Tag Archives: mobility rebate

Toyota Mobility Rebate Information

Toyota Mobility Assistance Program
This program provides cash reimbursement of up to $1,000 of the cost of any aftermarket adaptive equipment or conversion, for drivers and/or passengers, when installed on any eligible purchased or leased new Toyota vehicle.

  • Under this program, the cash reimbursement will be provided for the exact cost you paid to purchase and install qualifying adaptive driving or passenger equipment for transporting persons with physical disabilities
  • This offer applies to all purchased or leased new Toyota vehicles

The program also applies to purchasers of the Toyota Factory Installed Auto Access Seat, where the full $1,000 cash reimbursement will be paid directly to you.
Expect to receive payment within 6-8 weeks after all the paperwork is submitted. Incomplete paperwork will delay the payment.

Leased vehicles require advance written lessor approval of adaptive equipment installations.

Only vehicles sold or leased and delivered to a retail customer by an authorized Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. Inc. dealer are eligible under this program.

The adaptive equipment must be installed within 12 months of vehicle purchase or lease.

A Reimbursement Application Form must be submitted to the Toyota Mobility Assistance Center within 90 days of complete installation of adaptive equipment

Qualifying adaptive equipment or conversion is defined as any aftermarket alteration or equipment installation on an eligible Toyota vehicle that provides to the disabled user convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle.

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Dodge/ Chrysler’s Mobility Rebate

Chrysler’s Automobility Program

Overview
Designed to help customers with permanent disabilities enter, exit and/or operate a new vehicle, Chrysler’s Automobility Program can help you do the things you love to do in life. And, we’ll help you hit the road in the style that suits you best. Our goal is to assist in lessening the burden of the financial cost of modifying your vehicle.

How the Program Works
When you buy or lease any new 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013 Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram or FIAT® vehicle from a participating dealership or FIAT studio, Chrysler will give you a cash reimbursement to help reduce the cost of installing the adaptive driver or passenger equipment on your vehicle. Leased vehicles must be leased for a minimum of 12 months to be eligible.

Once you have a 2010-2013 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle that fits your transportation needs, contact a reputable and qualified adaptive equipment installer to ensure that it can be adapted to meet your needs.

Please consult a dealership or call Automobility Program Headquarters for eligibility requirements and program expiration dates.

A program application must be used to submit a claim for reimbursement under the terms and conditions of the Chrysler Automobility Program. Through this program, Chrysler will provide a reimbursement to each eligible customer who installs qualifying adaptive driver or passenger equipment on a purchased or leased new Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle (unless discontinued or excluded earlier at the discretion of Chrysler Group LLC).

A medical doctor’s prescription or note may also be required for certain types of modifications. Consult a dealership for more information on which modifications require notes.

Reimbursement
Conversions to Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicles qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $1,000. Running boards qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $400. Alerting devices qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $200. These reimbursements will not be reduced or affected by any additional outside funding. Consult your dealer for complete eligibility requirements.

Eligible Vehicles
Vehicles eligible for reimbursement include 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram and FIAT vehicles. Dodge Viper, Dodge Dart SE and Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT® models are ineligible.

Financing
If you require assistance with financing an adapted vehicle purchase / lease, we can help you finance the cost of your new vehicle, as well as any modifications you make to it. Conventional financing is available through Ally Financial to all qualified new vehicle buyers.

Click HERE for the Application

Honda Mobility Rebate Information

Honda’s Mobility Assistance Program
The Honda Customer Mobility Assistance Program is proud to support the mobility needs of drivers and passengers with physical disabilities. Honda will provide a reimbursement of up to $1,000 to each eligible, original retail customer for expenses incurred to purchase and install qualifying adaptive equipment on any eligible purchased or leased Honda vehicle.

Adapting Your Vehicle
Honda suggests that you request a copy of the Department of Transportation brochure “Adapting Motor Vehicles for People with Disabilities.”  

The process includes these steps:

  • Determine your state’s driver’s license requirements.
  • Evaluate your needs – Contact the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) for further information.
  • Select the right vehicle – Consult with your evaluator, an adaptive installer and your local Honda dealer to determine the best Honda model to meet your needs.
  • Choose a qualified mobility equipment installer – Shop around and ask about qualifications, capabilities, experience, warranty coverage and service. Confirm that they are members of NMEDA.
  • Obtain training on the use of the new equipment – When this process is complete, follow the guidelines and complete and submit an application for assistance to recover up to $1,000 of the cost of your adaptive equipment and/or conversion.

Program Requirements
General

  • Only the original vehicle owner is eligible for reimbursement.
  • Modifications must be completed for the original owner or his/her immediate family.
  • Only new Honda vehicles retailed or leased in the United States from an authorized Honda dealership.
  • Only one reimbursement request per vehicle.
  • Lease-vehicle modifications may be subject to written lessor approval. The customer is responsible for determining and satisfying lease-contract requirements.
  • Honda will consider reimbursement for modifications made to vehicle after February 1, 2004.
  • The written reimbursement request must be received within 6 months of the adaptive equipment installation.

Adaptations, Modifications or Equipment Installation

  • Qualifying adaptive equipment or conversion is defined as: alterations or adaptive-equipment installation that provides to the disabled user convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle.
  • Adaptive equipment installation must have taken place within the time and mileage limits of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.
  • Alterations or adaptive equipment installation requires a prescription or medical documentation to be considered for reimbursement.
  • Reimbursement requests (invoices) will be compared against the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Web site to verify that the alterer or repair business (individual, partnership or corporation) is registered with NHTSA and that the modification(s) are on the list of NHTSA exemptions.
  • If all conditions are met, Honda will provide up to a $1,000 cash reimbursement. Honda will be the secondary coverage in the case of two or more reimbursement sources.

Exceptions

  • Wheelchair or scooter hoists or ramps do not require a prescription, medical documentation or NHTSA exemption verification and NHTSA business registration for reimbursement consideration.
  • Modifications that DO NOT make inoperative any part of a device or element of design that has been installed on or in a motor vehicle in compliance with a Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard will not require NHTSA exemption verification and NHTSA business registration for reimbursement consideration.
  • *A reimbursement made by another source, such as medical insurance, will be subtracted from the customer’s original total expense. (Example: Total expense $5,000, Insurance reimbursement $4,000, Customer expense, $1,000. The customer expense of $1,000 will be reviewed and considered for a maximum of $1,000 reimbursement.)

Important Customer Information

  • The selection of an equipment manufacturer and installer is solely the customer’s responsibility (Honda does not endorse any company or supplier involved in adaptive equipment. Mobility warranty, installation warranty and related liabilities are not the responsibility of Honda).
  • The reimbursement application form must be completed in its entirety and signed by the customer. It should be mailed along with a copy of all required supporting documentation. (See checklist on application).

Click HERE For the Honda Mobility Assistance Brochure

Accessible Vehicles And Adaptive Mobility Equipment Q&A

Rear entry vs. side entry. Buying online. Buying used. What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care for answers to some common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Q: Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

A: Certified mobility dealers help consumers buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet their mobility needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“There are so many different products out there, and technology has improved so much. We just want to help people make the right decision,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy [a vehicle] that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return it.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained, make sure the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,”

So it means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.”

Other reasons to seek out a certified mobility equipment dealer include:

They provide a link to qualified service and repair, that it’s crucial to have done on a adapted vehicle serviced.

Some manufacturers of adapted vehicles sell directly to consumers, cutting costs by cutting out the middle man, says Jim Sanders, of VMi New England, based in Bridgewater, MA.

But expert assessment and “try before you buy” remain essentials for prospective buyers, with or without a dealer in the middle.

For example, We, a NMEDA QAP-certified member, send representatives to customers’ homes for assessment and test drives before they buy, and also offer unmatched service/maintenance to just about any modified vehicle including Rollx vans.

Q: Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

A: As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, clients are mostly shopping blind. Typically they have no idea how the vehicle they need will even work fro them, even if they have specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy it online,” “There not trying to assess your needs by e-mail or over the phone. There just trying to sell you something.

Some online dealers even have a questionnaire on its Web site to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you. It’s horrible when people get something that they’re disappointed in.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy [based] on price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online maybe able to save money up front, it wont over the long term.

In addition to consumers missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

Where do you want to sit? If you plan to drive from your wheelchair, then a side-entry conversion is what you’ll need, unless you can transfer to the driver’s seat (rear entry). With a rear-entry conversion, the wheelchair user typically is positioned in the back or between two mid-row captain’s seats, while a side entry offers a wheelchair user multiple seating options in the driver, front passenger and middle sections.

Q: What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

A: Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

Q: What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

A: Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question mobility dealers usually ask a client is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Q: Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

A: The most important difference between a rear- and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with a in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.

Q: What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

A: This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor, so it safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position, mid-ship position, there’s no obstruction to the door, and other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps only are currently only available for side-entry minivan conversions, and there is even a manual (unpowered) option.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than in-floor, and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

Q: I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

A: You have some choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality of mini van conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

For those who prefer to keep their standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and who can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your disease symptoms are worsening is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Q: Why are modified vehicles so darned expensive?

A: A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 — and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

Q: How can I pay less?

A: Consumers have some options.

Many consumers cut costs by purchasing pre-owned vehicles with new conversions, typically saving around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after you’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Q: How do people manage to pay for it?

A: Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment. But with home values decreasing.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles: Q&A

Wheelchair
Accessible Vans

Rear entry Vs. Side entry
Buying New Vs. Buying Used
Manual Ramp Vs. Powered Ramp
Honda Vs. Dodge/Chrysler Vs. Toyota Vs. Ford
Certified Mobility Dealer Vs. Car Dealer Vs. Buying online
What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care. Here are some answers to common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

Certified mobility dealers will help you buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet your needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“Technology has improved tremendously over the years so there are numerous products available. Our goal is to help people find the right equipment that best fits their needs,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy a vehicle that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained and that the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,” which means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.

