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Have A Fun And SAFE New Year’s Eve

New Year’s Eve is a night to have fun and celebrate the coming year. However, safety is a must when participating in the festivities. Whether you’re staying in and celebrating with friends and family, or you’re traveling to a party or city bash, following a few safety tips will ensure that you’re safe and sound when the clock strikes midnight, ringing in the New Year!

Designate a Driver:
If you are going to be driving New Year’s Eve, don’t drink and drive. If you have a friend who does not prefer to drink, make sure they take the wheel. You might even be on the water this New Year’s Eve. The person in charge of navigating the boat needs to be cautious, and this still applies to them. It is important to be safe on the water as well, so drink sensibly.

Be Alert:
Be aware of your surroundings and how others are acting. Stay away from those who are out of control and might cause harm. Taking preventive measures is key. If someone is really intoxicated, prevent them from trying to drive or leaving with someone they do not know. It’s important to keep an eye out for each other.

Don’t Drive:
If you don’t have to go behind the wheel, avoid it. More people will be driving under the influence on this particular night, so avoid a potentially dangerous accident by staying off the road. Otherwise, be alert and drive defensively. Most importantly, wear your seat belt. Also, using public transportation is a wise option. If taking a cab is too expensive, crashing at a friend’s place nearby is a convenient solution.

Stick Together:
This way we can look out for our friends and family. Going out to parties and nightclubs means a fast-paced, crazy night; so be sure to travel in groups. Having a safety net around you in this environment is imperative.

Monitor your Alcohol:
A majority of people will be drinking on New Year’s Eve, and there is nothing wrong with that. Just be sure to pay attention to how much you and others are consuming. Drinking too much alcohol can have lethal affects. Also, be wary of who you except drinks from (especially if they are open) and if you put your drink down think twice before drinking from it again. Be responsible.

Don’t forget about your pets:
They are just as much a part of the family as everyone else. If you are using fireworks, anything with loud noises, or fire, be sure that pets are kept at a distance as well as children. None of these are a good mix.

Be careful with open flames:
If you’re burning candles, incense or oil burners, remember to extinguish them before you turn in or before you leave the room they are burning in. Pay extra attention to pets and children around open flames.

Be extra careful with Fireworks:
If you are letting off fireworks in a residential area, be sure to practice proper safety precautions when using them. Let off fireworks in a field or other open area where homes and power lines are out of sight. Have a fire extinguisher nearby and never try to re-light a firework that did not go off when first lit. Also, be sure pets and children are at a safe distance from where fireworks are being ignited. Finally, always have an adult present when using any type of firework.

Everyone wants to have an unforgettable night — in a good way. By simply using some common sense, we can keep it that way. Ring in the New Year safely.

Safety Tips For The 4th of July Weekend!

It’s time for Fourth of July celebrations – fireworks, a backyard barbecue, maybe a trip to the beach. Whatever you have planned, we want you to enjoy the holiday and be safe!

Firework Safety
The safest way to enjoy fireworks is to attend a public fireworks show put on by professionals. Stay at least 500 feet away from the show. Many states outlaw most fireworks, but if you plan to set fireworks off at home, you should follow these safety steps:

  • Never give fireworks to small children, and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
  • Keep a supply of water close by as a precaution.
  • Make sure the person lighting fireworks always wears eye protection.
  • Light only one firework at a time and never attempt to relight “a dud.”
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place away from children and pets.
  • Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.
  • Leave any area immediately where untrained amateurs are using fireworks.

Barbeque Safety
Every year people in this country are injured while using backyard charcoal or gas grills. Follow these steps to safely cook up treats for your backyard barbecue:

  • Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
  • Never grill indoors – not in your house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.
  • Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.
  • Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.
  • Use the long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions when using grills.

Beach Safety
If your time at the beach you should listen to all the instructions and orders given by lifeguards. Other safety tips include:

  • Keep alert for local weather conditions. Check to see if any warning signs or flags are posted.
  • Swim sober and always swim with a buddy.
  • Have young children and inexperienced swimmers wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • Protect your neck – don’t dive headfirst. Walk carefully into open waters.
  • Protect your feet – the sand can burn them and glass and other sharp objects can cut them.
  • Watch out for aquatic life. Water plants and animals may be dangerous. Avoid patches of plants and leave animals alone.
  • Keep a close eye and constant attention on children and adults while at the beach. Wave action can cause someone to lose their footing, even in shallow water.

