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New England Disabled Sports: Winter Activities

About New England Disabled Sports
New England DisAbled Sports is a national recognized program which provides year round adaptive sport instruction to adults and children with physical and cognitive disAbilities.

Their programs allow individuals with disabilities to enjoy a boundary-free environment, enjoy outdoor recreation with friends and family, as well as provide access to equipment and instruction that might otherwise be unavailable.

Their Mission:
The Mission of New England Disabled Sports is, through sports, to change lives affected by disabilities. Download New England Disabled Sports brochure

Their Vision:
They envision a world where disabilities are not barriers.

Their Values:

  • They embrace volunteerism
  • They foster community
  • They strive for excellence
  • They listen to and learn from everyone
  • They nurture personal development through high-quality training and instruction
  • They strive for diversity

Winter Activities

Alpine Skiing

Mono skiing
The mono ski is a device used mainly by people with limited use (or absence) of the lower extremities. A mono ski, also known as a sit-ski, consists of a molded seat mounted on a metal frame. A shock absorber beneath the seat eases riding on uneven terrain and helps in turning by maximizing ski-snow contact. Modern mono skis interface with a single, ordinary alpine ski by means of a “ski foot,” a metal or plastic block in the shape of a boot sole that clicks into the ski’s binding. A mono skier use outriggers for stability; an outrigger resembles a forearm crutch with a short ski on the bottom. People new to mono-skiing are often surprised to see how much terrain is skiable in a mono ski; advanced mono skiers can be found not only carving turns on groomed runs but also skiing moguls, terrain parks, race courses, glades and even backcountry terrain—in short, wherever stand-up skiers can go.

Bi-skiing
A bi-ski is a sit ski with a can be skied independently like the mono-ski with hand-held outriggers, or can be skied with the assistance of an instructor using stabilizing outriggers and tethers. The skier moves his or her head, shoulders or hand-held outriggers to turn the bi-ski. The bi-ski has a lift mechanism for getting onto a chairlift. It can also be used to accustom a new sit-skier to the snow before moving to a mono-ski. Bi-skis are used by people with upper and lower limb impairments and with poor balance. People with these impairments might bi-ski:

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Amputees
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Severe epilepsy
  • Spinal bifida
  • Severe balance impairment

Outriggers are metal elbow crutches with the tip section of a ski pivoted on the bottom of the crutch. Some outriggers have adjustable brakes attached to the back edge of the ski to give some speed control. Outriggers are used to aid balance and/or to give support. Outriggers are used by mono-skiers, bi-skiers and standing skiers needing aid with balance.

3-Track & 4-Track skiing
3 track skiing is defined as skiing on one ski with outriggers to maintain balance. The student is able to stand on one ski and maintain dynamic balance with the assistance of outriggers (poles). 4 track skiing is very similar to 3 track but the skier has 2 feet on skies, rather than one.

Visually Impaired
Alpine (downhill) skiing is one of the rare opportunities available that allows the blind individual to move freely at speed through time and space. It provides the opportunity to embrace and commune with the primal force of gravity, thus experiencing the sheer exhilaration of controlled mass in motion, in a physically independent setting.

For those with Visual Impairment, a sighted Guide is needed. For lesser impairment the guide may simply need to ski a short distance in front of the skier to show the way. Skiers with greater vision loss or who are totally blind will generally ski using a headset arrangement to give audible instruction.

Snowboarding
Snowboarding has become very popular with New England DisAbled Sports students. People with cognitive or physical disAbilities are able to participate and experience the thrills of riding the mountain. The number of snowboarding lessons increases each year as the sport grows in popularity within our community. New England DisAbled Sports offers ski and snowboard lessons daily throughout the winter season.

Snowshoeing
Come explore the snow trails and fresh air of the mountains covered in snow while snowshoeing. Enjoy a winter hike in the woods from the more stable base of snowshoes. Take in peaceful scenery while working to improve your physical fitness level, balance and spatial awareness. You’ll love it!

Winter Biathlon
A seemingly unlikely combination of events – one is an aerobic activity (skiing or running) which requires strength, speed and endurance; the other is a passive activity (shooting) which requires concentration and a steady hand (difficult after you’ve been skiing, running or walking all out!).

Accessible Vehicles And Adaptive Mobility Equipment Q&A

Rear entry vs. side entry. Buying online. Buying used. What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care for answers to some common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Q: Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

A: Certified mobility dealers help consumers buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet their mobility needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“There are so many different products out there, and technology has improved so much. We just want to help people make the right decision,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy [a vehicle] that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return it.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained, make sure the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,”

So it means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.”

Other reasons to seek out a certified mobility equipment dealer include:

They provide a link to qualified service and repair, that it’s crucial to have done on a adapted vehicle serviced.

Some manufacturers of adapted vehicles sell directly to consumers, cutting costs by cutting out the middle man, says Jim Sanders, of VMi New England, based in Bridgewater, MA.

But expert assessment and “try before you buy” remain essentials for prospective buyers, with or without a dealer in the middle.

For example, We, a NMEDA QAP-certified member, send representatives to customers’ homes for assessment and test drives before they buy, and also offer unmatched service/maintenance to just about any modified vehicle including Rollx vans.

Q: Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

A: As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, clients are mostly shopping blind. Typically they have no idea how the vehicle they need will even work fro them, even if they have specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy it online,” “There not trying to assess your needs by e-mail or over the phone. There just trying to sell you something.

Some online dealers even have a questionnaire on its Web site to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you. It’s horrible when people get something that they’re disappointed in.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy [based] on price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online maybe able to save money up front, it wont over the long term.

In addition to consumers missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

Where do you want to sit? If you plan to drive from your wheelchair, then a side-entry conversion is what you’ll need, unless you can transfer to the driver’s seat (rear entry). With a rear-entry conversion, the wheelchair user typically is positioned in the back or between two mid-row captain’s seats, while a side entry offers a wheelchair user multiple seating options in the driver, front passenger and middle sections.

Q: What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

A: Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

Q: What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

A: Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question mobility dealers usually ask a client is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Q: Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

A: The most important difference between a rear- and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with a in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.

Q: What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

A: This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor, so it safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position, mid-ship position, there’s no obstruction to the door, and other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps only are currently only available for side-entry minivan conversions, and there is even a manual (unpowered) option.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than in-floor, and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

Q: I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

A: You have some choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality of mini van conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

For those who prefer to keep their standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and who can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your disease symptoms are worsening is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Q: Why are modified vehicles so darned expensive?

A: A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 — and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

Q: How can I pay less?

A: Consumers have some options.

Many consumers cut costs by purchasing pre-owned vehicles with new conversions, typically saving around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after you’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Q: How do people manage to pay for it?

A: Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment. But with home values decreasing.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles: Q&A

Wheelchair
Accessible Vans

Rear entry Vs. Side entry
Buying New Vs. Buying Used
Manual Ramp Vs. Powered Ramp
Honda Vs. Dodge/Chrysler Vs. Toyota Vs. Ford
Certified Mobility Dealer Vs. Car Dealer Vs. Buying online
What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care. Here are some answers to common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

Certified mobility dealers will help you buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet your needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“Technology has improved tremendously over the years so there are numerous products available. Our goal is to help people find the right equipment that best fits their needs,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy a vehicle that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained and that the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,” which means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.

 

Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, you are mostly shopping blind. Typically you will have no idea how the vehicle you need will work for you, even with specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle online, most online sellers are not qualified Mobility Dealers attempting to assess your needs, they’re just car dealers trying to sell you something.”

Some online dealers even have questionnaires on their websites to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you and your family. It’s horrible when people spend so much an a vehicle that will never work for them.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle based on the price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online may be able to save you some money up front, it won’t over the long term.

In addition to you missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

 

What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

 

What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question most mobility dealers will ask you is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Which Make and Model is the best for a handicapped accessible vehicle?

It honestly depends on what you fit into best and what options you prefer.

No two wheelchair accessible vehicles are the same. They vary in size, shape, color, features and design depending on the vehicle’s make and model. The only way to guarantee which is the best vehicle for you is if you come in and try them all out.

For example: The Honda has a little bit more room inside to maneuver a wheelchair than a Dodge, just as a Toyota has a bit more space than a Honda. A Ford offers more headroom than all of the above. But that all depends on the conversion and manufacturer.

Although color and features matter least to us, some find them just as important as fitting into the vehicle. Each Manufacturer offers their own color schemes, which you can look up on their websites. You can also search for what features you would prefer to have.

When you come into our Mobility Center we will help you find the vehicle that best fits you and your family’s needs. If you love the vehicle but not the color or features we can custom order a vehicle for you. That way we know you are buying a vehicle that best fits you and one that you are 100% happy with.

Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

The most important difference between a rear entry and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with an in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally  because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.


What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor which makes riding in the vehicle safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position or the mid-ship position. There is no obstruction to the doorway so other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps are currently only available as a side-entry minivan conversion, but they offer a manual (un-powered) option as well.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind” and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than an in-floor ramp and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

You have other choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality as the minivan conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

If you prefer to keep your standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your symptoms worsen is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Why are modified vehicles so  expensive?

A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 —  and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

How can I pay less?

You have  a few options.

You could cut costs by purchasing a pre-owned vehicle with a new conversion, typically saving you around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after they’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Another tactic to help save you money is to ask your Certified Mobility Dealer about any rebates or financial aid options that could benefit you.

How do people manage to pay for it?

Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

October Is Car Care Month: Is your vehicle prepared for winter driving?

Is your car ready to handle freezing conditions? Frigid temps can take a toll on your car and make winter driving even more hazardous than usual.
Here are a few tips to adapt to winter roads and preparing your car for the extreme cold.

Check the car’s battery
Cold weather takes a toll on batteries and requires a full charge. A battery is 35 percent weaker at 32 degrees and 60 percent weaker at zero degrees.

A load test by a qualified technician can determine whether a car’s battery is strong enough for winter. Keep in mind that if the car started with a jump start, the problem is not fixed and the battery most likely needs replacing.

Starting
Avoid excessive cranking. If the car doesn’t start after 20 seconds of cranking, wait a couple of minutes to let the battery recover.

Tire preparation
Tires should have sufficient tread depth that can handle New England’s winter weather. All-season tires are adequate for most vehicles but to get the greatest traction for both starting and stopping, snow tires are recommended. When considering snow tires, they should be installed on all four wheels

See and be seen
Clear windows, mirrors, and lights with an ice scraper, brush, or a spray de-icer. Driving with a snow-covered windshield, windows, side-view mirrors or lights invites a crash.

Completely clean snow from the roof, hood, and trunk. Windshield wipers and defrosters should be in good working order and washer reservoirs should be filled with no-freeze windshield washer fluid.

Consider specially designed winter wiper blades that prevent snow and ice buildup and improve visibility.

Reduce speeds
Most winter crashes happen from driving too fast for the weather conditions. Remember, everything takes longer on snow-covered roads, including accelerating, stopping, and turning.

Nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement so allow time to maneuver by driving slowly.

All-wheel drive is best
All-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive will help to get a car moving, but bear in mind it does little to improve braking. Don’t become overconfident and drive too fast for winter road conditions.

Anticipate stopping distance
In temperatures at or just above 32 degrees, a thin layer of water can cover the ice and cause slippery conditions, especially at intersections where snow and ice tend to melt first. The distance needed to stop on ice at 32 degrees is twice as long as at zero degrees.

Keep the engine cool
Mix certain cooling system antifreeze with an equal portion of water for maximum protection.

Accessible Haunted Houses in New England

According to the Websites these Haunted Houses are accessible.

Spooky World Presents Nightmare New England
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, all of our indoor attractions are accessible and have wooden floors. Please note that our outdoor attractions have paths that are grass, gravel and woodchips.

Is a Military Discount offered?
Yes – we are proud to honor our past and present men and women offering service to our country. To receive a $7 discount per ticket, please show your Military ID at any of our ticket windows when purchasing. A Military ID discount may not be combined with any other coupons or offers.

Ghoulie Manor
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, we are! If you don’t come with a wheelchair, you may need one by the time you leave.

Factory of Terror – Fall River, MA
Factory of Terror – Worcester, MA

Q. Is the Factory of Terror wheelchair accessible?
A. Yes, we have designed our attraction to make it wheelchair accessible.

Six Flags Fright Fest – Springfield, MA
Although the site does not  state it is Wheelchair accessible in the Plan Trip section it says: “7. Stop by Stroller Rental if you need a stroller, wheelchair, wooden stakes, silver bullets, garlic, or holy water.”

Canobie Lake Park Screamfest
Are the haunts wheelchair accessible?
Our haunted attractions can accommodate conventional and electric wheelchairs or electric service vehicles – although certain elements/effects will require the use of an alternate pathway. We do recommend, however, that you plan your visit with someone who is aware of your needs and can physically assist you when necessary.

Is Nightmare Vermont handicapped accessible?

Yes!  This year we are at the Memorial Auditorium which is wheelchair accessible. However, we can only make accommodations for our Thursday, Friday, Sunday and Wednesday shows.
Call 802 355-3107 two days in advance to make arrangements.

Note: You should call in advance to make sure their accommodations meet your needs.

Rust Treatment

Owning any type of vehicle means that you have to commit to regular service and maintenance to keep it in good condition. Owning a wheelchair van and adaptive equipment is no different – you still need regular service to keep everything operating the way it should. However, it comes with some additional caveats – you can’t just go to any service center and ensure that you’re maintaining your wheelchair van or mobility equipment correctly.

Here at our Mobility Center, not only do we understand the importance of maintaining your mobility vehicle and adaptive equipment, but we take the needed steps to ensure that everything is always in top condition. No other mobility dealer (that we know of) offers the level of maintenance offered by us.

Rust Maintenance
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

** We highly recommend that everyone gets their wheelchair vans rust proofed at least twice a year. Once in Spring and again in the Fall. **

If you consider that new vehicles undergo thousands of spot welds and numerous bends and folds during assembly; this process damages the automobile coating systems, exposing these panels to corrosion. Besides body-panel damage, certain mechanical parts are also at risk – suspension mounts, hood-locking mechanisms, door hinges, brake cables – which are all susceptible to the damaging effects of rust on your wheelchair van.

To protect your vehicle against corrosion our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required. A rust proofing product must be applied as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

Benefits of rust treatment
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast. Our rust prevention processes, products, plan and application have been found to be very effective and developed over more than 25 years and still remain affordable.

We are the only mobility dealer in New England to offer this service.
Our rust proofing processes is ever evolving and has been for more than 25 years.

Recreation Opportunities For People With Disabilities

All Out Adventures
All Out Adventures provides outdoor accessible recreational opportunities throughout Massachusetts for people of all abilities, their families and friends. Summer programs include accessible kayaking, canoeing, hiking and cycling. Winter programs include snowshoeing, x-country skiing & sit-skiing, ice skating, sled skating and snowmobile rides.

Accessible Swimming Pools
Accessible Swimming Pools outdoor swimming pool lifts are available at all of the State Parks and Recreation Department’s 20 swimming pools. The pools are free. Contact pool directly for information about other site factors affecting accessibility.

AccesSport America
AccesSport America is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the discovery of higher function, fitness, and fun for children and adults with disabilities through high-challenge sports, which include kayaking, windsurfing and water skiing.

Arcs.
Local Arcs provide a variety of social and recreational activities for children and teens with developmental disabilities.

Bostnet / Guide to Boston’s Before & After School Programs
Build the Out-of-School Time Network (BOSTnet) has built a network of out-of-school time (OST) resources and opportunities for all children and youth, including those from low-income families and youth with disabilities.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary offers nine miles of walking trails guiding through a variety of field, woodland, and wetland habitats. A quarter-mile, handicap accessible trail and boardwalk along the bank of Indian Brook. Universally accessible facilities: Nature Center, Restrooms, All Persons Trail.

BSC (Boston Sports Club) Adaptive Swim Program
On Monday and Wednesday evening, between 6:30pm and 7:30pm, BSC Waltham (840 Winter Street) offers an adaptive swim program for children, youth, adolescents and adults with disabilities in our 93 degree therapy pool. Volunteers between the ages of 16-20 from neighboring schools and organizations offer their time to pair with an individual seeking to increase range of motion, flexibility, and strength but most importantly to socialize with other individuals and families. Our adaptive swim program is offered during the school year (September thru May) in 8-week sessions at a cost of $200 per session. Our 120,000 square foot, state of the art facility can accommodate families in our men’s, women’s or family changing rooms, fully equipped with showers, lockers, restrooms, towels, and other amenities.

  • 781-522-2054
  • 781-522-2512

CAPEable Adventures
offers adaptive sports & therapeutic recreation activities to local residents and vacationers to the Cape.


Cape Cod Challenger Club

Cape Cod Challenger Club offers noncompetitive sports and recreation opportunities for children with disabilities.

Challenger Sport League
Some towns have challenger teams. The goal of the challenger team is to play with no pressure and to educate typical peers and their parents about sportsmanship. The program is available for boys and girls, ages 3 – 19 with all types of physical and developmental disabilities. Call your local town recreation department to find out if they offer challenger sports.

Children’s Physical Developmental Clinic at Bridgewater State University
BSC students from all majors have opportunities to volunteer as clinicians and work with children and youth with disabilities, ages 18 months to 18 years. Clinic dates are to the right on website’s homepage.

Choral / Community Voices
Open to individuals 16 years of age and older. Must be willing to be committed for 12 weeks. Provides a choral opportunity for adults and young adults with developmental delays. Singing in an ensemble, individuals will have the opportunity to develop and refine vocal technique, listening skills, and team-work. Repertoire will include songs from the masters, traditional and folk favorites, as well as pop and Broadway tunes. Performances are scheduled in December and June. Fee $156/fall, $243/spring.

Compelling Fitness
Compelling Fitness in Hanover provides group and / or individual physical fitness training for children and adults with special needs.

Fitness Program / Special Needs Training
Call your local YMCA.

Horseback Riding – PATH International Centers in Massachusetts
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, PATH International was formally known as North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA). Though PATH Intl. began with a focus on horseback riding as a form of physical and mental therapy, the organization and its dedicated members have since developed a multitude of different equine-related activities for therapeutic purposes, collectively known as equine-assisted activities and therapies (or EAAT).

JF&CS Sunday Respite Program
JF&CS Sunday Respite Program for Children with Developmental Disabilities including those on the Autism Spectrum. Program includes swimming, music and art therapy. The program meets at the Striar JCC in Stoughton from 1:00 -4:00. This program is run by JF&CS with additional funding from Eastern Bank.


Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S)

  • Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S) Thirteen specialized athletic programs are available. K.I.D.S. hosts dances, sports banquets, social activities and recreational events throughout the year. Serves individuals and families throughout Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. Participants range in age 5-40 and have varying disabilities. http://www.kidsinc.us/
  • info@kidsinc.us
  • 1-866-712-7799

LIAM Nation Athletics (formerly known as FOSEK, Friends of Special Education Kidz)
sports leagues for special needs children in Tewksbury and surrounding communities in Merrimack Valley. Accomodates athletes of all abilities. Bombers Baseball, Striker Soccer, Little Reds Basketball.

Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program
Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program provides outdoor recreation opportunities in Massachusetts State Parks for visitors of all abilities. Accessibility to Massachusetts State Parks is achieved through site improvements, specialized adaptive recreation equipment, and accessible recreation programs.

Massachusetts Hospital School Wheelchair Recreation & Sports Program
Wheelchair sports and recreation program for children ages 9 to 21. Horseback riding, swimming and , Wheelchair Athletes Program.

Miracle League of Massachusetts
Miracle League of Massachusetts provides baseball for special needs children. Free to participate (includes uniform). Located at Blanchard Memorial Elementary School Ball Field in Boxborough.

New England Wheelchair Athletic Association (NEWAA)
Volunteer organization that helps individuals with physcial disabilities participate in recreational
and sports activities. The NEWAA provides opportunities for athletic competition by sponsoring
regional and local meets.

Partners for Youth With Disabilities Provides mentoring programs that assist young people reach their full potential. Partners provides several types of mentoring programs including one-to-one, group mentoring and e-mentoring.

Piers Park Sailing
Piers Park Sailing provides programs for disabled youth and adults aboard 23-foot sonar sailboats on a no charge basis. Serves those with amputations, paralysis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, autism, hearing impaired, sight impaired and other disabilities. Successfully integrates youth with disabilities into summer youth sailing programs. Scholarships are available for all Adaptive sailing programs. “Yes You Can Sail” program Friday eves for $35.

  • (617) 561-6677

Senseability Gym
Senseability Gym serves special needs children in greater Hopedale area. Our mission is to provide a parent-led sensory gym, giving children with special needs a safe, fun, indoor area where they can play and accommodate their sensory needs.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports
Spaulding Adaptive Sports offers adaptive sports and recreation activities in Boston, Cape Cod and the North Shore. Includes wheelchair tennis, hand cycling, adaptive rowing, waterskiing or windsurfing.

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA)
Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) provides year round sports training and athletic competition for all persons with intellectual disabilities. Minimum age requirement is eight years of age. There is no maximum age requirement. SOMA summer games offers aquatics, athletics, gymnastics, sailing, tennis and volleyball. Go to above link to search SOMA region that covers your town.

Sudbury Adaptive Sports & Recreation
Programs for all ages and abilities.

Super Soccer Stars Shine
Our unique program uses soccer as a vehicle to teach life skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. Our innovative curriculum, designed by licensed educators and therapists, promotes the complete growth and development of each player. Our low player-to-coach ratios encourage and empower players to increase social potential with teammates, build self-awareness and confidence and advance gross and fine motor skills — all while each individual improves at his or her own pace! Located at 1 Thompson Square, Suite 301 in Charlestown. Call for information. Low pricing options and scholarship applications available.

Therapy and the Performing Arts – Cape Cod
Provides children and young adults with physical and intellectual disabilities the opportunity to enjoy various arts and recreational programs in addition to receiving therapeutic benefits from their participation. Children gain new and rewarding experiences from which they develop self-confidence, increase motor function, and have fun. Offers age appropriate programming on Cape Cod for children and young adults diagnosed with down syndrome, chromosomal abnormalies, cerebral palsy, genetic disorders and othe cognitive and physical disabilities. Classes are taught by certified instructors/ therapists with expertise in various disciplines. Programs are offered on a sliding scale fee based on the family’s ability to pay.


TILL Autism Support Center

TILL Autism Support Center has social programs for those with autism spectrum disorders. Programs include exciting Family Fun Days that include apple picking, rock climing, sledding, in-door gym time, zoo trips, holiday parties and much more.

Town Recreation Departments
Most programs are open to participants from neighboring towns. Call area town recreation department to find out if it has special programming for children with disabilities.

Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn.
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn. offers information about beach wheelchairs, biking, boating and more!

TopSoccer Program / Outreach Program for Soccer
is a community-based training and team placement program for young athletes with a mental or physical disability. For additional information or would like to start a TOPSoccer Program in your community contact:

YMCAs
YMCAs are accessible and offer a range of classes. Call your local YMCA to find out what programs are available.

The Lowell YMCA “Adaptive Aquatics Program” accommodates children with mild to moderate neurological, physical, or social challenges.

  • (978) 454-7825.

Oak Square YMCA of Greater Boston at 615 Washington St, Brighton has a new adaptive fitness room & offers Adapted Adult Speciality Fitness Partnership Program on Wednesday and Saturday 11AM – 12:30PM on the Fitness Floor.

Hopkinton YMCA offers seasonal specialized programs. “Aim High” archery program and “Rock On!” is an outdoor ropes course and rock climbing for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related social communication disorders.

  • 45 East Street in Hopkinton.

WaterFire Access Program
A water-taxi program at Dyer Street Dock in Providence Rhode Island which provides an unforgettable experience of the art work for children and adults with disabilities to assure that they can join in the most popular arts event in the state and share the experience with their families and friends. Reservations are required. Each Water Fire Access passenger can bring along one companion.

Waypoint Adventures
Adventures for people of all ages and abilities

Whole Children offers movement, art, recreation and music programs for infants, children and teens of all abilities. Located in Hadley.

How to adapt your new or pre-owned vehicle to meet your needs after a stroke

Driving after a stroke is often a major concern for survivor’s and their loved ones. It prompts many questions about ability, safety and vehicle options. Often times, the physical disadvantages that result from stroke can compromise a survivor’s ability to operate their vehicle.

Advances in the vehicle modification industry have introduced new driving controls that are giving independence back to stroke survivors that want to drive. They allow them to get back behind the wheel in their own vehicle to go where they want to go, when they want to go.

Innovative vehicle modifications such as hand controls, left-foot accelerators, lifts and mobility seating can transform your personal vehicle into a vehicle that give you more freedom.

Mobility equipment dealers strive to remain at the forefront of the vehicle modification industry by providing cutting-edge technology and a full selection of adaptable equipment for your pre-owned vehicle.

Hand Controls For Stroke Survivors with Limited Use of their Feet
Automotive Innovations is New England’s  #1 hand control installation facility  manufacturer of hand controls and driving aids for the disabled. Hand control systems are specifically designed to give drivers the benefit of controlling a vehicle with both hands on the wheel making for a safer, smoother driving experience.

Unlike other manual and or servo hand control installers in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, we have the ability to offer a custom fitment to your vehicle and you, for everything from a Fiat 500 to a Lamborghini Aventador no one else has the master craftsman, machining equipment and facility capable of performing a custom installation the way we can.

Push Rock hand controls have a handle in a vertical position; accelerating by rocking back in an arching motion using the fingers and/or the palm. There are several additional options to choose from:

  • Spinner knob: Attached to the steering wheel to allow controlled steering with use of one hand.
  • Single Pin: As an alternative to the spinner knob, this hand control was designed for clients that cannot open their hand fully.
  • Tri Pin: Great for an independent driver. It requires minimal gripping strength and/or reduced wrist stability.
  • V-Grip: This attachment is intended for drivers with moderate gripping strength.
  • Steering Wheel Extension: This device is individually customizable, so you can pick a diameter and height that best suits your needs. The easily removable device is completely compatible with any OEM steering wheel.

Servo electronic mobility controls offers driving control products that are safe and provide piece of mind every time you are on the road.

  • Lever  A gas/brake input with adjustable levels of force and travel from the full gas to the full brake position. It is designed for customers that have a wider range of motion and a larger effort level.
  • One handed steering and gas brake  A input that you can steer that is available in a two-axis configuration for gas/brake and steering It has a adjustable range of motion and very low levels  of force to operate. It is designed and custom build for each customers specific range of motion and abilities.
  • Wheel  A steering input that can be adjusted to less than 2 oz of force at the proper orthotic position of 3 3/8” from center. It is also able to be adaptable for customers that have a wider range of motion.

Left-foot Accelerator
Automotive Innovations offers the best left foot gas pedals with unmatched installations.  Left-foot accelerator are designed to offer a left foot gas pedal which acts exactly like your vehicle’s existing gas pedal. Our Left foot gas pedals are removable with features like a quick-release base so the entire assembly can be removed and re-installed quickly and easily.

Lifts for Stroke Survivors that use Wheelchairs or Walkers
Automotive Innovations can offer more solutions for the transportation of your mobility device than any other dealership in New England.

” Its worth the drive, I live in the western part of Massachusetts and will never trust my van with anyone other than Automotive Innovations. They have been taking care of me and my vans since 1996. When a company comes through for you time and time again whats that worth? For me it’s priceless and the drive is irrelevant.”

Chris P Whately, MA

  • Scooter & Wheelchair Lifts while are not always practical they do work in all types of vehicles. These fold-down wheelchair and scooter lifts make lifting and storing your manual folding wheelchair or scooter possible.

Mobility Seating
The mobility transfer seat is an innovative system for lower vehicles which can provide easer  access to an automotive seat. The seat power rotates out over the doorsill, bridging the gap for a safe transfer onto the seat. These seats are not always practical for every type of vehicle

Our goal is to match your lifestyle and your vehicle with equipment that will deliver independence.

