swinging action of the lift. One of the drawbacks to the rotary lift, though, is the cross-over bar. On some rotary lifts this bar connects the platform to the swing bar, limiting space for loading and unloading on the platform.

Switches serve very necessary functions in this lift. In most cases there are three switches on the dash. They operate the lift as well as provide an open and close function for the power door openers. The motors fit into or beside the doors and are manufactured to fit only one brand of lift.

Back-up System
You may also want to purchase a back-up system for your lift. Many government agencies require a lift to have a back-up system for use in emergencies. With a back-up system the lift can be manually manuvered and users can exit the van with assistance from an outsider. Most back-up systems are herd to operate alone, so expect to need someone’s help.

Safety Flaps
All lifts have an extension or “curb” at the edge of the platform which is approximately three-to-four inches high. This safety flap is designed specifically to prevent the wheelchair or scooter from rolling past the edge of the platform.

Finally, when purchasing a lift, be sure to check on the use of raised doors. If needed, your lift will have to be ordered for the extended doors. Determine if this is necessary before completing your vehicle equipment decisions. It will help you avoid very costly errors.

Again, be sure to consult the experts at VMi New England Mobility Center BEFORE you buy a wheelchair van or wheelchair vehicle lift to prevent costly and frustrating mistakes.

Need help selling a wheelchair van in New England?

Toyota Sienna VMI Northstar wheelchair van at newenglandwheelchairvan.com

I want to sell my wheelchair van can you help? Yes we can!

We will buy your late model clean wheelchair van.

Need help selling your wheelchair van? We can help with that too.

Wheelchair Van Classifieds can offer a “for sale by owner” approach but, at the same time, do not afford a personal interaction with a trained mobility sales expert, we do.

 

Let us do all the hard work and sell your wheelchair vehicle for you through our New England network of sales professionals dedicated to ensuring people looking to buy handicap vans and adapted vehicles get something thats going to work for them.

Sure you can try and sell your used accessible vehicle in a online classifieds by creating an account and creating your classified ads listing.

VMi New England, Bridgewater, MA offers a mobility classifieds listing service for free on all vans we take on consignment to sell for you, in which we handle the sales process for your adapted vehicle. Learn more about having us sell your wheelchair van or other handicapped vehicles at our state of the art mobility center.

We accept all quality, serviceable mobility vehicles for consignment used Braun handicap van classifieds, pre-owned VMI mobility vans, and even used Rollx and AMS wheelchair vans, and all other brands of accessible vehicles.

We can get consumers financed that other wise would not be able to buy your van.

Have more questions? Give our mobility experts a call today at 508-607-6006 to ask more about our “consignment program” handicap minivans.

Find used handicap vans and accessible vehicles for sale in our online mobility classifieds. Shop our nationwide selection consignment vehicles sold through VMi New England. Included in our wheelchair van classifieds are adapted cars, trucks, SUVs, full-size vans, minivans, and other professionally modified vehicles for the disabled or elderly. Find pre-owned conversion minivans from, Braun Entervan (Braunability), Vantage Mobility (VMI) Northstar and Summit, Eldorado, Amerivan, IMS ramp vans and even AMS Vans, Rollx vans, and more.

Previous customers of VMi New England and Automotive Innovations receive a complimentary mobility equipment inspection and minor repairs free when contracting with us to sell you used wheelchair van

We are also happy to accept trade-ins toward the purchase of any new or used handicap accessible van.

 

Contact us to take advantage of our huge world wide network of people looking to buy handicap vans.

spinal cord injury rehabilitation program new england

spinal cord injury rehabilitation program new england http://newenglandwheelchairvan.com/

Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program

Early rehabilitation treatment is critical to help patients achieve their fullest potential following a spinal cord injury. At New England Rehabilitation Hospital patients learn how to adapt and return to a normal life. Patients learn how to avoid complications and increase independence. New England Rehabilitation Hospital is pleased to offer a primary care practice for individuals with spinal cord injuries. This program provides individuals with spinal cord injury a community based physician that has the expertise and commitment to care for their special needs on an ongoing and proactive basis.

The Spinal Cord Injury Team of experienced clinicians at New England Rehabilitation Hospital may include some or all of the following professionals dependent on the patient’s individual needs:

The Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Team Consists of:

New England Rehabilitation Hospital’s Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program is designed to help individuals maximize their functional abilities so they can successfully return to the community. This goal is accomplished through development of an individualized treatment plan for each patient by the interdisciplinary staff. New England Rehabilitation Hospital advocates for involvement of the family in all aspects of care, and ensures patient/family education, support and participation in life care planning. New England Rehabilitation Hospital is fortunate to have the Greater Boston Chapter of the National Spinal Cord Injury Association at the hospital. The chapter is an invaluable asset in the rehabilitation and support of individuals with spinal cord injury.

  • Physiatrist (a physician who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation) Board Certified in Spinal Cord Injury Medicine
  • Psychiatrist
  • Nurses specializing in 24-Hour Rehabilitation Nursing
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Physical Therapist
  • Speech Language Pathologist
  • Case Manager
  • Benefits specialist
  • Dietician
  • Other medical specialties to include;
    • Neurologist
    • Neuropsychologist
    • ENT
    • Oncologist
    • Pulmonologist
    • Infectious Disease Specialist
    • Wound Specialist

Program Components

The Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program components include:

  • 24-Hour Rehabilitation nursing to address wound management, pain management, reinforce acquired functional skills, to assist with education of the patient and family.
  • Intensive and Individualized, goal-oriented treatment plans
  • Functional Approach to Activities of Daily Living and Community Re-entry
  • Availability of State-of-the-Art rehabilitation technology to include:
    • AutoAmbulator (partial weight support treadmill training)
    • Bioness H200 (Functional Electrical Stimulation)
    • Bioness L300 (Functional Electrical Stimulation)
    • Adaptive equipment for phone, computer and other aspects of communication.
  • Specialized insurance benefits coordination and management
  • Family conferences, education and support
  • Comprehensive case management discharge planning
  • Nutritional management
  • Daily Living Skills Training
  • Community Re-Entry Program
  • Splinting and Orthotics
  • Sexual Counseling
  • Educational Series
  • Driving Evaluation Program, as well as referrals to vendors for access and training to adaptive driving equipment.
  • Therapeutic Pool (Woburn only, 96 degrees)
  • Comprehensive Outpatient Services/Clinics including access to a physiatrist who specialize in the care of individuals with spinal cord injury.

Benefits Management and Coordination

An illness or injury may affect a person’s capacity for returning to work. If one of our patients is likely to be unable to return to work for a short or extended period, New England Rehabilitation Hospital offers the services of a Benefits Specialist to help the patient and family with practical matters of income replacement and health insurance concerns. The Benefits Specialist addresses such matters as: filing for Family and Medical Leave, Short Term Disability, Long Term Disability, Social Security Disability, MassHealth and COBRA assistance. The Benefits Specialist is also able to address social concerns of emergency aid for those persons who may not have worked prior to the injury or illness.

New England Rehabilitation Hospital recognizes the importance of assisting patients back to their homes, communities and places of work. The benefits service is dedicated to achieving those goals by helping patients and families navigate through disability benefits systems and by providing support to patients and families as they go through this often difficult and confusing process. Many patients have commented that they would not have known “where to begin” and that this service completes their overall rehabilitation.

New England Rehab Offers Elder Assist Clinic

New England Rehabilitation Hospital in conjunction with the Senior Resource Center (SRC) now offers complimentary, weekly Elder Assist Clinics in Woburn. These pre-registered private appointments with SRC’s Eldercare Nurse Attorneys help patients and their families with important issues, to include:

  • How to pay for current and long term health care needs
  • How to protect your home and your hard assets
  • Advice on estate planning

These clinics serve as a bridge in helping New England Rehabilitation Hospital patients and their families deal with transition needs for a safe and timely discharge home, to a skilled nursing facility, or an assisted living facility.

Senior Resource Center, Inc. is a full-service eldercare planning advisory group, supporting seniors and their families throughout Massachusetts, and southern New Hampshire.

New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center

new england regional spinal cord injury center http://newenglandwheelchairvan.com/

The New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center (NERSCIC) has developed a long and distinguished history of care, research, education, and service to people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in the New England region.  NERSCIC Network headquarters is located at the Boston University Medical Campus, with Network members Gaylord Hospital and Hospital for Special Care located in CT.

The NERSCIC Network serves as an advocate and resource for patients; their families, friends, and caregivers; and health care professionals throughout New England.  Our goal is to improve the health and function of people with SCI throughout the lifespan through innovative science and technology in three areas:

1. Consumer-focused Rehabilitation Researchwhich focuses on topics for people with SCI, such as health care self advocacy training, better ways to measure functioning, and which wheelchairs have the most breakdowns.  Learn more about how to participate in studies.