 

Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, you are mostly shopping blind. Typically you will have no idea how the vehicle you need will work for you, even with specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle online, most online sellers are not qualified Mobility Dealers attempting to assess your needs, they’re just car dealers trying to sell you something.”

Some online dealers even have questionnaires on their websites to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you and your family. It’s horrible when people spend so much an a vehicle that will never work for them.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle based on the price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online may be able to save you some money up front, it won’t over the long term.

In addition to you missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

 

What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

 

What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question most mobility dealers will ask you is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Which Make and Model is the best for a handicapped accessible vehicle?

It honestly depends on what you fit into best and what options you prefer.

No two wheelchair accessible vehicles are the same. They vary in size, shape, color, features and design depending on the vehicle’s make and model. The only way to guarantee which is the best vehicle for you is if you come in and try them all out.

For example: The Honda has a little bit more room inside to maneuver a wheelchair than a Dodge, just as a Toyota has a bit more space than a Honda. A Ford offers more headroom than all of the above. But that all depends on the conversion and manufacturer.

Although color and features matter least to us, some find them just as important as fitting into the vehicle. Each Manufacturer offers their own color schemes, which you can look up on their websites. You can also search for what features you would prefer to have.

When you come into our Mobility Center we will help you find the vehicle that best fits you and your family’s needs. If you love the vehicle but not the color or features we can custom order a vehicle for you. That way we know you are buying a vehicle that best fits you and one that you are 100% happy with.

Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

The most important difference between a rear entry and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with an in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally  because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.


What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor which makes riding in the vehicle safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position or the mid-ship position. There is no obstruction to the doorway so other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps are currently only available as a side-entry minivan conversion, but they offer a manual (un-powered) option as well.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind” and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than an in-floor ramp and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

You have other choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality as the minivan conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

If you prefer to keep your standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your symptoms worsen is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Why are modified vehicles so  expensive?

A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 —  and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

How can I pay less?

You have  a few options.

You could cut costs by purchasing a pre-owned vehicle with a new conversion, typically saving you around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after they’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Another tactic to help save you money is to ask your Certified Mobility Dealer about any rebates or financial aid options that could benefit you.

How do people manage to pay for it?

Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

VMI’s End Of 2014 Sale!

VMI's End Of 2014 Sale!

Get up to $3,000.00 in rebates on new 2014 Toyota and Honda VMI Conversion Minivans

This Deal is Limited to the following Vehicle Conversions:

  • New 2014 Honda Odyssey Northstar Conversion
  • New 2014 Honda Odyssey Summit Conversion
  • New 2014 Toyota Sienna Northstar Conversion
  • New 2014 Toyota Sienna Summit Conversion

Promotion Timeline:
The Promotion Started on Oct. 13, 2014
The Promotion expires on Dec. 31, 2014

The Possible Rebates Include:

VMI's 2014 Year-End Sale -- Possible RebatesVMI also offers a Rebate for disabled veterans, The Operation Independence Rebate, which is for $1,000.00

Terms and Conditions:
Final rebate amount is subject to dealer participation. Promotion runs from 10/13/14 through 12/31/14. Retail delivery must be made between 10/13/14 and 12/31/14, no exceptions. VMI will contribute $1,000.00 end user rebate on a new 2014 Honda or a new 2014 Toyota Northstar/Summit conversion minivan. Rebate offer is not applicable toward the purchase of Toyota Northstar E360. Rebate will be issued from VMI after retail delivery. Dealer must fax completed form to VMI at 602-304-3290 within 10 days of retail delivery. This rebate offer cannot be combined with any other offer except VMI Operation Independence Rebate. Restrictions apply. Promotion is subject to change without notice.

**VMI Mobility Dealer must buy replacement 2014 Honda or Toyota from VMI PDN inventory for end user to be eligible for the $1,000 VMI rebate. Dealer stipulations apply for rebate eligibility from VMI. Replacement VIN must be supplied when rebate form is submitted and is subject to verification.

*Participating dealers only.

***Honda or Toyota mobility rebate must meet eligibility requirements for Honda or Toyota conversion minivan purchases.

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles: Q&A

Wheelchair
Accessible Vans

Rear entry Vs. Side entry
Buying New Vs. Buying Used
Manual Ramp Vs. Powered Ramp
Honda Vs. Dodge/Chrysler Vs. Toyota Vs. Ford
Certified Mobility Dealer Vs. Car Dealer Vs. Buying online
What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care. Here are some answers to common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

Certified mobility dealers will help you buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet your needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“Technology has improved tremendously over the years so there are numerous products available. Our goal is to help people find the right equipment that best fits their needs,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy a vehicle that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained and that the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,” which means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.

 

Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, you are mostly shopping blind. Typically you will have no idea how the vehicle you need will work for you, even with specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle online, most online sellers are not qualified Mobility Dealers attempting to assess your needs, they’re just car dealers trying to sell you something.”

Some online dealers even have questionnaires on their websites to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you and your family. It’s horrible when people spend so much an a vehicle that will never work for them.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy a wheelchair accessible vehicle based on the price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online may be able to save you some money up front, it won’t over the long term.

In addition to you missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

 

What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

 

What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question most mobility dealers will ask you is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Which Make and Model is the best for a handicapped accessible vehicle?

It honestly depends on what you fit into best and what options you prefer.

No two wheelchair accessible vehicles are the same. They vary in size, shape, color, features and design depending on the vehicle’s make and model. The only way to guarantee which is the best vehicle for you is if you come in and try them all out.

For example: The Honda has a little bit more room inside to maneuver a wheelchair than a Dodge, just as a Toyota has a bit more space than a Honda. A Ford offers more headroom than all of the above. But that all depends on the conversion and manufacturer.

Although color and features matter least to us, some find them just as important as fitting into the vehicle. Each Manufacturer offers their own color schemes, which you can look up on their websites. You can also search for what features you would prefer to have.

When you come into our Mobility Center we will help you find the vehicle that best fits you and your family’s needs. If you love the vehicle but not the color or features we can custom order a vehicle for you. That way we know you are buying a vehicle that best fits you and one that you are 100% happy with.

Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

The most important difference between a rear entry and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with an in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally  because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.


What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor which makes riding in the vehicle safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position or the mid-ship position. There is no obstruction to the doorway so other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps are currently only available as a side-entry minivan conversion, but they offer a manual (un-powered) option as well.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind” and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than an in-floor ramp and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

You have other choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality as the minivan conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

If you prefer to keep your standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your symptoms worsen is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Why are modified vehicles so  expensive?

A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 —  and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

How can I pay less?

You have  a few options.

You could cut costs by purchasing a pre-owned vehicle with a new conversion, typically saving you around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after they’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Another tactic to help save you money is to ask your Certified Mobility Dealer about any rebates or financial aid options that could benefit you.

How do people manage to pay for it?

Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.

Connecticut Mobility Rebate Resources

Connecticut Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for Connecticut (CT) Residents
Welcome to your page for discovering disability grant possibilities for Connecticut residents. The organizational bodies below were carefully accumulated by The Mobility Resource as places for you to find funding or to receive assistance in finding funding for your new or used wheelchair van. It doesn’t matter if you’re looking to buy or to install accessibility equipment like a wheelchair or scooter ram, lift, outwardly pivoting seats, or adaptive driving controls. Disability grants can help with the cost of any of it.

As you set out to uncover Connecticut-based financial aid resources, start with the state government agencies and other groups listed below. All can help with your dream of acquiring a handicap van for increased independence, self-determination, freedom and standard of living.

Remember, too, that there are foundations and organizations dedicated to your disability. Most are national, but maintain chapters in Connecticut. Contact these branches to learn about their disability grants and other funding sources they may know of.

Sources for Connecticut Disability Grants and Assistance:

Bureau of Rehabilitation Services (BRS), State of Connecticut

Connecticut’s BRS is funded federally by the US Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and the Rehabilitation Services Administration. Its goal is to help the state’s disabled find and maintain employment. It offers disability grants for those requiring special transportation to go into work and other support.

Department of Social Services
25 Sigourney Street, 11th Floor
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 424-4844 or toll free (800) 537-2549
brs.dss@ct.gov

Connect-Ability

Connect-Ability uses federal funds to improve access to employment for Connecticut’s disabled population. It works to break down the barriers that stand between the disabled and a rewarding job. This includes helping with transportation hurdles, and the group can help you get a handicapped-accessible van if you need it.

(866) 844-1903
info@connect-ability.com
Connecticut Aging and Disabilities Resource Centers (ADRCs)
ADRCs, operated jointly by the US Administration on Community Living and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, are major resources for senior citizens and persons with disabilities across the country. Offices are located all around the state.

Connecticut Association of Area Agencies on Aging (C4A)

C4A is comprised of five offices serving Connecticut’s elderly population. Direct funding tends to go to groups, not individuals, but the Agency can steer you toward appropriate funding sources for your accessible vehicle.

Connecticut Council on Developmental Disabilities (CDD)
The Connecticut CDD works tirelessly to provide access to education, meaningful work and community life for people with developmental disabilities. If you or a family member has a condition classified as a developmental disability, the Council may help fund your wheelchair van with a grant.
460 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106-1308
(860) 418-6160 or  (800) 653-1134

Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA)
VAs around the nation work to support our veterans. If you’re a disabled veteran living in Connecticut, this is your source for help. The VA often awards grants to meet the mobility needs of veterans injured in the line of duty. Money may also be available if you have a disability that was only aggravated during service, or if it came about during (or was exacerbated by) VA care.

287 West Street
Rocky Hill, CT 06067
(860) 616-3600

Connecticut Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)

This is Connecticut’s branch of a nationwide organization set up by law to promote the principles of equal access and independent living for Americans with disabilities. The 23-member Council is appointed by the Governor, and consists of a majority of disabled Connecticut residents. This is a good resource when looking for sources of financial aid for your wheelchair van.