Finding a Dealer That’s Up to Standards

Hand controls, left-foot accelerator, lifts and mobility seating offers opportunities for the stroke survivor to regain their mobility freedom in their pre-owned vehicle. You have just found the best mobility dealer in all of New England that offers a ever evolving selection of adaptable equipment.

It is important to select a reputable dealer to provide the adaptable equipment and installation for your pre-owned vehicle.

  1. Are they members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has vehicle conversion standards?
  2. Are they Quality Assurance Program (QAP) certified?
  3. Do they provide ongoing service and maintenance?
  4. Do they provide 24/7 emergency service?
  5. Do they provide training on the adaptable equipment?
  6. Can the equipment be transferred to a new vehicle in the future?

Adapting pre-owned vehicles provides stroke survivors with mobility freedom in the vehicle they love and are familiar with.

Rust Treatment

Owning any type of vehicle means that you have to commit to regular service and maintenance to keep it in good condition. Owning a wheelchair van and adaptive equipment is no different – you still need regular service to keep everything operating the way it should. However, it comes with some additional caveats – you can’t just go to any service center and ensure that you’re maintaining your wheelchair van or mobility equipment correctly.

Here at our Mobility Center, not only do we understand the importance of maintaining your mobility vehicle and adaptive equipment, but we take the needed steps to ensure that everything is always in top condition. No other mobility dealer (that we know of) offers the level of maintenance offered by us.

Rust Maintenance
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

** We highly recommend that everyone gets their wheelchair vans rust proofed at least twice a year. Once in Spring and again in the Fall. **

If you consider that new vehicles undergo thousands of spot welds and numerous bends and folds during assembly; this process damages the automobile coating systems, exposing these panels to corrosion. Besides body-panel damage, certain mechanical parts are also at risk – suspension mounts, hood-locking mechanisms, door hinges, brake cables – which are all susceptible to the damaging effects of rust on your wheelchair van.

To protect your vehicle against corrosion our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required. A rust proofing product must be applied as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

Benefits of rust treatment
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast. Our rust prevention processes, products, plan and application have been found to be very effective and developed over more than 25 years and still remain affordable.

We are the only mobility dealer in New England to offer this service.
Our rust proofing processes is ever evolving and has been for more than 25 years.

The 5th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Is Today! Come Say Hi!

Bosotn Wpunded Vet Run 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike Downing
All donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race Track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!
Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call with any questions: (617) 697-5080

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run Is Tomorrow!!

Boston's 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run - 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike Downing
All donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race Track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!
Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call with any questions: (617) 697-5080

Motorcycle Awareness MonthMay is Motorcycle Awareness Month.
Share The Road.

It’s Time To Rust Proof Your Vehicle!

Spring has sprung
The snow is gone
& Rain has come
It’s time to rust proof your vehicle!

Owning any type of vehicle means that you have to commit to regular service and maintenance to keep it in good condition. Owning a wheelchair van and adaptive equipment is no different – you still need regular service to keep everything operating the way it should. However, it comes with some additional caveats – you can’t just go to any service center and ensure that you’re maintaining your wheelchair van or mobility equipment correctly.

Here at our Mobility Center, not only do we understand the importance of maintaining your mobility vehicle and adaptive equipment, but we take the needed steps to ensure that everything is always in top condition. No other mobility dealer (that we know of) offers the level of maintenance offered by us.

Rust Maintenance
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

** We highly recommend that everyone gets their wheelchair vans rust proofed at least twice a year. Once in Spring and again in the Fall. **

If you consider that new vehicles undergo thousands of spot welds and numerous bends and folds during assembly; this process damages the automobile coating systems, exposing these panels to corrosion. Besides body-panel damage, certain mechanical parts are also at risk – suspension mounts, hood-locking mechanisms, door hinges, brake cables – which are all susceptible to the damaging effects of rust on your wheelchair van.

To protect your vehicle against corrosion our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required. A rust proofing product must be applied as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

Benefits of rust treatment
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast. Our rust prevention processes, products, plan and application have been found to be very effective and developed over more than 25 years and still remain affordable.

We are the only mobility dealer in New England to offer this service.
Our rust proofing processes is ever evolving and has been for more than 25 years.

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run Is One Month Away!!

Boston's 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run - 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike Downing
All donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race Track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!
Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call with any questions: (617) 697-5080

Spring Rust Treatment

Owning any type of vehicle means that you have to commit to regular service and maintenance to keep it in good condition. Owning a wheelchair van and adaptive equipment is no different – you still need regular service to keep everything operating the way it should. However, it comes with some additional caveats – you can’t just go to any service center and ensure that you’re maintaining your wheelchair van or mobility equipment correctly.

Here at our Mobility Center, not only do we understand the importance of maintaining your mobility vehicle and adaptive equipment, but we take the needed steps to ensure that everything is always in top condition. No other mobility dealer offers the level of maintenance offered by us.

Rust Maintenance
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

** We highly recommend that everyone gets their wheelchair accessible vehicles rust proofed at least twice a year. Once in Spring and again in the Fall. **

If you consider that new vehicles undergo thousands of spot welds and numerous bends and folds during assembly; this process damages the automobile coating systems, exposing these panels to corrosion. Besides body-panel damage, certain mechanical parts are also at risk – suspension mounts, hood-locking mechanisms, door hinges, brake cables – which are all susceptible to the damaging effects of rust on your wheelchair van.

To protect your vehicle against corrosion our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required. A rust proofing product must be applied as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

Benefits of rust treatment
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast. Our rust prevention processes, products, plan and application have been found to be very effective and developed over more than 25 years and still remain affordable.

We are the only mobility dealer in New England to offer this service.

Our rust proofing processes is ever evolving and has been for more than 25 years.

Ready To Sell You Wheelchair Van? Make sure Its Ready To Be Bought!

If you’re trying to sell your wheelchair accessible vehicle by yourself, you should know the average mobility vehicle could take a few months to sell. The number of people with limited mobility in one local area who are in the market to purchase can be very small. Add to that the specialized equipment on your van that a potential buyer may not want, and the weeks roll by (and you’re still making payments on the old van).

The fastest deal is at a local mobility dealership. We buy and sell new and used vans throughout New England, take trade-ins, buy vehicle outright and/or can put them on consignment—whether it’s a non-converted vehicle or a converted van.

In order to get the best offer (or trade-in value), you should make sure its in “buying condition”.

Look at the vehicle with fresh eyes—like a buyer would. Ask yourself, “Would I buy this vehicle?”

  • If something needs repairing, fix it. A small investment can add hundreds to the value.
  • Wash it, wax it or take it to a detailer for a shine, inside and out. Maybe you only need to wash it and perhaps buy new floor mats.
  • Write down vehicle information such as year, make, model, interior and exterior colors and mileage; VIN number; side or rear entry, configuration of the interior of the van; standard features; removable features and any other adaptive extras.
  • Double check safety features: Are the tie-downs still sturdy and clean? Does the lift or ramp still operate smoothly?
  • Consider replacing the tires if they are bald.
  • Take out all personal items you may want to keep.
  • Find the registration, warranty, owner’s manual, equipment manuals and repair receipts.
  • All controls should be clearly labeled—and work!

Now you’re ready to sell or trade-in for a newer model.

Full Service Automotive Shop

The VMi New England Mobility Center’s Team in Bridgewater, MA offers a in-house body shop in addition to a auto service department that is staffed with the most qualified technicians ready to answer your questions and address your handicap van auto repair needs. Our auto body service and car repair experts have the experience to get your wheelchair accessible van back on the road in top condition. You can come from and where in New England to have one of our specialists repair your adapted vehicles, wheelchair vehicles, used adapted vehicles, or used conversion vans, conversion van or handicapped vehicle. Call anytime to schedule an appointment, or contact our van service department if you have any additional questions.

At the VMi New England Mobility Center we provide wheelchair accessible van body repair service for all make & model vans & mobility equipment. We service and repair most all brand mobility vehicles including BraunAbility and VMI van’s We perform body shop service, rust prevention, rust repair and warranty work on all the vehicles & products we sell. We repair wheelchair lifts in vans & buses for both private and commercial customers

Wheelchair Van Body Shop
With our in house down draft spray booth we can assist you with Autobody repair as well as work with insurance companies to be sure you get the proper support in repairing damaged wheelchahir accessible vehicles .

Full Service Automotive Shop
Our team of technicians also perform Full Service Auto repair so we can offer 1 stop shopping. Instead of using 2 different mechanics for the repair of one vehicle, let our trained service team handle all of your mechanical needs

Large Selection Of Wheelchair Van Parts In-Stock
We offer a large selection of parts for wheelchair lifts and wheelchair vans including: BraunAbility, VMI, Vision & more. Our expert staff in our service department are standing by to fix your mobility van. Whether you need a single part or would like to keep your entire fleet going, we have the name brand parts available. If we don’t have the exact part your looking for, we can get almost anything within a day. Give us a call today for all your wheelchair van needs.

New England DisAbled Sports: Winter Activities

New Englands Disabled Sports- Winter Activities

About New England DisAbled Sports
New England DisAbled Sports is a national recognized program which provides year round adaptive sport instruction to adults and children with physical and cognitive disAbilities.

Their programs allow individuals with disAbilities to enjoy a boundary-free environment, enjoy outdoor recreation with friends and family, as well as provide access to equipment and instruction that might otherwise be unavailable.

Their Mission:
The Mission of New England DisAbled Sports is, through sports, to change lives affected by disAbilities. Download New England DisAbled Sports brochure

Their Vision:
They envision a world where disAbilities are not barriers.

Their Values:

  • They embrace volunteerism
  • They foster community
  • They strive for excellence
  • They listen to and learn from everyone
  • They nurture personal development through high-quality training and instruction
  • They strive for diversity

Winter Activities

Alpine Skiing

Mono skiing
The mono ski is a device used mainly by people with limited use (or absence) of the lower extremities. A mono ski, also known as a sit-ski, consists of a molded seat mounted on a metal frame. A shock absorber beneath the seat eases riding on uneven terrain and helps in turning by maximizing ski-snow contact. Modern mono skis interface with a single, ordinary alpine ski by means of a “ski foot,” a metal or plastic block in the shape of a boot sole that clicks into the ski’s binding. A mono skier use outriggers for stability; an outrigger resembles a forearm crutch with a short ski on the bottom. People new to mono-skiing are often surprised to see how much terrain is skiable in a mono ski; advanced mono skiers can be found not only carving turns on groomed runs but also skiing moguls, terrain parks, race courses, glades and even backcountry terrain—in short, wherever stand-up skiers can go.

Bi-skiing
A bi-ski is a sit ski with a can be skied independently like the mono-ski with hand-held outriggers, or can be skied with the assistance of an instructor using stabilizing outriggers and tethers. The skier moves his or her head, shoulders or hand-held outriggers to turn the bi-ski. The bi-ski has a lift mechanism for getting onto a chairlift. It can also be used to accustom a new sit-skier to the snow before moving to a mono-ski. Bi-skis are used by people with upper and lower limb impairments and with poor balance. People with these impairments might bi-ski:

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Amputees
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Severe epilepsy
  • Spinal bifida
  • Severe balance impairment

Outriggers are metal elbow crutches with the tip section of a ski pivoted on the bottom of the crutch. Some outriggers have adjustable brakes attached to the back edge of the ski to give some speed control. Outriggers are used to aid balance and/or to give support. Outriggers are used by mono-skiers, bi-skiers and standing skiers needing aid with balance.

3-Track & 4-Track skiing
3 track skiing is defined as skiing on one ski with outriggers to maintain balance. The student is able to stand on one ski and maintain dynamic balance with the assistance of outriggers (poles). 4 track skiing is very similar to 3 track but the skier has 2 feet on skies, rather than one.

Visually Impaired
Alpine (downhill) skiing is one of the rare opportunities available that allows the blind individual to move freely at speed through time and space. It provides the opportunity to embrace and commune with the primal force of gravity, thus experiencing the sheer exhilaration of controlled mass in motion, in a physically independent setting.

For those with Visual Impairment, a sighted Guide is needed. For lesser impairment the guide may simply need to ski a short distance in front of the skier to show the way. Skiers with greater vision loss or who are totally blind will generally ski using a headset arrangement to give audible instruction.

Snowboarding
Snowboarding has become very popular with New England DisAbled Sports students. People with cognitive or physical disAbilities are able to participate and experience the thrills of riding the mountain. The number of snowboarding lessons increases each year as the sport grows in popularity within our community. New England DisAbled Sports offers ski and snowboard lessons daily throughout the winter season.

Snowshoeing
Come explore the snow trails and fresh air of the mountains covered in snow while snowshoeing. Enjoy a winter hike in the woods from the more stable base of snowshoes. Take in peaceful scenery while working to improve your physical fitness level, balance and spatial awareness. You’ll love it!

Winter Biathlon
A seemingly unlikely combination of events – one is an aerobic activity (skiing or running) which requires strength, speed and endurance; the other is a passive activity (shooting) which requires concentration and a steady hand (difficult after you’ve been skiing, running or walking all out!).

 

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run

Boston's 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run - 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike DowningAll donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 10am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
“New” Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call Andrew with any questions: 903-340-9402
Vendors please call: 617-416-0782

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Motorcycle Run

 Boston’s Annual Wounded Vet Bike Run Inspired by Cpl. Vincent Mannion Brodeur began in 2011. One of the most severely wounded veterans in the nation, Vinnie is the recipient of the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. While serving in Iraq in 2007 with the 82nd Airborne, Vinnie was critically injured by an insurgents improvised explosive device. After surviving 40 operations and a year long coma Vincent has become an inspiration for people throughout the nation. All proceeds from Vinnie’s Run went to creating a handicapped accessible living space for Vinnie. Every year Boston’s Wounded Vet Run will be dedicated to different veterans. All proceeds raised go towards housing modifications to suite a comfortable living for the disabled veteran. Besides housing modifications, funds are also used to improve the quality of life of disabled veterans. Recreational needs, cars, and basic living needs are also other fields of charity the ride is dedicated to. The event is sponsored by the Italian-American War Veterans, a federally chartered non-profit veterans organization. They fought, and we ride, a bike run honoring the wounded veteran’s of New England.

The Honorees for the 5th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run

2015 Event Information

When?
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where?
Begins at:
New Boston Harley
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost:
$20 per person
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins
Donate Here!!

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs at 1:30 for ceremony, food, and entertainment.

2015 Honorees
U.S ARMY SSGT Nick Lavery
U.S ARMY SSGT Mike Downing
U.S. ARMY SGT Brendan Ferreira
U.S ARMY SSGT Travis Mills

Vendors please call:
617-416-0782

October Is Car Care Month: Is your vehicle prepared for winter driving?

October Is Car Care Month- Is your vehicle prepared for winter driving

Is your car ready to handle freezing conditions? Frigid temps can take a toll on your car and make winter driving even more hazardous than usual.
Here are a few tips to adapt to winter roads and preparing your car for the extreme cold.

Check the car’s battery
Cold weather takes a toll on batteries and requires a full charge. A battery is 35 percent weaker at 32 degrees and 60 percent weaker at zero degrees.

A load test by a qualified technician can determine whether a car’s battery is strong enough for winter. Keep in mind that if the car started with a jump start, the problem is not fixed and the battery most likely needs replacing.

Starting
Avoid excessive cranking. If the car doesn’t start after 20 seconds of cranking, wait a couple of minutes to let the battery recover.

Tire preparation
Tires should have sufficient tread depth that can handle New England’s winter weather. All-season tires are adequate for most vehicles but to get the greatest traction for both starting and stopping, snow tires are recommended. When considering snow tires, they should be installed on all four wheels

See and be seen
Clear windows, mirrors, and lights with an ice scraper, brush, or a spray de-icer. Driving with a snow-covered windshield, windows, side-view mirrors or lights invites a crash.

Completely clean snow from the roof, hood, and trunk. Windshield wipers and defrosters should be in good working order and washer reservoirs should be filled with no-freeze windshield washer fluid.

Consider specially designed winter wiper blades that prevent snow and ice buildup and improve visibility.

Reduce speeds
Most winter crashes happen from driving too fast for the weather conditions. Remember, everything takes longer on snow-covered roads, including accelerating, stopping, and turning.

Nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement so allow time to maneuver by driving slowly.

All-wheel drive is best
All-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive will help to get a car moving, but bear in mind it does little to improve braking. Don’t become overconfident and drive too fast for winter road conditions.

Anticipate stopping distance
In temperatures at or just above 32 degrees, a thin layer of water can cover the ice and cause slippery conditions, especially at intersections where snow and ice tend to melt first. The distance needed to stop on ice at 32 degrees is twice as long as at zero degrees.

Keep the engine cool
Mix certain cooling system antifreeze with an equal portion of water for maximum protection.

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles: Q&A

Wheelchair
Accessible Vans

Rear entry Vs. Side entry
Buying New Vs. Buying Used
Manual Ramp Vs. Powered Ramp
Honda Vs. Dodge/Chrysler Vs. Toyota Vs. Ford
Certified Mobility Dealer Vs. Car Dealer Vs. Buying online
What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care. Here are some answers to common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

Certified mobility dealers will help you buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet your needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“Technology has improved tremendously over the years so there are numerous products available. Our goal is to help people find the right equipment that best fits their needs,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy a vehicle that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained and that the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,” which means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.

 

Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, you are mostly shopping blind. Typically you will have no idea how the vehicle you need will work for you, even with specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle online, most online sellers are not qualified Mobility Dealers attempting to assess your needs, they’re just car dealers trying to sell you something.”

Some online dealers even have questionnaires on their websites to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you and your family. It’s horrible when people spend so much an a vehicle that will never work for them.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle based on the price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online may be able to save you some money up front, it won’t over the long term.

In addition to you missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

 

What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

 

What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question most mobility dealers will ask you is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Which Make and Model is the best for a handicapped accessible vehicle?

It honestly depends on what you fit into best and what options you prefer.

No two wheelchair accessible vehicles are the same. They vary in size, shape, color, features and design depending on the vehicle’s make and model. The only way to guarantee which is the best vehicle for you is if you come in and try them all out.

For example: The Honda has a little bit more room inside to maneuver a wheelchair than a Dodge, just as a Toyota has a bit more space than a Honda. A Ford offers more headroom than all of the above. But that all depends on the conversion and manufacturer.

Although color and features matter least to us, some find them just as important as fitting into the vehicle. Each Manufacturer offers their own color schemes, which you can look up on their websites. You can also search for what features you would prefer to have.

When you come into our Mobility Center we will help you find the vehicle that best fits you and your family’s needs. If you love the vehicle but not the color or features we can custom order a vehicle for you. That way we know you are buying a vehicle that best fits you and one that you are 100% happy with.

Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

The most important difference between a rear entry and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with an in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally  because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.


What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor which makes riding in the vehicle safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position or the mid-ship position. There is no obstruction to the doorway so other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps are currently only available as a side-entry minivan conversion, but they offer a manual (un-powered) option as well.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind” and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than an in-floor ramp and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

You have other choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality as the minivan conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

If you prefer to keep your standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your symptoms worsen is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Why are modified vehicles so  expensive?

A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 —  and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

How can I pay less?

You have  a few options.

You could cut costs by purchasing a pre-owned vehicle with a new conversion, typically saving you around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after they’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Another tactic to help save you money is to ask your Certified Mobility Dealer about any rebates or financial aid options that could benefit you.

How do people manage to pay for it?

Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

Accessible Haunted Houses in New England

According to the Websites these Haunted Houses are accessible.

Spooky World Presents Nightmare New England
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, all of our indoor attractions are accessible and have wooden floors. Please note that our outdoor attractions have paths that are grass, gravel and woodchips.

Is a Military Discount offered?
Yes – we are proud to honor our past and present men and women offering service to our country. To receive a $7 discount per ticket, please show your Military ID at any of our ticket windows when purchasing. A Military ID discount may not be combined with any other coupons or offers.

Ghoulie Manor
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, we are! If you don’t come with a wheelchair, you may need one by the time you leave.

Factory of Terror – Fall River, MA
Factory of Terror – Worcester, MA

Q. Is the Factory of Terror wheelchair accessible?
A. Yes, we have designed our attraction to make it wheelchair accessible.

Six Flags Fright Fest – Springfield, MA
Although the site does not  state it is Wheelchair accessible in the Plan Trip section it says: “7. Stop by Stroller Rental if you need a stroller, wheelchair, wooden stakes, silver bullets, garlic, or holy water.”

Canobie Lake Park Screamfest
Are the haunts wheelchair accessible?
Our haunted attractions can accommodate conventional and electric wheelchairs or electric service vehicles – although certain elements/effects will require the use of an alternate pathway. We do recommend, however, that you plan your visit with someone who is aware of your needs and can physically assist you when necessary.

Is Nightmare Vermont handicapped accessible?

Yes!  This year we are at the Memorial Auditorium which is wheelchair accessible. However, we can only make accommodations for our Thursday, Friday, Sunday and Wednesday shows.
Call 802 355-3107 two days in advance to make arrangements.

Note: You should call in advance to make sure their accommodations meet your needs.

Boston’s Wounded Veteran Run 5k

Boston Wounded Veterans 5k

About Boston’s Wounded Veteran Run 5k
They are coordinating the inaugural 5K Race/walk for wounded Veterans on Sunday, October 12, 2014 in Saugus, MA.
They are passionate and committed to supporting all wounded veterans who have sacrificed so much for our safety and freedom.

5K Details
All Proceeds go to helping Veterans that were wounded in combat

When: October 12, 2014
Start: 10:00am
End: 02:00pm

Location:
177 Forest Street.
Saugus, Massachusetts 01906

Get In Touch
Marvin Pena
marvin@bostonwoundedvets.org
(617) 981-0124


Register
DonateContact

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About Boston’s Annual Wounded Vet Bike Run

Boston’s Annual Wounded Vet Bike Run Inspired by Cpl. Vincent Mannion Brodeur began in 2011. One of the most severely wounded veterans in the nation, Vinnie is the recipient of the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. While serving in Iraq in 2007 with the 82nd Airborne, Vinnie was critically injured by an insurgents improvised explosive device. After surviving 40 operations and a year long coma Vincent has become an inspiration for people throughout the nation. All proceeds from Vinnie’s Run went to creating a handicapped accessible living space for Vinnie. Every year Boston’s Wounded Vet Run will be dedicated to different veterans. All proceeds raised go towards housing modifications to suite a comfortable living for the disabled veteran. Besides housing modifications, funds are also used to improve the quality of life of disabled veterans. Recreational needs, cars, and basic living needs are also other fields of charity the ride is dedicated to. The event is sponsored by the Italian-American War Veterans, a federally chartered non-profit veterans organization. They fought, and we ride, a bike run honoring the wounded veteran’s of New England.

2014 Honorees

The Honorees for the 5th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run

Recreation Opportunities For People With Disabilities

All Out Adventures
All Out Adventures provides outdoor accessible recreational opportunities throughout Massachusetts for people of all abilities, their families and friends. Summer programs include accessible kayaking, canoeing, hiking and cycling. Winter programs include snowshoeing, x-country skiing & sit-skiing, ice skating, sled skating and snowmobile rides.

Accessible Swimming Pools
Accessible Swimming Pools outdoor swimming pool lifts are available at all of the State Parks and Recreation Department’s 20 swimming pools. The pools are free. Contact pool directly for information about other site factors affecting accessibility.

AccesSport America
AccesSport America is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the discovery of higher function, fitness, and fun for children and adults with disabilities through high-challenge sports, which include kayaking, windsurfing and water skiing.

Arcs.
Local Arcs provide a variety of social and recreational activities for children and teens with developmental disabilities.

Bostnet / Guide to Boston’s Before & After School Programs
Build the Out-of-School Time Network (BOSTnet) has built a network of out-of-school time (OST) resources and opportunities for all children and youth, including those from low-income families and youth with disabilities.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary offers nine miles of walking trails guiding through a variety of field, woodland, and wetland habitats. A quarter-mile, handicap accessible trail and boardwalk along the bank of Indian Brook. Universally accessible facilities: Nature Center, Restrooms, All Persons Trail.

BSC (Boston Sports Club) Adaptive Swim Program
On Monday and Wednesday evening, between 6:30pm and 7:30pm, BSC Waltham (840 Winter Street) offers an adaptive swim program for children, youth, adolescents and adults with disabilities in our 93 degree therapy pool. Volunteers between the ages of 16-20 from neighboring schools and organizations offer their time to pair with an individual seeking to increase range of motion, flexibility, and strength but most importantly to socialize with other individuals and families. Our adaptive swim program is offered during the school year (September thru May) in 8-week sessions at a cost of $200 per session. Our 120,000 square foot, state of the art facility can accommodate families in our men’s, women’s or family changing rooms, fully equipped with showers, lockers, restrooms, towels, and other amenities.

  • 781-522-2054
  • 781-522-2512

CAPEable Adventures
offers adaptive sports & therapeutic recreation activities to local residents and vacationers to the Cape.


Cape Cod Challenger Club

Cape Cod Challenger Club offers noncompetitive sports and recreation opportunities for children with disabilities.

Challenger Sport League
Some towns have challenger teams. The goal of the challenger team is to play with no pressure and to educate typical peers and their parents about sportsmanship. The program is available for boys and girls, ages 3 – 19 with all types of physical and developmental disabilities. Call your local town recreation department to find out if they offer challenger sports.

Children’s Physical Developmental Clinic at Bridgewater State University
BSC students from all majors have opportunities to volunteer as clinicians and work with children and youth with disabilities, ages 18 months to 18 years. Clinic dates are to the right on website’s homepage.

Choral / Community Voices
Open to individuals 16 years of age and older. Must be willing to be committed for 12 weeks. Provides a choral opportunity for adults and young adults with developmental delays. Singing in an ensemble, individuals will have the opportunity to develop and refine vocal technique, listening skills, and team-work. Repertoire will include songs from the masters, traditional and folk favorites, as well as pop and Broadway tunes. Performances are scheduled in December and June. Fee $156/fall, $243/spring.

Compelling Fitness
Compelling Fitness in Hanover provides group and / or individual physical fitness training for children and adults with special needs.

Fitness Program / Special Needs Training
Call your local YMCA.

Horseback Riding – PATH International Centers in Massachusetts
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, PATH International was formally known as North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA). Though PATH Intl. began with a focus on horseback riding as a form of physical and mental therapy, the organization and its dedicated members have since developed a multitude of different equine-related activities for therapeutic purposes, collectively known as equine-assisted activities and therapies (or EAAT).

JF&CS Sunday Respite Program
JF&CS Sunday Respite Program for Children with Developmental Disabilities including those on the Autism Spectrum. Program includes swimming, music and art therapy. The program meets at the Striar JCC in Stoughton from 1:00 -4:00. This program is run by JF&CS with additional funding from Eastern Bank.


Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S)

  • Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S) Thirteen specialized athletic programs are available. K.I.D.S. hosts dances, sports banquets, social activities and recreational events throughout the year. Serves individuals and families throughout Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. Participants range in age 5-40 and have varying disabilities. http://www.kidsinc.us/
  • info@kidsinc.us
  • 1-866-712-7799

LIAM Nation Athletics (formerly known as FOSEK, Friends of Special Education Kidz)
sports leagues for special needs children in Tewksbury and surrounding communities in Merrimack Valley. Accomodates athletes of all abilities. Bombers Baseball, Striker Soccer, Little Reds Basketball.

Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program
Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program provides outdoor recreation opportunities in Massachusetts State Parks for visitors of all abilities. Accessibility to Massachusetts State Parks is achieved through site improvements, specialized adaptive recreation equipment, and accessible recreation programs.

Massachusetts Hospital School Wheelchair Recreation & Sports Program
Wheelchair sports and recreation program for children ages 9 to 21. Horseback riding, swimming and , Wheelchair Athletes Program.

Miracle League of Massachusetts
Miracle League of Massachusetts provides baseball for special needs children. Free to participate (includes uniform). Located at Blanchard Memorial Elementary School Ball Field in Boxborough.