2. Comprehensive, State-of-the-Art Care

  • NERSCIC offers comprehensive inpatient and outpatient SCI care available through Gaylord Hospital and the Hospital for Special Care in CT.
  • NERSCIC is leading the development and dissemination of a uniform New England Standard of Care (NESoC) for SCI, a first-ever collaborative effort among area facilities with SCI expertise.  Its goal is to enhance learning opportunities for professionals and ensure that all people receive the same level of care throughout New England.

3.  Education and Collaboration

  • In 2012, NERSCIC unveiled a new Consumer Education Program called “Knowledge in Motion,”  in partnership with Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and modeled after the Stepping Forward- Staying Informed program pioneered by NERSCIC.
  • The Rehabilitation Research Roundtable joins together leaders of the local SCI community to collaborate on a common research and corresponding service and advocacy agenda.

Declare Your Independence on the 4th of July with a Wheelchair-Accessible Vehicle

  • Wheelchair Van VMi New England Boston Strong
  • Learn more about how to pick the right wheelchair-accessible vehicle that meets your needs.
  • Take a look inside the latest minivans, and other accessible vehicles like a pickup truck, motorcycle or snowmobile.
  • Buy new? Buy used? Convert your current vehicle? Here, we provide some factors to consider before making your decision.

Freedom. That’s what it’s all about, isn’t it? A wheelchair shouldn’t be a barrier to getting out and about, whether for work, day-to-day living or pleasure.

“we will always do all we can to deliver the driving freedom most take for granted to someone in a wheelchair, we are going to change the world one person on at a time” , -Jim Sanders 7/4/1988

Finding the right vehicle means analyzing your needs. Do you want to ride in your wheelchair or transfer to the vehicle’s seat? Will you be the driver or the passenger? If your muscle weakness is still progressing, how will your accessibility needs change down the line — and how can you accommodate them now?

What kind of vehicle do you want: car, minivan, van, truck, SUV or motorcycle? New or used? After-market conversion or built for accessibility from the start? Side or rear entry?

A great place to start answering questions is at the website for Vmi New England

The website is a treasure trove of tips for finding the right vehicle.

For an in-depth look into the life of Ralph Braun, founder and CEO of The Braun Corporation, read CEO with SMA Brings Mobility to All . Learn how he turned his scooter and modified van designs into a multimillion-dollar business — all while battling spinal muscular atrophy.

 

 

Braun Wheelchair Van Mobility Center vmienwenglan.com Boston Strong

Of course, in purchasing a vehicle, monetary concerns always come into play. The New England Mobility Center site offers various directions to take in finding government funding and public assistance. You’ll also find tips on buying auto insurance, numerous blogs on accessible-vehicle-related subjects and info on many travel accessories to make life easier on the road.

Because of the tremendous number of variables in the custom fitment for each persons specific needs, it’s not possible to give exact prices for the minivans featured. However, we can provide some figures that will give you a ballpark idea of accessible vehicle pricing.

  • New side-entry converted minivans range from around $48,000 to $75,000.
  • New rear-entry converted minivans with manually operated fold-out ramps start in the low $40,000s.
  • You can find 3-year-old minivans with brand-new conversions starting in the low $30,000s.

For those with severe muscle weakness who want to drive their vehicle themselves, certified driver rehabilitation specialists (CDRS) can evaluate your needs at the Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center, and provide a prescription for adapted driving equipment and driver training.  (For more on this topic, contact us at 508-697-6006).

As you’ll discover, the scope of accessible vehicles is very broad indeed. Here’s a sampler of the myriad options currently available in the world of wheelchair-accessible vehicles and conversion equipment.

MinivansBraunAbility’s Chrysler Entervan features flexible floor plans
For easier boarding, the Entervan has an integrated “kneeling” system; while the door is opening, the rear suspension is lowered, reducing the slope of the ramp. To learn more, call 508-697-6006 .Because wheelchair transportation requirements can change over time, BraunAbility enables buyers to easily configure the floor plan of its Chrysler Entervan. Whether you want to be the driver or the front-seat passenger, removing the appropriate seat is literally a snap: Unlock the seat base and roll the entire seat out of the van.
VMI’s Honda Odyssey Northstar promotes easy entry

 

Wheelchair Van bridgewater, ma newenglandwheelchairvan.com boston

In the side-entry, lowered-floor Honda Odyssey Northstar conversion by VMI, a remote control triggers the PowerKneel System, lowering the vehicle and activating a power ramp that telescopes out from within the interior floor.

The lower ramp offers a gentler angle, and the unrestricted entry means better maneuverability once inside.

VMI also offers the Summit accessible Toyota van conversion featuring a power fold-out, heavy-duty ramp system with an anti-rattle mechanism. It also has the power kneeling feature. To learn more, call 508-697-6006

.2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England Wheelchair Van Boston

Consider a rear entry, says Jim Sanders
Although rear-entry vehicles don’t allow wheelchair users to park in the driver or front-passenger locations, Jim’s vision has always been to offer as many options possible including optional swiveling driver or front-passenger seat that may facilitate transferring from the wheelchair. (For more on the rear- versus side-entry question, see them at, the Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center.) To learn more, call 508-697-6006 .Believing that entering and exiting the van through the back sometimes avoids  barriers, Our viewpoint and vision has always been to offer as many options as is practical. Rear-entry, lowered-floor modification converts Chrysler, Ford, GM, Honda and Toyota minivans. An automatic remote-control option can even activate the ramp and door. This vision and technology of lowering the vehicle closer to the ground and the ramp to a more comfortable angle for wheelchair access.

 

‘A mobility concept vehicle’ starts out as a accessible ground up conversion; that can even go green
A car or minivan hybrid concept vehicle can be designed custom for you from the ground up with safety and accessibility as its top priority.

mobility concept vehicle mobility center bridgewater, ma boston strong

Rental vehicles New locations are being added, before your next trip or give us a call to learn more at 508-697-6006. It’s may even be possible to rent a Rollx wheelchair-accessible Dodge or Chrysler minivan at selected airports around the country. Someone even told us Thrifty Car Rental, Dollar Rent-a-Car or Payless Car Rental companies were thinking about offer accessible vans at airports like T.F. Green airport 2000 Post Rd, Warwick, RI 02886, Manchester–Boston Regional Airport 1 Airport Rd, Manchester, NH 03103, Logan International Airport 1 Harborside Dr, Boston, MA 02128
Cars and SUV’s Sport an attitude with a flair for the freedom to have different concept vehicles built with optional Motors depending on your needs a Scion xB might even work.If you’re just not the minivan type, consider the freedom of a concept vehicle, Want a custom sporty wheelchair-accessible vehicle? Click the remote: Simultaneously, the driver’s door swings open, the rear driver-side door gull-wings up and the ramp unfolds, ready for you to maneuver your wheelchair into driving position.

 

A similar conversion can be configured on the passenger side. Or if rear entry suits your needs, we offer you the freedom to pick a model that work best for you. Prices range from the low $30,000s for a manual rear-entry model to the low $500,000s for a one off concept vehicle with automatic side-entry. To learn more, call 508-697-6006
.

Hand controls and footless driving solutions
Systems from mechanical to servo actuated can be installed on most cars with automatic transmissions. The accelerator input can mounted within easy reach of the vehicle’s standard steering wheel, with the controls just inches away on either the right or left. Smoothly accelerate the vehicle remotely without use of your feel, designed to make hands only driving safe and easy.Depending on the make and model of your vehicle, installed prices start around $1,200, additionally we offer transportation of the vehicle to and from our mobility center. To learn more, call 508-697-6006
Buying used AMS pre-owned van might even be considered.Resale on them is typically incredibly low and these can be a ok deal if your able to bring it to a qualified mobility center to ensure it is in safe and working condition.

AMS pre-owned van bridgewater, ma newenglandwheelchairvan.com

There’s no getting around the fact that wheelchair vans are expensive; retrofitting new vans with accessibility equipment doesn’t come cheap. One way to cut costs is to buy a used van to avoid the  depreciation that happens when buying new.VMi New England offers many pre-owned vans outfitted with their new conversion equipment which can save buyers as much as $15,000 to $20,000.

Or, if you already have a fairly new Chrysler, Dodge or Volkswagen van, they may be able to convert it for you. Rear-entry conversions start at around $13,000, while side-entry conversions start at around $22,000, not including the price of the vehicle. To learn more, call 508-697-6006.

There are many grey market conversion vans available to you via the internet, ebay and private parties.

Many of these vehicles are being sold by direct marketing companies or individuals who bought them via the internet or ebay only to find out there were many problems with the van, it was unsafe and or wouldn’t work for there needs.

So in turn they are for sale again for what appears to be a great deal.

I wish i had a dollar for every customer who brought a “internet deal”, “used car dealer van”, “ebay wheelchair van deal” into our facility wanting to know what we could do to make it work for them.

Only to hear, i’m very sorry you didn’t visit with us before you purchased this van that your family member or friend in the wheelchair will not fit into the van.