Suites 132 & 134,
151 New Park Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106

Connecticut Tech Act Project (CTTAP)
CTTAP is dedicated to getting assistive technology to the disabled and elderly Connecticut residents who need it for full participation in school, work and community life. They teach you how to use equipment and even lend it out temporarily, and they can help you secure financial aid for the assistive technologies you could benefit from.

25 Sigourney Street, 11th Floor
Hartford, CT 06106
(860) 424-4881 or (800) 537-2549

New England Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center
Persons with disabilities in Connecticut are served by The New England ADA Center, the area’s chapter of the National Network of ADA Centers. It endeavors to promote and strengthen the independence, self-determination, rights and quality of life of all state residents with a disability. This is an essential source of information and assistance while trying to locate all the disability grants for which you might qualify for acquiring a wheelchair van.
180-200 Portland Street

Suite 1
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 695-1225 or (800) 949-4232

Obie Harrington-Howes Foundation (OHHF)

OHHF is a nonprofit that awards grant money to Connecticut residents who have suffered a spinal cord injury. Disability grants are given to promote mobility, independence and access to education.

P.O.Box 2221
Darien, CT 06820
(888) 265-5859

These are only some of the resources available for Connecticut disability grants and assistance.
If you work with or know of another Connecticut agency or organization that should be listed here, please let us know.
Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Connecticut Disability Grants Handicap Funding CT
Buying a wheelchair van in Connecticut can be made financially easier through handicap funding, loans for the disabled, mobility finance programs, government assistance, and other accessible funding sources. Discover the largest directory of Connecticut disability grants to help cover the cost of buying a handicap van. AMS Vans is happy to deliver your handicap van to Connecticut and nationwide. Check Connecticut delivery prices for more details.

Disability Grants in Connecticut (CT)
The handicap grant foundations listed below may or may not provide funding for wheelchair vans to individuals. We have gathered this information from their respective websites as we work on building a list of disability grants and mobility resources. Please check with your local Connecticut disability funding program for complete details.

Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation
Awards hundreds of competitive grants and scholarships each year. In fact, in 2008, they distributed $8.9 million to hundreds of non-profit groups and students. Whether you’re seeking funding as an individual or on behalf of a non-profit organization, they welcome your interest in these opportunities.

How to Apply for Connecticut Disability Grants or Mobility Funding
Connecticut residents in search of handicap grants, mobility financing, disabled loans, government assistance, or other disability programs to buy a wheelchair van should contact any of the foundations listed. AMS Vans will work with one or more financial providers toward funding your wheelchair accessible van or vehicle conversion.

If you know of additional resources for Connecticut residents to find disability grants or other types of mobility funding, submit a foundation to AMS to help others who seek financing assistance.

The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Connecticut Disability Grants Handicap Funding CT
Buying a wheelchair van in Connecticut can be made financially easier through handicap funding, loans for the disabled, mobility finance programs, government assistance, and other accessible funding sources. Discover the largest directory of Connecticut disability grants to help cover the cost of buying a handicap van. AMS Vans is happy to deliver your handicap van to Connecticut and nationwide. Check Connecticut delivery prices for more details.

Disability Grants in Connecticut (CT)
The handicap grant foundations listed below may or may not provide funding for wheelchair vans to individuals. We have gathered this information from their respective websites as we work on building a list of disability grants and mobility resources. Please check with your local Connecticut disability funding program for complete details.

Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation
Awards hundreds of competitive grants and scholarships each year. In fact, in 2008, they distributed $8.9 million to hundreds of non-profit groups and students. Whether you’re seeking funding as an individual or on behalf of a non-profit organization, they welcome your interest in these opportunities.

How to Apply for Connecticut Disability Grants or Mobility Funding
Connecticut residents in search of handicap grants, mobility financing, disabled loans, government assistance, or other disability programs to buy a wheelchair van should contact any of the foundations listed. AMS Vans will work with one or more financial providers toward funding your wheelchair accessible van or vehicle conversion.

If you know of additional resources for Connecticut residents to find disability grants or other types of mobility funding, submit a foundation to AMS to help others who seek financing assistance.

Maine Mobility Rebate Resources

Maine Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for Maine (ME) Residents
If you reside in Maine, there is an array of available sources for disability grants. Money may be applied to various aspects of independence and living, including toward purchasing a new or used wheelchair van. Funds can also often be applied to buying and installing vehicle modifications for handicapped accessibility, including lowered floors and equipment that facilitates entry and exiting in a wheelchair or scooter, mobility equipment lifts and hand controls for adaptive driving capabilities.
Persons with physical disabilities in Maine can contact the following nonprofits and state government agencies for help. Some provide disability grants themselves, while others will point you in the right directions for financial aid. A handicap van is well within reach once you investigate assistance options.

In addition to the resources below, contact state branches of groups dedicated to helping people with your particular disability.

Sources for Maine Disability Grants and Assistance:
Alpha One

Alpha One is a Maine Center for Independent Living. It helps state residents with a variety of mobility impairments and other special needs achieve a more self-reliant lifestyle. The organization provides grants directly and serves as an essential information resource.

South Portland Office:
127 Main Street
South Portland, ME 04106
(207) 767-2189 or (800) 640-7200
Bangor Office:
11 Bangor Mall Blvd., Unit A
Bangor, ME 04401
 (207) 941-6553

Bureau of Maine Veterans Service
This is the Maine state government’s resource for veterans of a branch of the US military. Disabled veterans are entitled to numerous benefits, often including grants toward wheelchair vans or handicap accessibility equipment and conversions.

Veterans in Maine may also find their local US Department of Veterans Affairs, based in Togus at their website.

Maine Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRCs)
Maine’s ADRCs are scattered across the state, serving residents on a county-by-county basis. Use the link above to find your local office’s website and contact information. These Centers provide assistance and information to the elderly and people with disabilities.

Maine Association of Area Agencies on Aging (AAA)

AAA is a national program providing aid on a state-by-state basis. Local chapters serve groupings of counties. Maine’s Agencies assist the elderly with a variety of needs, including securing vans for people who rely on scooters or wheelchairs. Use the provided website to locate your branch’s website and contact information.

Maine CITE

This agency is run by the Maine Department of Education and funded by the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. They facilitate the acquisition of all types of assistive technology for state residents with disabilities.

University College
46 University Drive
Augusta, Maine 04330 USA
(207) 621-3195
iweb@mainecite.org

Maine Developmental Disabilities Council (MDDC)
Like all national DDCs, MDDC uses the Federally established definition of developmental disabilities. This group, a collection of individuals, families and agencies, is focused on promoting self-determination among state residents with developmental disabilities. Its services, assistance and information resources are many and varied.

139 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0139

(207) 287-4213 or (800) 244-3990

Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)

This sub-agency of the State of Maine’s Department of Labor, helps residents with disabilities secure employment. They can provide financial assistance and information for people with limited mobility who need a handicap van to hold down a job.

New England Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Centers

ADA Centers around the country help citizens with disabilities become more independent and fight to uphold their rights and quality of life. The New England chapter serves residents in this geographical area, including people in Maine.
180-200 Portland St., Suite 1
Boston, MA 02114

(617) 695-1225 or (800) 949-4232
ADAinfo@NewEnglandADA.org

Pine Tree Society (PTS)
PTS is a Maine-based nonprofit formed in 1936. It serves state residents with disabilities in many ways, including with the acquisition of assistive technologies.

P.O. Box 518
149 Front Street
Bath, Maine 04530
(207) 443-3341
info@pinetreesociety.org

These are only some of the resources available for Maine disability grants and assistance.
If you work with or know of another agency or organization in Maine that should be listed here, please let us know.
Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Maine Disability Grants Handicap Funding ME
In order to receive handicap funding in Maine, many residents use multiple sources of mobility funds available in Maine, such as disability grants, handicap loans, government assistance, and other help. Discover the largest source of Maine disability grants to help cover some or all of the money to fund handicap vans or wheelchair van conversions. AMS Vans can provide delivery of your handicap van to Maine and nationwide.

Disability Grants in Maine (ME)
Maine disability grants may or may not allocate funding for wheelchair vans. Check with the local Maine grant provider for more details.

mPower Loans
The mPower loan fund, also known as the Kim Wallace Adaptive Equipment Loan Program, is a citizen-funded loan program offering low-interest loans of $240 to $100,000 to assist in purchasing a handicap van.

Maine Cite 
The Maine Cite provides information on benefits disabled people can receive, as well as a few resources to find financing for citizens of Maine interested in buying a wheelchair accessible van.

How to Apply for Maine Grants or Mobility Funding
Maine residents seeking assistance with the purchase of mobility van conversions should contact one or more mobility funding programs listed above about disability grants offered. Once complete, AMS Vans is happy to work with one or all mobility funding sources such as grants for the disabled, church money, government funds, veterans’ programs or other financial outlets you have acquired to aid in the purchase of your wheelchair van. Please submit any other mobility funding resources for Maine residents or nationwide to AMS, so we can build the most comprehensive database of financial assistance programs for people with disabilities.

New York Mobility Rebate Resources

New York Disability Grants and Funds for Wheelchair Vans

Financial Aid Resources for Handicap Vans for New York (NY) Residents
New York disability grants are readily available to residents from various sources. Many are applicable to buying or leasing new or used wheelchair vans, or to handicap van conversions. The latter includes lowered flooring, access ramps, different styles of wheelchair or scooter lifts, turning automotive seating systems, adaptive driving hand controls and other equipment and modifications.

If you need help affording your handicapped-friendly ride, the following New York-based groups are the place to start. Contact any and all that sound relevant to your circumstances. You’ll find that many allow you to apply for financial aid; the others are willing and able to direct you toward sources of disability grants for which you or a family member may be eligible.

Also, contact state branches of nationwide organizations and foundations devoted to your specific cause of limited mobility. These are excellent sources of funding assistance and useful information.