New England Wheelchair Athletic Association (NEWAA)
Volunteer organization that helps individuals with physcial disabilities participate in recreational
and sports activities. The NEWAA provides opportunities for athletic competition by sponsoring
regional and local meets.

Partners for Youth With Disabilities Provides mentoring programs that assist young people reach their full potential. Partners provides several types of mentoring programs including one-to-one, group mentoring and e-mentoring.

Piers Park Sailing
Piers Park Sailing provides programs for disabled youth and adults aboard 23-foot sonar sailboats on a no charge basis. Serves those with amputations, paralysis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, autism, hearing impaired, sight impaired and other disabilities. Successfully integrates youth with disabilities into summer youth sailing programs. Scholarships are available for all Adaptive sailing programs. “Yes You Can Sail” program Friday eves for $35.

  • (617) 561-6677

Senseability Gym
Senseability Gym serves special needs children in greater Hopedale area. Our mission is to provide a parent-led sensory gym, giving children with special needs a safe, fun, indoor area where they can play and accommodate their sensory needs.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports
Spaulding Adaptive Sports offers adaptive sports and recreation activities in Boston, Cape Cod and the North Shore. Includes wheelchair tennis, hand cycling, adaptive rowing, waterskiing or windsurfing.

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA)
Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) provides year round sports training and athletic competition for all persons with intellectual disabilities. Minimum age requirement is eight years of age. There is no maximum age requirement. SOMA summer games offers aquatics, athletics, gymnastics, sailing, tennis and volleyball. Go to above link to search SOMA region that covers your town.

Sudbury Adaptive Sports & Recreation
Programs for all ages and abilities.

Super Soccer Stars Shine
Our unique program uses soccer as a vehicle to teach life skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. Our innovative curriculum, designed by licensed educators and therapists, promotes the complete growth and development of each player. Our low player-to-coach ratios encourage and empower players to increase social potential with teammates, build self-awareness and confidence and advance gross and fine motor skills — all while each individual improves at his or her own pace! Located at 1 Thompson Square, Suite 301 in Charlestown. Call for information. Low pricing options and scholarship applications available.

Therapy and the Performing Arts – Cape Cod
Provides children and young adults with physical and intellectual disabilities the opportunity to enjoy various arts and recreational programs in addition to receiving therapeutic benefits from their participation. Children gain new and rewarding experiences from which they develop self-confidence, increase motor function, and have fun. Offers age appropriate programming on Cape Cod for children and young adults diagnosed with down syndrome, chromosomal abnormalies, cerebral palsy, genetic disorders and othe cognitive and physical disabilities. Classes are taught by certified instructors/ therapists with expertise in various disciplines. Programs are offered on a sliding scale fee based on the family’s ability to pay.


TILL Autism Support Center

TILL Autism Support Center has social programs for those with autism spectrum disorders. Programs include exciting Family Fun Days that include apple picking, rock climing, sledding, in-door gym time, zoo trips, holiday parties and much more.

Town Recreation Departments
Most programs are open to participants from neighboring towns. Call area town recreation department to find out if it has special programming for children with disabilities.

Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn.
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn. offers information about beach wheelchairs, biking, boating and more!

TopSoccer Program / Outreach Program for Soccer
is a community-based training and team placement program for young athletes with a mental or physical disability. For additional information or would like to start a TOPSoccer Program in your community contact:

YMCAs
YMCAs are accessible and offer a range of classes. Call your local YMCA to find out what programs are available.

The Lowell YMCA “Adaptive Aquatics Program” accommodates children with mild to moderate neurological, physical, or social challenges.

  • (978) 454-7825.

Oak Square YMCA of Greater Boston at 615 Washington St, Brighton has a new adaptive fitness room & offers Adapted Adult Speciality Fitness Partnership Program on Wednesday and Saturday 11AM – 12:30PM on the Fitness Floor.

Hopkinton YMCA offers seasonal specialized programs. “Aim High” archery program and “Rock On!” is an outdoor ropes course and rock climbing for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related social communication disorders.

  • 45 East Street in Hopkinton.

WaterFire Access Program
A water-taxi program at Dyer Street Dock in Providence Rhode Island which provides an unforgettable experience of the art work for children and adults with disabilities to assure that they can join in the most popular arts event in the state and share the experience with their families and friends. Reservations are required. Each Water Fire Access passenger can bring along one companion.

Waypoint Adventures
Adventures for people of all ages and abilities

Whole Children offers movement, art, recreation and music programs for infants, children and teens of all abilities. Located in Hadley.

Three Questions to Ask Your Mobility Consultant about Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles

Answer search
When beginning your search for a wheelchair van in MA, RI, CT, VT, NH & ME, it is important to know which questions to ask your Mobility Consultant.  This could be the first time that you are going through this process, and VMi New England along side Automotive Innovations wants you to have a memorable experience.

We encourage your questions to help make purchasing your wheelchair accessible vehicle enjoyable and educational. Here are five of our most frequently asked questions proposed to our Mobility Consultants:

Do you have a service department for wheelchair van repairs?
Our technicians are highly trained and certified and are able to handle any problems you may have with your wheelchair accessible van.  By adhering to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS), becoming a Quality Assurance Program (QAP) facility, Automotive Innovations has shown its dedication to improving the quality of life for people with disabilities every day.

Can I test drive a wheelchair accessible vehicle before I purchase one?
Yes you can!  Our “Try Before You Buy” program means that you can test out our vehicles before you make your purchase, so that you can determine which vehicle will suit your needs.  Please contact us for more details.

How do you determine which wheelchair accessible vehicle will be right for me?
Our consultants take every step to get to know our customers to ensure that you purchase the right wheelchair accessible vehicle for you. Our Mobility Consultants go through a detailed step-by-step process to learn about your specific needs in order to get you the proper wheelchair van type, size and modifications to your wheelchair van.This mobility update has been brought to you by Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations your Bridgewater, MA New England NMEDA Mobility Dealer – Need some information on how to make your vehicle wheelchair accessible or upgraded with the latest and most convenient features?

Prepare Your Mobility Equipment For the Colder Weather

Cold temperatures not only slow wheelchair users down, but can also slow down their vans and accessible equipment. For example, if you use a hydraulic wheelchair lift, you may have noticed that the colder the weather, the slower the lift reacts. The cold thickens the fluid, making it move slower through hoses, valves and cylinders.

There’s not much you can do about that, but preparing other equipment for cold weather is important to help avoid accidents and breakdowns.

If you live in the New England area · call our Mobility Center today (508) 697-8324 · We’ll rust proof your wheelchair accessible vehicle, give you an oil change, tune-up, and/or semi-annual ramp/lift service and have any other accessible equipment checked before the temperature dips. If you ask we can also check your battery, antifreeze level, heater, brakes, defroster and thermostat.

Do It Yourself:

  • Purchase winter wiper blades that cut through snow and ice.
  • Keep the gas tank at least half full. It reduces condensation and makes your vehicle easier to start on cold mornings.
  • Buy tires that have MS, M+S, M/S or M&S on them, meaning they meet the Rubber Manufacturers Association guidelines and can bite through mud and snow.
  • For better traction and control, rotate tires so the best ones are in the front.
  • Get an electric engine block heater. It warms the engine so the motor can start. It connects to normal AC power overnight or before driving. In extremely cold climates, electrical outlets are sometimes found in public or private parking lots. 
  • Cold weather is tough on accessible van batteries. Buy one with greater starting power, higher cold cranking amps and reserve capacity for energy when the engine isn’t running.
  • Use synthetic oil to make starting a cold engine easier.

Before you drive:

  • Keep rock salt on hand to melt ice off walkways for a safer wheelchair ride.
  • Clean the snow off the roof and hood so it doesn’t “avalanche” onto the windshield and block your vision.
  • Clear the head and tail lights for best visibility.
  • Scrape the ice off mirrors and windows.

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Here at VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations we’ll service and repair your wheelchair accessible vehicle and/or equipment even if you didn’t buy it from us! So bring us your mobility van no matter the year (old or new), chassis (Honda, Dodge, Toyota, Ford, Chrysler, excreta..), or conversion (Side Entry, Rear Entry, VMI, Braun, Ricon, Rampvan, Elorado, Amerivan, excreta..)!!

Rust Proof Your Wheelchair Van Before It’s Too Late

Winter is Coming
De-Icing the roads
Rust Proof Your Wheelchair Van Before the Road Salt Hits the Streets!

We can’t live without salt. It’s a necessary nutrient, it’s used to seed rain clouds, soften household tap water, make chemicals and is used to make ice cream!

In parts of the country with freezing winter temperatures, drivers know that warming the cars up in the morning isn’t the only inconvenience. Icy roads are, too. The same chemical reaction between ice and salt that creates creamy, delicious ice cream also keeps our roads and sidewalks free of dangerous ice during the cold winter months.

A salt and sand mixture is frequently spread over roads before or after a snow or ice storm. Salt lowers water’s freezing point, causing any ice already formed to melt even though the air temperature remains well below freezing. The sand helps keep the salt in place, plus it adds a bit of traction to wet and often slushy roads.

While road salting helps people travel safely, it has drawbacks. It can cause major body and undercarriage damage to your Wheelchair accessible vehicle unless you take extra care and precaution.

If you’re one of the many who must travel the saline streets in the land of the ice and snow, we have some great tips to help protect your mobility vehicle from the ravages of road salt.

Plan Ahead
The best time to prevent salt damage to your conversion van is in Autumn,before the first snowflake falls; a little car maintenance will help keep the rust away.

Prevent
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast, but our rust prevention processes, product, plan and application has been found to be most effective. Our rust proofing is ever evolving and has been for over the past 25 years.

  • Our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required, we apply it as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your handicap accessible vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

As seen in the picture below this van has heavy rust and metal fatigue due to a lack of maintenance.

IMG_0697

Once the rust is this bad there’s not much we can do other than replace the van.
So call us or come in today to rust proof your van before it’s too late.

 

 

10 Simple Ways to Get Your Conversion Van Ready for winter

Winter Driving ahead

For anyone living in a northern state, Winter means rain, sleet, slush, snow and ice. Driving along icy roads is tricky at the best of times, and there’s not always a plow available to get your road clear in time to go to work for the day. Why not make your life a little easier now, by preparing your conversion van for the coming winter? You can do many small things before the snow starts to fall to make your winter that much easier to handle.

1. Get an oil change. Specifically, get the right sort of oil change. Oil won’t freeze in the kind of temperatures we see in the north, but it will get thicker. Thicker oil does a worse job of keeping your engine lubed up, which means more wear and tear on the moving parts you definitely don’t want to replace. Dirty oil gums up even worse, so get that oil changed before the temperatures drop.

2. Take steps to ensure visibility at all times. The most important and most neglected fluid for visibility is windshield washer fluid. Topping up that tank will save you plenty of headaches when you have to scrape frost off the glass or wait for a heater to melt it. A blast with wiper fluid and a few passes of the wipers will clear it right up. It helps if you clean your windshield inside as well. Of course, you should also have a good snowbrush and ice scraper stored away in the trunk or back seat. 

3. Perk up your battery. The cold and wet conditions of a typical winter can wreak havoc on a battery. Connections will corrode and the batter may lose the ability to hold a charge. The older a battery is, the more likely you’ll run into issues along the way. Most auto shops can test your battery’s ability to hold a charge, and can tell you if you need a new one. Get it looked at before you end up stalled on the side of the freeway.

4. Check the belts and hoses in your engine. Belts and hoses are made of rubber and plastic, which tend to get brittle as they age. The addition of road salt and icy water splashing up onto them only makes the process faster. Take your conversion van in to have it services and pay special attention to the belts and hoses, so you don’t end up dropping fluid or finding a snapped belt while you drive. 

5. Monitor your tire pressure. In wet and icy conditions, traction is key to keeping your conversion van on the road. Your tires are made to function best at a certain level of inflation, which varies depending on the tire. As the temperatures get colder, the pressure of the air in your tires will drop, at about 1 PSI per ten degrees. Keeping your tires inflated properly keeps them working as best they can. 

6. Switch to snow tires, if applicable. Snow tires aren’t for everyone. If you live in the middle of the city and the roads are plowed several times a day, you probably don’t need a lot of extra traction from your tires. On the other hand, if you live in an area with plenty of hills and the plows come few and far between, winter tires might be a good option. 

7. If you have four-wheel drive in your vehicle, test it out. Make sure the system engages smoothly. Since you probably don’t use the system much during the summer, it might have an issue that you don’t notice. Better to get it tested now than to discover it doesn’t work when you need it. Don’t forget to make sure that anyone driving your vehicle knows how to turn the system on and off. For new drivers experiencing their first winter in their parents’ conversion van, this can be all new. 

8. Check your engine coolant. Most conversion vans run on something between pure antifreeze and a half and half mixture of antifreeze and water. Diluted antifreeze is perfectly fine. It would take ridiculously low temperatures to freeze even a half and half mixture, so there’s no sense in wasting half a gallon of coolant when you don’t need it. You can test the mixture of antifreeze yourself, or take it to a mechanic. Check to see if your vehicle uses a special kind of antifreeze as well. Just remember that if you replace your antifreeze yourself, you need to dispose of the old coolant properly. It’s harmful to the environment and illegal in most places to pour antifreeze down the drain. 

9. Stock up on supplies and put together an emergency kit. In the event that something breaks and you’re stranded, having an emergency kit is a lifesaver. Here’s an idea of what you should have in your kit:

  • Blanket, boots, gloves and warm clothes
  • Emergency food and water
  • A snow brush, ice scraper and a small shovel
  • A flashlight with spare batteries and a set of road flares
  • Windshield wipers and extra fluid
  • Repair items like jumper cables, a tool kit, a tire pressure gauge and a spare tire
  • A first aid kit

10. Don’t forget your training. All the tools and supplies in the world won’t help you if you don’t know what to do when you’re broken down. If you’re likely to be stranded for an extended period, light flares for the front and back of your vehicle. Run the engine and heater only for short durations to save gas. Wear your warm clothes to keep warm instead. To prevent your conversion van from freezing shut, crack the window slightly. If you have hard candies with you, you can munch on them to keep your mouth from drying out. Of course, make sure you have contact numbers and a way to call for help if you do end up stranded.

Buy my wheelchair van in new england

Buy my wheelchair van in new england

buy my wheelchair van in new england newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Do you have a clean late model VMI, Braun or Eldorado wheelchair van you want to sell?

Bring it to us and if it’s in good shape and we can agree on a price we’ll write you a check for it

Photos
You’ve got photos so make the most of them! Assuming your Handicap Van is in good condition, you should take pictures of the handicap van to show us how clean it is both inside and out.

Exterior
Given that you can email us photos a good idea is to allocate at least 3 to the exterior of the handicap van you want to buy, taken from angles that reveal the handicap van in its best light. I.e. rear ¾ shot, full side shot, full front of ¾ front/side shots – what ever angles suit your Handicap Van best.

Interior
A good interior shot that shows the condition of the dash board and front seats as a minimum is highly recommended. If the wheelchair van has a clean, well presented interior you will want us to see it, as this is an area where wear and tear will be evident on the handicap van if not looked after. If the interior is damaged then it is up to you wether to photograph it, if you are selling a handicap van as is at a corresponding price and wish to give buyers a realistic appraisal of the handicap vans condition then yes, other wise it might be best to focus the camera on some of the handicap vans better attributes.

Accessories 
If the handicap van is fitted with after-market or factory accessories that will enhance the handicap van in the eyes of the buyer then ensure these are obvious in the exterior and interior photos. It may be a good idea to have a close up shot of a certain handicap accessible modification such lowered floors and handicap ramps.

Pre-existing damage/scratches 
If your handicap van has dents or scratches on the body work it is probably a good idea to show them in photos as they will then have a good idea of the Handicap Vans condition.

VIN Number: Include the VIN so we can run a Carfax on it.

Buyer / Seller Scams
We’ve been alerted to a scam which operates in the following way: An overseas buyer offers to buy your car. They will want to send you a cheque for an amount in excess of the purchase price of your car and will ask you to send the change back to them or to pay the change to a local shipping agent. There are several variations on the theme. If you get an offer like this from overseas, we recommend that you be alert to a possible scam.
Another scam operates as follows: Typically a car/bike/boat, etc will be offered for sale at a very low price. The seller will say that the item is located overseas or in a location that makes it difficult to inspect the item. The seller will ask you to send them a deposit or pay for the item before they will arrange to send it to you. If you get an offer like this, we recommend that you be alert to a possible scam.

We wish you the best of luck in selling us your handicap van!

ON THE ROAD TO INDEPENDENCE By Lori A. Frankian 5/5/1997

 

ON THE ROAD TO INDEPENDENCE

By Lori A. Frankian 5/5/1997

Can you imagine waiting 14 years to get behind the wheel of your very first vehicle?  If you are physically challenged you may know what “waiting” is all about.  I am 30 years old and confined to an electric wheelchair due to Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a fabulous little disease that affects my muscles and nerve cells.  Why did I wait so long to get my license you ask? In all honesty, there was no real effort made to raise the money for a new van when I reached legal age to drive.  A year later at 17, I moved to Boston to attend Northeastern University and who needs a car while attending college in the city?  I attended the five year school, graduated and decided to remain in the city and establish a career for myself as an theatre / film administrator.  The years passed and my patience for traveling out of my way to find an accessible train station with operating elevators began wearing thin. It was definitely time to pursue the options available to me towards purchasing a van.  I had been missing out on so very much and I needed to move forward in my life.

 

After years of saving every penny that entered my pocket, I finally received the green light for modifications funding from the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. It was time to purchase my van.  I bought a red Plymouth Voyager in June of 1994, and in a few months was driving on my own!

 

I no longer have to haul groceries home from the store in the pouring rain, losing half of them as they spill over the arms of my wheelchair.   I can drive my van home with as many bags as I want.  I do not have to struggle in 25 inches of snow when trying to get to work.  I now have my van to guide me wherever I want to go with ease.  I can travel to the most beautiful locations within the US for the very first time on my own.  Nobody will ever tell me that, “there isn’t time to stop.”  I am driving now and if want to stop, I am going to stop!  I could go on and on sharing the wonderful changes

that my new found independence allows but I am sure you get the picture.

 

I am so very thankful and appreciative of the people in my life that made it possible for me to get behind the wheel.  For starters, I thank my father for handling the constant wheelings and dealings between the car dealership and outside vendors.  He was very protective of my hard earned money and made sure that I got exactly what I was paying for and then some!

I thank Bob Sondheim at the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission for making sure that the funding was granted for the  modifications that allow me to operate my van.  Without my Dad or the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission,  I would not have had a van or modifications that would allow me to drive.

 

Last but not least, an enormous thank you goes to Jim Sanders at Automotive Innovations in Bridgewater, Massachusetts.  Jim and his wonderfully trained staff are responsible for building my van, putting every crucial piece of technology in its proper place and for making it operate with grace and efficiency. Automotive Innovations specializes in vehicle modifications and adaptive technology including high tech vans for physically challenged drivers. They are leaders in New England, known and respected for their quality, commitment and innovation. It’s the 90′s and technology is beyond our wildest dreams.  Automotive Innovations knows their stuff.

 

At first, I was intimidated by the electronic hand controls and the tiny steering wheel that I would drive with. I wondered, “will everything operate safely?” “Will my steering system fail to operate as I am driving down the highway?”  “What if my door jams and doesn’t allow the ramp to open, trapping me inside?”  These are a few of the questions that ran through my mind before Jim gave me a thorough explanation on all operation procedures and back up system functions.

 

Jim and his staff have been there for me from the get-go and I know they always will be.  I have called him on many occasions with questions and he was ready and willing to help me at a moments notice.   If it wasn’t for their high quality workmanship, I wouldn’t have the reliable form of transportation that I have today.  For that I will always be grateful.

 

Every time I get behind the wheel I am thankful that I have such an amazing form of independence to experience.  If independence is foreign to you, then I am sure you know where I am coming from.  If not, I ask that you appreciate the little things in life such as walking up steps and entering a public bathroom, finding it ready and willing to accept you.  Life should never be taken for granted.  It’s the little things in life that should be treasured because they can be taken away within an instant.  Even if it is as simple as driving down the street to pick up a cup of coffee!  Appreciate your freedom, I know I do!

Lori A. Frankian Boston, MA

 

expert adaptive mobility equipment installations bridgewater, ma mobility center

adaptive-mobility-van-equipment-center-bridgewater-ma
if you are you looking for a wheelchair accessible minivan for your transportation requirements? VMi New England is you one stop for adaptive mobility equipment and offers a wide selection of quality new and used wheelchair vans designed to accommodate your individual needs.
Our team of mobility consultants will help to explain the different styles of ramps and minivans available to you.
No matter what your driving preferences, we’ll find the right vehicle and adaptive equipment. We also take non-accessible trade-ins.  We sell the best quality new and used wheelchair vans in RI or MA.
Call us for info on adaptive mobility equipment veterans resources.

Grants through the Veterans Association for Disabled Veterans

Get help with a disabled veterans grant toward the sale price or conversion of a handicap accessible minivan. This grant is available for disabled veterans with service-related disabilities including:
•loss, or permanent loss of use, of one or both feet
•loss, or permanent loss of use, of one or both hands
•permanent loss or impairment of vision in both eyes
•ankylosis (immobility) of one or both knees, or one or both hips

Disabled Veterans Loan Program:

Loans for disabled veterans are available by seeking funds through other outlets. It is advised that you search for veterans loan programs by seeking out loans available for your specific disability.

You can also find loans to help pay for adapted vehicles by searching for money based on your disability instead of purely focusing on veterans benefits. Search through our Wheelchair Van Loans section to find other loans that apply to you.

We are always seeking to expand funding opportunities for the disabled to help pay for a handicap accessible minivan. If you know of other disability grant and loan programs for disabled veterans, please let us know.

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Automobile Adaptive Equipment Program-

The Automobile Adaptive Equipment (AAE) program permits physically challenged persons to enter, exit and/or operate a motor vehicle or other conveyance. The VA also provides necessary equipment such as platform wheelchair lifts, Under Vehicle Lifts (ULV), power door openers, lowered floors/raised roofs, raised doors, hand controls, left foot gas pedals, reduced effort and zero effort steering and braking, air conditioning and digital driving systems.

Eligibility

Veterans who are service connected for the loss, or loss of use of one or both feet or hands, or service connected ankylosis of one or both knees or hips.

Veterans who are service connected for permanent impairment of vision of both eyes that have a central acuity of 20/200.

NSC veterans are eligible for equipment/ modifications that will allow ingress and egress from a vehicle only.

Note: Eligible service connected veterans who are non-drivers are not eligible for reimbursement for operational equipment.

nes apply for leased vehicles just as if the veteran purchased a new or used vehicle.

Lease must be to the veteran and he/she be responsible for the repairs and maintenance of the vehicle, and not to any business.

Cost limitations will not exceed the allowable reimbursable amounts.

Conversions

– Mini- Van

Reimbursement for mini-van conversions will be made in an amount equal to or less than the average cost of a conventional van modification, plus 25% (SC only).

VA will reimburse for the cost of transporting/delivery of the vehicle.

– Full Size Van

This type of conversion is considered comfort, far exceeds the space required for transportation

The amount should not exceed conventional van conversion

– Pick-up Trucks

The space modified about half that of a mini van

The dollar amount should not exceed mini van conversion

– Motor Homes

All modifications must be pre-authorized.

Only VA approved add-on equipment may be authorized.

Maximum reimbursable amounts established for automobile adaptive equipment will not be exceeded for similar items authorized as adaptive equipment in a motor home.

Amount authorized and the purchase and installation of an approved lift in a motor home will not exceed the average amount authorized for purchase and installation of similar lifts installed in vans by the authorizing VA facility.

VA is not responsible for the removal, modification or reinstallation of any convenience items contained in the motor home, e.g., cabinets, stoves, showers, refrigerators, etc.

– Repairs

Routine service to items is not considered a repair e.g., brake shoes, drums & pads or other adjustments (only the power booster). Power Steering and Automatic Transmission service or fluid refills are not authorized (only the transmission itself, or the power steering components).

Maximum reimbursement is for the total amount of the certified invoice.

Repairs, cost of parts and labor, is listed in thee current Mitchell Mechanical Parts and Labor Estimating Guide for Domestic Cars.

Towing is not normally an authorized repair.

Exceptions to the 2 vehicles in a 4 year period rule

Normally only allowance can be provided for 2 vehicles in a 4 year period.

Exceptions to this rule are:
Theft
Fire
Accident
Court of legal actions
Costly Repairs
Changes in the drivers medical requirements necessitating a different type of vehicle

Required documentation to remove a vehicle of record

Important Note: These vehicles may not be sold or given to family members or any other party residing in the same household of the veteran, or transferred to a business owned by the veteran.
Proof of trade-in
Proof of sale
Proof of other means of disposal, e.g., total loss by accident , act of God, fire, theft, etc.

How to Apply

Please contact your local PVA National Service Officer for assistance with the application.

The information provided above was found in The Newsletter of New England Chapter Paralyzed Veterans of America.

Financing OptionsDID YOU KNOW? In most towns you are exempt from excise tax if you don’t pay state sales tax on your mobility van. See the bottom of this page for a list of most cities and towns in MA and RI for you to check on your options. 

Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund – The Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund (CICRF) helps families bear the excessive financial burdens associated with the care of children with special health care needs and disabilities. more info

CONSUMER LOANS – New England Mobility Center has banking programs that can offer up to 10 years financing on a wheelchair handicap van. Even if your credit is less than perfect we will work hard to get you financed!!

INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS – A nonprofit organization that helps grant people money so they can maintain an independent lifestyle.

INDEPENDENT MOBILITY SYSTEMS – IMS offers long-term financing on all new purchases. All loan transactions are done on-site and guaranteed to help fit your needs.

INSURANCE COMPANIES – We will help you work with your insurance company to make sure you are receiving the maximum your benefits allow.

MANUFACTURERS’ REBATES – Major manufacturers often offer rebates. We’ll help you process all paperwork. more info

MEDICAID – In certain instances, Medicaid will pay for vehicle adaptive equipment. This falls under the “Medicaid waiver” and each state administers this program differently. We will be able to process you Medicaid claims for you as of January 2003.

PFS – Patient Financing offers long-term financing fit for your budget. PFS will finance any medical related equipment up to $25,000.00.

TOYOTA FINANCING- We can now get up 10 year financing on Toyota Sienna Rampvans.

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION – Provides help for veterans.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION – A State funded organization that’s goal is to provide individuals with the means they need to get back into the workforce.
If you are located in Seekonk Massachusetts we are close by and worth the drive from anywhere in New England.