Rip currents are responsible for deaths on our nation’s beaches every year, and most of the rescues are performed by lifeguards. Any beach with breaking waves may have rip currents. Be aware of the danger of rip currents and remember the following:

  • If someone is caught in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore until out of the current. Once free, turn and swim toward shore. If that’s not possible swim to the shore, float or tread water until free of the rip current and then head toward the shore.
  • Stay at least 100 feet away from piers and jetties. Permanent rip currents often exist near these structures.

Sun Protection
Limit exposure to direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a protection factor of at least 15. Reapply sunscreen often. Remember to drink plenty of water regularly, even if not thirsty. Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them. Protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses that will absorb 100 percent of UV sunlight.

During hot weather, watch for signs of heat stroke—hot, red skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing. If it’s suspected someone is suffering from heat stroke:

  • Call 9-1-1 and move the person to a cooler place.
  • Quickly cool the body by applying cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin (or misting it with water) and fanning the person.
  • Watch for signs of breathing problems and make sure the airway is clear. Keep the person lying down.

Have A Fun And SAFE New Year’s Eve

New Year’s Eve is a night to have fun and celebrate the coming year. However, safety is a must when participating in the festivities. Whether you’re staying in and celebrating with friends and family, or you’re traveling to a party or city bash, following a few safety tips will ensure that you’re safe and sound when the clock strikes midnight, ringing in the New Year!

Designate a Driver:
If you are going to be driving New Year’s Eve, don’t drink and drive. If you have a friend who does not prefer to drink, make sure they take the wheel. You might even be on the water this New Year’s Eve. The person in charge of navigating the boat needs to be cautious, and this still applies to them. It is important to be safe on the water as well, so drink sensibly.

Be Alert:
Be aware of your surroundings and how others are acting. Stay away from those who are out of control and might cause harm. Taking preventive measures is key. If someone is really intoxicated, prevent them from trying to drive or leaving with someone they do not know. It’s important to keep an eye out for each other.

Don’t Drive:
If you don’t have to go behind the wheel, avoid it. More people will be driving under the influence on this particular night, so avoid a potentially dangerous accident by staying off the road. Otherwise, be alert and drive defensively. Most importantly, wear your seat belt. Also, using public transportation is a wise option. If taking a cab is too expensive, crashing at a friend’s place nearby is a convenient solution.

Stick Together:
This way we can look out for our friends and family. Going out to parties and nightclubs means a fast-paced, crazy night; so be sure to travel in groups. Having a safety net around you in this environment is imperative.

Monitor your Alcohol:
A majority of people will be drinking on New Year’s Eve, and there is nothing wrong with that. Just be sure to pay attention to how much you and others are consuming. Drinking too much alcohol can have lethal affects. Also, be wary of who you except drinks from (especially if they are open) and if you put your drink down think twice before drinking from it again. Be responsible.

Don’t forget about your pets:
They are just as much a part of the family as everyone else. If you are using fireworks, anything with loud noises, or fire, be sure that pets are kept at a distance as well as children. None of these are a good mix.

Be careful with open flames:
If you’re burning candles, incense or oil burners, remember to extinguish them before you turn in or before you leave the room they are burning in. Pay extra attention to pets and children around open flames.

Be extra careful with Fireworks:
If you are letting off fireworks in a residential area, be sure to practice proper safety precautions when using them. Let off fireworks in a field or other open area where homes and power lines are out of sight. Have a fire extinguisher nearby and never try to re-light a firework that did not go off when first lit. Also, be sure pets and children are at a safe distance from where fireworks are being ignited. Finally, always have an adult present when using any type of firework.

Everyone wants to have an unforgettable night — in a good way. By simply using some common sense, we can keep it that way. Ring in the New Year safely.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #10

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #10

Tip 10: Keep an Emergency Kit Inside Your Car

The simplest thing you can do to combat the cold weather is to keep a few essential supplies and tools with you as you drive. You’ll obviously want a spare tire and the tools to change out a flat, but it’s a good idea to keep some extra material in the trunk as well. Bottles of engine oil, washer fluid and coolant all come in handy. An ice scraper is a necessity, since you and your car won’t be going anywhere with frozen snow blocking your view.

Flashlights and flares are helpful if you’re stuck on the road late at night when visibility levels are low. Even if you’re wearing a coat, an extra pair of gloves, boots or even a blanket can keep you warm and dry if your heating unit isn’t working properly.

 

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #9

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #9

Tip 9: Make Sure You Rust Proof Your Vehicle

Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your Vehicle. If neglected, the damages can make your vehicle investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your vehicle from falling apart.

Rust is a serious problem and spreads like a rash. It can shorten the lifespan and value of any vehicle.