Motorcycles

When it comes to motorcycles Jim Sanders has and will always promote accessible motorcycles and his personal belief that they offer the ultimate freedom when it comes to travel (unless it’s snowing in which case we need to talk about snowmobiles)

If you can operate a manual wheelchair, you may be able to drive a wheelchair-accessible motorcycle, says Sanders. Want a touring bike, a BMW, a KTM or how about a dirt bike. A remote-controlled drop-down ramp at the rear of the vehicle can be up fitted  allowing a rider to pull his or her chair into position, secure it with a push-button docking system, and ride off — no transferring necessary.

 

Bikes featuring a powerful BMW 1170 cc engine, a six-speed, two-button, thumb-operated gear shifter, and a rear-wheel-drive differential can be up fitted . Want a bike with a reverse gear for easier parking and maneuvering? To learn more, call 508-697-6006. If you can operate a manual wheelchair, you maybe able to drive a wheelchair-accessible motorcycle, says Sanders.

A remote-controlled drop-down ramp at the rear of the vehicle allows a rider to pull his or her chair into position, secure it with a push-button docking system, and ride off — no transferring necessary.

SUVs and trucks 

ryno wheelchair pick up truck bridgewater, ma boston, ma  newenglandwheelchairvan.com

A Stow-Away lift puts you inside

Bruno doesn’t sell wheelchair-accessible vehicles, but they do offer products that can be up fit  into vehicles.

Known for their home stair lifts and attachable vehicle lifts for transporting wheelchairs and scooters, they also make an add-on mechanism that may allow you to transfer you from a wheelchair up into the seat of a high-profile SUV or pickup.

 

Ryno no-transfer conversion for pickups 

Being a wheelchair user doesn’t mean you have to give up using a pickup truck. VMi New England has been offering pick up truck conversions for over 10 years allowing either driver-side or passenger-side entry into the cab of a GMC Sierra or Chevy Silverado without ever having to transfer out of the wheelchair.

When activated with the remote control, the door opens from the cab, then the lift platform deploys which rests flat on the ground. The wheelchair user backs onto the platform, which then elevates up and into the cab as the door slides back into the closed position.

To learn more, call 508-697-6006.

 

Logan International Airport
General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport is located in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, US. It covers 2,384 acres, has six runways, and employs an estimated 16,000 people.Wikipedia
Code: BOS
Elevation: 19′ 0″ (5.80 m)
Address: 1 Harborside Dr, Boston, MA 02128
Phone: (800) 235-6426
Manchester–Boston Regional Airport
Manchester–Boston Regional Airport, commonly referred to simply as “Manchester Airport,” is a public airport located three miles south of the central business district of Manchester, New Hampshire on … Wikipedia
Code: MHT
Elevation: 266′ (81 m)
Address: 1 Airport Rd, Manchester, NH 03103
Phone: (603) 624-6539
T. F. Green Airport
T. F. Green Airport, also known as Theodore Francis Green Memorial State Airport, is a public airport located in Warwick, six miles south of Providence, in Kent County, Rhode Island, USA. Wikipedia
Code: PVD
Elevation: 55′ (17 m)
Address: 2000 Post Rd, Warwick, RI 02886
Phone: (888) 268-7222
Hours:

Open all.  –  See all
Conquest
conquest [ˈkɒnkwɛst ˈkɒŋ-]

n

1. the act or an instance of conquering or the state of having been conquered; victory
2. a person, thing, etc., that has been conquered or won
3. the act or art of gaining a person’s compliance, love, etc., by seduction or force of personality
4. a person, whose compliance, love, etc., has been won over by seduction or force of personality

 

 

wheelchair van: battery maintenance- some useful tips

BATTERY MAINTENANCE – SOME USEFUL TIPS.

 

wheelchair van battery VMi new england

BATTERY MAINTENANCE: SOME BASIC TIPS

There is nothing worse than getting inside your wheelchair van, turn the key (or pushing a few buttons), and hear “click, click, click, click…” Oh no, a dead battery!  Although this isn’t a major mechanical issue, it’s a major inconvenience, and could possibly leave you stranded in a parking lot or even unable to get in or out of your car or wheelchair van.  The good news is that it’s very preventable.

It’s important to consider all of the electrical devices, and the power demands required for todays wheelchair vans and other vehicles outfitted with mobility equipment. These devices could be factory systems like power door locks, power windows, power seats, anti-theft devices, keyless entry and even the vehicle’s clock. These devises could also be aftermarket systems or mobility equipment like a remote starter, wheelchair lift, transfer seat, scooter lifter, or an electronic wheelchair securement system.  All these electronics require a source of reliable power, so read on, and we will explain some basic tips and information regarding non-sealed lead acid batteries typically used in wheelchair vans and mobility equipped vehicles.

First, here’s a brief explanation on how your wheelchair van’s battery works and how it’s recharged:  A vehicle battery’s main purpose is to provide a source of power or electricity to get the vehicle started. Its secondary purpose is to supply power or electricity to all of those other systems and devices mentioned above.  Once a car, truck or wheelchair accessible vehicle is started and the engine is running, the vehicle’s charging system, namely the alternator, immediately goes to work recharging the battery back to 100% state of charge. This is due to the loss of battery power that was required to turn over the engine and start your vehicle. Additionally, the vehicles charging system provides all of the electricity that the automobile needs to be driven, like operate your lights, windshield wipers, heat and air conditioning systems, even play your favorite radio station.   Your wheelchair lift, scooter lifter, turnout seat or other electronic adaptive mobility equipment is connected directly to your battery, compounding its importance in keeping your vehicle reliable.  In simpler terms, your wheelchair van’s battery is essentially like a gas tank. If you keep taking power out of it and your vehicle’s charging system can’t put anything back into it, or isn’t given an opportunity to do so, you soon will have no power in reserve for when you need it most.

Driving habits, not defects in batteries, are often the cause of battery failure. Short and infrequent trips can rob a battery of its charge and not allow it to properly recharge.  In fact, a German manufacturer of luxury automobiles revealed that of 400 vehicles returned to dealerships under warranty for not starting or a dead battery, nearly 50% simply needed their batteries charged, not replaced, and had no other mechanical problems.  They simply didn’t have enough of a charge, most likely due to the owner’s driving habits.

Another common cause of battery failure is acid stratification. The electrolyte on a stratified battery concentrates on the bottom, causing the upper half of the cell to be acid poor. This effect is similar to a cup of coffee in which the sugar collects on the bottom when the waitress forgets to bring the stirring spoon. Batteries tend to stratify if kept at low charge (below 80%) and never have the opportunity to receive a full charge. Short distance driving while operating power doors, power ramps, power kneel systems, and HVAC electric blowers contributes to this. Acid stratification reduces the overall performance of the battery.

The more common reasons for a dead battery are:

  • Forgetting the headlights are turned on after you park the van.
  • Forgetting a reading light or courtesy light is turned on. This is easy to do since most cars have a feature that delays turning off the interior lights after you leave the van, so that you don’t notice that you left a light turned on.
  • A corroded or loose connection between the battery and the cables attached to it.
  • A defective interior door switch or trunk lamp switch that leaves the bulb lit.
  • A defective charging system that does not replenish the battery’s charge.
  • An old battery that has lost its ability to maintain a full charge.
  • Repeated use of a platform wheelchair lift, scooter lifter, turnout seat or other mobility equipment without allowing the vehicle’s battery to re-charge.

Batteries can have a life expectancy of 3 to 5 years, after which they should be replaced preventatively even if they are working well.  Batteries have to work much harder during winter months when it is cold out, and batteries often start to show signs of failure in sub-freezing temperatures. Maintenance is an important part of ensuring a battery’s operating life. Simply driving the vehicle does not always adequately recharge the battery.

Here is some information that will help preserve battery life on your wheelchair van or vehicle with mobility equipment.

  • Vehicles stored for more than 30 days should have the negative battery cable disconnected.
  • In cold temperatures, a discharged battery can freeze and damage the plates. Batteries with damaged plates require replacement.
  • In hot weather (80 degrees and above), if a battery discharges, it greatly affects the battery’s long-term life.
  • Do not leave any door open for an extended period. The OEM electronic system will not “sleep” right away. During this time, there could be up to a 200-milliamp draw from other devices and systems and mobility equipment in the vehicle, even if the dome lights are off.
  • Very short drives reduce a battery’s charge while long drives increase it.

Vehicles that are not driven on a daily basis may require the use of an On-Board Automatic Trickle Charger to keep the battery fully charged. When buying a new battery for your wheelchair van, we suggest you purchase and install a battery with the greatest Cold Cranking Amp (CCA) capacity possible. Of course the physical size, cable hook up, and terminal type must be a consideration.

 

Wheelchair Vans, Accessible Cars, and Wheelchair Accessible SUVs…Proudly built just for you!

Wheelchair Vans, Accessible Cars, and Wheelchair Accessible SUVs…Proudly built just for you!

Wheelchair Van VMi New England

VMi New England has been building and selling the safest, most affordable, and reliable wheelchair vans, mobility cars and accessible SUVs for over 25 years! Our FREE, at-home product demonstration program takes the stress out of purchasing an accessible vehicle and will ensure you get the perfect van for your needs. Our factory direct pricing will save you thousands over purchasing from a internet dealer. When you see a VMi New England wheelchair van for sale on our website, you know you’re getting the safest and most reliable handicap accessible vehicle on the mobility market today. Buy factory direct and save!