——————————————————————————–

Massachusetts City and Town Directory

ABINGTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
500 GLINIEWICZ WAY
02351
Phone: (781) 982-2112
Fax: (781) 982-2138
Email: ladams@abingtonmass.com
Website: www.abingtonmass.com
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

ACTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
472 MAIN STREET
01720
Phone: (978) 929-6620
Fax: (978) 264-9630
Email: clerk@acton-ma.gov
Website: www.acton-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

ACUSHNET
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
122 MAIN STREET
02743
Phone: (508) 998-0215
Fax: (508) 998-0216
Email: plabonte@acushnettown.mec.edu
Website: www.acushnet.ma.us
Hours: M, W-F: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-8p

ADAMS
TOWN CLERK
8 PARK ST
01220
Phone: (413) 743-8320
Fax: (413) 743-8316
Email: hmeczywor@town.adams.ma.us
Website: www.town.adams.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

AGAWAM
TOWN HALL
36 MAIN STREET
01001
Phone: (413) 786-0400
Fax: (413) 786-9927
Email: clerk@agawam.ma.us
Website: www.agawam.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

ALFORD
TOWN HALL
5 ALFORD CENTER RD
01230
Phone: (413) 528-4536
Fax: (413) 528-4581
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: townofalford.org
Hours: Th: 8a-11a

AMESBURY
TOWN CLERK
62 FRIEND ST.
01913
Phone: (978) 388-8100
Fax: (978) 388-8150
Email: bonnijo@amesburyma.gov
Website: www.amesburyma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

AMHERST
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
TOWN HALL
4 BOLTWOOD AVE
01002
Phone: (413) 259-3035
Fax: (413) 259-2401
Email: burgesss@amherstma.gov
Website: www.amherstma.gov
Hours: M-W & F: 8a-4:30p; Th: 12p-4:30p

ANDOVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
TOWN OFFICES
36 BARTLET STREET
01810
Phone: (978) 623-8255
Fax: (978) 623-8260
Email: lmurphy@andoverma.gov
Website: www.andoverma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

AQUINNAH
TOWN CLERK
65 STATE RD
02535
Phone: (508) 645-2304
Fax: (508) 645-2310
Email: aqhcp@comcast.net
Website: www.aquinnah-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 9:30a-1:30p & By appointment

ARLINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
730 MASS. AVE.
02476
Phone: (781) 316-3070
Fax: (781) 316-3079
Email: crainville@town.arlington.ma.us
Website: www.arlingtonma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

ASHBURNHAM
TOWN CLERK
32 MAIN ST
01430
Phone: (978) 827-4102
Fax: (978) 827-4105
Email: townclerk@ashburnham-ma.gov
Website: www.ashburnham-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; M 1st & 3rd: 5p-7p

ASHBY
TOWN CLERK
895 MAIN ST
01431
Phone: (978) 386-2424
Fax: (978) 386-2490
Email: tclerk@ci.ashby.ma.us
Website: www.ci.ashby.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12p; W: 5p-8p

ASHFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
412 MAIN STREET
PO BOX 560
01330
Phone: (413) 628-4441 x 5
Fax: (413) 628-0228
Email: TOWNHALL@ASHFIELD.ORG
Website: WWW.TOWNOFASHFIELD.ORG
Hours: M & Tu: 9a-3p; W: 9a-11a

ASHLAND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
101 MAIN ST
TOWN HALL
01721
Phone: (508) 881-0100 x 601
Fax: (508) 231-1503
Email: townclerkoffice@ashlandmass.com
Website: www.ashlandmass.com
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8a-3:30p; W: 8a-7p

ATHOL
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
584 MAIN STREET
01331
Phone: (978) 249-4551
Fax: (978) 249-2491
Email: townclerk@townofathol.org
Website: www.athol-ma.gov
Hours: M,W & Th: 8a-5p;Tu: 8a-8p

ATTLEBORO
BOARD OF ELECTION CMMSSNR
77 PARK ST
02703
Phone: (508) 223-2222
Fax: (774) 203-1805
Email: elections@cityofattleboro.us
Website: www.cityofattleboro.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

AUBURN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
104 CENTRAL ST
01501
Phone: (508) 832-7701
Fax: (508) 832-7702
Email: clerk@town.auburn.ma.us
Website: www.auburnguide.com
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

AVON
TOWN CLERK
65 EAST MAIN ST
BUCKLEY CENTER
02322
Phone: (508) 588-0414
Fax: (508) 559-0209
Email: jkopke@avonmass.org
Website: www.avonmass.org
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

AYER
TOWN CLERK
1 MAIN ST
PO BOX 308
01432
Phone: (978) 772-8215
Fax: (978) 772-8222
Email: clerk@ayer.ma.us
Website: www.ayer.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

BARNSTABLE
TOWN CLERK & BD OF REGIS.
367 MAIN ST./1ST FL.
HYANNIS, MA
02601
Phone: (508) 862-4044
Fax: (508) 790-6326
Email: linda.hutchenrider@town.barnstable.ma.us
Website: www.town.barnstable.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BARRE
TOWN CLERK
40 WEST ST
PO BOX 418
01005
Phone: (978) 355-5003
Fax: (978) 355-5025
Email: clerk@townofbarre.com
Website: www.townofbarre.com
Hours: M & W: 7p-9p; Tu-Wed-Th: 9a-12p, 1p-4p

BECKET
TOWN CLERK
557 MAIN ST
01223
Phone: (413) 623-8934
Fax: (413) 623-6036
Email: townclerk@townof becket.org
Website: www.townofbecket.org
Hours: M & Tu: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 11:30a-8:30p

BEDFORD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
10 MUDGE WAY
01730
Phone: (781) 275-0083
Fax: (781) 275-5757
Email: doreent@town.bedford.ma.us
Website: www.town.bedford.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

BELCHERTOWN
TOWN CLERK
2 JABISH ST, RM 201
P.O. BOX 629
01007
Phone: (413) 323-0281
Fax: (413) 323-0107
Email: clerk@belchertown.org
Website: www.belchertown.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

BELLINGHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
10 MECHANIC ST
02019
Phone: (508) 657-2830
Fax: (508) 657-2832
Email: aodabashian@bellinghamma.org
Website: www.bellinghamma.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; T-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

BELMONT
BELMONT TOWN CLERK
455 CONCORD AVE
02478
Phone: (617) 993-2600
Fax: (617) 993-2601
Email: ecushman@belmont-ma.gov
Website: www.belmont-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

BERKLEY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 NORTH MAIN ST
02779
Phone: (508) 822-3348
Fax: (508) 822-3511
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 9:30a-2:30p

BERLIN
TOWN CLERK
23 LINDEN ST. #8
01503
Phone: (978) 838-2931
Fax: (978) 838-0014
Email: townclerk@townofberlin.com
Website: www.townofberlin.com
Hours: Tu & Th: 11a-2p; W: 7p-9p

BERNARDSTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O.BOX 504
01337
Phone: (413) 648-5408
Fax: (413) 648-9318
Email: bernardstontownclerk@crocker.com
Website: www.town.bernardston.ma.us
Hours: M-Tu & Th: 9a-12p; W: 4p-7p

BEVERLY
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
191 CABOT ST
01915
Phone: (978) 605-2326
Fax: (978) 921-8511
Email: kconnolly@beverlyma.gov
Website: www.beverlyma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

BILLERICA
TOWN CLERK
365 BOSTON RD
01821
Phone: (978) 671-0926
Fax: (978) 671-0908
Email: sschult@town.billerica.ma.us
Website: www.town.billerica.ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

BLACKSTONE
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
15 ST. PAUL ST.
01504
Phone: (508) 883-1500
Fax: (508) 883-4953
Email: mstaples@townofblackstone.org
Website: www.townofblackston.org
Hours: M-F: 9a-4:30p; Tu: 5:30p-7:30p

BLANDFORD
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 101
102 MAIN STREET
01008
Phone: (413) 848-0054
Fax: (413) 848-2216
Email: clerk@townofblanford.com
Website: www.townofblandford.com
Hours: M: 6p-9p & By appointment

BOLTON
TOWN CLERK
P.O.BOX 278
663 MAIN ST.
01740
Phone: (978) 779-2771
Fax: (798) 779-5461
Email: townclerk@townofbolton.com
Website: www.townofbolton.com
Hours: M-Th: 9a-4p; Tu: 6p-8p

BOSTON
BOSTON ELECTION DEPT.
ONE CITY HALL SQUARE
ROOM 241
02201
Phone: (617) 635-3767
Fax: (617) 635-4483
Email: Maryanne.Marrero@cityofboston.gov
Website: WWW.CITYOFBOSTON.GOV/ELECTIONS
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p

BOURNE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
24 PERRY AVENUE
BUZZARDS BAY
02532
Phone: (508) 759-0600
Fax: (508) 759-7980
Email: wchapman@townofbourne.com
Website: www.townofbourne.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BOXBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
29 MIDDLE RD
01719
Phone: (978) 263-1116
Fax: (978) 264-3127
Email: elizabeth.markiewicz@town.boxborough.ma.us
Website: www.town.boxborough.ma.us/
Hours: M: 10a-2p & 7p-9p; Tu-F: 9a-2p

BOXFORD
TOWN CLERK
7A SPOFFORD RD
01921
Phone: (978) 887-6000 x 151
Fax: (978) 887-0943
Email: rphelan@town.boxford.ma.us
Website: www.town.boxford.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p

BOYLSTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
221 MAIN ST
01505
Phone: (508) 869-2234
Fax: (508) 869-6210
Email: SBOURASSA@BOYLSTON-MA.GOV
Website: www.boylston-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-2p; M: 6p-8p

BRAINTREE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
1 J.F.K. MEMORIAL DR
02184
Phone: (781) 794-8240
Fax: (781) 794-8259
Email: jpowers@braintreema.gov
Website: www.townofbraintreegov.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BREWSTER
TOWN CLERK
2198 MAIN ST
02631
Phone: (508) 896-4506
Fax: (508) 896-8089
Email: cwilliams@town.brewster.ma.us
Website: www.town.brewster.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

BRIDGEWATER
TOWN CLERK & BR OF REGIS.
64 CENTRAL SQUARE
02324
Phone: (508) 697-0921
Fax: (508) 697-0941
Email: clerk@bridgewaterma.org
Website: www.bridgewaterma.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p

BRIMFIELD
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 508
01010
Phone: (413) 245-4100
Fax: (413) 245-4107
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.brimfieldma.org
Hours: Tu: 6:30p-8p; Sat: 9a-11a

BROCKTON
ELECTION COMMISSION
45 SCHOOL ST
02301
Phone: (508) 580-7117
Fax: (508) 583-6424
Email: jmcgarry@cobma.us
Website: www.brockton.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

BROOKFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
6 CENTRAL STREET
01506
Phone: (508) 867-2930
Fax: (508) 867-5091
Email: mseery@brookfieldma.us
Website: www.brookfield@ma.us
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 9a-3p; W: 9a-6p

BROOKLINE
TOWN CLERK
333 WASHINGTON ST
02445
Phone: (617) 730-2010
Fax: (617) 730-2043
Email: pward@brooklinema.gov
Website: www.brooklinema.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-5p; Th: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12:30p

BUCKLAND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 159
01338
Phone: (413) 625-8572
Fax: (413) 625-8570
Email: twnclerk@crocker.com
Hours: M-Th: 7:30a-3p

BURLINGTON
TOWN CLERK
29 CENTER STREET
01803
Phone: (781) 270-1660
Fax: (781) 238-4692
Email: clerk@burlmass.org
Website: www.burlington.org/clerk
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

CAMBRIDGE
ELECTION COMMISSION
51 INMAN ST
FIRST FLOOR
02139
Phone: (617) 349-4361
Fax: (617) 349-4366
Email: elections2@cambridgema.gov
Website: www.cambridgema.gov/election
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; T-Th: 8:30a-5p; F: 8:30a-12p

CANTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
801 WASHINGTON ST
02021
Phone: (781) 821-5013
Fax: (781) 821-5016
Email: tkenney@town.canton.ma.us
Website: www.town.canton.ma.us
Hours: M, W-F: 9a-5p; Tu: 9a-7p

CARLISLE
TOWN HALL
66 WESTFORD STREET
01741
Phone: (978) 369-6155
Fax: (978) 371-0594
Email: chinton@carlisle.mec.edu
Website: www.carlislema.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-3p & By appointment

CARVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
108 MAIN ST
02330
Phone: (508) 866-3403
Fax: (508) 866-3408
Email: jean.mcgillicuddy@carverma.org
Website: www.carverma.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

CHARLEMONT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 605
01339
Phone: (413) 339-4335
Fax: (413) 339-0320
Email: SELECT@BCN.NET
Website: www.charlemont-ma.us
Hours: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY 8:30 A.M. TO 4:00 P.M.

CHARLTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
37 MAIN ST
01507
Phone: (508) 248-2249
Fax: (508) 248-2381
Email: darlene.tully@townofcharlton.net
Website: www.townofcharlton.net/
Hours: M,Th: 7:30a-3:30p; Tu: 7:30a-7p; W: 8a-3:30p; F: 7:30a-12p

CHATHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
549 MAIN STREET
02633
Phone: (508) 945-5101
Fax: (508) 945-0752
Email: jsmith@chatham-ma.gov
Website: www.chatham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

CHELMSFORD
TOWN CLERKS OFFICE
50 BILLERICA RD
01824
Phone: (978) 250-5205
Fax: (978) 250-5208
Email: bdelaney@townofchelmsford.us
Website: www.townofchelmsford.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

CHELSEA
CITY CLERK
500 BROADWAY
02150
Phone: (617) 466-4050
Fax: (617) 466-4059
Email: DClayman@chelseama.gov
Website: www.ci.chelsea.ma.us/
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

CHESHIRE
TOWN CLERK
80 CHURCH ST BOX S
01225
Phone: (413) 743-1690
Fax: (413) 743-0389
Email: townclerk@cheshire-ma.gov
Hours: Tu: 9a-9p; W & Th:9a-3p

CHESTER
TOWN CLERK
15 MIDDLEFIELD RD
01011
Phone: (413) 354-6603
Fax: (413) 354-2268
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofchester.net/chestermass
Hours: M: 6p-8p

CHESTERFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 13
01012
Phone: (413) 296-4741
Fax: (413) 296-4394
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofchesterfieldma.com/
Hours: M: 7p-9p; Sat: 1st & 3rd of month 9a-11a; By appointment

CHICOPEE
CITY CLERK
17 SPRINGFIELD ST
01013
Phone: (413) 594-1466
Fax: (413) 594-1469
Email: krattell@chicopeema.gov
Website: www.chicopeema.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p (Clerk); M-F 9a-5p (Registrars)

CHILMARK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 119
02535
Phone: (508) 645-2107
Fax: (508) 645-2110
Email: townclerk@chilmarkma.gov
Website: www.chilmarkma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-12p

CLARKSBURG
CLARKSBURG TOWN HALL
111 RIVER RD
01247
Phone: (413) 663-8255
Fax: (413) 664-6575
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: W: 9:30a-2p; Th: By appointment

CLINTON
TOWN HALL
242 CHURCH ST
01510
Phone: (978) 365-4119
Fax: (978) 612-0212
Email: pboyce@clintonma.gov
Website: www.clintonma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

COHASSET
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
41 HIGHLAND AVE
02025
Phone: (781) 383-4100
Fax: (781) 383-1561
Email: mdouglas@townofcohasset.org
Website: www.townofcohasset.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-1p

COLRAIN
TOWN HALL
55 MAIN RD
01340
Phone: (413) 624-3454
Fax: (413) 624-8852
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.colrainma.com/
Hours: M-Th: 9a-4p; M Evenings: 6p-8p

CONCORD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
22 MONUMENT SQUARE
P.O. BOX 535
01742
Phone: (978) 318-3080
Fax: (978) 318-3093
Email: townclerk@concordma.gov
Website: www.concordma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p (Sept-June); M-Th: 8:30a-5p; F: 8:30a-12p (July-Aug)

CONWAY
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
32 MAIN ST
P.O. BOX 240
01341
Phone: (413) 369-4235
Fax: (413) 369-4237
Email: clerk@townofconway.com
Website: www.townofconway.com/
Hours: Tu,Th & F: 9a-12p

CUMMINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 128
01026
Phone: (413) 634-5354
Fax: (413) 634-5568
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.cummington-ma.gov/
Hours: Th: 6p-7:30p

DALTON
TOWN CLERK
462 MAIN STREET
01226-1677
Phone: (413) 684-6103
Fax: (413) 684-6129
Email: daltonmc@bcn.net
Website: www.dalton-ma.gov/
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-6p

DANVERS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 SYLVAN ST
01923
Phone: (978) 777-0001
Fax: (978) 777-1025
Email: kwoytovich@mail.danvers
Website: www.danvers.govoffice.com/
Hours: M-W: 8a-5p; Th: 8a-7:30p; F: 8a-1:30p

DARTMOUTH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
400 SLOCUM RD
02747
Phone: (508) 910-1853
Fax: (508) 910-1894
Email: lmedeiros@town.dartmouth.ma.us
Website: www.town.dartmouth.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-12:30p & 1:30p-4:30p

DEDHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
26 BRYANT ST
02026
Phone: (781) 751-9200
Fax: (781) 751-9109
Email: pmunchbach@dedham-ma.gov
Website: www.dedham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 4:30p-7p

DEERFIELD
TOWN CLK/TREAS/TAX CLTR.
8 CONWAY ST
SO DEERFIELD
01373
Phone: (413) 665-2130
Fax: (413) 665-5512
Email: town.clerk@town.deerfield.ma.us
Website: www.town.deerfield.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

DENNIS
TOWN CLERK
485 MAIN STREET
P O BOX 2060
02660
Phone: (508) 760-6112
Fax: (508) 394-8309
Email: tbunce@town.dennis.ma.us
Website: www.town.dennis.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

DIGHTON
TOWN CLERK
979 SOMERSET AVE
02715
Phone: (508) 669-5411
Fax: (508) 669-5932
Email: smedeiros@townofdighton.com
Website: www.dighton-ma.gov
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 7:30a-4:30p; W: 7:30a-5:30p

DOUGLAS
TOWN CLERK
29 DEPOT ST
01516
Phone: (508) 476-4000
Fax: (508) 476-4012
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-1p & 1:30p-4p; Tu: 6p-8p

DOVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
5 SPRINGDALE AVE
02030
Phone: (508) 785-0032
Fax: (508) 785-2341
Email: townclerk@doverma.org
Website: www.doverma.org
Hours: M,W & F: 9a-1p; Tu & Th: 9a-4p

DRACUT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
62 ARLINGTON ST.
01826
Phone: (978) 453-0951
Fax: (978) 452-7924
Email: townclerk@dracut-ma.us
Website: www.dracut-ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

DUDLEY
TOWN CLERK
71 WEST MAIN STREET
01571
Phone: (508) 949-8004
Fax: (508) 949-7115
Email: oraf@dudleyma.gov
Website: www.dudleyma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12p & 12:30p-4:30p; Th: 5p-7p; F: 9a-1p

DUNSTABLE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
511 MAIN ST
01827
Phone: (978) 649-4514
Fax: (978) 649-4371
Email: CSkerrett@dunstable-ma.gov
Website: www.dunstable-ma.gov
Hours: M: 6:00pm – 8:00 pm; TWT: 9:00am – 3:00 pm

DUXBURY
TOWN CLERK
878 TREMONT ST
02332
Phone: (781) 934-1100
Fax: (781) 934-9278
Email: oates@town.duxbury.ma.us
Website: www.town.duxbury.ma.us
Hours: M: 8a-7p; T-Th: 8a-12p 1p-4p; F: 8a-12:30p

EAST BRIDGEWATER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
175 CENTRAL ST
BOX 387
02333
Phone: (508) 378-1606
Fax: (508) 378-1638
Email: mweidenfeller@ebmass.com
Website: www.eastbridgewaterma.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12p

EAST BROOKFIELD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 568
01515-0568
Phone: (508) 867-6769
Fax: (508) 867-4190
Email: ebtownclerk301@charterinternet.com
Website: www.eastbrookfieldma.us
Hours: M: 9a-2p & 6p-8p; Tu: 9a-3p; 2nd & 4th Th: 9a-2p

EAST LONGMEADOW
TOWN HALL
60 CENTER SQUARE
01028
Phone: (413) 525-5400
Fax: (413) 525-0022
Email: tflorence@eastlongmeadowma.gov
Website: www.eastlongmeadowma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p

EASTHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
2500 STATE HWY
02642
Phone: (508) 240-5900
Fax: (508) 240-1291
Email: townclerk@eastham-ma.gov
Website: www.eastham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

EASTHAMPTON
OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK
50 PAYSON AVE
STE 100
01027-2260
Phone: (413) 529-1460
Fax: (413) 529-1417
Email: cityclerk@easthampton.org
Website: www.easthampton.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-5p

EASTON
TOWN CLERK
136 ELM ST
02356
Phone: (508) 230-0530
Fax: (508) 230-0539
Email: jgillis@easton.ma.us
Website: www.easton.ma.us
Hours: M: 8:30a-7:30p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

EDGARTOWN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 35
70 MAIN ST
02539
Phone: (508) 627-6110
Fax: (508) 627-6123
Email: wwilliams@edgartown-ma.us
Website: www.ci.edgartown.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-12p & 1p-4p

EGREMONT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 56
01258
Phone: (413) 528-0182
Fax: (413) 528-5465
Email: tegremont@yahoo.com
Website: www.egremont-ma.gov/
Hours: Tu: 7p-9p; By appointment

ERVING
TOWN HALL
12 EAST MAIN STREET
01344
Phone: (413) 422-2800 x 101
Fax: (413) 422-2808
Email: r.newton@umassp.edu
Website: www.erving-ma.org
Hours: M: 6:30p-9p

ESSEX
TOWN CLERK
30 MARTIN STREET
01929
Phone: (978) 768-7111
Fax: (978) 768-2505
Email: CWRIGHT@ESSEXMA.ORG
Website: HTTP://WWW.ESSEXMA.ORG
Hours: M & W: 9a-1p; M: 7p-8:30p

EVERETT
REGISTRARS OF VOTERS
484 BROADWAY,ROOM 10
02149
Phone: (617) 394-2297
Fax: (617) 389-0764
Email: michael.matarazzo@ci.everett.ma.us
Website: www.cityofeverett.com
Hours: M: 8a-7:30p; T-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-11:30a

FAIRHAVEN
TOWN CLERKS OFFICE
40 CENTER ST
02719
Phone: (508) 979-4025
Fax: (508) 979-4079
Email: elowney@fairhaven-ma.gov
Website: www.fairhaven-ma.gpv
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

FALL RIVER
BOARD OF ELECTIONS
1 GOVERNMENT CENTER
RM 636
02722
Phone: (508) 324-2630
Fax: (508) 324-2633
Email: lcamara@fallriverma.org
Website: www.fallriverma.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-5p

FALMOUTH
REGISTRAR OF VOTERS
59 TOWN HALL SQ
02540
Phone: (508) 495-7357
Fax: (508) 457-2511
Email: mpalmer@falmouthmass.us
Website: www.town.falmouth.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

FITCHBURG
CITY CLERK
718 MAIN STREET
01420
Phone: (978) 345-9592
Fax: (978) 345-9595
Email: afarrell@ci.fitchburg.ma.us
Website: www.fitchburgma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

FLORIDA
TOWN CLERK
20 SOUTH ST
01343
Phone: (413) 664-6685
Fax: (413) 664-8640
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: W: 5:30p-7:30p; By appointment

FOXBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
40 SOUTH STREET
02035
Phone: (508) 543-1208
Fax: (508) 543-6278
Email: bcutler@mail.town.foxborough.ma.us
Website: www.townfoxborough.us
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; Tu: 5p-8p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

FRAMINGHAM
TOWN CLERK
150 CONCORD STREET
ROOM 105
01702
Phone: (508) 532-5520
Fax: (508) 628-1358
Email: valerie.mulvey@framinghamma.gov
Website: www.framinghamma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

FRANKLIN
TOWN CLERK
355 EAST CENTRAL ST.
MUNICIPAL BUILDING
02038
Phone: (508) 520-4900
Fax: (508) 520-4903
Email: townclerk@franklin.ma.us
Website: http://franklinma.virtualtownhall.net/Pages/index
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-6p; F:8a-1p

FREETOWN
TOWN CLERK
P O BOX 438
02702
Phone: (508) 644-2203
Fax: (508) 644-9826
Email: townclerk@town.freetown.ma.us
Website: www.town.freetown.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

GARDNER
CITY CLERK
CITY HALL, ROOM 121
95 PLEASANT STREET
01440
Phone: (978) 630-4058
Fax: (978) 630-2589
Email: aagnelli@gardner-ma.gov
Website: www.gardner-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

GEORGETOWN
TOWN CLERK
1 LIBRARY ST
01833
Phone: (978) 352-5711
Fax: (978) 352-5725
Email: jmcgrane@georgetownma.gov
Website: www.georgetown.gov
Hours: M & W: 8:30a-12:30p

GILL
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
325 MAIN RD
01354
Phone: (413) 863-8103
Fax: (413) 863-7775
Email: townclerk@gillmass.org
Website: www.gillmass.org/
Hours: M-Th: 1p-4p; M: 5:30p-6:30p

GLOUCESTER
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
9 DALE AVE
01930
Phone: (978) 281-9720
Fax: (978) 282-3051
Email: llowe@gloucester-ma.gov
Website: www.ci.gloucester.ma.us/
Hours: M: 8:30a-4p; Tu-W: 10:30a-4p; Th: 10:30a-6:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

GOSHEN
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 124
01032
Phone: (413) 268-8236
Fax: (413) 268-8237
Email: d.polwrek@egoshen.com
Hours: M: 6p-8:30p

GOSNOLD
TOWN HALL
PO BOX 28
CUTTYHUNK
02713
Phone: (508) 990-7408 x 106
Fax: (508) 990-3318
Email: gosnoldtownclerk@yahoo.com
Website: http://egoshen.net/
Hours: Varies, call first

GRAFTON
TOWN CLERK
30 PROVIDENCE RD
01519
Phone: (508) 839-5335
Fax: (508) 839-4602
Email: clerks@grafton-ma.gov
Website: www.grafton-ma.gov
Hours: M, W-F: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p

GRANBY
TOWN CLERK
215 B WEST STATE ST
TOWN OFFICES
01033
Phone: (413) 467-7178
Fax: (413) 467-3101
Email: Kathykr@granbyma.org
Website: www.granbyma.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-3p; F: 9a-12p; By appointment

GRANVILLE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 247
01034
Phone: (413) 357-8585 x 3
Fax: (413) 357-6002
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: http://townofgranville.net
Hours: M: 9a-12p & 7:30p-9p

GREAT BARRINGTON
TOWN CLERK
334 MAIN ST
01230
Phone: (413) 528-1619
Fax: (413) 528-2290
Email: mryan@townofgb.org
Website: www.townofgb.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

GREENFIELD
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
14 COURT SQUARE
01301
Phone: (413) 772-1555
Fax: (413) 772-1542
Email: townclerk@greenfield-ma.gov
Website: www.townofgreenfield.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

GROTON
TOWN CLERK
173 MAIN STREET
01450
Phone: (978) 448-1100
Fax: (978) 448-2030
Email: townclerk@townofgroton.org
Website: www.townofgroton.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 9a-4p

GROVELAND
TOWN CLERK
183 MAIN STREET
01834
Phone: (978) 469-5005
Fax: (978) 469-5006
Email: abrodie@grovelandma.com
Website: www.grovelandma.com
Hours: M-Th: 9a-4:30p; M: 6p-8p; F: 9a-2p

HADLEY
TOWN CLERK
100 MIDDLE STREET
01035
Phone: (413) 584-1590
Fax: (413) 586-5661
Email: clerk@hadleyma.org
Website: www.hadleyma.org/
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

HALIFAX
TOWN CLERK
499 PLYMOUTH ST
02338
Phone: (781) 293-7970
Fax: (781) 294-7684
Email: bgaynor@town.halifax.ma.us
Website: www.town.halifax.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; 2nd Tu: 6p-8p

HAMILTON
TOWN CLERK
577 BAY ROAD
01936
Phone: (978) 468-5570
Fax: (978) 468-2682
Email: jwetson@hamiltonma.gov
Website: www.hamiltonma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p

HAMPDEN
TOWN CLERK
625 MAIN STREET
01036
Phone: (413) 566-2151
Fax: (413) 566-3513
Email: townclerk@hampden.org
Website: www.hampden.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-3p

HANCOCK
TOWN CLERK
3650 HANCOCK RD
01237
Phone: (413) 738-5225
Fax: (413) 738-5310
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: Th: 8a-1p; 1st Sat of the month 9a-11a

HANOVER
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
550 HANOVER STREET
02339
Phone: (781) 826-2691
Fax: (781) 826-5950
Email: clerk@hanover-ma.gov
Website: www.hanover-ma.gov/
Hours: M, T & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

HANSON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
542 LIBERTY STREET
02341
Phone: (781) 293-2772
Fax: (781) 294-0884
Email: bsloan@hanson-ma.gov
Website: www.hanson-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-8p

HARDWICK
TOWN CLERK
307 MAIN ST
BOX 575
01031
Phone: (413) 477-6700
Fax: (413) 477-6703
Email: clerk@townofhardwick.com
Website: www.townofhardwick.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-4p & 6:30-8p; Tu-W: 8:30a-12p; 3rd Sat of month 9a-12p