The best time to prevent rust damage to your vehicle is in Autumn: before the first snowflake falls and Spring: after the first heavy rain fall; a little vehicle maintenance will help keep the rust away.

 

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #8

Tip 8: Check Your Vehicle’s Belts and Hoses

The belts and hoses under your car’s hood are typically checked when the car is due for a tune-up (usually every 30,000 miles). Even if you’re not getting a tune-up this winter, it doesn’t hurt to have a mechanic take a look at how everything is holding up around your engine. Cold temperatures can weaken belts and hoses, and if something snaps or breaks while you’re out on the road, a tow truck will be the only way to get moving again.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #7

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #7

Tip 7: Replace Windshield Wipers and Wiper Fluid

Low visibility can make driving in cold weather extremely dangerous, so it’s important to make sure the wiper blades are up to par. Your wiper blades are made out of rubber, and with time they’ll crack, split and deteriorate. It’s suggested that you replace your windshield wipers every six to 12 months. Keeping your wiper fluid filled up is also a plus, as fluid can assist in breaking up snow and ice on the windshield.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #6

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #6

Tip 6: Check Your Defrosting and Heating Units

When our windshields fog up in the winter, it’s because moisture from inside the car condenses on the glass and makes it very difficult to see. Water vapor coming in from an open window — or even from your own breathing — can fog up a window. Defrosters solve this problem by blowing warm, dry air over the glass. If you’re sure your defroster unit is functioning properly but there’s still a problem with too much fogging, have your car checked for air leaks around the doors and windows bringing in extra moisture.

It’s also important to stay warm and comfortable while driving, since shivering makes it difficult to steer or pay attention to the road. If your heater isn’t working, you may have a faulty heater coil. Although heater coils are expensive to replace, it will be worth it during cold winter mornings if you don’t want to freeze behind the wheel.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #5

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #5

Tip 5: Keep Your Fuel Tank Full

Do you ever let your gas tank run on fumes until the very last moment, only to fill it up with about $15 worth of gas? Although it’s never a great idea to do this any time of the year because you run the risk of getting stranded, the damage you might inflict on your car with a near-empty tank during winter is much worse. Cold and constantly shifting temperatures can cause condensation to form on the walls of a gas tank in the red, and soon water will drip down and into the gas. It will eventually sink to the bottom, since water is heavier than gas, which is bad news — if water finds its way into the fuel lines, it will freeze up, blocking any flow of gas to the engine and effectively halting your travel plans. Any repairs that have to be made can be costly, too, so despite gas prices, keeping your tank full will help both your car and your wallet.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #4

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #4

Tip 4: Put in the Right Amount of Antifreeze

Antifreeze protects your engine from both freezing in cold weather and heating up on hot days, and it also cuts back on corrosion. It’s important to keep equal parts antifreeze and water in your radiator — a 50:50 ratio is considered the norm and will keep fluids from freezing at temperatures as low as -34 degrees Fahrenheit. Fortunately, you won’t have to stand over your engine with a measuring cup — you can buy pre-mixed bottles of antifreeze and water at gas stations. If you don’t pay attention to the amount of antifreeze, the coolant can freeze, and the engine will get extremely hot. Chances are you’ll blow a gasket or two, and the cost of replacing them with labor can be expensive.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #3

Get Ready For Winter- Tip #3

Check Your Oil

Oil lubricates the metal surfaces of your engine and stops them from grinding together and causing a lot of damage. The viscosity — or thickness — of the oil greatly affects your engine’s performance. If the oil is too thick, it will flow too slowly between parts and your engine will get too hot. In the winter time, cold temperatures cause oil to thicken, but you can overcome this problem by filling your engine with an oil of a lower viscosity. Your owner’s manual should tell you the ideal type of oil you should use, and it also might specifically suggest a thinner oil type depending on the season. Remember, most technicians recommend that you change your oil every 3,000 miles or once every three months.

Get Ready For Winter: Tip #2

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Tip 2: Check Your Battery

Car batteries last for about three to five years, so it’s best to keep track of how old yours is. If it’s time to get a new one, you can replace it in the fall when batteries typically go on sale. Winter months are tough on your engine and cause it to work harder, and this puts more pressure on the battery.

If your battery isn’t that old, it’s still good to take a look and make sure nothing’s wrong. Check the battery cables and clamps for fraying or corrosion. If there’s a white, powdery substance around the clamps, that’s corrosion from battery acid — you can clean it off easily with baking soda, water and a toothbrush. Your battery is also filled with fluid, so make sure it has enough inside. Most batteries have caps on top, and you can check the level by removing the caps. If it’s low, fill the holes with distilled water, being careful not to fill past the bottom of the cap.