Sources for New York Disability Grants and Assistance

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)
ACCESS-VR is a primary resource for disabled New York State residents seeking or trying to hold down a job. It offers an array of services and support to help you get back to work. If this means you need a wheelchair van, a disability grant may be available to you through this agency.
One Commerce Plaza, Room 1609
Albany, New York 12234
(800) 222-5627
accesadm@mail.nysed.gov

Center for Assistive Technology (CAT)
CAT is run by the University of Buffalo’s School of Public Health and Health Professionals. It strives to educate people about assistive technologies and to increase access among those who need it. The Center does not directly provide disability grants or other funding, but its variety of services and resources make it a go-to reference for information about help affording a handicap van.
100 Sylvan Parkway, Suite 400
Amherst, NY 14228
(716) 204-8606 ext. 200

New York Aging and Disabilities Resource Centers (ARDCs)
ADRCs are some of the best sources for information and assistance available to persons with disabilities and senior citizens. Offices are all around the state, serving residents in their immediate vicinity.

New York State Association of Area Agencies on Aging (NYSAAAA)
NYSAAAA upholds the independence and dignity of New York’s elderly. It coordinates for dozens of offices all around the state. Your local branch can assist you with securing the handicapped-accessible vehicle you or an aging loved one needs.

New York State Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (DDPC)
The New York DDPC works to further the self-determination and full participation of state residents with a developmental disability. To this end, they assist such people and their families with acquiring the information, services, technologies and other support they require. You may qualify for a disability grant from the council.
99 Washington Avenue, 12th Floor, Suite 1230
Albany, New York 12210
(518) 486-7505 or (800) 395-3372
ddpc@ddpc.ny.gov

New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs (VA)
The VA in New York is dedicated to providing prompt, comprehensive support to in-state US veterans and their families. For veterans who became disabled while on active military duty or while receiving VA services, or for those whose existing disabilities were aggravated under these circumstances, disability grants are available.
5 Empire State Plaza, 17th Floor
Albany, NY 12223-1551
(888) 838-7697
DVAInfo@veterans.ny.gov

New York State Independent Living Council (NYSILC)
NYSILC is a nonprofit, non-governmental group formed under federal mandate. The majority-disabled council is appointed by the Governor to further the cause of independent living among New York’s disabled population. The body supports statewide Independent Living Centers, and may be able to direct you toward financial aid for your mobility needs.
111 Washington Avenue, Suite 101
Albany, NY 12210
(518) 427-1060 or (877) 397-4126

 

Northeast Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Center
Among the National Network of ADA Centers, the Northeast branch serves persons with disabilities residing in New York state. It is one of the single best resources for information and assistance. Get in touch to learn about many disability grants for which you may qualify that can be put toward your wheelchair van, accessibility equipment or other modifications.
Employment and Disability Institute
Cornell University
ILR School
201 Dolgen Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 255-6686 or (800) 949-4232
northeastada@cornell.edu

Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA), New York State
The State of New York’s OTDA provides financial assistance and a variety of other services to people with disabilities. It is also a good place to check in with to find other sources of funding if you’re trying to buy or lease a wheelchair van or to have accessibility conversions installed.
40 North Pearl Street
Albany, NY 12243
(518) 473-1090
nyspio@otda.ny.gov

Rehabilitation Services

Office of Rehabilitation Services
The Office of Rehabilitation Services helps people with disabilities become employed and live independently in the community. They provide a variety of programs and services to empower individuals with disabilities to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment and economic self-sufficiency.

Vocational Rehabilitation
The focus of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program is to help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. Individuals who apply for this program are interested in becoming employed. If a person receives Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and they are interested in working, they are assumed to be eligible for this program.

Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired
The Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or who have significant visual impairments. The goal is to help them become independent, active, and self-sufficient members of their community. Services are available for children and adults.

Disability Determination Services
The Disability Determination Services unit determines the eligibility for children and adults with disabilities who are applying for cash benefits from the federal Social Security Administration’s programs – Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

Assistive Technology Access Partnership
The Office of Rehabilitation Services administers the Assistive Technology Access Partnership which can help individuals with disabilities get assistive technology devices and services.

Links

New York Disability Grants Handicap Funding NY
Funding handicap needs, like wheelchair vans for people with disabilities, is possible through grants, financing loans, and other funds. Find a handicap van for sale then browse the largest resource for New York disability grants for the disabled to help pay for new wheelchair vans or handicap accessible van conversions.

Disability Grants in New York (NY)
The handicap funding organization(s) provided may or may not allocate financing for handicap vans. Refer to your local New York grants providers and foundations for complete details.

Equipment Loan Fund for the Disabled
The New York State Office of Children and Family Services provides assistance and loans to help in the purchase of wheelchair vans.

How to Apply for New York Grants or Mobility Funding
New York residents seeking disability grants or other mobility finance assistance should contact the grant provider(s) listed above. We will work with any mobility financing services or other sources of funding to help you purchase a handicap van. Contribute to the largest list of New York mobility grant resources by telling us your favorite programs.

Dodge/ Chrysler’s Mobility Rebate

Chrysler’s Automobility Program

Overview
Designed to help customers with permanent disabilities enter, exit and/or operate a new vehicle, Chrysler’s Automobility Program can help you do the things you love to do in life. And, we’ll help you hit the road in the style that suits you best. Our goal is to assist in lessening the burden of the financial cost of modifying your vehicle.

How the Program Works
When you buy or lease any new 2010, 2011, 2012 or 2013 Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram or FIAT® vehicle from a participating dealership or FIAT studio, Chrysler will give you a cash reimbursement to help reduce the cost of installing the adaptive driver or passenger equipment on your vehicle. Leased vehicles must be leased for a minimum of 12 months to be eligible.

Once you have a 2010-2013 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle that fits your transportation needs, contact a reputable and qualified adaptive equipment installer to ensure that it can be adapted to meet your needs.

Please consult a dealership or call Automobility Program Headquarters for eligibility requirements and program expiration dates.

A program application must be used to submit a claim for reimbursement under the terms and conditions of the Chrysler Automobility Program. Through this program, Chrysler will provide a reimbursement to each eligible customer who installs qualifying adaptive driver or passenger equipment on a purchased or leased new Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle (unless discontinued or excluded earlier at the discretion of Chrysler Group LLC).

A medical doctor’s prescription or note may also be required for certain types of modifications. Consult a dealership for more information on which modifications require notes.

Reimbursement
Conversions to Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicles qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $1,000. Running boards qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $400. Alerting devices qualify for a maximum reimbursement of $200. These reimbursements will not be reduced or affected by any additional outside funding. Consult your dealer for complete eligibility requirements.

Eligible Vehicles
Vehicles eligible for reimbursement include 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 Chrysler, Jeep®, Dodge, Ram and FIAT vehicles. Dodge Viper, Dodge Dart SE and Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT® models are ineligible.

Financing
If you require assistance with financing an adapted vehicle purchase / lease, we can help you finance the cost of your new vehicle, as well as any modifications you make to it. Conventional financing is available through Ally Financial to all qualified new vehicle buyers.

Click HERE for the Application

Honda Mobility Rebate Information

Honda’s Mobility Assistance Program
The Honda Customer Mobility Assistance Program is proud to support the mobility needs of drivers and passengers with physical disabilities. Honda will provide a reimbursement of up to $1,000 to each eligible, original retail customer for expenses incurred to purchase and install qualifying adaptive equipment on any eligible purchased or leased Honda vehicle.

Adapting Your Vehicle
Honda suggests that you request a copy of the Department of Transportation brochure “Adapting Motor Vehicles for People with Disabilities.”  

The process includes these steps:

  • Determine your state’s driver’s license requirements.
  • Evaluate your needs – Contact the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) for further information.
  • Select the right vehicle – Consult with your evaluator, an adaptive installer and your local Honda dealer to determine the best Honda model to meet your needs.
  • Choose a qualified mobility equipment installer – Shop around and ask about qualifications, capabilities, experience, warranty coverage and service. Confirm that they are members of NMEDA.
  • Obtain training on the use of the new equipment – When this process is complete, follow the guidelines and complete and submit an application for assistance to recover up to $1,000 of the cost of your adaptive equipment and/or conversion.

Program Requirements
General

  • Only the original vehicle owner is eligible for reimbursement.
  • Modifications must be completed for the original owner or his/her immediate family.
  • Only new Honda vehicles retailed or leased in the United States from an authorized Honda dealership.
  • Only one reimbursement request per vehicle.
  • Lease-vehicle modifications may be subject to written lessor approval. The customer is responsible for determining and satisfying lease-contract requirements.
  • Honda will consider reimbursement for modifications made to vehicle after February 1, 2004.
  • The written reimbursement request must be received within 6 months of the adaptive equipment installation.

Adaptations, Modifications or Equipment Installation

  • Qualifying adaptive equipment or conversion is defined as: alterations or adaptive-equipment installation that provides to the disabled user convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle.
  • Adaptive equipment installation must have taken place within the time and mileage limits of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.
  • Alterations or adaptive equipment installation requires a prescription or medical documentation to be considered for reimbursement.
  • Reimbursement requests (invoices) will be compared against the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Web site to verify that the alterer or repair business (individual, partnership or corporation) is registered with NHTSA and that the modification(s) are on the list of NHTSA exemptions.
  • If all conditions are met, Honda will provide up to a $1,000 cash reimbursement. Honda will be the secondary coverage in the case of two or more reimbursement sources.

Exceptions

  • Wheelchair or scooter hoists or ramps do not require a prescription, medical documentation or NHTSA exemption verification and NHTSA business registration for reimbursement consideration.
  • Modifications that DO NOT make inoperative any part of a device or element of design that has been installed on or in a motor vehicle in compliance with a Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard will not require NHTSA exemption verification and NHTSA business registration for reimbursement consideration.
  • *A reimbursement made by another source, such as medical insurance, will be subtracted from the customer’s original total expense. (Example: Total expense $5,000, Insurance reimbursement $4,000, Customer expense, $1,000. The customer expense of $1,000 will be reviewed and considered for a maximum of $1,000 reimbursement.)