HARVARD
TOWN CLERK
13 AYER RD
01451-1458
Phone: (978) 456-4100
Fax: (978) 456-4113
Email: jvellante@harvard.ma.us
Website: www.harvard.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; Tu: 8:30a-7p

HARWICH
TOWN CLERK
732 MAIN ST
02645
Phone: (508) 430-7516
Fax: (508) 430-7617
Email: adoucette@town.harwich.ma.us
Website: www.harwich-ma.gov
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4p; F: 8:30a-12p

HATFIELD
TOWN CLERK
59 MAIN ST
01038
Phone: (413) 247-0492
Fax: (413) 247-5029
Email: lslysz@townofhatfield.org
Website: www.townofhatfield.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

HAVERHILL
CITY CLERK
4 SUMMER ST ROOM 118
01830
Phone: (978) 374-2312
Fax: (978) 373-8490
Email: mtoomey@cityofhaverhill.com
Website: www.ci.haverhill.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

HAWLEY
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
8 PUDDING HOLLOW RD
01339
Phone: (413) 339-5518
Fax: (413) 339-4959
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: By appointment

HEATH
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
1 EAST MAIN STREET
HEATH
01346
Phone: (413) 337-4934
Fax: (413)-337-8540
Email: townclerk@townofheath.org
Website: www.townofheath.org/
Hours: M: 5:30p-7:30p; By appointment

HINGHAM
TOWN CLERK
210 CENTRAL STREET
02043
Phone: (781) 741-1410
Fax: (781) 740-0239
Email: townclerk@hingham-ma.com
Website: www.hingham-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-1p

HINSDALE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 803
01235
Phone: (413) 655-2301
Fax: (413) 655-8807
Email: frissell1@msn.com
Website:
Hours: M: 10:30a-12:30p; W: 6:30p-8p; By appointment

HOLBROOK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
50 N FRANKLIN STREET
02343
Phone: (781) 767-4314
Fax: (781) 767-9054
Email: town_clerk@holbrookmassachusetts.us
Website: http://holbrookma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

HOLDEN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1196 MAIN STREET
01520
Phone: (508) 829-0265
Fax: (508) 829-0281
Email: cjenkins@townofholden.net
Website: www.townofholden.net
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

HOLLAND
TOWN CLERK
27 STURBRIDGE RD
01521
Phone: (413) 245-7108
Fax: (413) 245-7037
Email: hollandtowncler@gmail.com
Website: http://town.holland.ma.us
Hours: Tu: 9a-8p; S: 10a-12p

HOLLISTON
TOWN CLERK
703 WASHINGTON ST.
01746
Phone: (508) 429-0601
Fax: (508) 429-0684
Email: greendalee@holliston.k12.ma.us
Website: www.townofholliston.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

HOLYOKE
REGISTRAR OF VOTERS
536 DWIGHT ST
RM# 9
01040
Phone: (413) 322-5540
Fax: (413) 322-5541
Email: egans@ci.holyoke.ma.us
Website: www.holyoke.org/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

HOPEDALE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 7
78 HOPEDALE STREET
01747
Phone: (508) 634-2203
Fax: (508) 634-2200
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.hopedale-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 9a-12p & 1p-4p; M: 5p-7p

HOPKINTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
18 MAIN STREET
01748
Phone: (508) 497-9710
Fax: (508) 497-9702
Email: annc@hopkinton.org
Website: www.hopkinton.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

HUBBARDSTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
7 Main St., Unit 12
01452
Phone: (978) 928-1400 x 202
Fax: (978) 928-1402
Email: tclerk@hubbardstonma.us
Website: www.hubbardstonma.us
Hours: M: 2p-8p; Tu-Th: 8a-4p

HUDSON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
78 MAIN ST
01749
Phone: (978) 568-9615
Fax: (978) 562-8508
Email: jwordell@townofhudson.org
Website: www.townofhudson.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

HULL
TOWN CLERK
253 ATLANTIC AVE
02045
Phone: (781) 925-2262
Fax: (781) 925-0224
Email: jbennett@town.hull.ma.us
Website: www.town.hull.ma.us
Hours: M & W: 8a-4p; Tu & Th: 8a-7:30p

HUNTINGTON
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 523
01050
Phone: (413) 667-3186
Fax: (413) 667-3507
Email: huntingtonclerk@comcast.net
Website: www.huntingtonma.us
Hours: M: 9a-12p; 1st & 3rd W: 6p-8p

IPSWICH
TOWN CLERK
25 GREEN STREET
01938
Phone: (978) 356-6600 x 1015
Fax: (978) 356-6021
Email: pamc@ipswich-ma.gov
Website: www.ipswich-ma.gov
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

KINGSTON
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
26 EVERGREEN STREET
02364
Phone: (781) 585-0502
Fax: (781) 585-0542
Email: mlmurzyn@kingstonmass.org
Website: www.kingstonmass.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-12p & 1p-4:30p

LAKEVILLE
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
346 BEDFORD ST
02347
Phone: (508) 946-8814
Fax: (508) 946-3970
Email: town.clerk@lakevillema.org
Website: www.lakevillema.org
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-5p

LANCASTER
TOWN HALL
695 MAIN ST, SUITE 2
01523
Phone: (978) 365-2542
Fax: (978) 368-4011
Email: sthompson@lancasterma.net
Website: www.ci.lancaster.ma.us
Hours: M: 9a-6p; T-Th: 9a-4p; F: By appointment

LANESBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 1492
01237
Phone: (413) 442-1351
Fax: (413) 443-5811
Email: tcmum@verizon.net
Website: M-Th: 8a-1p
Hours: M-Th: 7:30a-12:30p

LAWRENCE
ELECTION DIVISION
200 COMMON ST RM 4
01840
Phone: (978) 620-3290
Fax: (978) 722-9230
Email: rtejada@cityoflawrence.com
Website: www.cityoflawrence.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

LEE
TOWN CLERK
32 MAIN ST
01238
Phone: (413) 243-5505
Fax: (413) 243-5507
Email: sscarpa@town.lee.ma.us
Website: www.town.lee.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

LEICESTER
TOWN CLERK
3 WASHBURN SQUARE
01524
Phone: (508) 892-7011
Fax: (508) 892-7070
Email: davisd@leicesterma.org
Website: www.leicesterma.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:00a-5p; Tu: 8a-7p

LENOX
TOWN CLERK
6 WALKER ST
01240
Phone: (413) 637-5506
Fax: (413) 637-5518
Email: clerktreas@townoflenox.com
Website: www.townoflenox.com/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

LEOMINSTER
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
25 WEST ST
ROOM 5
01453
Phone: (978) 534-7536
Fax: (978) 534-7546
Email: lbouchard@leominster-ma.gov
Website: www.leominster-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p; Th Evenings till 5:30p

LEVERETT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
9 MONTAGUE RD
PO BOX 300
01054
Phone: (413) 548-9150
Fax: (413) 458-9150
Email: townclerk@leverett.ma.us
Website: www.leverett.ma.us
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 9:30a-2:30p

LEXINGTON
TOWN CLERK
1625 MASS. AVE
02420
Phone: (781) 862-0500
Fax: (781) 861-2754
Email: townclerk@lexingtonma.gov
Website: www.lexingtonma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

LEYDEN
TOWN HALL
16 WEST LEYDEN RD
01337
Phone: (413) 774-7769
Fax: (413) 772-0146
Email: leydenselectmen@live.com
Website: www.townofleyden.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-12:30p; W: 6p-7:30p

LINCOLN
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
16 LINCOLN ROAD
01773
Phone: (781) 259-2607
Fax: (781) 259-1677
Email: brookss@lincoltown.org
Website: www.lincolntown.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; July-Aug M-Th : 8a-5p

LITTLETON
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
37 SHATTUCK STREET
01460
Phone: (978) 540-2401
Fax: (978) 952-2321
Email: crory@littletonma.org
Website: www.littletonma.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-3p; Tu: 5p-8p; F: 9p-12p

LONGMEADOW
TOWN CLERK
20 WILLIAMS STREET
01106
Phone: (413) 565-4103
Fax: (413) 565-4130
Email: kingram@longmeadow.org
Website: www.longmeadow.org
Hours: M-Th: 8:15a-4:30p; F: 8:15a-12p

LOWELL
ELECTIONCENSUS DEPT.
375 MERRIMACK ST
RM 5 BASEMENT
01852
Phone: (978) 970-4046
Fax: (978) 970-4089
Email: gcenik@lowellma.gov
Website: www.lowellma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

LUDLOW
TOWN CLERK CMMC
488 CHAPIN ST.
01056
Phone: (413) 583-5600
Fax: (413) 583-5603
Email: clerk@ludlow.ma.us
Website: www.ludlow.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

LUNENBURG
BOARD OF REGISTRAR
17 MAIN ST
PO BOX 135
01462
Phone: (978) 582-4130
Fax: (978) 582-4148
Email: kherrick@lunenburgonline.com
Website: www.lunenburgonline.com
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8:30a-1:30p & 3:30p-6:30p

LYNN
VOTER REGISTRATION OFFICE
3 CITY HALL SQ
ROOM 203
01901
Phone: (781) 586-6805
Fax: (781) 477-7032
Email: maudley@ci.lynn.ma.us
Website: www.ci.lynn.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4p; Tu: 8:30a-8p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

LYNNFIELD
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
55 SUMMER ST
01940
Phone: (781) 334-9400
Fax: (781) 334-9469
Email: asummers@town.lynnfield.ma.us
Website: www.town.lynnfield.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

MALDEN
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
200 PLEASANT ST
ROOM 323
02148
Phone: (781) 397-7116
Fax: (781) 388-0610
Email: kanderson@cityofmalden.org
Website: www.ci.malden.ma.us/
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA
TOWN CLERK
10 CENTRAL ST
01944
Phone: (978) 526-2040
Fax: (978) 526-2001
Email: samolchukd@manchester.ma.us
Website: www.manchester.ma.us
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-5p; Th: 8:30a-8p

MANSFIELD
TOWN CLERK
6 PARK ROW
02048
Phone: (508) 261-7345
Fax: (508) 261-1083
Email: hchristian@mansfieldma.com
Website: mansfieldma.com
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

MARBLEHEAD
TOWN CLERK
188 WASHINGTON ST
01945
Phone: (781) 631-0528
Fax: (781) 631-0561
Email: townclerk@marblehead.org
Website: www.marblehead.org
Hours: M-Tu & Th: 8a-5p; W: 8a-6p; F: 8a-12:30p

MARION
MARION TOWN HALL
2 SPRING STREET
02738
Phone: (508) 748-3502
Fax: (508) 748-3534
Email: mbissonnette@marionma.gov
Website: www.marionma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-3:30p

MARLBOROUGH
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
140 MAIN ST
01752
Phone: (508) 460-3775
Fax: (508) 460-3723
Email: lthomas@marlborough-ma.gov
Website: www.marlborough-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p; Sept-June M: 8:30a-7p

MARSHFIELD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
870 MORAINE ST
02050
Phone: (781) 834-5540
Fax: (781) 834-6289
Email: ppicco@townofmarshfield.com
Website: www.townofmarshfield.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-7:30p; Tu-F: 8:30a-4:30p

MASHPEE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
16 GREAT NECK RD NO
02649
Phone: (508) 539-1400 x 5534
Fax: (508)-539-1428
Email: townclerk@ci.mashpee.ma.us
Website: www.ci.mashpee.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

MATTAPOISETT
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
TOWN HALL 16 MAIN ST
BOX 89
02739
Phone: (508) 758-4103
Fax: (508) 758-3030
Email: bsullivan@mattapoisett.net
Website: www.mattapoisett.net
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p; 2nd & 4th Tu: 4p-6p

MAYNARD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
195 MAIN ST
01754
Phone: (978) 897-1000
Fax: (978) 897-8553
Email: msokolowski@townofmaynard.net
Website: www.townofmaynard-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

MEDFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
459 MAIN ST
02052
Phone: (508) 906-3024
Fax: (508) 359-6182
Email: cmayer@medfield.net
Website: www.town.medfield.net
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

MEDFORD
REGISTRARS OF VOTERS
85 GEORGE HASSETT DR
02155
Phone: (781) 393-2491
Fax: (781) 391-1895
Email: jjoyce@medford.org
Website: www.medford.org/Pages/index
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

MEDWAY
TOWN CLERK
155 VILLAGE STREET
02053
Phone: (508) 533-3204
Fax: (508) 533-3201
Email: mwhite@townofmedway.org
Website: www.townofmedway.org/
Hours: M: 8a-7:30p; T-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

MELROSE
MELROSE ELECTION DEPT
562 MAIN ST
02176
Phone: (781) 979-4125
Fax: (781) 979-4149
Email: langiolillo@cityofmelrose.org
Website: www.cityofmelrose.org
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; F 8:30-12:30

MENDON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
20 MAIN ST
PO BOX 54
01756
Phone: (508) 473-1085
Fax: (508) 478-8241
Email: townclerk@mendonma.net
Website: www.mendonma.net
Hours: M: 8a-6p; T-Th: 8a-4p

MERRIMAC
TOWN CLERKS OFFICE
2 SCHOOL STREET
01860
Phone: (978) 346-8013
Fax: (978) 346-7832
Email: townclerk@townofmerrimac.com
Website: www.merrimac01860.info
Hours: M, T & F: 9a-4p; Th: 9a-12p & 1p-7p

METHUEN
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
41 PLEASANT ST
112
01844
Phone: (978) 983-8515
Fax: (978) 983-8977
Email: ctouma-conway@ci.methuen.ma.us
Website: www.ci.methuen.ma.us/
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

MIDDLEBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
20 CENTRE ST 1ST FL
02346
Phone: (508) 946-2415
Fax: (508) 946-2308
Email: aferreira@middleborough.com
Website: www.middleborough.com
Hours: M,Tu & Th, F: 8:45a-5p

MIDDLEFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 265
01243
Phone: (413) 623-2079
Fax: (413) 623-6108
Email: TownClerk@middlefieldma.us
Website: www.middlefieldma.us
Hours: M: 7p-9p; Sat: 9a-12p

MIDDLETON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
48 SOUTH MAIN ST
01949
Phone: (978) 774-6927
Fax: (978) 774-6167
Email: townclerk@townofmiddleton.org
Website: www.townofmiddleton.org
Hours: M, W & Th: 9a-4p; Tu: 9a-8p; F: 9a-1pp

MILFORD
TOWN CLERK
52 MAIN ST
01757
Phone: (508) 634-2307
Fax: (508) 634-2324
Email: rbellaquua@townofmilford.com
Website: www.milford.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

MILLBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
127 ELM ST.
01527
Phone: (508) 865-9110
Fax: (508) 865-0857
Email: jdavolio@townofmillbury.net
Website: www.millbury-ma.org
Hours: M-Fri 8:30-4:30 Tue 4:30 – 7:00

MILLIS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
900 MAIN STREET
MEMORIAL BUILDING
02054
Phone: (508) 376-7046
Fax: (508) 376-7055
Email: psjogren@millis.net
Website: www.millis.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-8p; T-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

MILLVILLE
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
8 CENTRAL STREET
01529
Phone: (508) 883-5849
Fax: (508) 883-2994
Email: townclerk@millvillema.org
Website: www.millvillema.org/
Hours: M-Th: 9a-1p; W: 6p-8p

MILTON
TOWN CLERK
525 CANTON AVENUE
02186
Phone: (617) 898-4859
Fax: (617) 696-6995
Email: jmullen@townofmilton.org
Website: www.townofmilton.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

MONROE
TOWN HALL
102 SCHOOL ST
01350
Phone: (413) 424-5272
Fax: (413) 424-5272
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Tu: 8a-12p

MONSON
TOWN CLERK
110 MAIN STREET
STE 4
01057
Phone: (413) 267-4115
Fax: (413) 267-3726
Email: townclerk@monson-ma.gov
Website: www.monson-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

MONTAGUE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
ONE AVENUE A
01376
Phone: (413) 863-3200
Fax: (413) 863-3224
Email: townclerk@montague-ma.gov
Website: www.montague.net/
Hours: M, T & Th: 8:30a-5:30p; W: 8:30a-6:30p

MONTEREY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 277
01245
Phone: (413) 528-5175
Fax: (413) 528-9452
Email: montclerks@verizon.net
Website: www.montereyma.gov/Public_Documents/index
Hours: W: 4p-6p; Sat: 9:30a-12:30p & By appointment

MONTGOMERY
TOWN CLERK
58 NORTH RD
01085
Phone: (413) 862-3386
Fax: (413) 862-3204
Email: tomfarcht@townofmtwashington.com
Website: www.townofmtwashington.com
Hours: By appointment

MOUNT WASHINGTON
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
118 EAST ST
01258
Phone: (413) 528-2839
Fax: (413) 528-2839
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M: 7:30p-9p; By appointment

NAHANT
TOWN HALL
334 NAHANT ROAD
01908
Phone: (781) 581-0018
Fax: (781) 593-0340
Email: mbarile@nahant.org
Website: www.nahant.org/default.shtml
Hours: M-F: 8a-12p

NANTUCKET
TOWN & COUNTY CLERK
16 BROAD STREET
02554
Phone: (508) 228-7216
Fax: (508) 325-5313
Email: cstover@nantucket-ma.gov
Website: www.nantucket-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-3:45p

NATICK
TOWN CLERK
13 EAST CENTRAL ST
01760
Phone: (508) 647-6459
Fax: (508) 655-6715
Email: dblatz@natickma.org
Website: www.natickma.org
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

NEEDHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 920663
1471 HIGHLAND AVENUE
02492
Phone: (781) 455-7510
Fax: (781) 449-4569
Email: Teaton@needhamma.gov
Website: www.needhamma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

NEW ASHFORD
TOWN HALL
188 MALLERY RD
01237
Phone: (413) 458-5461
Fax: (413) 458-5461
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: Hours Vary

NEW BEDFORD
BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISS
133 WILLIAM ST
ROOM 114
02740
Phone: (508) 979-1420
Fax: (508) 979-1422
Email: maria.tomasia@newbedford-ma.gov
Website: www.ci.new-bedford.ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

NEW BRAINTREE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
20 MEMORIAL DRIVE
01531
Phone: (508) 867-4952
Fax: (508) 867-4467
Email: townclerk@newbraintree.org
Website: www.newbraintree.org
Hours: M: 7p-9p; First Sat of Month 9a-11a & By Appointment

NEW MARLBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 99
01244
Phone: (413) 229-8278
Fax: (413) 229-6674
Email: nmtownclerk@yahoo.com
Website: www.new-marlborough.ma.us/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

NEW SALEM
TOWN CLERK
24 SOUTH MAIN ST
01355
Phone: (978) 544-2731
Fax: (978) 544-5775
Email: newsalemsclerk@aol.com
Hours: M: 6p-9p

NEWBURY
TOWN CLERK
25 HIGH ROAD
01951
Phone: (978) 465-0862
Fax: (978) 465-3064
Email: townclerk@townofnewbury.org
Website: www.townofnewbury.org
Hours: M,W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p

NEWBURYPORT
CITY CLERK
60 PLEASANT STREET
P.O. BOX 550
01950
Phone: (978) 465-4407
Fax: (978) 462-7936
Email: rjones@cityofnewburyport.com
Website: www.cityofnewburyport.com
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

NEWTON
ELECTION COMMISSION
1000 COMMONWEALTH AV
02459
Phone: (617) 796-1350
Fax: (617) 796-1359
Email: dolson@newtonma.gov
Website: www.ci.newton.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p; Tu until 8p

NORFOLK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 LIBERTY LANE
02056
Phone: (508) 528-1400
Fax: (508) 541-3363
Email: bernardo@virtualnorfolk.org
Website: www.virtualnorfolk.org/public_documents/norfolkma_clerk/index
Hours: M-Th: 9a-5p

NORTH ADAMS
CITY CLERK
10 MAIN STREET
01247
Phone: (413) 662-3015
Fax: (413) 662-3050
Email: city_clerk@northadams-ma.gov
Website: www.northadams-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p; June-Aug M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

NORTH ANDOVER
TOWN CLERK
120 MAIN STREET
01845
Phone: (978) 688-9501
Fax: (978) 688-9557
Email: jbradshaw@townofnorthandover.com
Website: www.townofnorthandover.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

NORTH ATTLEBOROUGH
BOARD OF ELECTIONS
43 S WASHINGTON ST
02760
Phone: (508) 699-0106
Fax: (508) 699-0134
Email: boardofelections@north-attleboro.ma.us
Website: www.north-attleboro.ma.us
Hours: M-W, F: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-7p; July-Aug M-F: 8a-4p

NORTH BROOKFIELD
TOWN CLERK
215 NORTH MAIN ST
01535
Phone: (508) 867-0203
Fax: (508) 867-0217
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.northbrookfield.net/
Hours: Tu: 12p-3p & 5p-8p; Th:12p-3p

NORTH READING
TOWN CLERK / REGISTRARS
235 NORTH ST
01864
Phone: (978) 357-5230
Fax: (978) 664-4196
Email: bstats@northreadingma.gov
Website: www.northreadingma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-1p

NORTHAMPTON
REGISTRAR OF VOTERS
210 MAIN STREET RM 8
01060
Phone: (413) 587-1291
Fax: (413) 587-1308
Email: cclerk@northamptonma.gov
Website: www.northamptonma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

NORTHBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
63 MAIN STREET
01532
Phone: (508) 393-5001
Fax: (508) 393-6996
Email: adowd@town.northborough.ma.us
Website: www.town.northborough.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 7a-12p

NORTHBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
7 MAIN STREET
01588
Phone: (508) 234-2001
Fax: (508) 234-0813
Email: dcedrone@northbridgemass.org
Website: www.northbridgemass.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; T-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; F: 8:30a-1p

NORTHFIELD
TOWN CLERK
69 MAIN ST
01360
Phone: (413) 498-2901
Fax: (413) 498-5103
Email: gzukowski@townnfld.com
Website: www.northfield.ma.us
Hours: M, Tu & 2nd W of Month: 9a-3p; All other W: 9a-12p & 5p-8p

NORTON
TOWN CLERK
70 E MAIN ST
02766
Phone: (508) 285-0230
Fax: (508) 285-0297
Email: townclerk@nortonmaus.com
Website: www.nortonma.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; Th:4:30-7:30p

NORWELL
TOWN CLERK
345 MAIN STREET
P O BOX 295
02061
Phone: (781) 659-8072
Fax: (781) 659-8073
Email: panderson@townofnorwell.net
Website: www.townofnorwell.net/Public_Documents/index
Hours: M-Tu: 8a-4:15p; W: 8a-7:30p; Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

NORWOOD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
566 WASHINGTON ST
02062
Phone: (781) 762-1240
Fax: (781) 278-3018
Email: mfolan@norwoodma.gov
Website: www.norwoodma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

OAK BLUFFS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 2490
56 SCHOOL STREET
02557
Phone: (508) 693-3554
Fax: (508) 693-5124
Email: dratcliff@oakbluffsma.gov
Website: www.oakbluffsma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM

OAKHAM
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
2 COLDBROOK RD
UNIT # 4
01068
Phone: (508) 882-5549
Fax: (508) 882-3060
Email: christine.mardirosian@oakham-ma.gov
Website: www.centralquabbin.org/towns/Oakham/index.shtml
Hours: Mon. evenings: 7pm- 9pm & Wednesdays: 9am-11:30am

ORANGE
TOWN CLERK
6 PROSPECT ST
01364
Phone: (978) 544-1100
Fax: (978) 544-1134
Email: townclerk@townoforange.org
Website: www.townoforange.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p, closed 12:30-1:00; F: 8a-1p

ORLEANS
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
19 SCHOOL RD
02653
Phone: (508) 240-3700
Fax: (508) 240-3388
Email: kdarling@town.orleans.ma.us
Website: www.town.orleans.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

OTIS
TOWN CLERK
1 N.MAIN RD. BOX 237
01253
Phone: (413) 269-0100
Fax: (413) 269-0111
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofotisma.com/Pages/index
Hours: Tu-F: 8a-3p; Sat: 9a-11a

OXFORD
OXFORD TOWN CLERK
325 MAIN ST
01540
Phone: (508) 987-6032
Fax: (508) 987-1804
Email: lkelley@town.oxford.ma.us
Website: www.town.oxford.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-4:30p

PALMER
TOWN CLERK
4417 MAIN ST
01069
Phone: (413) 283-2608
Fax: (413) 283-2637
Email: townclerk@townofpalmer.com
Website: www.townofpalmer.com
Hours: M-F: 9a-4:30p

PAXTON
TOWN CLERK
697 PLEASANT ST
01612
Phone: (508) 799-7347
Fax: (508) 797-0966
Email: sstone@townofpaxton.net
Website: www.townofpaxton.net
Hours: M: 12p-7p; T-Th: 9a-2p

PEABODY
CITY CLERK
24 LOWELL STREET
01960
Phone: (978) 538-5750
Fax: (978) 538-5985
Email: tim.spanos@peabody-ma.gov
Website: www.peabody-ma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4p; Th: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

PELHAM
TOWN CLERK & REGISTRARS
351 AMHERST RD
01002
Phone: (413) 253-0512
Fax: (413) 256-1061
Email: pelhamtownclerk@comcast.net
Website: www.townofpelham.org
Hours: F: 10:30a-1:30p

PEMBROKE
TOWN CLERK
100 CENTER STREET
02359
Phone: (781) 293-7211
Fax: (781) 293-4650
Email: msmith@townofpembrokemass.org
Website: www.pembroke-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; M: 7p-9p

PEPPERELL
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 MAIN STREET
01463
Phone: (978) 433-0339
Fax: (978) 433-0338
Email: jsauer@town.pepperell.ma.us
Website: www.town.pepperell.ma.us
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12:00p

PERU
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
3 EAST MAIN ROAD
01235
Phone: (413) 655-8312
Fax: (413) 655-2759
Email: townclerk@townofperuma.com
Hours: M: 6p-8p & By appointment

PETERSHAM
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
PO BOX 486
01366
Phone: (978) 724-6649
Fax: (978) 724-3501
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.centralquabbin.org/towns/Petersham/index.shtml
Hours: M: 6p-8p

PHILLIPSTON
TOWN CLERK
50 THE COMMON
01331
Phone: (978) 249-1733
Fax: (978) 249-1733
Email: townclerk@phillipston-ma.gov
Website: www.phillipston.gov
Hours: M: 12p-2p & 6p-8p; W: 4p-6p; Sat: 8:30a-10a

PITTSFIELD
REGISTRARS OF VOTERS
70 ALLEN STREET
01201
Phone: (413) 499-9460
Fax: (413) 499-9463
Email: ltyer@pittsfieldch.com
Website: www.pittsfield.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p

PLAINFIELD
TOWN HALL
348 MAIN ST
01070
Phone: (413) 634-5582
Fax: (413) 634-5785
Email: thatcher@bcn.net
Website: www.plainfieldmass.us/general.htm
Hours: Th: 6p-8p; By Appointment

PLAINVILLE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 1717
02762
Phone: (508) 695-3010
Fax: (508) 695-1857
Email: erobertson@plainville.ma.us
Website: www.plainville.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; M: 5p-8p

PLYMOUTH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
11 LINCOLN ST
02360
Phone: (508) 747-1620
Fax: (508) 830-4062
Email: lpizer@townhall.plymouth.ma.us
Website: www.plymouth-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 7:30a-5p: Tu: 7:30a-7p

PLYMPTON
TOWN CLERK
5 PALMER ROAD
02367
Phone: (781) 585-3220
Fax: (781) 582-1505
Email: town_clerk@town.plympton.ma.us
Website: http://town.plympton.ma.us/
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 9a-2p; M: 6p-8p

PRINCETON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
6 TOWN HALL DRIVE
01541
Phone: (978) 464-2103
Fax: (978) 464-2106
Email: townclerk@town.princeton.ma.us
Website: www.town.princeton.ma.us
Hours: M-W: 8a-3:30p; Tu: 5p-7p; Th: 8a-12p

PROVINCETOWN
TOWN HALL
260 COMMERCIAL ST
02657
Phone: (508) 487-7013
Fax: (508) 487-9560
Email: djohnstone@provincetown-ma.gov
Website: www.provincetown-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-6p

QUINCY
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
1305 HANCOCK ST
02169
Phone: (617) 376-1131
Fax: (617) 376-1139
Email: ncrispo@quincyma.gov
Website: www.quincyma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

RANDOLPH
TOWN CLERK/REGISTRAR
41 SOUTH MAIN ST
02368
Phone: (781) 961-0900
Fax: (781) 961-0919
Email: bhoward@randolph-ma.gov
Website: www.townofrandolph.com
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; Tu-F: 8:30a-4:30p

RAYNHAM
TOWN CLERK
558 SOUTH MAIN ST.
02767
Phone: (508) 824-2700
Fax: (508) 823-1812
Email: hlounsbury@town.raynham.ma.us
Website: www.town.raynham.ma.us/Public_Documents/index2
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 7p-9p; F: 8:30a-12p

READING
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
16 LOWELL ST
01867
Phone: (781) 942-9050
Fax: (781) 942-9070
Email: lgemme@ci.reading.ma.us
Website: www.ci.reading.ma.us/Pages/index
Hours: M,W & Th: 7:30a-5:30p; Tu: 7:30a-7p

REHOBOTH
TOWN CLERK
148R PECK ST
02769
Phone: (508) 252-6502
Fax: (508) 252-5342
Email: kconti@town.rehoboth.ma.us
Website: www.town.rehoboth.ma.us/
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

REVERE
ELECTION DEPARTMENT
281 BROADWAY
02151
Phone: (781) 286-8200
Fax: (781) 286-8206
Email: dcolella@revere.org
Website: www.revere.org
Hours: M-Th: 8:15a-5p; F: 8:15a-12:15p; Closed the last Friday of the month.