 Our success is measured by our customers’ happiness…

2013 GM Eqonix Hand Controls

VMi New England’s mission is providing you with the perfect new or used wheelchair van or handicap accessible vehicle, based on your individual mobility needs, and our entire inventory of new and used handicapped vans come standard with the most comprehensive mobility conversion warranty in the industry. With our vans, you’re purchasing a handicap van or accessible car directly from a manufacturer at factory direct pricing, and while a internet mobility dealer or car dealer may mark up a wheelchair van or wheelchair lift thousands of dollars, we pass our factory direct savings directly on to you, our customers.

Free at-home product demonstrations and nationwide delivery! We offer you the freedom to make the purchase of wheelchair vans, handicap vans, scooter accessible vans, and mobility vehicles easier than it’s ever been before…

Ford Wheelchair Driver Van 4x4

The right wheelchair accessible vehicle at the right price…We offer FREE, at-home mobility vehicle demonstrations and substantial factory direct savings. Our mobility consultants will bring the wheelchair conversion you’re interested in directly to your home and provide a custom fitting and mobility consultation with both you and your family…all in the comfort of your own driveway! Or you have the option to come to our facility and test out new and used, Honda, Toyota, Dodge, Chrysler, Volkswagen and Ford wheelchair vans Whether you’re interested in new or used wheelchair vans or accessible cars, our huge selection of over 150 accessible vehicles, fast handicap vehicle loan track approval processes, and nationwide delivery make buying the wheelchair accessible van or car of your dreams an absolute breeze.

 

mobility concept vehicles for wheelchair drivers

“To get something you never had, you have to do something you’ve never done.” ~Unknown

dodge wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles
Were going to change the world one person at a time
Join the revolution
Do you want a 4×4 wheelchair vehicle you can drive?
We have built 4×4 accessible vehicles going all the way back to the 80’s
Want a 4×4 SUV you can drive your wheelchair from?
Want a Ford Explorer SUV that is a wheelchair accessible vehicle?
We can and will build you a concept vehicle you can drive from a wheelchair.
 'Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.'    - -George S. Patton
‘Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.’    – -George S. Patton

One definition of resilience is “the ability to cope with shocks and keep functioning in a satisfying way”. Resilience is about the self organizing capacity of systems. This means the ability to bounce back after disaster, or the ability to transform if a bad stage has happened. Both of these forms of resilience seem relevant to explore in our times, especially in relation to Assistive Driving Technology for Wheelchair Drivers.

Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations as a company is aware of this challenge and has been working on cutting edge wheelchair driving technology since the 80’s

automotive mobility concept vehicle systems
Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations is leading in its study of ever evolving automotive wheelchair driving systems.

wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

Ford wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

The way we see it, everyone has a fundamental need to have there own personal transportation, to access anything they need like, clean water, food, fibres and many other goods and services.

For future human development it is essential to understand the contribution each person can make to human livelihoods, health, security and culture if given the chance.

wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

Resilience thinking is part of the solution, as it thrives at building flexibility and adaptive capacity. People and nature are interdependent. That means, we have to look for collaboration within society to find resilient solutions.

Interdependence between people and nature.

IMG_0094

Exploring the missing links in our imagination
Solutions to find new possibilities in the Assistive Driving Technology require creativity.

Creativity is the answer to missing links in our imagination, at least according to Jim Sanders. They have found a unique way to explore the relationship between current automotive designs, people and technology.
A safe operating vehicle for people in wheelchairs
“In the face of ever evolving change in transportation needs, we need to work together to find safe mobility solutions for humanity. The key is in creative mobility solutions that connect nature with people. Flexible and adaptive strategies will bring us further. By stretching our imagination, we will start to explore the unknown. And by always looking for new combinations of technology, and common sense, we will find the new solutions.” Jim Sanders 2013

Sometimes even the smallest shift in thinking or doing can create the biggest changes in someones lifecan you save trust for a rainy day?necessity is the mother of invention

IMG_1598

driven by the freedom of the choice  to explore the worlds future possibilities

 VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations is one of America’s best providers of wheelchair vans, vehicle modifications, and adaptive equipment including hand controls, wheelchair and scooter lifts, ramps, raised doors, lowered floors and specialized gas, brake and steering controls. With hundreds of accessible vehicles available to be custom built for your specific needs, from the industries best manufacturers such as VMI, Eldorado and Braun, at our New England mobility center.   Founded in 1984 and offering the best equipped mobility facility in New England with a unparalleled commitment to offering a broad selection of specialized vehicles and services to meet the needs of every customer. Our facility is also Quality Assurance Program (QAP) certified (first in Massachusetts) through the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), resulting in Automotive Innovations being held to the highest standards in the vehicle modification industry.   We have a strong and committed Veteran sales staff with many decades of experience satisfying our customers’ needs. Feel free to browse our inventory online, visit our huge indoor showroom where every day is a ability expo, request more information about vehicles, set up a test drive or inquire about financing!   Feel free to call upon our friendly Mobility Consultants with any questions you may have about options on wheelchair vans or any of our other products. 508-697-6006We look forward to exceeding your expectations for decades to come!
concept |ˈkänˌsept|nounan abstract idea; a general notion: structuralism is a difficult concept | the concept of justice.• a plan or intention; a conception: the center has kept firmly to its original concept.• an idea or invention to help sell or publicize a commodity: a new concept in corporate hospitality.• Philosophy an idea or mental picture of a group or class of objects formed by combining all their aspects.• [ as modifier ] (of a car or other vehicle) produced as an experimental model to test the viability of new design features.ORIGIN mid 16th cent. (in the sense ‘thought, frame of mind, imagination’): from Latinconceptum ‘something conceived,’ from concept-‘conceived,’ from concipere (see conceive) .
exceed |ikˈsēd|verb [ with obj. ]be greater in number or size than (a quantity, number, or other measurable thing): production costs have exceeded $60,000.• go beyond what is allowed or stipulated by (a set limit, esp. of one’s authority): the Tribunal’s decision clearly exceeds its powers under the statute.• be better than; surpass: catalog sales have exceeded expectations.mobilitynoun1 elderly people may become socially isolated as a result ofrestricted mobility: ability to move, movability,moveableness, motility, vigour, strength, potency.2 the gleeful mobility of Billy’s face: expressiveness,eloquence, animation.3 the mobility of the product: transportability,portability, manoeuvrability.4 an increasing mobility in the workforce: adaptability,flexibility, versatility, adjustability.
freedom |ˈfrēdəm|nounthe power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants without hindrance or restraint: we do have some freedom of choice | he talks of revoking some of the freedoms.• absence of subjection to foreign domination or despotic government: he was a champion of Irish freedom.• the state of not being imprisoned or enslaved: the shark thrashed its way to freedom.• the state of being physically unrestricted and able to move easily: the shorts have a side split for freedom of movement.• (freedom from) the state of not being subject to or affected by (a particular undesirable thing):government policies to achieve freedom from want.• the power of self-determination attributed to the will; the quality of being independent of fate or necessity.• unrestricted use of something: the dog is happy having the freedom of the house when we are out.• archaic familiarity or openness in speech or behavior.

wheelchair vans with advanced safety technologies you can rely on

wheelchair vans with advanced safety technologies

wheelchair vans with advanced safety technologies you can rely on

At VMi New England mobility center we have wheelchair vans that offer safe, convenient and reliable personal mobility that stand the test of time— the freedom to travel where you want, when you want. Our wheelchair vans include the most popular minivans available offering some of the most advanced safety technologies available. Come visit our mobility center showroom where every day is a ability expo and see mobility vans like the Chrysler Town & Country, Toyota Sienna, Honda Odyssey and Dodge Grand Caravan.

Come try out reliable mobility vans from Vantage Mobility, Eldorado, Mobility Works or BraunAbility many different styles and configurations:

  • Extra-tall height: Toyota VMI Northstar Access 360, Eldorado Amerivan, Chrysler/Dodge Entervan XT, Toyota Rampvan XT
  • Standard height (foldout ramp): Toyota Sienna, Honda Odyssey and Dodge-Chrysler
  • Standard height (in-floor ramp): Toyota Sienna, Honda Odyssey and Dodge-Chrysler
  • Centered-lowered: Dodge CompanionVan SE
  • Rear-entry: Toyota Sienna, Honda Odyssey and Dodge-Chrysler

come see first hand the added space you get from a extra-tall height with in-floor or foldout ramps from the best manufactures in the industry

With more room to enter and exit, Toyota VMI Northstar Access 360, Eldorado Amerivan, Chrysler/Dodge Entervan XT, Toyota Rampvan XT the BraunAbility Entervan XT and Rampvan XT are built to fit your space needs. Several provide extra-tall height offering the highest vertical door clearances available, a full four inches more than the standard lowered floor wheelchair van. They are available in Toyota Sienna, Honda Odyssey, Chrysler Town & Country Touring and Limited models as well as three Dodge Grand Caravan models; the Express, Mainstreet Crew and R/T models.