Important Customer Information

  • The selection of an equipment manufacturer and installer is solely the customer’s responsibility (Honda does not endorse any company or supplier involved in adaptive equipment. Mobility warranty, installation warranty and related liabilities are not the responsibility of Honda).
  • The reimbursement application form must be completed in its entirety and signed by the customer. It should be mailed along with a copy of all required supporting documentation. (See checklist on application).

Click HERE For the Honda Mobility Assistance Brochure

Toyota Mobility Rebate Information

Toyota Mobility Assistance Program
This program provides cash reimbursement of up to $1,000 of the cost of any aftermarket adaptive equipment or conversion, for drivers and/or passengers, when installed on any eligible purchased or leased new Toyota vehicle.

  • Under this program, the cash reimbursement will be provided for the exact cost you paid to purchase and install qualifying adaptive driving or passenger equipment for transporting persons with physical disabilities
  • This offer applies to all purchased or leased new Toyota vehicles

The program also applies to purchasers of the Toyota Factory Installed Auto Access Seat, where the full $1,000 cash reimbursement will be paid directly to you.
Expect to receive payment within 6-8 weeks after all the paperwork is submitted. Incomplete paperwork will delay the payment.

Leased vehicles require advance written lessor approval of adaptive equipment installations.

Only vehicles sold or leased and delivered to a retail customer by an authorized Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. Inc. dealer are eligible under this program.

The adaptive equipment must be installed within 12 months of vehicle purchase or lease.

A Reimbursement Application Form must be submitted to the Toyota Mobility Assistance Center within 90 days of complete installation of adaptive equipment

Qualifying adaptive equipment or conversion is defined as any aftermarket alteration or equipment installation on an eligible Toyota vehicle that provides to the disabled user convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle.

Audi Mobility Rebate Information

2013 Audi Mobility Rebate Program
Will Offer $1,500 in assistance for approved adaptive equipment.

Audi is pleased to announce that they are continuing the 2013 Mobility Assistance program for handicap hand controls that are installed on any qualifying Audi model. They will also consider other types of handicap assists (such as hydraulic lifts for scooters, etc.) on a case-by-case basis. All exception requests should be made directly to mobilityassistance@audi.com.

Audi will offer $1,500 in assistance for hand controls (or other approved handicap assistance devices) to anyone who purchases or leases a new Audi or CPO Audi vehicle (Dealer demonstrator vehicles are also included). The client should contact an adaptive equipment retailer of their choice for information concerning the purchase and installation of such equipment.

Required documentation
To qualify for payment, the client must submit the following documentation:

  • Name, address, home and secondary phone numbers.
  • A photocopy of a signed Purchase (Bill of Sale) or Lease Agreement for a new Audi or Audi CPO vehicle.
  • A photocopy of a paid invoice for hand control installation (or other approved assistance devices) on the Audi model purchased or leased.

All payments will be made directly to the Audi owner approximately four weeks after submission to Audi. Documentation should be submitted, faxed or emailed to:
Audi of America, Inc.

ATTN: Audi Mobility Assistance Program
3800 Hamlin Road
Auburn Hills, MI 48326

Phone: +1-800-822-AUDI (2834)
Fax: +1-248-754-6513
Email: mobilityassistance@audi.com

Fiat Mobility Rebate Information

Fiat 500 equipped with hand control devices for individuals with physical disabilities save $200

Save $200 on the installation of any new hand controls in your new or used Fiat for the month of July in 2013

Do you have a Fiat 500 and are in need of it being equipped with a set of hand controls or other mobility devices for individuals with physical disabilities.

We offer a lifetime guaranty on our installation. If you ever feel there is something wrong with your hand controls (even if we didn’t install them) please come in to our Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center for a free inspection by a certified mobility craftsman.

If you looking to have mobility equipment expertly installed by master craftsman call 508-697-6006 Automotive Innovations Bridgewater, MA

We will alter your automobile to suit your mobility needs, help you find the perfect hand controls or mobility equipment for your vehicle and install it expertly for you.

Mercedes-Benz Mobility Rebate Information

If you have special transportation needs and require mobility equipment installed in your new Mercedes-Benz you could be eligible for the Mobility Program.

If you are eligible for this program, MBUSA will defray part of the cost for adaptive equipment installed by an NMEDA (National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association) certified mobility installer on a purchased or leased new Mercedes-Benz vehicle. Click and download the PDF below for the program application and to learn more about program details, eligibility and available reimbursement amounts.

PROGRAM GUIDELINES
Through this program, Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC will provide a reimbursement to eligible customers who install qualifying adaptive driver or passenger equipment on a purchased or leased new Mercedes-Benz vehicle during the program period which may be discontinued by MBUSA at it’s discretion.

  • This program applies to vehicles sold or leased and delivered through an authorized U.S. MB dealer on which adaptive equipment has been installed by an NMEDA certified mobility installer.
  • The adaptive equipment must be installed within six months of new vehicle purchase or lease. An application form with all required supporting documentation must be submitted to the Customer Assistance Center within 60 days of complete installation of adaptive equipment. Note that all adaptations must have medical documentation.
  • Adaptive equipment is defined as equipment that is required by persons with a permanent disability to drive, enter, exit and/or be transported safely in a Mercedes-Benz motor vehicle. Factory-optional equipment is not reimbursable under this program. A prescription or note from a licensed medical doctor on physician’s letterhead with a specific diagnosis is required for reimbursement.
  • Conversions to M-Class, G-Class, GL-Class, GLK-Class and R-Class models may be reimbursed up to a maximum of $1,000. Conversions to all other eligible Mercedes-Benz models qualify for reimbursement up to a maximum of $750. Side steps or running boards qualify for reimbursement up to $400 out of the maximum reimbursement available.
  • The application form must be completed in its entirety along with all required documentation and signed by the customer and dealership.
  • Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC will be the final judge as to the eligibility, interpretation and fulfillment of all elements of this program. Any payment or benefits received are subject to the Program Guidelines. Payments made by Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC hereafter constitute good will reimbursements to assist new Mercedes-Benz purchasers with the installation of special need mobility equipment and such payment does not represent any approval of the equipment or installation method or otherwise constitute a representation or warranty regarding the fitness, quality, appropriateness, effectiveness or suitability for use with Mercedes-Benz products or any other warranty of any type with respect to the equipment or its installation.
  • A copy of the application form, a copy of the adaptive equipment company’s itemized paid invoice, vehicle registration and a prescription or note from a licensed medical doctor on physician’s letterhead stating the specific diagnosis (when required) must be mailed to the following address:

CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE CENTER
3 MERCEDES DR.
MONTVALE, NJ 07645

Customer is responsible for submitting this application. Payment to the individual customer will be mailed within six weeks after receipt of an approved claim form and all required documentation.

Please call Customer Assistance Center with Any Questions:
1-800-FOR-MERCedes

Click HERE for the application form along with the guidelines

Kia Mobility Rebate Information

Military Offers

Special Offers for members of the United States Armed Forces that are active, reservists, retirees, have received and honorable discharge or military members that are on disability from the United States Armed Forces, including spouses.

For More Information:

  • Click this link: Military Offers
  • Enter your zip code
  • Click on the offers to see details

Jaguar Mobility Rebate Information

Jaguar Mobility Program
The Jaguar Mobility Headquarters can assist in locating assessment centers, equipment dealers and installers, and potential resources for financial assistance.

For further information on the Jaguar Mobility Program call 1-800-207-5517 or TTY 1-800-833-0312 .

Nissan Mobility Rebate Information

MOBILIZE AND GET
REIMBURSED UP TO $1000

The Nissan Mobility Assist Program is committed to making every Nissan vehicle accessible. To help make this happen, we’re offering up to a $1,000 reimbursement on your purchase and installation of qualified adaptive equipment. It’s a simple process that you can manage directly through the Nissan Mobility website.

Mobility Information
Please contact the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for additional information on equipment and registered installers

Overview
Purchase or lease a new Nissan through a participating Nissan dealer  Within 6 months, have qualifying adaptive equipment installed by a NHTSA-registered  installer

Complete “Nissan Mobility Form” online and submit all applicable documentation through fax or email within 90 days of installation.

Documentation includes: vehicle sale or purchase agreement, copy of invoice from NHTSA-registered installer, proof of customer payment (receipt) for equipment/installation, medical documentation as described in the program rules, lessor written letter of approval (if applicable), medical insurance statement (if applicable)  Receive reimbursement of up to $1,000 from Nissan

Program Rules
Retailed vehicles only; vehicle must be purchased or leased from a participating Nissan dealer after 4/2/2013  Used sales and Fleet sales are not eligible under this program Nissan Mobility Assist reimbursement cannot be applied toward the purchase or lease of the vehicle

Only one reimbursement per vehicle may be made  All leased vehicle modifications should be approved by lessor For existing leases through Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation (NMAC), the following types of adaptive equipment have been pre-approved: Hand Controls, Wheelchair/Scooter Lift, Left Foot Accelerator, Turning Automotive Seating Adaptive equipment must be installed after vehicle has been retailed and within 6 months of purchase or lease from an authorized Nissan dealer.

Requests for reimbursement must be made within 90 days after the equipment is installed Adaptive equipment must be medically necessary in order to operate the Nissan vehicle or transport passengers with a documented physical disability To receive reimbursement for vehicle modifications, medical documentation must be submitted to Nissan clearly stating the disability or impairment for which the equipment is intended.