RICHMOND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1529 STATE RD
01254
Phone: (413) 698-3315
Fax: (413) 698-3272
Email: clerk@richmondma.org
Website: www.richmondma.org/townhall.htm
Hours: Tu-F: 9a-12p; 1st, 2nd, & 4th W: 6p-8p

ROCHESTER
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
1 CONSTITUTION WAY
02770
Phone: (508) 763-3866
Fax: (508) 763-4892
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofrochestermass.com/
Hours: M: 9a-12p & 5p-7p; Tu-F: 9a-12p

ROCKLAND
TOWN CLERK
242 UNION ST
02370
Phone: (781) 871-1892
Fax: (781) 871-0386
Email: clerk@rockland-ma.gov
Website: www.rockland-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; 1st & 3rd M: 7p-8:30p

ROCKPORT
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 429
01966
Phone: (978) 546-6894
Fax: (978) 546-3562
Email: TownClerk@town.rockport.ma.us
Website: www.town.rockport.ma.us/
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-6p; F: 8a-1p

ROWE
TOWN CLERK
34 BROADWAY
01367
Phone: (413) 339-5520
Fax: (413) 339-5316
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.rowe-ma.gov/Pages/index
Hours: Tu: 8:30a-12:00p

ROWLEY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 351
01969
Phone: (978) 948-2081
Fax: (978) 948-2162
Email: townclerk@townofrowley.org
Website: www.town.rowley.ma.us/
Hours: M: 1p-8p; Tu,Th & F: 8a-12p; W: 8a-4:30p

ROYALSTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 127
01368
Phone: (978) 249-0493
Fax: (978) 575-0748
Email: townclerk@royalston-ma.gov
Website: www.royalston.com/
Hours: M 9a.m to 1 p.m, Summer hours June 21-Labor Day M 5-8:30 p.m.

RUSSELL
TOWN CLERK
65 MAIN ST
01071
Phone: (413) 862-3265
Fax: (413) 862-3103
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.townofrussell.us
Hours: Tu: 5:30p-7:30p; F: 4p-6p

RUTLAND
TOWN CLERK
250 MAIN STREET
01543
Phone: (508) 886-4104
Fax: (508) 886-2929
Email: sallyh@townofrutland.org
Website: www.townofrutland.org/
Hours: M & W: 8a-4:30p; Tu: 8a-7p; Th: 8:30a-1p

SALEM
CITY CLERK
93 WASHINGTON ST
01970
Phone: (978) 745-9595
Fax: (978) 740-9209
Email: clapointe@salem.com
Website: www.salem.com
Hours: M-W : 8a-4p; Th: 8a- 7p; F: 8a-12p

SALISBURY
TOWN CLERK/REGISTRARS
5 BEACH ROAD
01952
Phone: (978) 462-1145
Fax: (978) 462-4176
Email: townclerk@salisburyma.gov
Website: www.salisburyma.gov
Hours: M: 8:30a-6p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4p; F: 8:30a-1p

SANDISFIELD
TOWN HALL
3 SILVERBROOK RD
P O BOX 163
01255
Phone: (413) 258-4711
Fax: (413) 258-4225
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 9a-2p; M: 6p-7p

SANDWICH
TOWN CLERK
145 MAIN ST
02563
Phone: (508) 888-0340
Fax: (508) 888-2497
Email: twhite@townofsandwich.net
Website: www.sandwichmass.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-8p

SAUGUS
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
298 CENTRAL ST
01906
Phone: (781) 231-4101
Fax: (781) 231-4109
Email: jrappa@saugus-ma.gov
Website: www.saugus-ma.gov
Hours: M:8:30a-7p;T-Th:8:15a-5p;F:8:15a-12:30p;
June-Aug M:8:30a-7p;T-Th:8:15a-4p;F: 8:15a-12:30p

SAVOY
TOWN HALL
720 MAIN RD
01256
Phone: (413) 743-3759
Fax: (413) 743-4292
Email: townofsavoy@verizon.net
Website: www.townofsavoy.org/
Hours: Tu: 12p-1p; By appointment

SCITUATE
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
600 C J CUSHING WAY
02066
Phone: (781) 545-8743
Fax: (781) 545-8704
Email: townclerk@town.scituate.ma.us
Website: www.town.scituate.ma.us/townhall.html
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:45p; Tu: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-11:45a

SEEKONK
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
100 PECK ST
02771
Phone: (508) 336-2920
Fax: (508) 336-0764
Email: jparker@seekonk-ma.gov
Website: www.seekonk.info
Hours: M, Tu & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; W: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-12p

SHARON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
90 SOUTH MAIN ST
02067
Phone: (781) 784-1505
Fax: (781) 784-1503
Email: mchused@townofsharon.org
Website: www.townofsharon.net/
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-5p; Th: 8:30a-8p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

SHEFFIELD
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 175
01257
Phone: (413) 229-7000
Fax: (413) 229-7010
Email: fjoyce@sheffieldma.gov
Website: www.sheffieldma.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

SHELBURNE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
51 BRIDGE ST
01370
Phone: (413) 625-0300
Fax: (413) 625-0303
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M & Tu: 10a-5p; Th: 10a-4p

SHERBORN
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
19 WASHINGTON STREET
01770
Phone: (508) 651-7853
Fax: (508) 651-0407
Email: Carole.Marple@sherbornma.org
Website: www.sherbornma.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12p

SHIRLEY
TOWN CLERK
7 KEADY WAY
01464
Phone: (978) 425-2600
Fax: (978) 425-2681
Email: amcdougall@shirley-ma.gov
Website: www.shirley-ma.gov
Hours: M: 9a-3p & 6p-8:30p; T-Th: 9-3p; By appointment M-Th: 3p-4:30p

SHREWSBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
100 MAPLE AVE
01545
Phone: (508) 841-8507
Fax: (508) 842-0587
Email: swright@th.ci.shrewsbury.ma.us
Website: www.shrewsbury-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

SHUTESBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 COOLEYVILLE ROAD
P.O. BOX 264
01072
Phone: (413) 259-1204
Fax: (413) 259-1107
Email: townclerk@shutesbury.org
Website: www.shutesbury.org
Hours: M-Th: 9a-1p & By appointment

SOMERSET
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
140 WOOD STREET
02726
Phone: (508) 646-2818
Fax: (508) 646-2802
Email: dberge@town.somerset.ma.us
Website: www.somersetmass.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p; W: 4p-6p every other Wed, call first

SOMERVILLE
ELECTION COMMISSION
93 HIGHLAND AVE
02143
Phone: (617) 625-6600
Fax: (617) 625-5643
Email: nsalerno@somervillema.gov
Website: www.somervillema.gov
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7:30p; F: 8:30a-12:30p

SOUTH HADLEY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
116 MAIN ST
01075
Phone: (413) 538-5023
Fax: (413) 538-7565
Email: chamlin@southhadleyma.gov
Website: www.southhadley.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

SOUTHAMPTON
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 276,TOWN HALL
01073
Phone: (413) 527-8392
Fax: (413) 527-1471
Email: townclerk@southampton.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

SOUTHBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
17 COMMON ST
01772
Phone: (508) 485-0710
Fax: (508) 480-0161
Email: townclerk@southboroughma.com
Website: www.southboroughma.com
Hours: M,W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

SOUTHBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
41 ELM ST
01550
Phone: (508) 764-5408
Fax: (508) 764-5425
Email: mdaoust@southbridgemass.org
Website: www.ci.southbridge.ma.us
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; Th: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

SOUTHWICK
TOWN CLERK
454 COLLEGE HIGHWAY
01077
Phone: (413) 569-5504
Fax: (413) 569-0667
Email: treasurer@southwick.ma.net
Website: www.southwickma.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

SPENCER
TOWN CLERK
157 MAIN ST
01562
Phone: (508) 885-7500
Fax: (508) 885-7528
Email: jmulhall@spencerma.gov
Website: www.spencerma.gov
Hours: M & Tu: 7:30a-4:30p & 6p-8p; W & Th: 7:30a-4:30p, Closed Friday

SPRINGFIELD
ELECTION COMMISSION
36 COURT ST
GROUND FLOOR ROOM 8
01103
Phone: (413) 787-6189
Fax: (413) 787-6186
Email: kkusek@springfieldcityhall.com
Website: www.springfieldcityhall.com
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p

STERLING
TOWN CLERK
BUTTERICK, RM 113
1 PARK ST
01564
Phone: (978) 422-8111
Fax: (978) 422-0289
Email: TownClerk@town.sterling.ma.us
Website: www.town.sterling.ma.us
Hours: Open to Public M-Th: 8:30a- 4p; F: 8:30a-11:30a

STOCKBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 417
01262
Phone: (413) 298-4170 x 251
Fax: (413) 298-4344
Email: clerk@townofstockbridge.com
Website: www.townofstockbridge.com/
Hours: M-F: 9a-12p & 1p-4p

STONEHAM
TOWN CLERK
35 CENTRAL ST
02180
Phone: (781) 279-2650
Fax: (781) 279-2653
Email: jhanright@ci.stoneham.ma.us
Website: www.stoneham-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12p

STOUGHTON
TOWN CLERK
10 PEARL ST.
02072
Phone: (781) 341-1300
Fax: (781) 232-9295
Email: cmooney@stoughton-ma.gov
Website: www.stoughton.org/
Hours: M-W: 8:30a-4:30p; Th: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-12p

STOW
TOWN CLERK
380 GREAT ROAD
01775-2127
Phone: (978) 897-4514
Fax: (978) 897-4534
Email: townclerk@stow-ma.gov
Website: www.stow-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-12:30p & 1p-4p; F: 8a-1p; No F hours June 1- Sept 1

STURBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
308 MAIN STREET
01566
Phone: (508) 347-2510
Fax: (508) 347-5886
Email: lmurawski@town.sturbridge.ma.us
Website: www.town.sturbridge.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

SUDBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
322 CONCORD RD.
01776
Phone: (978) 639-3351
Fax: (978) 443-0264
Email: clerk@sudbury.ma.us
Website: www.sudbury.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p summer hours (July/Aug) may be different

SUNDERLAND
TOWN CLERK
12 SCHOOL STREET
01375
Phone: (413) 665-1442
Fax: (413) 665-1446
Email: townclerk@townofsunderland.us
Website: www.townofsunderland.us/
Hours: M-W: 8a-4p; M: 6p-8p; Th: 8a-12p

SUTTON
TOWN CLERK
4 UXBRIDGE RD
01590
Phone: (508) 865-8725
Fax: (508) 865-8721
Email: l.rodgers@town.sutton.ma.us
Website: www.suttonma.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 9a-12p

SWAMPSCOTT
TOWN CLERK
22 MONUMENT AVE
01907
Phone: (781) 596-8855
Fax: (781) 596-8870
Email: sduplin@town.swampscott.ma.us
Website: www.town.swampscott.ma.us/
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

SWANSEA
TOWN CLERK
81 MAIN ST
02777
Phone: (508) 678-9389
Fax: (508) 324-6700
Email: SWANSEATOWNCLERK@YAHOO.COM
Website: www.swanseamass.org/
Hours: M, Tu, Th & F: 9a-4p; W: 9a-5p

TAUNTON
ELECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS
15 SUMMER ST
02780
Phone: (508) 821-1044
Fax: (508) 821-1202
Email: cityclerk@tmlp.net
Website: www.taunton-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p

TEMPLETON
TOWN CLERK OFFICE
4 ELM STREET
BALDWINVILLE, MA
01436
Phone: (978) 939-8466
Fax: (978) 939-8327
Email: charris@templeton1.org
Website: www.templeton1.org/
Hours: M: 7:30a-5p; Tu-Th: 8a-3p; F: 7:30a-1p

TEWKSBURY
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1009 MAIN STREET
TOWN HALL
01876
Phone: (978) 640-4355
Fax: (978) 851-8610
Email: townclerk@tewksbury-ma.gov
Website: www.tewksbury.info
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4:30p

TISBURY
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
PO BOX 606
51 SPRING ST
02568
Phone: (508) 696-4215
Fax: (508) 693-5876
Email: mmudge@tisburyma.gov
Website: www.tisburyma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

TOLLAND
TOWN HALL
241 W GRANVILLE RD
01034
Phone: (413) 258-4068
Fax: (413) 258-4048
Email: townclerktolland@earthlink.net
Website: www.tolland-ma.gov
Hours: M: 2p-4p & By appointment

TOPSFIELD
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
8 WEST COMMON STREET
01983
Phone: (978) 887-1505
Fax: (978) 887-1502
Email: pburke@topsfield-ma.gov
Website: www.topsfield-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-12p

TOWNSEND
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
272 MAIN ST
01469
Phone: (978) 597-1704
Fax: (978) 597-8135
Email: clerk@townsend.ma.us
Website: www.townsend.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 9a-4p; Tu 9a-8p

TRURO
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 2012
02666-2012
Phone: (508) 349-7004
Fax: (508) 349-5505
Email: caslade@truro-ma.gov
Website: www.truro-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

TYNGSBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
25 BRYANTS LANE
01879
Phone: (978) 649-2300
Fax: (978) 649-2320
Email: jshifres@tyngsboroughma.gov
Website: www.tyngsboroughma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8:30a-4p; F: 8a-12:30p

TYRINGHAM
TOWN HALL
P.O. BOX 416
116 MAIN RD
01264
Phone: (413) 243-1749
Fax: (413) 243-4942
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.tyringham-ma.gov/
Hours: By appointment

UPTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 MAIN ST
P. O. BOX 969
01568
Phone: (508) 529-3565
Fax: (508) 529-1010
Email: kmcelreath@upton.ma.us
Website: www.upton.ma.us/pages/town-clerk.php
Hours: M & W: 9a-3p; Tu & Th: 9:15a-1p & 6p-8p

UXBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK
21 SOUTH MAIN ST
01569
Phone: (508) 278-3156
Fax: (508) 278-3154
Email: town.clerk@uxbridge-ma.gov
Website: www.uxbridge-ma.gov
Hours: M, T & Th: 7:30a-5p; W: 8a-7p

WAKEFIELD
TOWN CLERK
1 LAFAYETTE ST.
01880
Phone: (781) 246-6383
Fax: (781) 246-4155
Email: mgalvin@wakefield.ma.us
Website: www.wakefield.ma.us/
Hours: M-W: 8:a-4:30p; Th: 8a-7p; F: 8a-12:30p

WALES
TOWN OFFICES
3 HOLLOW ROAD
PO BOX 834
01081-0834
Phone: (413) 245-7571
Fax: (413) 245-3261
Email: townclerk@townofwales.net
Website: www.townofwales.net
Hours: M & Tu: 9a-3p

WALPOLE
TOWN HALL
135 SCHOOL ST
02081
Phone: (508) 660-7296
Fax: (508) 660-7228
Email: rfucile@walpole-ma.gov
Website: www.walpole-ma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-8p; F: 8a-12p

WALTHAM
DEPARTMENT OF CITY CLERK
610 MAIN STREET
02452
Phone: (781) 314-3120
Fax: (781) 314-3130
Email: rmalone@city.waltham.ma.us
Website: www.city.waltham.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WARE
126 MAIN ST.
01082
Phone: (413) 967-9648
Fax: (413) 967-9638
Email: ntalbot@townofware.com
Website: www.townofware.com/
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WAREHAM
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
54 MARION ROAD
02571
Phone: 508-291-3100 x 3143
Fax: 508-291-6511
Email: masilva@wareham.ma.us
Website: www.wareham.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WARREN
TOWN CLERK
P.O. BOX 603
01083
Phone: (413) 436-5702
Fax: (413) 436-9754
Email: warrentownclerk@yahoo.com
Website: www.warren-ma.gov
Hours: M-W: 8a-3p; Th: 2p-7p

WARWICK
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
12 ATHOL RD
01378
Phone: (978) 544-8304
Fax: (978) 544-6499
Email: townclerk@town.warwick.ma.us
Website: www.warwickma.org/
Hours: M: 9a-12p

WASHINGTON
TOWN CLERK
8 SUMMIT HILL RD
PO BOX 98
01223
Phone: (413) 623-8878
Fax: (413) 623-2116
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M: 7p-9p

WATERTOWN
TOWN CLERK
149 MAIN STREET
02472
Phone: (617) 972-6488
Fax: (617) 972-6595
Email: jflynn@watertown-ma.gov
Website: www.watertown-ma.gov
Hours: M, W-Th: 8:30a-5p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-5p; June-Aug F: 8:30a-2p

WAYLAND
TOWN CLERK
41 COCHITUATE ROAD
01778
Phone: (508) 358-3631
Fax: (508) 358-3627
Email: ltoombs@wayland.ma.us
Website: www.wayland.ma.us
Hours: M: 8:30a-7p; Tu-Th: 8:30a-4:30p, F: 8:30a-12:30p

WEBSTER
TOWN CLERK
350 MAIN ST SUITE 3
01570
Phone: (508) 949-3850
Fax: (508) 949-3850
Email: bcraver@webster-ma.gov
Website: www.webster-ma.gov/
Hours: M: 8a-7p; Tu-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8:30a-12p

WELLESLEY
TOWN CLERK
525 WASHINGTON ST
02482
Phone: (781) 431-1019
Fax: (781) 237-5037
Email: knagle@wellesleyma.gov
Website: www.wellesleyma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-5p

WELLFLEET
TOWN CLERK
300 MAIN STREET
02667
Phone: (508) 349-0301
Fax: (508) 349-0317
Email: dawn.rickman@wellfleet-ma.gov
Website: www.wellfleet-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WENDELL
TOWN CLERK
9 Morse Village Rd
P. O. Box 41
WENDELL DEPOT MA
01380
Phone: 978-544-3395 x 102
Fax: 978-544-7467
Email: townclerk@wendellmass.us
Website: www.wendellmass.us/
Hours: W: 6:30p-8:30p and by appointment

WENHAM
TOWN CLERK
138 MAIN STREET
01984
Phone: (978) 468-5520
Fax: (978) 468-8014
Email: treid@wenhamma.gov
Website: www.wenhamma.gov
Hours: M, W & Th: 9a-4:30p; Tu: 9a-7p; F: 9a-1p

WEST BOYLSTON
TOWN CLERK
127 HARTWELL ST, 100
01583
Phone: (508) 835-6240
Fax: (508) 835-4102
Email: kim.hopewell@westboylston-ma.gov
Website: www.westboylston.com
Hours: M-W: 9a-4p; Th-F: 9a-2:30p

WEST BRIDGEWATER
TOWN CLERK
65 NORTH MAIN ST
02379
Phone: (508) 894-1200
Fax: (508) 894-1210
Email: nmorrison@wbridgewater.com
Website: www.town.west-bridgewater.ma.us
Hours: M,Tu & Th: 8a-4p; W: 8a-7p; F: 8a-1p

WEST BROOKFIELD
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
2 E. MAIN ST
01585
Phone: (508) 867-1421
Fax: (508) 867-1400
Email: sallen@town.west-brookfield.ma.us
Website: www.wbrookfield.com/
Hours: M-Th: 9a-2p

WEST NEWBURY
TOWN CLERK
381 MAIN ST
TOWN OFFICE BUILDING
01985
Phone: (978) 363-1100
Fax: (978) 363-1117
Email: mmccarron@wnewbury.org
Website: www.wnewbury.org
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-12p

WEST SPRINGFIELD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
26 CENTRAL ST
01089
Phone: (413) 263-3012
Fax: (413) 263-3046
Email: ofrizzell@west-springfield.ma.us
Website: www.west-springfield.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4:30p

WEST STOCKBRIDGE
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
21 STATE LINE RD
01266
Phone: (413) 232-0300
Fax: (413) 232-7195
Email: wstnclerk@msn.com
Website: www.weststockbridge-ma.gov
Hours: T & Th: 1:30p-4p

WEST TISBURY
TOWN HALL
BOX 278
02575
Phone: (508) 696-0148
Fax: (508) 696-0103
Email: townclerk@westtisbury-ma.gov
Website: www.westtisbury-ma.gov/
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-1:30p

WESTBOROUGH
TOWN CLERK
34 WEST MAIN STREET
01581
Phone: (508) 366-3020
Fax: (508) 366-3099
Email: nyendriga@town.westborough.ma.us
Website: www.town.westborough.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8a-5p; Tu: 8a-8p; F: 7:30a-12p

WESTFIELD
BOARD OF REGISTRARS
59 COURT STREET
ROOM 211
01085
Phone: (413) 572-6266
Fax: (413) 564-3114
Email: m.colon@cityofwestfield.org
Website: www.cityofwestfield.org
Hours: M-F: 9a-5p

WESTFORD
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
55 MAIN STREET
01886
Phone: (978) 692-5515
Fax: (978) 399-2555
Email: ktari@westfordma.gov
Website: www.westfordma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WESTHAMPTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
ONE SOUTH RD
01027
Phone: (413) 527-0463
Fax: (413) 527-8655
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: Every M: 9-5; 7p-8p also by appointment

WESTMINSTER
TOWN CLERK
11 SOUTH STREET
01473
Phone: (978) 874-7406
Fax: (978) 874-7411
Email: dmacaloney@westminster-ma.gov
Website: www.westminster-ma.gov
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4:30p; F: 8a-1p

WESTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
P.O. BOX 378
11 TOWN HOUSE ROAD
02493
Phone: (781) 893-7320
Fax: (781) 529-0106
Email: davenport.d@westonmass.org
Website: www.weston.org
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-5p

WESTPORT
OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK
816 MAIN RD
02790
Phone: (508) 636-1001
Fax: (774) 264-5152
Email: clerk@westport-ma.gov
Website: www.westport-ma.com
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4p; 1st M of month: 8:30a-6p

WESTWOOD
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
580 HIGH ST
02090
Phone: (781) 326-3964
Fax: (781) 329-8030
Email: dpowers@townhall.westwood.ma.us
Website: www.townhall.westwood.ma.us
Hours: M, W & Th: 8:30a-4:30p; Tu: 8:30a-7p; F: 8:30a-1p

WEYMOUTH
TOWN CLERK/REGISTRAR
75 MIDDLE STREET
02189
Phone: (781) 682-6129
Fax: (781) 335-3283
Email: crose@weymouth.ma.us
Website: www.weymouth.ma.us
Hours: M-Tu & Th-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WHATELY
TOWN CLERK
218 CHESTNUT PLAIN R
P. O. BOX 89
01093
Phone: (413) 665-0054
Fax: (413) 665-9560
Email: tclerk2@comcast.net
Website: www.whately.org
Hours: M, W, Th & F: 9a-4p; Tu: 12p-7p

WHITMAN
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
P O BOX 426
54 SOUTH AVENUE
02382
Phone: (781) 618-9710
Fax: (781) 618-9791
Email: pamela.martin@whitman-ma.gov
Website: www.whitman-ma.gov/
Hours: M, W-F: 8a-4p; Tu: 8a-7:30p

WILBRAHAM
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
240 SPRINGFIELD ST
01095
Phone: (413) 596-2800
Fax: (413) 596-2830
Email: blitchfield@wilbraham-ma.gov
Website: www.wilbraham-ma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WILLIAMSBURG
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 447
01039-0447
Phone: (413) 268-8402
Fax: (413) 268-8409
Email: townclerk@burgy.org
Website: www.burgy.org
Hours: M: 8:30a-3:30p & 5:30p-7p; Tu: 8:30a-3:30p; Th: 9a-2p & 6p-8p

WILLIAMSTOWN
TOWN CLERK
31 NORTH ST
01267
Phone: (413) 458-9341
Fax: (413) 458-4839
Email: mkennedy@williamstown.net
Website: www.williamstown.net
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WILMINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
121 GLEN RD
01887
Phone: (978) 658-2030
Fax: (978) 657-7564
Email: sgeorge@town.wilmington.ma.us
Website: www.wilmingtonma.gov
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

WINCHENDON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
109 FRONT ST
01475
Phone: (978) 297-2766
Fax: (978) 297-1616
Email: CLERK@TOWN.WINCHENDON.MA.US
Website: www.TOWNOFWINCHENDON.COM
Hours: M: 8a-6p; Tu-Th: 8a-5p

WINCHESTER
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
71 MOUNT VERNON
01890
Phone: (781) 721-7130
Fax: (781) 721-1153
Email: townclerk@winchester.us
Website: www.winchester.us
Hours: M-F: 8a-4p

WINDSOR
TOWN CLERK
3 HINSDALE RD
01270
Phone: (413) 684-3977
Fax: (413) 684-1585
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Hours: M: 5p-7p & By appointment

WINTHROP
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1 METCALF SQUARE
TOWN HALL
02152
Phone: (617) 846-1742
Fax: (617) 539-5814
Email: jdemato@town.winthrop.ma.us
Website: www.town.winthrop.ma.us/Pages/index
Hours: M & W: 8a-4:30p; T & Th: 8a-7p

WOBURN
CITY CLERK’S OFFICE
10 COMMON ST
01801
Phone: (781) 897-5850
Fax: (781) 897-5859
Email: wcampbell@cityofwoburn.com
Website: www.cityofwoburn.com
Hours: M-W: 9a-4:30p; Th: 9a-7p; F: 9a-1p

WORCESTER
ELECTION DIVISION
455 MAIN ST RM 208
01608
Phone: (508) 799-1134
Fax: (508) 799-1137
Email: medunaj@worcesterma.gov
Website: www.worcesterma.gov
Hours: M: 8:45a-5p; Tu-F: 8:45a-4:15p

WORTHINGTON
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
PO BOX 247
01098
Phone: (413) 238-5577
Fax: (413) 238-5579
Email: elections@sec.state.ma.us
Website: www.worthington-ma.us/
Hours: Sat: 10a-12:30p

WRENTHAM
OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK
79 SOUTH ST
02093
Phone: (508) 384-5415
Fax: (508) 384-5434
Email: cmollica@wrentham.ma.us
Website: www.wrentham.ma.us
Hours: M-Th: 8a-4p; F: 8a-1:30p

YARMOUTH
TOWN CLERK’S OFFICE
1146 ROUTE 28
SO. YARMOUTH, MA
02664
Phone: (508) 398-2231
Fax: (508) 760-4842
Email: jhibbert@yarmouth.ma.us
Website: www.yarmouth.ma.us
Hours: M-F: 8:30a-4:30p

——————————————————————————–

Rhode Island City and Town Directory

Barrington
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-247-1900

Bristol
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-253-7000

Burrillville
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-568-4300

Central Falls
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-727-7400

Charlestown
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-364-1200

Coventry
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-821-6400

Cranston
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-461-1000

Cumberland
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-728-2400

East Greenwich
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-886-8665

East Providence
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-435-7500

Exeter
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-295-7500

Foster
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-392-9200

Glocester
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-568-6206

Hopkinton
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-377-7777

Jamestown
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-423-7200

Johnston
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-351-6618

Lincoln
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-333-1100

Little Compton
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-635-4400

Middletown
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-849-5540

Narragansett
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-789-1044

New Shoreham
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-466-3200

Newport
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-846-9600

North Kingstown
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-294-3331

North Providence
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-232-0900

North Smithfield
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-767-2200

Pawtucket
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-728-0500

Portsmouth
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-683-3255

Providence
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-421-7740

Richmond
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-539-2497

Scituate
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-647-2822

Smithfield
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-233-1000

South Kingstown
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-789-9331

Tiverton
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-625-6700

Warren
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-245-7340

Warwick
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-738-2000

West Greenwich
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-392-3800

West Warwick
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-822-9200

Westerly
More info →
Town Web site
Phone: 401-348-2500

Woonsocket
More info →
City Web site
Phone: 401-762-6400

 

Adapting Motor Vehicles for People with disAbilities

newenglandwheelchairvan.com boston strong

Introduction

A Proven Process for Gaining Freedom on the Road

The introduction of new technology continues to broaden opportunities for people with disabilities to drive vehicles with adaptive devices. Taking advantage of these opportunities, however, can be time consuming and, sometimes, frustrating.