The Toyota Northstar Access 360 wheelchair van is available in the Sienna model. With its sporty look and one-touch entry and exit system, this mobility vehicle has high-tech convenience and the reliability of premium transportation.

wheelchair vans with standard height lowered floor conversions offer reliable, safer in-floor ramps or a power foldout ramp for people with power wheelchairs

The VMI Nothstar & Summit, Eldorado Amerivan and BraunAbility conversions all offer different heights in the same Honda, Toyota, Dodge and Chrysler Town & Country Touring and Limited models.

The standard height handicapped vans also are available in the Honda Odyssey model. The Odyssey wheelchair handicap conversion van features the one-touch power and entry/exit system as well as the flexible Step and Roll seating. It boasts a 3.5L V6 for optimum power with fuel economy performance. The Honda Odyssey door opening height is different from each of the different manufactures.

standard height with in-floor ramp

Premium in-floor ramp wheelchair and scooter vans have been being built by Vantage Mobility for over 20 years and available in four trim levels: LE, SE, XLE and Limited. The Toyota Sienna rampvan Northstar Access360 features the out-of-sight ramp that stores safely in-floor for obstacle free entry and exit.

Center-lowered with foldout ramp

Do you travel with a companion regularly? The Dodge CompanionVan SE while not a choice if you want to ride in the passengers front position of a wheelchair van. It’s economical and has a lowered floor with ample room for a wheelchair or scooter. The CompanionVan SE features a manual door and bi-fold ramp with 52.5 inches of door opening height.

Rear-entry Wheelchair Vans

Rear entry wheelchair vans or mobility vans. The rear-entry conversion is available on models including the Chrysler Town & Country, Dodge Grand Caravan, Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna. You can customize its seating configurations and choose the features best suited for your individual needs and budget.

To speak with a handicap van specialist and receive your free mobility consultation, contact VMi New England at 508-697-6006. Call or email for additional information on many different wheelchair van products.

Abstract: Our staff have worked with rehabilitation engineering research experts all over the United States for more than 26 years on wheelchair transportation safety issues with a objective of looking at all the issues related to the safety of individuals seated in wheeled mobility devices while they are being transported or while they drive themselves in a motor vehicle. Researched topics include: the safety of individuals who drive from their wheelchairs in smaller vehicles and those who are transported in larger vehicles like buses, working with industry engineers to create industry standards as best practices to improve the safety of individuals who use mobility devices, and the crashworthiness of wheelchairs and other mobility equipment. We have been working with products to make releasing the seatbelt easier, an easier system for securing a wheelchair, automated docking systems for individuals who drive themselves while seated in a wheelchair or use public transportation, and a system for the safety of both individuals and their mobility devices while using public transportation vehicles. These projects have been a collaborative effort involving the experts across the globe.
Descriptor Terms: ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY, SAFETY MATERIALS, DEVICES DESIGN, DRIVING, MOTOR VEHICLES, PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION, SAFETY, TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT, TRANSPORTATION, WHEELCHAIRS.

Built in Safety

Some handicapped van conversion are designed with safety in mind, some are not. Using much of the same safety technology developed to protect drivers piloting modern racecars 200+ miles per hour, some engineers have created what we believe to be is the safest wheelchair accessible minivan conversion available today. You can rest assured that the safety features built into the wheelchair van conversion you get from us will be there when you need them. Not all fully automated accessible van conversions are built utilizing duty-tested systems that allow you to easily exit the vehicle in the case of power loss or emergency, or has successfully crash-tested  their wheelchair accessible vehicles. Not all handicap van converter build quality conversions,there are more and more grey market conversions being built and sold on-line or on ebay every day.

 At VMi New England mobility center, we believe you can’t put a price tag on your family’s safety, but your wheelchair van shouldn’t break the bank either…When you purchase a accessible van from us you are assured it will not be a great market conversion, you’re not only saving money. You’re also gaining 26+ years of accessible vehicle safety experience and innovation that will be there when you need it most…

Saying Goodbye to the Wheelchair Accessible Volkswagen Routan

vw wheelchair van massachusetts
Chrysler report indicates that it won’t be building any more minivans for Volkswagen. You can at least try to act surprised.
In 2008 Volkswagen struck a deal with Chrysler to turn the Town & Country into the Routan. The VW version of the Canadian minivan got a fresh face and returned suspension, but was essentially the same as its Chrysler counterpart. After four years of dismal sales (despite a costly advertising campaign with Brook Shields) the Routan has apparently been discontinued. The news was apparently slipped in under the radar into an announcement of production adjustments at the plant in Windsor, Ontario.

While the decision to axe the Routan was likely driven by lackluster sales, we can’t help but wonder if the tense relations between Volkswagen and Fiat/Chrysler didn’t usher the Routan to its grave. The Routan was just one of many nameplates under which the same van was sold, alongside the Chrysler Town & Country, Dodge Grand Caravan, Ram C/V and, in overseas markets, the Chrysler and Lancia Grand Voyager. Volkswagen reportedly has no plans to replace the Routan with a new model, although it has plenty of vans overseas (like the Touran and Sharan) it could bring over to North America if it deemed it worthwhile.

Over the past month or two, we’ve been going through our wheelchair van buyer’s guide here at VMi New England. This week was meant to spotlight the Volkswagen Routan, the fourth line of new minivans we offer.

Unfortunately though, the Volkswagen Routan is being discontinued.

Remembering the Volkswagen Routan

The Routan is an interesting mix of a vehicle.  See, the name and logo say Volkswagen.  The exterior curves and interior aesthetics look and feel like a Volkswagen.  Much like you would expect from a “European” vehicle, it also features a tighter suspension with firm steering to match.

Beneath its sheet metal and fiberglass exterior, however, it’s almost the exact same van as the Town & Country/Caravan.  The engine, the dimensions, the wheelbase, the list goes on.

The Routan is built on the same frame with the same engine.

But you’d be surprised how much the look and handling add.  Many have commented that the Routan is about as sleek and sturdy as a minivan could possibly get.  Alas, it wasn’t enough to keep it in production.

Though sales have been okay for the Routan, they weren’t quite good enough to keep it alive.  Part of the problem is no doubt the higher cost of the van.  Considering just how similar it was to the considerably cheaper Caravan in terms of specs, it was often a hard sell.

And so, the Routan has been retired.

The Future Beyond the Routan

Volkswagen is currently planning to replace the Routan with a crossover SUV.  While this might be good for the general public, SUVs (particularly crossovers) don’t exactly offer great wheelchair access.

For the wheelchair van community, we will still be offering the Odyssey, the Town & Country, and the ever popular Caravan, all three of which are fantastic vehicles.  Could the future bring a new wheelchair accessible minivan into the mix?

Why does Honda make wheelchair vans?

Why does Honda make wheelchair vans?

VMi New England Honda Wheelchair Van

Truth be told, Honda isn’t in the business of making wheelchair vans. It is in the business of making great vehicles that readily lend themselves to wheelchair van conversion. Models like the Odyssey and the Element would sell well regardless of their use in wheelchair van circles. Honda undoubtedly appreciates their popularity in the accessibility market and takes that under consideration when making the vehicles, though.

As we continue to see an increased demand for accessible vehicles and the reputation of Honda wheelchair vans continues to grow, we can undoubtedly expect to see more Odyssey conversions on the road.

Honda’s Wheelchair Vans

The Odyssey minivan are extremely popular conversion targets and are happily used by thousands of people who rely upon wheelchairs.

 

These Honda wheelchair vans don’t roll off the assembly line ready for use. They start out as standard passenger vehicles and are then modified by conversion experts for wheelchair use. That happens because people hold the Odyssey and Element in high regard.

Honda isn’t known for full-sized vans, but two of its smaller vehicles have strong fan bases in the wheelchair van community.

Honda’s get strong marks from their purchasers on a number of fronts. Here are three of them:

  1. ◦First, they’re aesthetically pleasing. The Element is one of the more attractive vehicles that are well suited for conversion and the Odyssey impresses critics year after year with its good-looking design.
  2. ◦Second, Honda has earned their reputation for reliability and cost-effectiveness. These are sturdy, reliable options that consistently provide a great deal of bang for the buyer’s buck, matching the manufacturer’s overall profile.
  3. ◦Third, conversion pros have turned the process of making a stock Honda into an impressive Honda wheelchair van into a science. The adjustments necessary to make the transition are proven and effective. Put simply, these vehicles make great wheelchair vans.

am i ready for a wheelchair van

am i ready for a wheelchair van

2013 Honda Wheelchair Van Massachusetts


“I’m Not Ready…”
People offer many reasons for staying away from modified vans:
“What I drive is a reflection of my personality. A seven foot high van isn’t who I am.”
“Meeting the challenge of transferring to my car and hauling my chair in behind me makes me feel good about myself.”
“I simply don’t have money for a lift and all the modifications I’d have to do to a van.”