The documentation must be prepared on official letterhead of and signed by a licensed, certified medical professional Installer must be registered with NHTSA and customer must provide Nissan with a receipt from the installer Nissan Accessories are not eligible for reimbursement     Exceptions
Nissan will not provide reimbursement for the purchase and/or installation of equipment that has already been fully claimed and fulfilled by medical insurance  A reimbursement made by another source, such as medical insurance, will be subtracted from the customer’s original total expense. (Example: Total expense $5,000, Insurance  reimbursement $4,000, Customer expense, $1,000. The customer expense of $1,000 will  be reviewed and considered for a maximum of $1,000 reimbursement.)

Warranty Information
Adaptations are not warranted by Nissan, please consult with your installer and/or equipment provider for warranty information  Contact Information  The vehicle modifications must fall within those permitted under the NHTSA exemption as set out in 49 CFR §595.7  Expect to receive reimbursement within 6-10 weeks after all required paperwork has been received by Nissan
Any damage to the vehicle due to adaptive equipment or its installation may void or not be covered under the Nissan New Vehicle Limited Warranty Nissan assumes no responsibility for death, injuries, or damage related to the installation of adaptive equipment

Requests for assistance may be submitted via email Applicable claim documentation may be submitted via fax at 888-912-2409

Ford Mobility Rebate Information

Program Details
The Ford Mobility Motoring adaptive equipment reimbursement of up to $1,000, or up to $200 for alert hearing devices, lumbar support or running boards, is available on any new Ford or Lincoln vehicle purchased or leased from a U.S. Ford or Lincoln dealer during the program period. Maximum reimbursement per vehicle is $1,000. Your Ford or Lincoln dealer has complete program details.

For example: If the cost of adding adaptive equipment is less than $1,000, your cash reimbursement will be for the exact amount of the adaptive equipment. Your Ford or Lincoln dealer has complete program details.

New Program Guidelines

Major structural vehicle modifications to accommodate the installation of wheelchair lift or ramp MUST be completed by a Ford Authorized Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) to be eligible for reimbursement. This change will be effective for any units modified after March 31,2011.

Raised roof and lowered floor conversions alone do not meet the eligibility requirements. 

Documentation must show that mobility adaptive equipment (such as a wheelchair lift, ramp or adaptive controls) was installed on the vehicle.

Adaptive equipment is defined as devices that make it easier for persons with permanent physical disabilities to drive or be transported in a vehicle. For more information about adaptive equipment please click on the “Adaptive Equipment Eligibility” page in the navigation bar.

Eligible Vehicles

All new model Ford or Lincoln Cars, Vans, CUVs ,SUVs and Trucks sold or leased during the program period. Eligible vehicles must have installation of the qualifying adaptive equipment within one year of reported purchase/lease date to the ultimate consumer.

New vehicles acquired from a U.S. Ford Authorized Pool Converter are eligible for the program.

Used units, including those previously in rental service, lease service or repurchased vehicles by Ford Motor Company that are available for resale, are not eligible.

Eligible Customers
Customer must be the end-user of the vehicle that requires installation of qualifying adaptive driving or assistance equipment, or passenger aid equipment. The end-user may also be defined as an organization, church, assisted living facility, nursing home, municipality, city, state or federal government.

Claims may be made for adaptive equipment required by a family member of the owner/lessee of an eligible vehicle, providing the equipment be permanently fitted to the vehicle.

*Includes all new Ford and Lincoln vehicles when purchased or leased from a U.S. Ford or Lincoln dealer during the program period.

Modification Eligibility
To be eligible for the Ford Mobility Motoring reimbursement, any/all structural modifications must in their entirety make the vehicle viably useful for the individual(s) for whom the modification is being made. Claims for modifications that may, in part, be commonly recognized as consistent with mobility modifications, but by themselves do not create a completed vehicle for use by the intended individual(s) are not eligible.

Major structural vehicle modifications to accommodate the installation of wheelchair lift or ramp MUST be completed by a Ford Authorized Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) to be eligible for reimbursement. This change is in effect for any units modified after March 31, 2011.

Examples of major structural vehicle modifications include, but are not limited to, raised roofs or door openings and lowered floors. Non-structural vehicle adaptations (adaptive equipment) such as bolt on items or driving aids do not require the work to be completed by a Ford Quality Vehicle Modifier.

Raised roof and lowered floor conversions alone do not meet the eligibility requirements. Documentation must show that mobility adaptive equipment (such as a wheelchair lift, ramp or adaptive controls) was installed on the vehicle.

Adaptive Equipment Eligibility
Finding the Right Mobility Dealer
Choosing a company to provide your adaptive equipment is an important decision. Be sure to ask about credentials, experience, warranty coverage and service after the sale.

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association
NMEDA is a non-profit organization composed of dealers, automotive manufacturers, rehabilitation professionals and mobility equipment providers that encourages professionalism and works to establish national guidelines and standards for the mobility best practices. To view a list of current members, go to www.nmeda.org. NMEDA Quality Assurance Program, QAP, is a nationally recognized accreditation program for the adaptive mobility equipment industry. As such, the companies involved have been certified to comply with NMEDA quality control processes, have the proper insurance and have obtained the applicable training from the adaptive equipment manufacturers they represent.

Carriers

Price Range : $500 – $4,000

Bumper-Mounted Carrier – allows manual wheelchairs to be mounted on bumper. Most of the bumper-mounted carriers can be removed to allow access to the trunk.

Car Top Carrier – an electric motor-driven hoist operates by switches. A steel pin lowers to pick up a manual wheelchair, which folds as it rises to the carrier.

Hitch-Mounted Carrier – tilts down when loading the wheelchair and then easily tilts up and locks into place.

Pickup Truck Carrier – stores the wheelchair in the bed of the truck after the wheelchair has been folded and picked up by an electric-driven motor. Certain manufacturers’ carriers will pick up the rigid chair, power wheelchair or a scooter not folded.


Parking Brake Extensions
Price Range : $50 – $900

Electric Parking Brake – motorized and can be set and released by a switch located within easy reach of the driver. Ideal for those with limited foot and leg strength.

Manual Parking Brake – for those with limited foot and leg strength. It is a handle attached to the parking brake and is long enough to operate by hand.

Hand Controls
Price Range : $360 – $2,000

Electrical
Electronic Hand Controls – this technology comes in two segments: Primary and Secondary Controls. Primary controls operate the gas, brake and steering functions. Products are usually combinations of joysticks and levers. Secondary controls operate all other vehicle functions. Products include voice activated controls, touch pads and power headrests. Please note: electronic controls do not fit in the price range above as each modification is unique to the individual. Please see your installer for an estimate.

Push Pull Control – brakes the vehicle when pushed toward the floor and accelerates the vehicle when pulled upward.

Push Right Angle Pull Hand Control – push the handle upward toward the instrument panel to brake and pull it downward at a right angle to accelerate.

Push Twist Control – similar to accelerating on a motorcycle. The handle is twisted to accelerate and pushed toward the floor to brake.

Quad Hand Controls – consists of an extra L–shaped bracket attached to the hand controls.

Mechanical
Push/Rotary Control – operates by pushing forward to apply the brakes and rotating backward to apply the gas.

Lifts
Price Range :$600 – $18,000

An Automatic lift will fold, unfold, lower and rise by operating a switch on either side of the lift, on the dash or outside the van. The Semi-Automatic lift operates similar to the automatic lift, but requires manual folding and unfolding of the platform.

Electrical Mechanical Lift – operates by chain or screw rod and depends upon the power provided by the battery.

Hydraulic Lift – uses a pump and cylinder to raise and lower the lift in conjunction with the van’s battery.

Outside Lift – requires installing a trailer hitch as the scooter is carried on the outside of the vehicle.

Pickup Truck Lift – picks up the scooter and stores it in the bed of the truck. It can lift a rigid chair (manual), an electric scooter or a power wheelchair.

Platform Lift – (as shown above) requires either two side doors or one sliding door on a van and is stored either on the side, the rear or under the floor of the van.

Rotary (Swing) Lift – beneficial because of the parking conveniences, due to less room needed to enter and exit the van. This device swings into the van and the lift platform sits on the floor in the middle of the van.

Trunk Lift – puts the scooter into the trunk, provided the scooter measures less than the trunk.

Under-the-Floor Lift – only pump and motor are located inside.Door Openers
Price Range : $800 – $2,000

Chain Door Opener – slide door that travels in a track, located at the top of the van.

Pivot Arm and Push/Pull Gear Door Opener – opens double–out doors outward.

Power Assist Seats
Price Range : $1,800 – $6,800

Rotating Seat – This system for lower vehicles provides easy access to an automotive seat. The seat rotates out over the doorsill, bridging the gap for a safe transfer onto the seat. Once you’re on, the seat rotates back into the vehicle. Both manual and power versions are available.

Rotating and Lift Seat – This system for higher vehicles provides easy access to an automotive seat. The seat rotates, comes out of the vehicle, and lowers toward the ground, eliminating the climbing and twisting normally required to enter a higher vehicle. Units are powered out and down; however, some models are equipped with manual rotation, while others have powered rotation.

Steering Devices
Price Range : $50 – $350

Amputee Ring – designed best for those with prosthesis. The hook of the prosthesis will fit into the ring and remain in place while driving.

“Para” Spinner Knob – consists of a base, which is adjustable, and a detachable knob that can be comfortably gripped with one hand.

Palm Grip – ideal for someone who has control of the wrist but is limited in grip strength. The hand is always held flat to the steering wheel while driving.

Quad Grip with Pin – a 3/8″ steel shaft from a stiff leather cuff that inserts into the spinner base. A stable wrist is required. The pin may be attached on a horizontal or a vertical position.

Quad Steering Cuff or Splint – a wrist cock up splint with a post attached in a
vertical or horizontal position. It is ideal for persons either lacking hand and wrist function or those unable to use the above steering devices.

Spinner Cuff – operates as the hand is held in place by a cuff and fastened with Velcro. A lockable short rod is placed in the base of the steering wheel near the palm of the hand to allow the person to steer.

Tri-Post or Tri-Pin Spinner Knob – stabilizes & secures the hand & wrist while driving.