The information in this brochure is based on the experience of driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals who work with individuals who require adaptive devices for their motor vehicles. It is centered around a proven process —evaluating your needs, selecting the right vehicle, choosing a qualified dealer to modify your vehicle, being trained, maintaining your vehicle — that can help you avoid costly mistakes when purchasing and modifying a vehicle with adaptive equipment.

Also included is general information on cost savings, licensing requirements, and organizations to contact for help. Although the brochure focuses on drivers of modified vehicles, each section contains important information for people who drive passengers with disabilities.

 


 

Investigate Cost Saving Opportunities &Licensing Requirements

Cost Saving Opportunities

The costs associated with modifying a vehicle vary greatly. A new vehicle modified with adaptive equipment can cost from $20,000 to $80,000. Therefore, whether you are modifying a vehicle you own or purchasing a new vehicle with adaptive equipment, it pays to investigate public and private opportunities for financial assistance.

There are programs that help pay part or all of the cost of vehicle modification, depending on the cause and nature of the disability. For information, contact your state’s Department of Vocational Rehabilitation or another agency that provides vocational services, and, if appropriate, the Department of Veterans Affairs. You can find phone numbers for these state and federal agencies in a local phone book. Also, consider the following.

  • Many nonprofit associations that advocate for individuals with disabilities have grant programs that help pay for adaptive devices.
  • If you have private health insurance or workers’ compensation, you may be covered for adaptive devices and vehicle modification. Check with your insurance carrier.
  • Many manufacturers have rebate or reimbursement plans for modified vehicles. When you are ready to make a purchase, find out if there is such a dealer in your area.
  • Some states waive the sales tax for adaptive devices if you have a doctor’s prescription for their use.
  • You may be eligible for savings when submitting your federal income tax return. Check with a qualified tax consultant to find out if the cost of your adaptive devices will help you qualify for a medical deduction.

Licensing Requirements

All states require a valid learner’s permit or driver’s license to receive an on–the–road evaluation. You cannot be denied the opportunity to apply for a permit or license because you have a disability. However, you may receive a restricted license, based on your use of adaptive devices.

 


 

Evaluate Your Needs

Driver rehabilitation specialists perform comprehensive evaluations to identify the adaptive equipment most suited to your needs. A complete evaluation includes vision screening and, in general, assesses:

  • Muscle strength, flexibility, and range of motion
  • Coordination and reaction time
  • Judgment and decision making abilities
  • Ability to drive with adaptive equipment

Upon completion of an evaluation, you should receive a report containing specific recommendations on driving requirements or restrictions, and a complete list of recommended vehicle modifications.

Finding a Qualified Evaluator

To find a qualified evaluator in your area, contact a local rehabilitation center or call the Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED). The phone number is in the resource section. The Association maintains a data base of certified driver rehabilitation specialists throughout the country. Your insurance company may pay for the evaluation. Find out if you need a physician’s prescription or other documen-tation to receive benefits.

Being Prepared for an Evaluation

Consult with your physician to make sure you are physically and psychologically prepared to drive. Being evaluated too soon after an injury or other trauma may indicate the need for adaptive equipment you will not need in the future. When going for an evaluation, bring any equipment you normally use, e.g., a walker or neck brace. Tell the evaluator if you are planning to modify your wheelchair or obtain a new one.

Evaluating Passengers with Disabilities

Evaluators also consult on compatibility and transportation safety issues for passengers with disabilities. They assess the type of seating needed and the person’s ability to exit and enter the vehicle. They provide advice on the purchase of modified vehicles and recommend appropriate wheelchair lifts or other equipment for a vehicle you own. If you have a child who requires a special type of safety seat, evaluators make sure the seat fits your child properly. They also make sure you can properly install the seat in your vehicle.

 


 

Select the Right Vehicle

Selecting a vehicle for modification requires collaboration among you, your evaluator, and a qualified vehicle modification dealer. Although the purchase or lease of a vehicle is your responsibility, making sure the vehicle can be properly modified is the responsibility of the vehicle modification dealer. Therefore, take the time to consult with a qualified dealer and your evaluator before making your final purchase. It will save you time and money. Be aware that you will need insurance while your vehicle is being modified, even though it is off the road.

The following questions can help with vehicle selection. They can also help determine if you can modify a vehicle you own.

  • Does the necessary adaptive equipment require a van, or will another passenger vehicle suffice?
  • Can the vehicle accommodate the equipment that needs to be installed?
  • Will there be enough space to accommodate your family or other passengers once the vehicle is modified?
  • Is there adequate parking space at home and at work for the vehicle and for loading/unloading a wheelchair?
  • Is there adequate parking space to maneuver if you use a walker?
  • What additional options are necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle?

If a third party is paying for the vehicle, adaptive devices, or modification costs, find out if there are any limitations or restrictions on what is covered. Always get a written statement on what a funding agency will pay before making your purchase.

 


 

Choose a Qualified Dealer to Modify Your Vehicle

Even a half inch change in the lowering of a van floor can affect a driver’s ability to use equipment or to have an unobstructed view of the road; so, take time to find a qualified dealer to modify your vehicle. Begin with a phone inquiry to find out about credentials, experience, and references. Ask questions about how they operate. Do they work with evaluators? Will they look at your vehicle before you purchase it? Do they require a prescription from a physician or other driver evaluation specialist? How long will it take before they can start work on your vehicle? Do they provide training on how to use the adaptive equipment?

If you are satisfied with the answers you receive, check references; then arrange to visit the dealer’s facility. Additional information to consider is listed below.

  • Are they members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has vehicle conversion standards?
  • What type of training has the staff received?
  • What type of warranty do they provide on their work?
  • Do they provide ongoing service and maintenance?
  • Do they stock replacement parts?

Once you are comfortable with the dealer’s qualifications, you will want to ask specific questions, such as:

  • How much will the modification cost?
  • Will they accept third party payment?
  • How long will it take to modify the vehicle?
  • Can the equipment be transferred to a new vehicle in the future?
  • Will they need to modify existing safety features to install the adaptive equipment?

While your vehicle is being modified, you will, most likely, need to be available for fittings. This avoids additional waiting time for adjustments once the equipment is fully installed. Without proper fittings you may have problems with the safe operation of the vehicle and have to go back for adjustments.

Some State Agencies specify the dealer you must use if you want reimbursement.

 


 

Obtain Training on the Use of New Equipment

Both new and experienced drivers need training on how to safely use new adaptive equipment. Your equipment dealer and evaluator should provide information and off-road instruction. You will also need to practice driving under the instruction of a qualified driving instructor until you both feel comfortable with your skills. Bring a family member or other significant person who drives to all your training sessions. It’s important to have someone else who can drive your vehicle in case of an emergency.

Some state vocational rehabilitation departments pay for driver training under specified circumstances. At a minimum, their staff can help you locate a qualified instructor. If your evaluator does not provide on-the-road instruction, ask him or her for a recommendation. You can also inquire at your local motor vehicle administration office.

 


 

Maintain Your Vehicle

Regular maintenance is important for keeping your vehicle and adaptive equipment safe and reliable. It may also be mandatory for compliance with the terms of your warranty. Some warranties specify a time period during which adaptive equipment must be inspected. These “check ups” for equipment may differ from those for your vehicle. Make sure you or your modifier submits all warranty cards for all equipment to ensure coverage and so manufacturers can contact you in case of a recall.

For additional copies of this brochure and other important vehicle safety information, you can contact DOT’s web site at www.nhtsa.dot.gov and the DOT Auto Safety Hotline: 888-DASH-2-DOT (888-327-4236).

 


 

Resources

The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED)
2425 N. Center Street # 369, Hickory, NC 28601
(866) 672-9466
www.driver-ed.org
www.aded.net

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA)
11211 N. Nebraska Ave., Suite A5, Tampa, FL 33612
(800) 833-0427 
www.nmeda.org

AAA
1000 AAA Drive, Heathrow, FL 32746-5063
(404) 444-7961
www.aaa.com

Department of Veteran Affairs
(800) 827-1000
www.va.gov

State Departments of Vocational Rehabilitation
Listed in telephone book.


The following manufacturers offer rebates or reimbursements on new vehicle modification.

Daimler Chrysler Corporation
(800) 255-9877
(TDD Users: (800) 922-3826)
www.automobility.daimlerchrysler.com

Ford Motor Company
(800) 952-2248
(TDD Users: (800) TDD-0312)
www.ford.com/mobilitymotoring

General Motors Corporation
(800) 323-9935
(TDD Users: (800) TDD-9935)
www.gmmobility.com

Saturn
(800) 553-6000, Prompt 3
(TDD Users: (800) 833-6000)
www.saturn.com

Volkswagen
(800) 822-8987
www.vw.com

Audi
(800) 822-2834
www.audiusa.com

Ford Mobility Motoring Program

ford mobility center motoring program new england

Ford Mobility Motoring Program

The Ford Mobility Motoring Program offers financial assistance of up to $1,000 on new Ford Motor Company vehicle purchases or leases. For more information, contact the Ford Mobility Motoring Program toll free at 800-952-2248 (TTY Users: 800-833-0312). In Canada call 800-565-8985.

Click here to visit their website

The reimbursement process is quick and easy. Once your vehicle has been purchased and adaptive equipment installation is completed, your dealer will assist you in submitting your claim. Your dealer will need the following documentation:

  • Vehicle Bill of Sale – must have the VIN included
  • Paid Adaptive Equipment Invoice – should be dated and marked paid

 

Your reimbursement check will then arrive directly from Ford Motor Company, usually within two to four weeks.

 

  • Determine your state’s driver’s license requirements.
  • Evaluate your needs – Contact VMi New England for further information.
  • Select the right vehicle – Consult with aevaluator at VMi New England Mobility Center and adaptive installer to determine the best Honda model to meet your needs.
  • Go to a qualified mobility equipment installer like VMi New England Mobility Center – Shop around and ask about qualifications, capabilities, experience, warranty coverage and service.
  • Obtain training on the use of the new equipment – When this process is complete, follow the guidelines and complete and submit an application for assistance to recover up to $1,000 of the cost of your adaptive equipment and/or conversion.

Dodge Grand Caravan Wheelchair Van Conversion

Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar Conversion

VMI first developed the Northstar handicap van conversion in the early 1990’s to meet customer preferences for increased interior space. To this day, the VMI Northstar on the Dodge Grand Caravan minivan remains one of the best mobility ramp vans in America.

By sliding out of a space below the floor, the Northstar mobility ramp maximizes space inside the accessible vehicle. There are so many benefits of an in-floor wheelchair ramp, it is easily understood why its so popular.

Dodge VMI Northstar at Automotive Innovations www.bridgewatermobility.com

VMI New England Dodge Northstar Wheelchair Van VMiNewEngland.com

Description
Interior handles, and switches, buttons are easily accessed
Front passenger seat retains regular functions
No additional noise from handicap ramp
In the event of an accident, the accessible ramp is under the floor-not inside the mobility van
Works on curbs up to 10 inches tall
Increased maneuverability due to greater space inside the accessible van
Ramp-free doorway allows easy entry/exit for ambulatory passengers
Minimized conversion wear and tear (fewer ramp cycles to load/unload additional passengers)
Uncluttered and clean wheelchair vehicle interior
Mobility vehicle interior gets less dirt inside
Increased handicapped ramp width

Specifications
Maximum Floor Drop – 11″
Handicap Vehicle Ground Clearance – 5.5″
Door Opening Width – 30.75″
Door Opening Height – 55.125″
Usable Mobility Ramp Width – 29.25″
Wheelchair Ramp Length – 45.75″
Length from Back Seats to Kickplate – 58.25″
Overall Floor Length – 86″
Floor Width at Front Doors – 61″
Interior Height at Driver & Passenger Positions (Without Sunroof) – 58″
Interior Height at Center Position – 57.63″
Steering Wheel Bottom to Floor – 29.5″
Measured Down from Front Edge of Steering Wheel to Front Kick-Up – 16.25″

Standard Features
Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar only
Extremely-low 8.0° handicapped ramp angle
Sure Deploy backup system leaves accessible van conversion usable even with power failure
Manual secondary backup system for additional peace of mind
800lb. handicap ramp weight capacity

Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar AND Summit
Fully-powered accessible van ramp
11” drop FLEX Floor maximizes interior space and headroom for better maneuverability
Complete undercoating and rust proofing
PowerKneel system lowers the minivan to reduce ramp angle
Seamless integration with Dodge Grand Caravan vehicle electronics
Complete control through Dodge keyfob and interior switches
Removable front passenger and driver seat bases
No-skid wheelchair ramp surfacing
Complete crash testing and compliance with all government safety standards
3-year/36,000-mile warranty

Optional Features
Durafloor (rubberized flooring) to match Dodge Grand Caravan interiors


••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••


Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Summit Conversion

The Summit folding wheelchair ramp van conversion on a Dodge Grand Caravan is an economical choice compared to the popular Northstar in-floor handicapped ramp conversion from VMI. Summit mobility ramps utilize siderails that are 2 inches tall. This is especially important for those with a hard time navigating an incline. VMI Summit handicapped accessible van on the Dodge Grand Caravan also includes an industry best access ramp length of only 50.25”.

The short handicap ramp provides two key advantages to VMI customers. First, passengers can easily use the Dodge handle for the sliding door and switches because the handicapped ramp is not covering them. Second, users in wheelchairs have more room to move on and off the ramp when other vehicles park too close.

Dodge VMI Summit at Automotive Innovations www.bridgewatermobility.com

VMI New England Dodge Summit Wheelchair Van VMiNewEngland.com

Description
Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Summit Only
2” siderails help people with a disabilities stay on the ramp when coming in and out
When other vehicles park too close, 50.25” ramp leaves users more room to maneuver
By simply pushing outward on the ramp, it can be deployed incase of a mechanical/power failure
Handicap ramp surface allows debris to fall through so it doesn’t end up inside the vehicle
Mobility ramp has a quiet cabin dut to an anti-rattle device
600lb. handicapped ramp rating

Dodge Grand Caravan with VMI Northstar AND Summit
Fully-powered accessible ramp
11” drop FLEX Floor maximizes head clearance and interior space for maneuvering a wheelchair
Complete undercoating and rust proofing
PowerKneel system lowers the minivan to reduce wheelchair ramp angle
Total integration with Dodge systems prevents damage to vehicle/ conversion
Accessible van conversion is controlled through interior sliding-door switches and Dodge keychain
Easy-out passenger and front driver seat stands
No-slip handicapped ramp
Total crash-testing and compliance with all government standards for safety
3-year/36,000-mile warranty

Specifications
Maximum Floor Drop – 11″
Mobility Vehicle Ground Clearance – 5.5″
Door Opening Height – 54.25″
Usable Wheelchair Ramp Width – 28.88″
Handicap Ramp Length – 50.25″
Length from Back of Seats to Kickplate – 58.25″
Overall Floor Length – 86″
Floor Width at Doors – 61″
Interior Height at Center Position – 58″
Interior Height at Drivers & Passengers Position (Without Sunroof) – 58″
Steering Wheel Bottom to Floor – 29.5″
Measured Down from Front Edge of Steering Wheel to Front Kick-Up – 16.25

Standard Features
Power Folding Wheelchair Ramp with Non-Skid Surface
Power Sliding Door with Easy Manual Operation
Maximum Interior Headroom
Undercoating and Complete Rust Proofing
Manual Backup Ramp Operation
Warranty – Mobiltiy Conversion Van
Fully Crash Tested
Remote Control Activation
600 Pound Load Rating for Handicap Ramp
9.7 Degree Handicap Ramp Angle

Optional Features
Rubberized Flooring

wheelchair lifts: automatic and semiautomatic MA, RI, CT, VT, NH & ME

wheelchair lifts automatic and semiautomatic newenglandwheelchairvan.com

TYPES OF WHEELCHAIR LIFTS

Usage of wheelchair lift can facilitate everyday functioning, eliminating the need to lift the wheelchair and place it into the vehicle with just pulling up to the platform of the lift and be lifted up or down. It is extremely convenient, giving confidence to wheelchair users to go to the places they want to. Wheelchair lifts made a significant and positive change compared to the previous experiences when they didn’t exist.

Wheelchair lifts are advanced mobility systems that have changed the way the disabled move, work and live, being a blessing for users and caregivers equally. They are used for wheelchair accessible vans and other mobility vehicles, known also by the name platform lift, making the travel of wheelchair user much easier and more pleasant. Wheelchair lifts have multiple purposes and can help people with disabilities in many ways, even being adapted according to individual needs in as many ways you need.

Usage of wheelchair lift can facilitate everyday functioning, eliminating the need to lift the wheelchair and place it into the vehicle with just pulling up to the platform of the lift and be lifted up or down. It is extremely convenient, giving confidence to wheelchair users to go to the places they want to. Wheelchair lifts made a significant and positive change compared to the previous experiences when they didn’t exist.

They can be automatic and semi-automatic, electric and hydraulic. Automatic one takes care of the folding, unfolding, lowering and raising, while semi-automatic one needs manual operating. Electric wheelchair lifts are easier to maintain than hydraulic ones. They are flexible and easy to install and come with battery back-up. The full benefit of electric wheelchair lift can be felt together with stair and automobile lifts and van ramps. Hydraulic ones don’t need electricity and can function in the case of power failure. However, they require constant maintenance and care.

Wheelchair lifts that are usually used for vans and minivans are called rotary or “swing” lifts because their method of operation involves moving the wheelchair by swinging it up-and-down or inside and outside. There is a great choice of wheelchair lifts, so you should consider all the options, with the respect for your needs and wants, including the decision about whether you want to travel in the wheelchair or in the vehicle seat, which will also mean the difference between installing it inside or outside the van. Both options have advantages and disadvantages.

An outside wheelchair lift is intended for your personal mobile device to be installed outside of the car or wheelchair vans. It will be carried behind, but the way that the driver will have complete road visibility. If you choose an outside lift, it will require very small modifications of the vehicle. The lift is usually attached to a trailer hitch on the rear.

The type of the wheelchair lifts has to be compatible with your van. There are some special features that can make a difference in your everyday functioning, for example having a back-up lifting or lowering mechanism if the main drive system fails. When you sort out your needs, it’s easier to make a decision about the choice of the corresponding advanced mobility system.

Lifts

In this section we explain the various types of lifts available on the market. There are advantages and disadvantages to all of these lifts. It is highly recommended that you get to know the lifts available, the product lines, your nearest dealers and their qualifications. If you purchase a lift only to find that there is no one within a reasonable distance to provide service and repairs you will soon regret that purchase. Always consult experts at VMi New England Mobility Center BEFORE you buy.

There are basically two types of wheelchair lifts:

  1. Platform Lift
  2. Rotary (or Swing) Lift

In addition, these two lifts come in various types. Hydraulic, electrical mechanical, gravity and those that combine hydraulic and electrical.

The hydraulic lift uses a pump and a cylinder filled with fluid pressure, which enables the pump to raise and lower the lift along with the power from the van’s battery.

The electricall mechanical lift operates either by chain or screw rod, with power provided solely by the battery.

The gravity lift has power to lift and fold, while gravity lowers the lift platform to ground level.

All of these lifts depend, at least in part, on the battery. If your battery is weak or dead, the lifts will not work.

If you are a scooter user, measure your scooter’s length. Some scooters are longer than the standard platform on lifts. An extended platform is available to accommodate these longer scooters. Be aware, though, that this could require a raised roof, too.

Platform Lift
This lift is stored either in the side, the rear, or under the floor of a van. The lift requires two doors or a sliding door on the side of a van. The platforms have expanded metal in the upper half of the platform for better visibility when the lift is folded and the van is being driven.

Lifts stored under the van require modifications to the exhaust system, gas tank, etc., depending on the make of the van. Only the pump and motor are located inside vans using under-the-floor lifts.

Platforms may also be different, depending on the lift. There are both solid and fold-in-half platforms.  The fold-in-half platform folds to give better accessibility to the doors. Some fold-in-half platform lifts are mounted on a single post.

Be aware of the differences between automatic and semi-automatic lifts. A fully automatic lift will fold, unfold, lower and raise by operating a switch located inside (on the side of the lift) or outside (on the side of the van), and, in most cases, on the dash. A semi-automatic lift requires manual folding and unfolding of the platform. Using a hand-held pendant switch, the platform can be mechanically lowered and raised. You MUST have assistance with this type of lift, as it is designed for passengers who will not be riding alone.

Rotary Lift (or “Swing Lift”)
The platform of this type of lift never folds. Instead it “swings” inside, outside and up-and-down. The rotary lift swings into the van and the lift platform sits on the floor in the middle of the van.

Some individuals like the rotary lift because of the parking convenience. Less room is needed to enter or exit the van. Also, this lift is mounted on one post inside the van. The post controls the swinging action of the lift. One of the drawbacks to the rotary lift, though, is the cross-over bar. On some rotary lifts this bar connects the platform to the swing bar, limiting space for loading and unloading on the platform.

Switches serve very necessary functions in this lift. In most cases there are three switches on the dash. They operate the lift as well as provide an open and close function for the power door openers. The motors fit into or beside the doors and are manufactured to fit only one brand of lift.

Back-up System
You may also want to purchase a back-up system for your lift. Many government agencies require a lift to have a back-up system for use in emergencies. With a back-up system the lift can be manually manuvered and users can exit the van with assistance from an outsider. Most back-up systems are herd to operate alone, so expect to need someone’s help.

Safety Flaps
All lifts have an extension or “curb” at the edge of the platform which is approximately three-to-four inches high. This safety flap is designed specifically to prevent the wheelchair or scooter from rolling past the edge of the platform.

Finally, when purchasing a lift, be sure to check on the use of raised doors. If needed, your lift will have to be ordered for the extended doors. Determine if this is necessary before completing your vehicle equipment decisions. It will help you avoid very costly errors.

Again, be sure to consult the experts at VMi New England Mobility Center BEFORE you buy a wheelchair van or wheelchair vehicle lift to prevent costly and frustrating mistakes.

ESPN, Ben Affleck To Honor father-son team Hoyt, Yes You Can

Team Hoyt

Actor Ben Affleck is set to present an award for perseverance to a father-son team who have competed together in more than 1,000 races despite the younger man’s severe disabilities.

Rick Hoyt, 51, has cerebral palsy and is unable to use his hands or legs. But with the help of a custom-made wheelchair steered by his father — Dick Hoyt, 73 — he’s blazed through finish lines at triathlons, marathons and other endurance events for over 30 years.

Now the duo, known as Team Hoyt, will be honored at the ESPYS, an awards show presented by ESPN highlighting the best in sports for the year. Affleck  a Boston, MA native  will present the Hoyts with the Jimmy V Perseverance Award at the event July 17, ESPN said.

The Hoyts had indicated that this year’s Boston Marathon would be their last. But after bombs exploded at the event when the men were just one mile shy of the finish line, they vowed to compete again next year. ESPN indicated that the Hoyts’ commitment to race again is testament to the pair’s “determination in the face of adversity.”

“Rick and I are grateful to be receiving this award,” said Dick Hoyt. “Our motto is ‘Yes You Can’ and we strive to always persevere even when others tell you that it cannot be done.”

New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center

new england regional spinal cord injury center http://newenglandwheelchairvan.com/

The New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center (NERSCIC) has developed a long and distinguished history of care, research, education, and service to people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in the New England region.  NERSCIC Network headquarters is located at the Boston University Medical Campus, with Network members Gaylord Hospital and Hospital for Special Care located in CT.

The NERSCIC Network serves as an advocate and resource for patients; their families, friends, and caregivers; and health care professionals throughout New England.  Our goal is to improve the health and function of people with SCI throughout the lifespan through innovative science and technology in three areas:

1. Consumer-focused Rehabilitation Researchwhich focuses on topics for people with SCI, such as health care self advocacy training, better ways to measure functioning, and which wheelchairs have the most breakdowns.  Learn more about how to participate in studies.

2. Comprehensive, State-of-the-Art Care

  • NERSCIC offers comprehensive inpatient and outpatient SCI care available through Gaylord Hospital and the Hospital for Special Care in CT.
  • NERSCIC is leading the development and dissemination of a uniform New England Standard of Care (NESoC) for SCI, a first-ever collaborative effort among area facilities with SCI expertise.  Its goal is to enhance learning opportunities for professionals and ensure that all people receive the same level of care throughout New England.

3.  Education and Collaboration

  • In 2012, NERSCIC unveiled a new Consumer Education Program called “Knowledge in Motion,”  in partnership with Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and modeled after the Stepping Forward- Staying Informed program pioneered by NERSCIC.
  • The Rehabilitation Research Roundtable joins together leaders of the local SCI community to collaborate on a common research and corresponding service and advocacy agenda.

Brain Injury Association of America New England

http://www.biaa.org/

brain injury association of america wheelchair vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com
 

Brain injury is not an event or an outcome. It is the start of a misdiagnosed, misunderstood, under-funded neurological disease. Individuals who sustain brain injuries must have timely access to expert trauma care, specialized rehabilitation, lifelong disease management and individualized services and supports in order to live healthy, independent and satisfying lives.

The Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) is the voice of brain injury. We are dedicated to increasing access to quality health care and raising awareness and understanding of brain injury through advocacy, education and research. With a nationwide network of state affiliates, local chapters and support groups, we provide help, hope and healing for individuals who live with brain injury, their families and the professionals who serve them.

2012 BIAA Issue Briefs Available

06-Mar-2012BIAA has released its updated Issue Briefs for all advocates to use when meeting with national, state and local government officials. The five Issue Briefs provide important information about critical public policy issues for people with brain injury, including: military, access to care, research, TBI Act appropriations and reauthorization, and membership in the Congressional Brain Injury Task Force. Go here to download the 2012 Issue Briefs.

 

Accidents happen. Brain injury happens.

Unsolicited. Unanticipated. Unwelcome.

In the blink of an eye, everything changes; nothing is as it was before.

How will you identify brain injury if it happens to you or to someone you love? How will you cope with it? What resources will you need? Where will you find them?

Here you will find information for brain injury survivors, family members, caregivers, professionals and others. The Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts is here to help.