 

Mostly what keeps people in their cars is the I’m Not Ready Syndrome:

  • I’m not ready to give up the fun car.
  • I’m not ready to give up the challenge.
  • I’m not ready to spend the money.

Eventually, two or three primary factors ­ preserving function, maximizing options and flexibility, looking into the future in order to plan for and anticipate change ­ drive the decision and help clarify the choices.

Despite all the good, logical reasons for continuing to drive those cars, many find it difficult to deny nagging shoulder pain, decreased tolerance for the hassles of car transfers and chair loading, or the simple fact that they don’t have the energy they once did. Making a change is a dilemma many survivors confront each day.

 

Reason #1: The Shoulders
The first consideration mentioned by many in the rehabilitation field for making the change from car to van is maintaining and preserving physical function. Research with those injured more than 20 years indicates that the biggest predictor of pain and fatigue two things that can get in the way of function ­ was having experienced pain and fatigue three years earlier. Not making changes when problems first arise is an almost sure way of having them get worse.

The pain and fatigue can come from the distance of the transfer, since getting as close to the car seat as to a bed is difficult. Another consideration is the height of the transfer. Having to lift up or down in the process of doing a transfer adds considerable extra stress to shoulders. Also muscling the chair itself in and out of the car can cause more pain and do damage. And, just the sheer number of transfers continues to accumulateover time. What results from all this is usually joint pain ­ from the neck all the way down to the wrist ­ often arthritic in nature, and often accompanied by tendinitis. The joint pain, the arthritis, the tendinitis are the body’s way of saying that what you’re doing isn’t working very well and is causing some harm.

Researchers have also linked fatigue to future problems, including depression, lower quality of life and, in some survivors, the need for both more durable medical equipment and help from others. As car transfers and chair loading become more difficult, many people report curtailing activities in order to avoid the transfers. Too often therapists encounter aging clients who are giving up things they enjoy – fishing, traveling, even working – because of pain and fatigue. Still, even though people find themselves giving up activities, they resist making the changes necessary to avoid the hassles, the pain, the fatigue. For many it comes down to wanting to fight off the realities of aging with a disability for as long as possible. The arguments are predictable, in part, because they’re so valid: like we said before, big vans are inconvenient and hard to drive, they cost too much, people like the physical challenge of doing transfers. Often it’s an image thing.

 

Reason #2: Image
A vehicle is often an extension of one’s personality. Giving up part of our personality ­ rugged or adventurous individual; sporty, fun kind of guy; or sedate, respectable, suburban family person ­ isn’t easy. Most everyone who buys a vehicle gives some thought to image. Not everyone feels comfortable driving a big van: they can be too big, not sporty enough or they simply don’t fit our self image. While minivans are an option for some individuals, many ­ especially big people who use big chairs ­ find minivans too small for the lift they need and too tight inside for the necessary maneuverability.

Regaining independence following injury and rehab was for many the single most significant achievement of post-paralysis life. Giving up the car may be viewed as giving up ­ not only by the survivor but also by those around him. Yet, making the changes and using the lift may be necessary to maintain that highly prized independence: Isn’t getting there far more important than just exactly how it’s done?

 

Reason #3: Somebody Else
Decisions about what to drive affect more than just the survivor, especially if someone else is doing the chair loading. A change to a van with a lift could be necessary even if your back or shoulders are just fine. Wives, husbands and caregivers age too, and they are often called on to help with many transfers, chores and tasks requiring heavy or awkward lifting. Survivors need to be not only aware but also sensitive to their needs.

Reason #4: $$$$$
A switch to a modified van can add $15,000 to $30,000 or more to the cost of a vehicle. Insurance and fuel costs usually go up, and some modified vans ­ even ones without raised roofs ­ won’t fit in standard garages and may require modified garage arrangements as well. Yet there are costs involved in becoming less active, not going out as much and staying home more. Active people tend to be healthier, happier and less depressed. Going too long on deteriorating shoulders can leave people even more dependent, eventually making hired help more necessary.

People ­ even some who are unemployed and on Medicaid ­ buy vans and somehow find ways to pay for them. Worker’s Compensation, Medicaid Waivers, Vocational Rehabilitation and the VA are all government programs which may help with funding. Charitable organizations such as Easter Seals are a possibility. Fraternal organizations may provide help. Some banks issue extended loans and Independent Living Centers may offer low interest loans.

Lower cost home equity loans may also be an option. There are always fund raisers ­ through church, civic or community organizations. And used equipment, or used modified vans are also possibilities. We tend to figure out necessities.

 

Thinking Ahead
Sound decisions which will provide flexibility for five to eight years need to be based on a realistic assessment of present function and trends in your strength, stamina, life-style, pain and function. Is it practical to stick with a car if strength has been decreasing and pain has been increasing for the past three years? Transfers may not be much of a problem now, but is it realistic to expect they’ll still be as easy in 5 years, when you’re 56? Can you afford not to change?

More often than not, the decision to switch from a car to a van is one of many decisions which contribute to the lifelong process of adaptation to disability. Adaptive equipment helps narrow the gap between aspiration and ability, between wants and needs, and allows us to do so comfortably and safely. Adaptive equipment can help avoid pain, preserve energy and prevent future problems. New equipment can preserve time and energy and help enhance as well as maintain both independence and quality of life.

Quality of life may be the prime consideration for switching from car to van. The switch is a matter of preventative maintenance ­ a change which may allow us to keep the function we have and maintain the quality of life we desire. How we regard these changes can be as important as the changes themselves.

 

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Financing Options for Wheelchair Vans Massachusetts and New England

Financing Options

The New VMI Northstar Wheelchair van Conversion Toyota Sienna financing options

DID YOU KNOW? In most towns you are exempt from excise tax if you don’t pay state sales tax on your mobility van. See the bottom of this page for a list of most cities and towns in MA and RI for you to check on your options.

VMi New England offers on-site bank financing. Our goal is to provide you with the vehicle that will fit your needs. Here are some financing options we have available for you on-site:

CONSUMER LOANS – We offer adaptive mobility van banking programs that can offer up to 10 years financing on a wheelchair handicap van. Even if your credit is less than perfect we will work hard to get you financed!!

INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS – A nonprofit organization that helps grant people money so they can maintain an independent lifestyle.

INDEPENDENT MOBILITY SYSTEMS – IMS used to offer long-term financing on all new purchases. All loan transactions are done on-site and guaranteed to help fit your needs.

INSURANCE COMPANIES – We will help you work with your insurance company to make sure you are receiving the maximum your benefits allow.

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS – May be able to help to familles that have children with disabilities. (up to age 20)

MANUFACTURERS REBATES – Major manufacturers often offer rebates. We’ll help you process all paperwork.

MEDICAID – In certain instances, Medicaid will pay for vehicle adaptive equipment. This falls under the “Medicaid waiver” and each state administers this program differently. We will be able to process you Medicaid claims for you as of January 2003.

PFS – Patient Financing offers long-term financing fit for your budget. PFS will finance any medical related equipment up to $25,000.00.

TOYOTA FINANCING– We can now get financing on Toyota Sienna wheelchair vans.

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION – Provides help for veterans.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION – A State funded organization that’s goal is to provide individuals with the means they need to get back into the workforce.

 

A wheelchair van is more obtainable than you realize.

A wheelchair van is more obtainable than you realize.

VMi New England Wheelchair Van MA

VMi New England your local Mobility Resource understands a wheelchair van is much more than a way to get around. It means independence, a higher quality of life and freedom. We also understand that people with disabilities often struggle with medical bills, limited income and other financial obstacles that can make owning a handicap van seem unrealistic.
A wheelchair van is more obtainable than you realize. Numerous grants and reimbursements are offered from varied sources. And now you’ve found the most comprehensive online resource for wheelchair van financial assistance options. Explore the links below to discover the available grants, rebates and reimbursements for buying a wheelchair van or modifying a car with adaptive driving equipment.
Learn about rebates offered by original equipment manufacturers. Vehicle manufacturer programs that give money back on new wheelchair vans or handicap van conversion equipment are a great way to cut your costs.
See a list of nonprofit organizations and associations that award grants to people with physical disabilities. Grants can significantly offset the expense of a wheelchair van or adaptive driving equipment.
Find sources of funding for veterans of the U.S. military. Most veterans are eligible for partial or complete aid for acquiring a wheelchair van.
Read about aid benefiting families of children with special mobility needs. Grants for physically disabled children help families afford a handicap van.
Search for grants given out by your state. Every state provides financial aid to the physically disabled. Your state government is an essential source to help make a wheelchair van, accessibility modification or adaptive driving controls more affordable.
If you work with or know of another agency or organization that should be listed here, please pass along any pertinent information to us:
info@VMiNewEngland.com

Father’s day Wheelchair Van Sale!

 Father’s day Wheelchair Van Sale!

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Buy any VMi New England wheelchair van in stock for your father before 6/22/2013 and save a extra $1000

Can be combined with other rebates and offers.