V-Grip or U-Grip – hand controls keep the hand in an upright position and in place while driving. It is used primarily by persons who have adequate use of wrist movements.

Deep Dish Steering Wheel – used for those who have limited reach to be able to turn the wheel safely due to its smaller size.

Foot Steering Controls – for drivers who need to maneuver the vehicle by their feet.

Horizontal Steering – the steering column is easily adjusted by motorization for those drivers with limited reach.

Steering Column Extension – the steering column is extended by 2-6 inches allowing room to steer for individuals driving from their wheelchairs.

Joystick – very similar to the joystick on a wheelchair, this larger scaled version allows the driver to maneuver the vehicle.

Low Effort Steering – reduces the effort needed to steer by approximately 40 percent.

Reduced Effort Steering – for drivers who have limited use of their upper extremities.

Servo Controls – unlike the other hand controls, these operate by an auxiliary motor, rather than the pressure of an individual’s hand. It reduces the amount of strength needed by the driver.

Zero Effort Steering – reduces the effort needed to steer by approximately 70 percent.

Wheelchair Restraints
Price Range : $50 – $2,000

Electric Restraint System – consists of a device on the bottom of the chair and another device on the floor of the van. When the two devices are properly aligned, a lock will sound and the wheelchair will not move.

Manual Restraints or Tie-Downs System – requires an attendant because it cannot be operated from the wheelchair. Four straps are snugly placed around the four wheelchair wheels to help prevent rolling during vehicle movement.

Upper Torso Restraint – used in addition to the wheelchair restraints for those with weak muscles in the upper torso area and poor balance.Adaptive equipment describes an installed device, in addition to a structural modification, that is necessary for a person with a permanent physical disability to drive or be transported in a vehicle.

Some equipment not thought of as typical adaptive equipment, or equipment which is not available from the factory, that serves a need to operate or ride in a vehicle for persons with disabilities such as but not limited to: assist handles, keyless entry, keyless ignition switch, lumbar support, headrest adjustment, pedal extensions power seats, remote liftgate opener, running boards, seat belt extenders, seat modifications, and special mirrors may be eligible for reimbursement and require additional documentation. You will be notified if additional documentation is needed such as a letter or prescription clearly describing the permanent physical disability requiring this equipment, prepared by a licensed or certified medical professional.

Factory installed options such as air conditioning, running boards, lumbar seats and power windows are not considered eligible under the terms of the program.

Reimbursement Assistance
The reimbursement process is quick and easy. Once your vehicle has been purchased and adaptive equipment installation is completed, your dealer will assist you in submitting your claim. Your dealer will need the following documentation:

  • Vehicle Bill of Sale – must have the VIN included
  • Paid Adaptive Equipment Invoice – should be dated and marked paid

Your reimbursement check will then arrive directly from Ford Motor Company, usually within two to four weeks.

Frequently asked Questions

How do I apply for reimbursement?
Contact the Customer Care Center at (800) 952–2248 and a representative will assist with contacting your dealer.

What is the time period of the Ford Mobility Motoring Program and which vehicles are eligible?
Please visit your Ford or Lincoln dealer for complete program details including program effective dates and eligible vehicles.

How soon after I purchase or lease my new vehicle do I have to complete the adaptive equipment installation?
Claim must be submitted within 12 months of the reported sale date.

How do I receive my Ford Mobility Motoring financial reimbursement?
When the adaptive equipment installation has been completed on your new vehicle, either you or the adaptive equipment dealer will take the paid adaptive equipment invoice to the Ford or Lincoln dealer where you purchased or leased your new vehicle. You will receive a check mailed to you directly from Ford for up to $1,000 toward the cost of your adaptive equipment or up to $200 on after-market alert hearing devices, lumbar seats and running boards. Total reimbursement is not to exceed $1,000.

How long does it take to receive my check?
It usually takes 7-10 business days after the dealer submits the authorized claim and the claim is approved by Ford.

What adaptive equipment qualifies for the financial reimbursement?
Adaptive equipment is defined as any installed device that makes it easier for persons with disabilities to drive or be transported in a vehicle. Equipment that can be factory installed, or is considered a factory option by Ford, is not eligible. Equipment which is not clearly related to a specific medical need, such as after–market alert hearing devices, swivel seats, pedal extensions and running boards, will require original medical documentation clearly detailing the physical disability or permanent impairment for which the equipment is intended. This documentation must be prepared by a licensed, certified medical or medical–related professional.

May I go to any adaptive equipment installer or must I go to someone on your State Resource Guide listing?
You may take your vehicle to the adaptive equipment installer of your choice. The list provided for reference only and no endorsement is intended. You should verify information, check with adaptive equipment manufacturers and obtain complete references before any services are rendered.

Is it necessary for me to visit an assessment center before I qualify for Ford Mobility Motoring reimbursement?
No. If you already have equipment you’re going to transfer, or you know what equipment you need, it is not necessary for you to have an evaluation at an assessment center. However, it could be beneficial to have an evaluation every four years.

May I use the financial reimbursement toward the purchase or lease of my vehicle?
No. The Mobility reimbursement can only happen after you have supplied your Ford or Lincoln dealer with the paid invoice for your adaptive equipment installation.

Does newly purchased used adaptive equipment qualify?
Yes. As long as you have a paid receipt, newly purchased used equipment acquired for your installation will qualify for reimbursement.

Can the Ford Mobility Motoring financial reimbursement be used in combination with other incentives or rebates?
Yes. The Ford Mobility Motoring financial reimbursement may be combined with all other public and private offers, including the “Commercial Connection Program”, in effect at the time of purchase or lease.

Are Ford Mobility Motoring benefits available if I purchase or lease a new vehicle under the Ford A, X or Z Plans?
Yes. A, X and Z Plan vehicles are eligible as long as they otherwise meet plan provisions.

Are used vehicles, or vehicles which have previously been in rental or lease service, eligible?
No. Only new models purchased or leased from a Ford or Lincoln dealer are eligible.

Will Ford Mobility Motoring cover the cost of transferring my equipment from my old vehicle to a new vehicle?
Yes. The cost of the transfer installation to your new vehicle is covered with a paid receipt.

If I have a family member who requires adaptive equipment assistance to enter or ride in my new vehicle, will Ford Mobility Motoring cover the cost of the equipment for that person?
Yes. Adaptive equipment required to transport a person with a physical disability is covered up to the maximum of $1,000 and up to $200 on after–market alert hearing devices, lumbar seats and running boards. Total reimbursement is not to exceed $1,000.

Volkswagen Mobility Rebate

Volkswagen provides up to $1,000 towards the purchase and installation of mobility-access equipment in a new VW Routan. If modifications are less than $1,000, that amount is reimbursed.

Acura Mobility Rebate Information

Mobility Overview
Enhancing mobility for drivers with disabilities.

The Acura Mobility Program is proud to support the mobility needs of drivers and passengers with physical disabilities. When you purchase or lease an Acura vehicle, you will be provided with a cash reimbursement of up to $1,000 of the cost of aftermarket adaptive equipment that is installed on any eligible vehicle.
To download an application form, click here

Program Elements

Acura suggests that you request a copy of the Department of Transportation’s brochure, “Adapting Motor Vehicles for People with Disabilities.” Copies are available by visiting www.NHTSA.DOT.GOV . Search using key words “Adapting Motor Vehicles”. The process of adapting your vehicle includes the following steps:

  • Know your state’s driver’s license requirements.
  • You may wish to contact the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) to help identify the adaptive equipment that best meets your needs.
  • Select the right vehicle by collaborating with your evaluator, as well as a vehicle modification installer and your local Acura dealer before deciding on the best Acura model for you
  • Choose a qualified equipment installer to modify your vehicle. Take the time to find out about credentials, experience, references, warranty coverage and the services they provide. Make sure they are members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has established vehicle conversion standards.
  • Obtain training on the use of the new equipment. Your equipment dealer and evaluator should provide information and off-road instruction. You will also need to practice driving under the instruction of a qualified driving instructor until you both feel comfortable with your skills.


Program Guidelines
Acura will provide a reimbursement of up to $1,000 to each eligible, original retail client for the expenses incurred to purchase and install qualifying adaptive equipment on any eligible purchased or leased Acura vehicle.

Requirements

  • Only the original vehicle owner is eligible for reimbursement.
  • Modifications must be completed for the original owner or his/her immediate family.
  • Only new Acura vehicles retailed or leased in the United States from an authorized Acura dealership are eligible.
  • Only one reimbursement request per vehicle.
  • Lease vehicle modifications may be subject to written lessor approval. The client is responsible for determining and satisfying lease contract requirements.
  • Acura will consider reimbursement for modifications made to vehicles after February 1, 2004.
  • The written reimbursement request must be received within 6 months of the adaptive equipment installation.
  • Fleet and commercial vehicles are not eligible.
  • Any alteration or adaptive equipment that Acura has identified that alters the safety of the vehicle (i.e. seat belt extenders) is not eligible.

Adaptions, Modifications and Equipment Installation

  • Qualifying adaptive-equipment or conversion is defined as alterations or adaptive equipment installation that provide to the disabled user convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle.
  • Alterations or adaptive-equipment installation require a prescription or medical documentation to be considered for reimbursement.
  • Reimbursement requests (invoices) will be compared against the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) website to verify that the alterer or repair business (individual, partnership or corporation) is registered with NHTSA and that the modifications are on the list of NHTSA exemptions.
  • EXCEPTION: Wheelchair or scooter hoists or ramps do not require a prescription, medical documentation or NHTSA exemption verification and NHTSA business registration for reimbursement consideration.
  • EXCEPTION: Modifications that “DO NOT” make inoperative any part of a device or element of design that has been installed on or in a motor vehicle in compliance with a Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard will not require NHTSA exemption verification and NHTSA business registration for reimbursement consideration.
  • The installation of adaptive equipment must have taken place within the time and mileage limits of the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.
  • If all conditions are met, Acura will provide up to a $1,000 cash reimbursement. Acura will be the secondary coverage in the case of two or more reimbursement sources.* * A reimbursement made by another source such as medical insurance will be subtracted from the client’s original total expense. (Example: Total expense $5,000, Insurance reimbursement $4,000, Client expense $1,000. The client expense of $1,000 will be reviewed and considered for a maximum of $1,000 reimbursement.)