ABI Waiver: Open Enrollment Period May 1-21, 2012

Medicaid will be accepting applications for residential programs from May 1- 21, 2012. Applications must be postmarked during this period. Medicaid will accept applications for non-residential programs on an ongoing basis beginning May 1, 2012.

Click here to watch testimonials of those who have benefited from theABI Waiver

Watch “Brain Injury and You: The ABI Waiver”

Support BIA-MA through Raffles and Races this Spring

Help support brain injury prevention and awareness through one of BIA-MA’s many fundraisers, including a raffle for a trip to Pinehurst in North Carolina as well as a raffle for kayaking apparel!

Click here to see the ways you can support BIA-MA

Support Brain Injury Services- Call Your Legislator Today!

If you or your loved one is currently receiving brain injury services, or are in need of services that are not available to you due to a shortage of funds, you are urged to contact your State Legislator.

Click here to learn more about what BIA-MA is advocating for.

Types of Brain Injury

traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to the head caused by an external physical force. Most traumatic brain injuries are caused by accidents or assaults to the skull that are sufficiently hard to cause the brain to move within the skull or to cause the skull to break and directly injure the brain. TBI may produce a diminished or altered state of consciousness and an impairment of cognitive abilities or physical functioning. It may also result in the disturbance of behavioral or emotional functioning. The damage can be focal, confined to one area of the brain, or diffuse, involving more than one area of the brain.

Causes of TBI include:

– Domestic violence and assaults
– Falls
– Motor vehicle crashes
– Shaken baby syndrome
– Sports and recreational accidents

An acquired or non-traumatic brain injury (ABI) refers to any type of brain damage occurring after birth that is not hereditary, congenital, degenerative, or the result of an external impact. Acquired brain injury takes place at the cellular level of the brain and may result in mild, moderate, or severe impairments in one or more areas, including cognition, physical functions, and psycho-social behavior.

Causes of ABI or non-traumatic brain injury include:

– Brain tumors, intracranial tumors, intracranial surgery
– Excessive drug and alcohol abuse
– Lack of oxygen caused by an airway obstruction, such as in near-drowning
– Seizure disorder
– Stroke or aneurysm

Support Groups

Brain injury can have a traumatic effect on both survivors and their families. BIA-MA sponsors support groups across the state that provide survivors and their loved ones a forum for sharing information about brain injury as well as a compassionate and understanding peer group and an opportunity to socialize and make new friends with others through recreational activities and outings.

Below you can find our support group list. This list includes support groups from all over the state and is regularly updated, however, we urge you to call the individual support group before attending a meeting, as location and times sometimes change.


Spina Bifida: New England

41st Annual Falmouth Road Race-Sunday, August 11spina bifida in new england wheelchair van

Charity numbers available onTeam SBAGNE!

Team SBAGNE wants you to join our team as we run the 7.1 miles from Woods Hole to Falmouth Heights in support of the Spina Bifida Association of Greater New England. If you are interested in running and fundraising for SBAGNE, contact Wendy Potts atwpotts@SBAGreaterNE.org

Team SBAGNE has begun training for the 41st running of the Falmouth Road Race!

Help them meet their fundraising goal of $45,000.



Spina Bifida is a congenital defect in which part of one or more vertebrae (the bone structure that surrounds the spinal column), fail, to develop completely, leaving part of the spinal cord exposed. It can occur anywhere on the spine but is most common in the lower back. The severity of the condition depends on how much nerve tissue is exposed. Frequently special adaptations on a vehicle are necessary for independent driving. The person with spina bifida may also have impairments in the ~areas of vision, perception (how the brain interprets what the eyes see) or learning. Adaptive driving equipment is frequently used for physical problems. A spinner knob and hand controls can be used if a person is unable to use either foot for gas or brake. Specialized modifications can also allow a person to transfer to the driver’s seat or drive from the wheelchair in a van or minivan.

Common factors that can affect safe driving:

  • Limited range of motion and strength
  • Difficulty with coordinated movements
  • Visual impairments (poor acuity)
  • Trouble visually scanning or tracking quickly
  • Learning difficulties
  • Impaired judgment in complex situations
  • Slow processing and reaction time

A driver rehabilitation evaluation will examine the strengths and weaknesses of each individual as related to the driving task. The goal is independent, safe driving. No modifications or vehicle selection should be made until the person has completed a driver evaluation. 

If you or those that drive with you notice any of the above warning signs and need a driving evaluation, give us a call at 508-697-6006 and we can, help you with with knowledge about medical conditions, and help with a comprehensive evaluation and determine your ability to drive. 

  • Visual Perception
  • Functional Ability
  • Reaction Time
  • Behind-the-wheel evaluation

Declare Your Independence on the 4th of July with a Wheelchair-Accessible Vehicle

  • Wheelchair Van VMi New England Boston Strong
  • Learn more about how to pick the right wheelchair-accessible vehicle that meets your needs.
  • Take a look inside the latest minivans, and other accessible vehicles like a pickup truck, motorcycle or snowmobile.
  • Buy new? Buy used? Convert your current vehicle? Here, we provide some factors to consider before making your decision.

Freedom. That’s what it’s all about, isn’t it? A wheelchair shouldn’t be a barrier to getting out and about, whether for work, day-to-day living or pleasure.

“we will always do all we can to deliver the driving freedom most take for granted to someone in a wheelchair, we are going to change the world one person on at a time” , -Jim Sanders 7/4/1988

Finding the right vehicle means analyzing your needs. Do you want to ride in your wheelchair or transfer to the vehicle’s seat? Will you be the driver or the passenger? If your muscle weakness is still progressing, how will your accessibility needs change down the line — and how can you accommodate them now?

What kind of vehicle do you want: car, minivan, van, truck, SUV or motorcycle? New or used? After-market conversion or built for accessibility from the start? Side or rear entry?

A great place to start answering questions is at the website for Vmi New England

The website is a treasure trove of tips for finding the right vehicle.

For an in-depth look into the life of Ralph Braun, founder and CEO of The Braun Corporation, read CEO with SMA Brings Mobility to All . Learn how he turned his scooter and modified van designs into a multimillion-dollar business — all while battling spinal muscular atrophy.

 

 

Braun Wheelchair Van Mobility Center vmienwenglan.com Boston Strong

Of course, in purchasing a vehicle, monetary concerns always come into play. The New England Mobility Center site offers various directions to take in finding government funding and public assistance. You’ll also find tips on buying auto insurance, numerous blogs on accessible-vehicle-related subjects and info on many travel accessories to make life easier on the road.

Because of the tremendous number of variables in the custom fitment for each persons specific needs, it’s not possible to give exact prices for the minivans featured. However, we can provide some figures that will give you a ballpark idea of accessible vehicle pricing.

  • New side-entry converted minivans range from around $48,000 to $75,000.
  • New rear-entry converted minivans with manually operated fold-out ramps start in the low $40,000s.
  • You can find 3-year-old minivans with brand-new conversions starting in the low $30,000s.

For those with severe muscle weakness who want to drive their vehicle themselves, certified driver rehabilitation specialists (CDRS) can evaluate your needs at the Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center, and provide a prescription for adapted driving equipment and driver training.  (For more on this topic, contact us at 508-697-6006).

As you’ll discover, the scope of accessible vehicles is very broad indeed. Here’s a sampler of the myriad options currently available in the world of wheelchair-accessible vehicles and conversion equipment.

MinivansBraunAbility’s Chrysler Entervan features flexible floor plans
For easier boarding, the Entervan has an integrated “kneeling” system; while the door is opening, the rear suspension is lowered, reducing the slope of the ramp. To learn more, call 508-697-6006 .Because wheelchair transportation requirements can change over time, BraunAbility enables buyers to easily configure the floor plan of its Chrysler Entervan. Whether you want to be the driver or the front-seat passenger, removing the appropriate seat is literally a snap: Unlock the seat base and roll the entire seat out of the van.
VMI’s Honda Odyssey Northstar promotes easy entry

 

Wheelchair Van bridgewater, ma newenglandwheelchairvan.com boston

In the side-entry, lowered-floor Honda Odyssey Northstar conversion by VMI, a remote control triggers the PowerKneel System, lowering the vehicle and activating a power ramp that telescopes out from within the interior floor.

The lower ramp offers a gentler angle, and the unrestricted entry means better maneuverability once inside.

VMI also offers the Summit accessible Toyota van conversion featuring a power fold-out, heavy-duty ramp system with an anti-rattle mechanism. It also has the power kneeling feature. To learn more, call 508-697-6006

.2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England Wheelchair Van Boston

Consider a rear entry, says Jim Sanders
Although rear-entry vehicles don’t allow wheelchair users to park in the driver or front-passenger locations, Jim’s vision has always been to offer as many options possible including optional swiveling driver or front-passenger seat that may facilitate transferring from the wheelchair. (For more on the rear- versus side-entry question, see them at, the Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center.) To learn more, call 508-697-6006 .Believing that entering and exiting the van through the back sometimes avoids  barriers, Our viewpoint and vision has always been to offer as many options as is practical. Rear-entry, lowered-floor modification converts Chrysler, Ford, GM, Honda and Toyota minivans. An automatic remote-control option can even activate the ramp and door. This vision and technology of lowering the vehicle closer to the ground and the ramp to a more comfortable angle for wheelchair access.

 

‘A mobility concept vehicle’ starts out as a accessible ground up conversion; that can even go green
A car or minivan hybrid concept vehicle can be designed custom for you from the ground up with safety and accessibility as its top priority.

mobility concept vehicle mobility center bridgewater, ma boston strong

Rental vehicles New locations are being added, before your next trip or give us a call to learn more at 508-697-6006. It’s may even be possible to rent a Rollx wheelchair-accessible Dodge or Chrysler minivan at selected airports around the country. Someone even told us Thrifty Car Rental, Dollar Rent-a-Car or Payless Car Rental companies were thinking about offer accessible vans at airports like T.F. Green airport 2000 Post Rd, Warwick, RI 02886, Manchester–Boston Regional Airport 1 Airport Rd, Manchester, NH 03103, Logan International Airport 1 Harborside Dr, Boston, MA 02128
Cars and SUV’s Sport an attitude with a flair for the freedom to have different concept vehicles built with optional Motors depending on your needs a Scion xB might even work.If you’re just not the minivan type, consider the freedom of a concept vehicle, Want a custom sporty wheelchair-accessible vehicle? Click the remote: Simultaneously, the driver’s door swings open, the rear driver-side door gull-wings up and the ramp unfolds, ready for you to maneuver your wheelchair into driving position.

 

A similar conversion can be configured on the passenger side. Or if rear entry suits your needs, we offer you the freedom to pick a model that work best for you. Prices range from the low $30,000s for a manual rear-entry model to the low $500,000s for a one off concept vehicle with automatic side-entry. To learn more, call 508-697-6006
.

Hand controls and footless driving solutions
Systems from mechanical to servo actuated can be installed on most cars with automatic transmissions. The accelerator input can mounted within easy reach of the vehicle’s standard steering wheel, with the controls just inches away on either the right or left. Smoothly accelerate the vehicle remotely without use of your feel, designed to make hands only driving safe and easy.Depending on the make and model of your vehicle, installed prices start around $1,200, additionally we offer transportation of the vehicle to and from our mobility center. To learn more, call 508-697-6006
Buying used AMS pre-owned van might even be considered.Resale on them is typically incredibly low and these can be a ok deal if your able to bring it to a qualified mobility center to ensure it is in safe and working condition.

AMS pre-owned van bridgewater, ma newenglandwheelchairvan.com

There’s no getting around the fact that wheelchair vans are expensive; retrofitting new vans with accessibility equipment doesn’t come cheap. One way to cut costs is to buy a used van to avoid the  depreciation that happens when buying new.VMi New England offers many pre-owned vans outfitted with their new conversion equipment which can save buyers as much as $15,000 to $20,000.

Or, if you already have a fairly new Chrysler, Dodge or Volkswagen van, they may be able to convert it for you. Rear-entry conversions start at around $13,000, while side-entry conversions start at around $22,000, not including the price of the vehicle. To learn more, call 508-697-6006.

There are many grey market conversion vans available to you via the internet, ebay and private parties.

Many of these vehicles are being sold by direct marketing companies or individuals who bought them via the internet or ebay only to find out there were many problems with the van, it was unsafe and or wouldn’t work for there needs.

So in turn they are for sale again for what appears to be a great deal.

I wish i had a dollar for every customer who brought a “internet deal”, “used car dealer van”, “ebay wheelchair van deal” into our facility wanting to know what we could do to make it work for them.

Only to hear, i’m very sorry you didn’t visit with us before you purchased this van that your family member or friend in the wheelchair will not fit into the van.

Motorcycles

When it comes to motorcycles Jim Sanders has and will always promote accessible motorcycles and his personal belief that they offer the ultimate freedom when it comes to travel (unless it’s snowing in which case we need to talk about snowmobiles)

If you can operate a manual wheelchair, you may be able to drive a wheelchair-accessible motorcycle, says Sanders. Want a touring bike, a BMW, a KTM or how about a dirt bike. A remote-controlled drop-down ramp at the rear of the vehicle can be up fitted  allowing a rider to pull his or her chair into position, secure it with a push-button docking system, and ride off — no transferring necessary.

 

Bikes featuring a powerful BMW 1170 cc engine, a six-speed, two-button, thumb-operated gear shifter, and a rear-wheel-drive differential can be up fitted . Want a bike with a reverse gear for easier parking and maneuvering? To learn more, call 508-697-6006. If you can operate a manual wheelchair, you maybe able to drive a wheelchair-accessible motorcycle, says Sanders.

A remote-controlled drop-down ramp at the rear of the vehicle allows a rider to pull his or her chair into position, secure it with a push-button docking system, and ride off — no transferring necessary.

SUVs and trucks 

ryno wheelchair pick up truck bridgewater, ma boston, ma  newenglandwheelchairvan.com

A Stow-Away lift puts you inside

Bruno doesn’t sell wheelchair-accessible vehicles, but they do offer products that can be up fit  into vehicles.

Known for their home stair lifts and attachable vehicle lifts for transporting wheelchairs and scooters, they also make an add-on mechanism that may allow you to transfer you from a wheelchair up into the seat of a high-profile SUV or pickup.

 

Ryno no-transfer conversion for pickups 

Being a wheelchair user doesn’t mean you have to give up using a pickup truck. VMi New England has been offering pick up truck conversions for over 10 years allowing either driver-side or passenger-side entry into the cab of a GMC Sierra or Chevy Silverado without ever having to transfer out of the wheelchair.

When activated with the remote control, the door opens from the cab, then the lift platform deploys which rests flat on the ground. The wheelchair user backs onto the platform, which then elevates up and into the cab as the door slides back into the closed position.

To learn more, call 508-697-6006.

 

Logan International Airport
General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport is located in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, US. It covers 2,384 acres, has six runways, and employs an estimated 16,000 people.Wikipedia
Code: BOS
Elevation: 19′ 0″ (5.80 m)
Address: 1 Harborside Dr, Boston, MA 02128
Phone: (800) 235-6426
Manchester–Boston Regional Airport
Manchester–Boston Regional Airport, commonly referred to simply as “Manchester Airport,” is a public airport located three miles south of the central business district of Manchester, New Hampshire on … Wikipedia
Code: MHT
Elevation: 266′ (81 m)
Address: 1 Airport Rd, Manchester, NH 03103
Phone: (603) 624-6539
T. F. Green Airport
T. F. Green Airport, also known as Theodore Francis Green Memorial State Airport, is a public airport located in Warwick, six miles south of Providence, in Kent County, Rhode Island, USA. Wikipedia
Code: PVD
Elevation: 55′ (17 m)
Address: 2000 Post Rd, Warwick, RI 02886
Phone: (888) 268-7222
Hours:

Open all.  –  See all
Conquest
conquest [ˈkɒnkwɛst ˈkɒŋ-]

n

1. the act or an instance of conquering or the state of having been conquered; victory
2. a person, thing, etc., that has been conquered or won
3. the act or art of gaining a person’s compliance, love, etc., by seduction or force of personality
4. a person, whose compliance, love, etc., has been won over by seduction or force of personality

 

 

Veterans Star Spangled Salute – Wheelchair Van Giveaway

Veteran Wheelchair Van Boston MA

Contact us for more info on your chance to win a 2013 Toyota Sienna SE, with a VMI Northstar Conversion. The Star Spangled Salute campaign is valid from March 13, 2013 to November 10, 2013 for all Disabled US Veterans.

***Limit one entry per household!***

Toyota Sienna VMI Northstar at Automotive Innovations www.bridgewatermobility.comWin A 2013 Toyota Sienna SE

In Phoenix, AZ a 2013 Toyota Sienna SE minivan, that is wheelchair accessible, is up for grabs in a new contest sponsored by Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. and Vantage Mobility International.

The contest, The Star Spangled Salute, runs from March 13th 2013 through November 10th 2013 and is open to all disabled veterans.

The winner will be picked in a random drawing on Veteran’s Day.

The Toyota Sienna SE Wheelchair accessible minivan features VMI’s Access360 In-floor Ramp Conversion.

Toyota Wheelchair Van MA

“Access to reliable transportation is critical for wounded warriors who are reclaiming their independence,” said former Air Force Lieutenant General John F. Regni, who is a member of the VMI board of advisers. “A VMI-converted Toyota Sienna will give them the mobility to secure a job, take care of their family and travel to the doctor.”

Terms and conditions: Star Spangled Salute campaign is valid from March 13, 2013 to November 10, 2013 for all Disabled US Veterans.  The winner will be randomly drawn on November 11, 2013 and must show proof of military service.  The winner will receive a 2013 Toyota Sienna SE with the VMI Northstar Conversion; no exceptions will be made.  No purchase necessary. Valid within the United States only.  Limit one entry per household.  Entries may be made HERE or by calling 800-488-6148. If the chosen winner has already purchased their VMI Toyota Sienna Northstar conversion between 3/13/13 and 11/10/2013, they can elect to be reimbursed their out of pocket cost of the wheelchair accessible VMI Toyota Sienna Northstar van on or by December 31, 2013. Reimbursement will be coordinated between VMI and the winner directly if the vehicle was purchased prior to the winner being announced.  Campaign is not valid on any added accessories. Customer is responsible for the payment of applicable taxes and registration fees.  Prize must be claimed by December 31, 2013 and is non-transferable.  No exceptions will be made.

Accessible Vehicles And Adaptive Mobility Equipment Q&A

Accessible Vehicles and Adaptive Mobility Equipment Q&A

Rear entry vs. side entry. Buying online. Buying used. What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care for answers to some common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Q: Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

A: Certified mobility dealers help consumers buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet their mobility needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“There are so many different products out there, and technology has improved so much. We just want to help people make the right decision,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy [a vehicle] that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return it.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained, make sure the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,”

So it means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.”

Other reasons to seek out a certified mobility equipment dealer include:

They provide a link to qualified service and repair, that it’s crucial to have done on a adapted vehicle serviced.

Some manufacturers of adapted vehicles sell directly to consumers, cutting costs by cutting out the middle man, says Jim Sanders, of VMi New England, based in Bridgewater, MA.

But expert assessment and “try before you buy” remain essentials for prospective buyers, with or without a dealer in the middle.

For example, We, a NMEDA QAP-certified member, send representatives to customers’ homes for assessment and test drives before they buy, and also offer unmatched service/maintenance to just about any modified vehicle including Rollx vans.

Q: Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

A: As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, clients are mostly shopping blind. Typically they have no idea how the vehicle they need will even work fro them, even if they have specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy it online,” “There not trying to assess your needs by e-mail or over the phone. There just trying to sell you something.

Some online dealers even have a questionnaire on its Web site to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you. It’s horrible when people get something that they’re disappointed in.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy [based] on price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online maybe able to save money up front, it wont over the long term.

In addition to consumers missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

Where do you want to sit? If you plan to drive from your wheelchair, then a side-entry conversion is what you’ll need, unless you can transfer to the driver’s seat (rear entry). With a rear-entry conversion, the wheelchair user typically is positioned in the back or between two mid-row captain’s seats, while a side entry offers a wheelchair user multiple seating options in the driver, front passenger and middle sections.

Q: What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

A: Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

Q: What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

A: Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question mobility dealers usually ask a client is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Q: Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

A: The most important difference between a rear- and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with a in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.

Q: What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

A: This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor, so it safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position, mid-ship position, there’s no obstruction to the door, and other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps only are currently only available for side-entry minivan conversions, and there is even a manual (unpowered) option.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than in-floor, and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

Q: I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

A: You have some choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality of mini van conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

For those who prefer to keep their standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and who can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your disease symptoms are worsening is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Q: Why are modified vehicles so darned expensive?

A: A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 — and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

Q: How can I pay less?

A: Consumers have some options.

Many consumers cut costs by purchasing pre-owned vehicles with new conversions, typically saving around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after you’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Q: How do people manage to pay for it?

A: Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment. But with home values decreasing.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

For Affordable Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles in Massachusetts, Think Used

For Affordable Accessible Vehicles in Massachusetts, Think Used

Used Wheelchair Vans Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine
Do not allow finances to keep you from purchasing the handicap car you need. Instead, for affordable accessible vehicles, think used at VMi New England in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. There are dozens of used mobility vehicles on the market that will fit any budget.Living with a physical disability does present challenges. Fortunately, society has come a long way in making handicap accessible accommodations . Whether you use a wheelchair or have other mobility challenges, you will find that most forms of public transportation are wheelchair accessible.However, when it comes to independence and freedom, you’ll need your own handicap accessible car or van. For some it makes good economic sense to invest in a used wheelchair van from a trusted mobility dealership. Not only are used accessible vehicles more affordable, but many offer the same features as new ones and some include warranty coverage.

Make a list of the handicap options most suited to your needs including the wheelchairs dimensions with you in it along with wants prior to viewing affordable accessible vehicles. If you have difficulty with fine motor skills, you would benefit from a handicap car with a key-less start-up system. Do you prefer to drive while seated in a wheelchair or would a transfer seat be better? Handicap accessible vans offer lots of space for passengers and cargo, but handicap accessible cars can be more affordable and fuel efficient.

Be prepared to choose among a variety of mobility vehicles within your price range at VMi New England. Feel free to contact us while conducting research in advance to find your best options for used accessible vehicles.. Used, affordable accessible vehicles can be purchased through many places, but be very cautious when shopping at companies, such as car dealerships, and on-line specialty websites. Most of them aren’t interested in your long term needs and only want to make a sale.

Your best value will always be with a knowledgeable mobility dealership who’s interested in building a long lasting relationship.

 

How to adapt your new or pre-owned vehicle to meet your needs after a stroke

How to adapt your pre-owned vehicle to meet your needs after a stroke

Easy Car Makeovers for Adaptive Driving

 CAN I DRIVE AFTER A STROKE newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Driving after a stroke is often a major concern for survivor’s and their loved ones. It prompts many questions about ability, safety and vehicle options. Often times, the physical disadvantages that result from stroke can compromise a survivor’s ability to operate their vehicle.

Advances in the vehicle modification industry have introduced new driving controls that are giving independence back to stroke survivors that want to drive. They allow them to get back behind the wheel in their own vehicle to go where they want to go, when they want to go.

Innovative vehicle modifications such as hand controls, left-foot accelerators, lifts and mobility seating can transform your personal vehicle into a vehicle that give you more freedom.

Mobility equipment dealers strive to remain at the forefront of the vehicle modification industry by providing cutting-edge technology and a full selection of adaptable equipment for your pre-owned vehicle.

Hand Controls For Stroke Survivors with Limited Use of their Feet

Automotive Innovations is New England’s  #1 hand control installation facility  manufacturer of hand controls and driving aids for the disabled. Hand control systems are specifically designed to give drivers the benefit of controlling a vehicle with both hands on the wheel making for a safer, smoother driving experience.

Unlike other manual and or servo hand control installers in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, we have the ability to offer a custom fitment to your vehicle and you, for everything from a Fiat 500 to a Lamborghini Aventador no one else has the master craftsman, machining equipment and facility capable of performing a custom installation the way we can.

Push Rock hand controls have a handle in a vertical position; accelerating by rocking back in an arching motion using the fingers and/or the palm. There are several additional options to choose from:

  • Spinner knob: Attached to the steering wheel to allow controlled steering with use of one hand.
  • Single Pin: As an alternative to the spinner knob, this hand control was designed for clients that cannot open their hand fully.
  • Tri Pin: Great for an independent driver. It requires minimal gripping strength and/or reduced wrist stability.
  • V-Grip: This attachment is intended for drivers with moderate gripping strength.
  • Steering Wheel Extension: This device is individually customizable, so you can pick a diameter and height that best suits your needs. The easily removable device is completely compatible with any OEM steering wheel.

Servo electronic mobility controls offers driving control products that are safe and provide piece of mind every time you are on the road.

Servo Steering Servo gas brake

  • Lever  A gas/brake input with adjustable levels of force and travel from the full gas to the full brake position. It is designed for customers that have a wider range of motion and a larger effort level.
  • One handed steering and gas brake  A input that you can steer that is available in a two-axis configuration for gas/brake and steering It has a adjustable range of motion and very low levels  of force to operate. It is designed and custom build for each customers specific range of motion and abilities.
  • Wheel  A steering input that can be adjusted to less than 2 oz of force at the proper orthotic position of 3 3/8” from center. It is also able to be adaptable for customers that have a wider range of motion.

Left-foot Accelerator

Automotive Innovations offers the best left foot gas pedals with unmatched installations.  Left-foot accelerator are designed to offer a left foot gas pedal which acts exactly like your vehicle’s existing gas pedal. Our Left foot gas pedals are removable with features like a quick-release base so the entire assembly can be removed and re-installed quickly and easily.

Lifts for Stroke Survivors that use Wheelchairs or Walkers

Automotive Innovations can offer more solutions for the transportation of your mobility device than any other dealership in New England.

” Its worth the drive, I live in the western part of Massachusetts and will never trust my van with anyone other than Automotive Innovations. They have been taking care of me and my vans since 1996. When a company comes through for you time and time again whats that worth? For me it’s priceless and the drive is irrelevant.”

Chris P Whately, MA

  • Scooter & Wheelchair Lifts while are not always practical they do work in all types of vehicles. These fold-down wheelchair and scooter lifts make lifting and storing your manual folding wheelchair or scooter possible.

Mobility Seating

The mobility transfer seat is an innovative system for lower vehicles which can provide easer  access to an automotive seat. The seat power rotates out over the doorsill, bridging the gap for a safe transfer onto the seat. These seats are not always practical for every type of vehicle

Our goal is to match your lifestyle and your vehicle with equipment that will deliver independence.

Finding a Dealer That’s Up to Standards

Hand controls, left-foot accelerator, lifts and mobility seating offers opportunities for the stroke survivor to regain their mobility freedom in their pre-owned vehicle. You have just found the best mobility dealer in all of New England that offers a ever evolving selection of adaptable equipment.

It is important to select a reputable dealer to provide the adaptable equipment and installation for your pre-owned vehicle.

  1. Are they members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has vehicle conversion standards?
  2. Are they Quality Assurance Program (QAP) certified?
  3. Do they provide ongoing service and maintenance?
  4. Do they provide 24/7 emergency service?
  5. Do they provide training on the adaptable equipment?
  6. Can the equipment be transferred to a new vehicle in the future?

Adapting pre-owned vehicles provides stroke survivors with mobility freedom in the vehicle they love and are familiar with.

By: Jim Sanders, VMi New England

Another VMI Wheelchair Van on it’s way to Massachusetts

Here we have a brand new 2013 Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Van that is being custom built for Ventura P. It’s going through final inspection in AZ and will soon be on a truck bringing it to Vmi New England in Bridgewater, MA for the installation of a mobility seat, hand controls, electric parking brake and a Ez-Lock Wheelchair Tie Down.

VMI Summit Wheelchair van conversion in final inspection

VMI Summit Wheelchair van conversion in final inspection

VMI New England van soon to be on it's way to Boston, MA

VMI New England van soon to be on it’s way to Boston, MA