Ring in 2013 with a NEW Wheelchair Van! Rebates available on Both 2012 and 2013 models – save over $5000 in some cases!!

Call us today to find out what rebates you qualify for (based on residence of end user and other qualifiers).    Call 1-508-697-6006 to be connected to your nearest Wheelchair Van indoor showroom.

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Come in where its warm and dry to sit inside the vans and compare them side by side to determine your best option!

 ACURA

The Acura Mobility Program is proud to support the mobility needs of drivers and passengers with physical disabilities. When you purchase or lease an Acura vehicle, you will be provided with a cash reimbursement of up to $1,000 of the cost of aftermarket adaptive equipment that is installed on any eligible vehicle.

CHRYSLER
Conversions to Dodge Caravan, Dodge Grand Caravan, and Chrysler Town & Country models may be reimbursed up to a maximum of $1,000. Conversions to all other eligible Chrysler, Jeep® or Dodge models qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $750. Dodge and Freightliner Sprinter models qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $500 on wheel chair lifts. Running boards qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $400. Alerting devices qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $200. These reimbursements will not be reduced or affected by any additional outside funding.

2012 Dodge Grand Caravan Wheelchair Van

FORD
The Ford Mobility Motoring Program provides up to $1,200 of reimbursement toward the cost of installed adaptive equipment on any new Ford, Lincoln or Mercury vehicle and up to $200 on aftermarket alert hearing devices, lumbar seats and running boards (when not available as factory options). Total reimbursement is not to exceed $1,200.

GENERAL MOTORS
Get up to $1,000 in reimbursement ($1,200 for eligible Chevy Express and GMC Savana vans, including cutaways) for the cost and installation of eligible adaptive equipment. Plus get two additional years of standard OnStar service at no additional cost on all eligible, new OnStar-equipped vehicles. That’s a retail value of $400 or more, depending on the level of standard service on the vehicle.

HONDA
The Honda Customer Mobility Assistance Program is proud to support the mobility needs of drivers and passengers with physical disabilities. Honda will provide a reimbursement of up to $1,000 to each eligible, original retail customer for expenses incurred to purchase and install qualifying adaptive equipment on any eligible purchased or leased Honda vehicle.

Honda Wheelchair Van New England MA, RI, CT, VT, NH and Maine

HYUNDAI
Hyundai Mobility Program program will assist Hyundai owners with up to $1,000 toward the cost of installation of new adaptive equipment in a new Hyundai vehicle purchased by an authorized Hyundai dealership.

LEXUS
Lexus Mobility Assistance Reimburses the vehicle owner up to $1,000 cash for after-market adaptive equipment for drivers and/or passengers when installed on any eligible Lexus vehicle purchased or leased new.

TOYOTA
Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. will provide a reimbursement of up to $1,000 to each eligible, original retail customer, for the exact cost they paid to purchase and install qualifying adaptive driving or passenger equipment for transporting persons with physical disabilities.

Toyota Hand controls New England MA, RI, CT, VT, NH and Maine

VOLKSWAGEN
Volkswagen of America will provide up to $1000 towards the purchase and installation of lift equipment, carriers, hand controls, or pedal extensions on any eligible Volkswagen model.

VOLVO
Mobility by Volvo provides up to $1,000 in financial assistance toward the cost of adding adaptive equipment to an eligible new Volvo and up to $200 on alert hearing devices.

All of these programs have a number of qualifications, limitations, and restrictions that are subject to change at any time. Therefore, it is imperative that you contact the manufacturer for complete and current program rules to verify rebate amounts and eligibility before making any purchase.

Wheelchair Accessible Taxis: New Taxis will Improve Mobility in Rhode Island

Wheelchair Accessible Taxis

New Taxis will Improve Mobility in Rhode Island

ri wheelchair taxi

In April 2012, thirteen new accessible taxis were introduced to Rhode Island, greatlyimproving access to transportation for the mobility impaired.  Local taxi companies have purchased these vehicles, with support from the Federal Transit Administration’s New Freedom program.

RIPTA and the RI Division of Public Utilities and Carriers also provided support to help bring these vehicles to Rhode Island.

The taxis will serve seventeen communities in Rhode Island, including Providence, Newport, and Woonsocket.

T.F. Green Airport in Warwick will also be served.

How Do I Arrange for These Taxis?

The accessible taxis operate just like any other licensed taxicabs in Rhode Island.

Rides are arranged by calling the taxi company licensed to operate in your community. Or, you may hail an available cab on the street. If your return trip begins outside the cab company’s licensed territory, it must be arranged in advance and made within 24 hours.

You must have a return trip receipt in order to be picked up outside any company’s assigned service area.

Operating hours vary by company and the number of accessible taxis is limited, so it is best to call and reserve a vehicle in advance.

See below to find a company in your area.

Taxi Contact Info RI

How Do I Board These Taxis?

The new taxis are modified mini-vans.  Passengers using mobility devices board via a ramp which extends from the rear of the vehicle.  Inside the taxi, the vehicle floor has been specially lowered to comfortably accommodate passengers seated in a wheelchair or scooter. All passengers ride in a forward-facing position.

Taxi drivers have been specially trained to assist you on the ramp, and to secure mobility devices within the vehicle to prevent movement during travel.

Passengers using both motorized and non-motorized wheelchairs and scooters can board the taxis. The vehicle ramp and rear compartment can accommodate mobility devices up to 30 inches wide with a total weight of 750 pounds (passenger plus device). Seating for up to four additional taxi passengers is available on the second row bench seat and front passenger seat.

What are the Taxi Fares?

Standard Rhode Island taxi rates will apply to any service provided with these vehicles.

There are no discounts, even if you are eligible for RIPTA ADA services or other transportation through The RIde Program.

There is a $1.00 surcharge for each additional passenger beyond two, even if one of these additional passengers is a personal care attendant. Additional luggage and/or fuel surcharges may also be applied, per RI taxi regulations, but there is no charge for your wheelchair or scooter.

Other Questions?

Call the individual taxi company operating in your area, or RIPTA’s Customer Service line at 781-9400 For TTD use the RI relay at 711.

You may also visit www.GoProvidence.com or www.GoNewport.com to find wheelchair accessible cab service in these areas.

Resources for Bostonians with Disabilities

Handicapped Parking

More Information

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles (WAV)

Established in 1991, the City of Boston Hackney Division’s WAV Program consists of a fleet of 100 vehicles to provide transportation access to those that are unable to use traditional taxi cabs due to mobility impairments.
WAV (Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles) are taxi cabs that have been modified to accommodate wheelchairs and other assistive mobility devices so that people with disabilities can travel independently. WAV cabs are typically min-vans or utility vehicles, and they look similar to other Boston taxi cabs because they have the same medallions, identifications, and paint markings. WAV cabs can be identified by the blue symbol of accessibility on the rear of the vehicle which lets people know that a particular cab is equipped with a ramp that can accommodate a wheelchair.
WAVs operate like regular taxis. You do not need to sign up ahead of time or fill out an application in order to use a WAV. Anyone who needs wheelchair accommodations can use a WAV. People with disabilities can hail a WAV vehicle on the street when they see one, or else they can call for a cab and request a WAV vehicle. Taxi cab companies have been instructed to respond to WAV requests in a timely manner. For more information, call the Boston Police Department Hackney Unit at 617-343-4475.

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Taxi Discount Coupon Program

The Elderly Commission partners with Boston Police Department Hackney Division to provide an affordable transportation option.
Under this program, City of Boston residents age 65 and over, as well as disabled residents of all ages may purchase coupon books worth $10 at a cost of $5 per book (a 50% discount) for all taxis licensed by the City of Boston.
  • Taxi Coupons do not expire.
  • You must be a resident of Boston to purchase coupons and proper ID is required.
  • Coupons can only be purchased with cash.
  • A maximum of two books per person per month can be purchased.
  • All City of Boston licensed taxi cab drivers are required to accept Taxi Discount Coupons.
Coupon books can be purchased at Boston City Hall, Room 271, or at various sites throughout the city. Please call 617-635-4366 for more information.

MBTA Access Guide Available Online

This pilot website is designed to provide information about the accessibility features, customer experience, and customer journey on all MBTA fixed route transportation modes (i.e. buses, subway, commuter rail). The intent of the site is to provide an understanding of how to best utilize MBTA system resources and recognize both customer and operator responsibilities.
Explore the Guide

MBTA Reduced Fare & Passes

The MBTA offers persons with disabilities reduced fare and pass options.
MBTA Reduced Fare & Pass Information

Residential Handicap Parking Program

In an effort to accommodate Boston residents whose disabilities substantially limit their ability to walk, the City of Boston has established a Residential Handicap Parking Space Program which is administered jointly by the Boston Commission for Persons with Disabilities (CPWD) and the Boston Transportation Department (BTD).
Any resident of Boston who meets the requirements of the Residential Handicap Parking Space Program is entitled to apply. However, possession of an HP / DV Plate or HP Placard does not guarantee that a request for a parking space will be approved. Additionally, applicants should be aware that the installation of a Residential HP Parking Space does not reserve a parking space for their exclusive personal use. All HP spaces on public streets in Boston are available for use by any vehicle with a valid HP / DV license plate, or an HP placard.

Obtaining a Disabled Placard or Plate

Disability plates are issued to qualified MA residents who are primary owners of a registered passenger vehicle or motorcycle.
Disability placards are issued to qualified MA residents on a temporary or permanent basis. A person may be issued only one valid placard at a time.

Report Handicap Parking Abuse

Report suspected abuse of a disabled placard or handicap parking space to MassDOT.
Report Handicap Parking Abuse Form

Boston, Massachusetts, Low Priced Handicap Accessible Wheelchair Vans for MA

VMi New England will offer you a low price on your next custom van purchase in Boston, Massachusetts and nationwide. We give customized assistance to help you find affordable new or used wheelchair cars with side and rear entry lowered floor van conversions. Our handicap autos are ideal for personal or commercial transportation for wheelchairs, mobility scooters, and powerchair users. We will bring you a new or used wheelchair van to Boston and still save you thousands of dollars. So get away in Boston, Massachusetts, MA, and explore the possibilities.

You can choose many options for handicap vans including the option to buy a mobility van, sell your wheelchair van to us, trade in a vehicle towards the purchase of a mobility van, convert your vehicle with van conversions for wheelchair accessibility and find adaptive mobility equipment for handicap vans.

 

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Toyota Lowered Floor Mini Van

Get Great Deals on New and Used Mobility Vans in Boston, Massachusetts – MA

If you want or need to buy a wheel chair van in Boston, then we can help. With brands such as Volkswagen, Toyota, Honda, Dodge and Chrysler, along with our wide variety of new wheelchair vehicles with new conversions and used wheelchair vehicles with new or used conversions, you are sure to find the right disability car to meet your needs. We carry used handicap vehicles by Braun, VMI, and other brands with models such as the Braun Entervan, VMI Northstar, and many others (even maybe a AMS ). If you don’t see the specific handicap vehicle make or model that you’re looking for, please contact one of our mobility consultants today. VMi New England is committed to assisting you in your search to find the perfect adapted van that will meet your mobility needs at a price that is affordable to you.

Sell Your Disability Car in Boston, Massachusetts

VMi New England Toyota Sienna Northstar

 

Need to sell your scooter van or non-converted minivan? We buy handicap accessible vans of all types and brands from nearly all manufacturers in Massachusetts or nationwide. It’s also possible for us to purchase non-converted minivans including Chrysler, Volkswagen, and Dodge (long wheelbase only). For your convenience VMi New England now has mobility consignment programs, giving us new mobility alternatives and solutions. Also, for a very minimal cost you can sell your wheelchair lift van through our vast network of mobility classified listings online. Our previous customers can take advantage of our nationwide wheelchair van classified listing service for free.

VMi New England accepts most cars, trucks, minivans, sports cars, off road vehicles or ramp vans for trade-in when buying a wheelchair minivan. We won’t let a trade in stop you from buying a new or used wheelchair vehicle or wheelchair vehicle conversion. Come in for a quick price quote on the value of your trade-in vehicle.

Let us install a wheelchair accessible vehicle conversion into your Dodge, Chrysler, Volkswagen, or Honda minivan. VMi New England’s mobility dealership has low prices on safe, quality side and rear entry wheelchair van conversions that have been around for over 20 years.

Contact us when purchasing or installing mobility equipment in Boston, Massachusetts such as wheelchair lifts, mobility scooter and powerchair vehicle carriers, transfer seats, or other adaptive equipment. VMi New England offers popular brands of driver aids and If you don’t find the specific mobility equipment that meets your handicap van needs, we will make it special order it for you.

NMEDA Announces New Vehicle Winners for the Second Annual Mobility Awareness Month Campaign

NMEDA Announces New Vehicle Winners for the Second Annual Mobility Awareness Month Campaign

2013 NMEDA Whinners

Three “Local Heroes” win wheelchair accessible vehicles

Bridgewater, MA.–(Mobility Buzz)–June 08, 2013–

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) yesterday announced the three winners of the 2013 National Mobility Awareness Month campaign. The National Mobility Awareness Month movement educates seniors, veterans, caregivers, and people with disabilities about wheelchair accessible vehicles and adaptive mobility equipment options available to them to live an active and mobile lifestyle.

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) yesterday announced the three winners of the 2013 National Mobility Awareness Month campaign. The National Mobility Awareness Month movement educates seniors, veterans, caregivers, and people with disabilities about wheelchair accessible vehicles and adaptive mobility equipment options available to them to live an active and mobile lifestyle.

NMEDA is once again awarding three deserving “Local Heroes” with a wheelchair accessible vehicle tailored to meet their needs through an online contest. Sponsors, Chrysler Automobility, SanTan Honda and Toyota Mobility, are providing the vehicles, which will be customized by NMEDA manufacturers — BraunAbility and Vantage Mobility International (VMI).

This year’s winners are:

   -- Abigail Carter from Lexington, KY 

   -- Jeff Scott from Victoria, BC 

   -- Steve Herbst from Palatine, IL

To qualify as a “Local Hero”, entrants submitted either written or videotaped stories of how they are triumphing over their mobility issues through their academic and career ambitions, as well as their family and local community contributions. Caregivers, friends, and family members were also welcomed to submit entries.

“It has been another great year for Mobility Awareness Month,” said Dave Hubbard, executive director and CEO of NMEDA. “We made more than 1.2 billion impressions through the media and social media engagements throughout the campaign and hope that we’ve helped those in need of mobility solutions find necessary resources. We are equally excited about the 1,225 people entered into the Local Heroes campaign and look forward to how their lives are changed and specifically those of our three winners.”

About National Mobility Awareness Month

National Mobility Awareness Month is the annual celebration that encourages seniors, veterans, caregivers and people with disabilities to enjoy active, mobile lifestyles. Founded in 1989 as a not-for-profit trade association, the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) supports the awareness month with the assistance of approximately 600 mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers and driver rehabilitation specialists located in the United States and Canada dedicated to expanding opportunities for people with disabilities.

For updates, please visit VMiNewEngland.com

2013 Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van VMI Summit 360 Conversion

A question from Easter Seals, Boston Massachusetts

A message from Easter Seals MA

In just 5 days, thousands of people have taken the Disability Etiquette Challenge. Will you be one more person to take the challenge? The answers might surprise you!

 

How to Buy a Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle in New England and Save Time and Money

How to Buy a Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle in New England and Save Time and Money

Maintenance is an inevitability with any vehicle, and the specialized parts of any wheelchair accessible vehicles can make finding a location for service and repairs difficult. This is not an issue with Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations. For over 25 years we have received specialized training in repairing and servicing wheelchair-accessible vehicles, wheelchair ramps and lifts, and any other accessory, no matter the model. A relationship with us can be the first step to maintaining a properly functioning vehicle.

VMi New England Service Department

wheelchair accessible vehicle is a specialty vehicle and is different from your neighbor’s sedan. Purchasing online can make finding a repair and maintenance location a less straightforward process. A purchase from a Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations is a promise for maintenance at the same location (we have been in he same town for over 20 years).

VMi New England Wheelchair Showroom

No two people or wheelchairs are the same, and with that no two vehicles are the same. With the hundreds of options available for a wheelchair-accessible vehicle, they can be made to fit any variety of needs. How do I know what options I want, what height I need my vehicle to be, or what preferences I have? Find out first hand what van or ramp combination fits you best. Come try a VMI Summit, a VMI Northstar Toyota Sienna 360 or VMI Honda Odyssey may fit you better than a  BraunAbility Toyota with Quiet Drive and or the new BraunAbility Honda Odyssey

 

Find out and see first hand why grey market online converted vans are not the value they might appear to be

Rollx 2011 Honda

Nothing wrong with this van according to several internet mobility experts

Online shopping limits the buyer to taking the word of the seller at face value, but at Vmi New England all of these options can be tried out firsthand. 

It is important that an investment as big as a mobility vehicle is perfect for you, so it is a good idea to try out what fits your style best.

Vmi New England will work closely with you to help determine how you can qualify for the maximum amount of available manufacturer rebates as well as state & federal tax deductions. Both are excellent ways to save money, but the rules & requirements can be difficult to navigate if you don’t have experience applying for them. We’ve helped many customers receive these incentives and know exactly which steps you need to take to ensure the best chance of receiving them yourself. That level of service is hard to match online.

The internet is a fantastic research tool and can help you decide what vehicle is perfect for you, but no one vehicle is a one-size-fits-all match. 

Come visit Vmi New England where everyday is a Abilities Expo we are just a short ride away from Boson and try all the best mobility vehicles available out personally to make sure it is the perfect one for you. 

It is your life, your money, and you should get a vehicle that comes with great service, guaranteed maintenance, and fits like a glove.

Need some information on how to make your vehicle wheelchair accessible or upgraded with the latest and most convenient features? 

info@newenglandwheelchairvan.com

508-697-6006