Important Client Information

  • The selection of an equipment manufacturer and installer is solely the client’s responsibility. (Acura does not evaluate or endorse any company or supplier involved in adaptive equipment. Mobility equipment warranty, installation warranty and related liabilities are not the responsibility of Acura.)
  • Clients can pick up an application at their local Acura dealer, via this website, or through Acura Client Relations.



Reimbursement Documentation and Proccess
Documentation required for reimbursement consideration:

  • Completed and signed Reimbursement Application
  • Proof of Vehicle Sales or Lease Agreement
  • Copy of invoice for adaptive-equipment installation and/or vehicle modification and proof of payment
  • Copy of state driver’s license to verify that the person is eligible to operate a modified vehicle
  • Copy of the prescription or medical documentation
  • Name of contributing medical insurance carrier/entity that provides primary support, and policy number


Reimbursements will be processed and mailed within 4 weeks of receipt of all required documentation. Reimbursement requests should be mailed to:
Acura Client Relations
P.O. Box 2964
Torrance, CA 90509-2964

CLIENT RESOURCES
Please call Acura Client Relations with any questions.

Acura
800-382-2238
www.acura.com

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association
(NMEDA) 
800-833-0427
www.nmeda.org

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
www.nhtsa.dot.gov
To download an application form, click here

Acura reserves the right to modify or terminate this program without notice.

Acura does not assume responsibility for the quality, safety or efficiency of adaptive equipment or installation and cannot guarantee that such modifications comply with applicable government safety standards.




Frequently Asked Questions


Do reimbursements apply to used or fleet vehicles?
No. This program applies to only new Acura vehicles that are retailed or leased in the U.S.

How long will it take me to receive my reimbursement?
Payments will be mailed within 4 weeks of receipt of all required documentation.

What types of adaptive equipment can I obtain reimbursement for?
Acura will consider reimbursement for those modifications that have been approved by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA). You can find more information on the NHTSA website.

What is the time limit to apply for a reimbursement?
The reimbursement request must be made within 6 months of the adaptive equipment installation.

Where can I get information on adaptive equipment?
The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) provides a directory of dealers in your area.

Where do I get a reimbursement application?
In addition to the printable .PDF (Acrobat) format version of the form on this website, forms are also available at your local Acura dealer or upon request at Acura Client Relations at 1-800-382-2238.

Are used vehicles included in the Acura mobility assistance program?
Acura has limited the program to original vehicle owners/lessees whose vehicles are within the Manufacturer’s warranty period and who request reimbursement for NHTSA-approved and compliant modifications to their vehicles.

Does the Acura New Vehicle Limited Warranty cover modified vehicles and/or adaptive equipment?
No. The Acura New Vehicle Limited Warranty applies only to the Acura vehicle. It does not include the adaptive equipment, its installation or any other non-original equipment.

Does the installation of adaptive equipment void my warranty?
No, adaptive equipment and modifications unto themselves do not void the New Vehicle Limited Warranty that applies to the Acura product. However, if your vehicle experiences a problem/failure and that problem/failure is determined by Acura to be the direct result of the adaptive equipment and/or its installation, your warranty coverage may be voided for that particular repair. All warranty issues are reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

Volvo Mobility Rebate Information

Mobility by Volvo is an extension of the Volvo philosophy that travels with you from your retailer to your driveway. Our goal is to assist you, providing you with transportation solutions found within the extraordinary comfort and safety of a specially adapted Volvo.

Mobility by Volvo Program Reimbursemeny

  • Up to $1,000 toward the cost of adaptive equipment added to an eligible new Volvo
  • Up to $200 on alert hearing devices
  • Maximum reimbursement is $1,000.

You may contact Volvo to request an Information Kit or click to download the following resources:



Start the Reimbursement Process
To receive your reimbursement, you or your retailer must obtain a Mobility by Volvo Claim Form. You may contact the Mobility by Volvo Center at (800) 803-5222 or complete the Contact Us Form , to receive the Claim Form.

Eligible Adaptive Equipment
“Adaptive equipment” includes all permanently installed mobility devices, necessary for a person with a physical disability to drive, or be transported in, a vehicle. Options available from the factory or the retailer for installation, such as running boards and power-assisted seats, are not considered eligible for reimbursement.

Although a Driver Assessment Center is likely your best authority on what is right for you or a family member, here are examples of adaptive equipment installations available for Volvo vehicles, approved by Mobility by Volvo:

  • Carriers
  • Lifts/Hoists
  • Driving Aids/Hand Controls

Mobility by Volvo TERMS AND CONDITIONS:

  • Offer is limited to $1,000 toward the cost of adding adaptive equipment, and $200 on an alert hearing device, per vehicle. Maximum reimbursement is $1,000. Offer only available to legal U.S. residents. Offer is not transferable.
  • Offer only available for purchases of 2012 or 2013 model year new vehicles, properly retired courtesy cars, and retired demonstrators. Offer cannot be applied to the purchase of any other model year Volvo or Volvo courtesy car, models sold directly or indirectly outside of the United States, and/or VCIC (overseas delivery) program sales. Vehicles purchased as used are not eligible.
  • Claims must be submitted within 180 days of vehicle purchase.
  • Factory or retailer installation options, such as running boards and power-assisted seats, are not considered eligible for reimbursement.
  • Offer cannot be used toward the cost of the purchase or installation of Volvo options or accessories, and the payment of sales tax. This offer is subject to federal, state and local taxes.
  • Consumers should verify modification information and obtain complete modifier references before having the vehicle modified.

Contact your local Volvo retailer for complete details.



Volvo New Car Warranty
Damage caused by unapproved or improperly installed adaptive equipment, alert hearing devices and accessories will not be covered under the Volvo New Car Warranty. Owners should refer to the Volvo Warranty and Service Records Information booklet for additional warranty information. Volvo Cars of North America, LLC, assumes no responsibility for death, injury or expenses that my result from the installation of adaptive equipment, alert hearing device and non-genuine Volvo Accessories.


Note: The adaptive equipment listed above is subject to change and should be used for reference purposes only. Volvo Cars of North America, LLC, is providing this information for assistance and reference purposes only—no endorsement is intended. The quality of services and/or equipment provided by others can only be assured by the supplying organization. Consumers should verify information and obtain complete references before beginning any vehicle adaptation.

Hyundai Mobility Rebate Information

Get up to $1,000.00
Toward the cost of installing
Adaptive Equipment in your new Hyundai.

Overview

We believe in the freedom that goes along with driving your own car. But we also know that buying and modifying a new vehicle can be expensive. To help out, Hyundai is offering $1,000 toward the cost of adaptive equipment. Everything you need to get started is right here, including links to informative guides, fact sheets, and specialists who can help you determine the equipment and training you need.


The process is simple:

  1. Review the eligibility requirements and program details below
  2. Download and complete the one-page mobility form
  3. Mail vehicle purchase documents and completed mobility form to Hyundai Motor America

Eligibility Requirements and Program Details

What vehicles are eligible?

  • New, unused 2012, and 2013 model year Hyundai vehicles sold or leased and delivered to a retail customer by an authorized Hyundai Dealership in the U.S.A. are eligible for reimbursement under this program.
  • Fleet sales and vehicles purchased from a source other than an authorized dealer of Hyundai Motor America are not eligible.


What equipment is eligible?

  • Any aftermarket alterations or equipment installation on an eligible Hyundai vehicle that provides to the user convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle.
  • Equipment which is not clearly related to a specific medical need, such as altering devices, swivel seats, pedal extensions, and running boards, will require original medical documentation clearly detailing the physical disability or permanent impairment for which the equipment is intended. This documentation must be prepared on a letterhead by a licensed, certified medical or medical-related professional.
  • Damage caused by unapproved or improperly installed adaptive equipment, alert hearing devices, and accessories will not be covered under the Hyundai new-car warranty. Owners should refer to the Hyundai Warranty and Service booklet for additional warranty information.
  • Labor for equipment transferred from the old vehicle into the new Hyundai vehicle is only eligible when the cost of the labor is clearly stated in the invoice from the adaptive equipment company.
  • Hyundai accessories are NOT eligible for reimbursement.

Program details:

  • Maximum Mobility reimbursement is up to $1,000 of the total equipment and labor costs.
  • Only one reimbursement per customer.
  • Reimbursements will be made to the customer only—not to the dealership or any adaptive equipment company.
  • The mobility equipment must be installed within six months of the vehicle purchase or lease.
  • The Hyundai Mobility Form and required documentation must be submitted to Hyundai Motor America within 60 days of complete installation of adaptive equipment.
  • Hyundai Mobility financial assistance cannot be applied toward the purchase or lease of a new Hyundai vehicle.
  • Hyundai Motor America assumes no responsibility for death, injury, or expenses that may result from the installation of adaptive equipment, alert hearing devices, and non-genuine Hyundai Accessories.
  • The offer is good from January 3, 2013 through January 2, 2014.

Download and Complete the Claim Form
Once you’ve purchased a vehicle and your adaptive equipment has been installed, complete the one-page Hyundai Mobility Form. Next, collect copies of the following documents:

  • The Purchase Agreement or Sales Contract
  • Itemized and paid invoice(s) from the adaptive equipment company. The invoice must clearly state the customer’s full name, the eligible Hyundai vehicle, and the Hyundai Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)
  • Your vehicle’s registration
  • If the equipment is not clearly related to a specific medical need, you’ll also need documentation from a medical professional that states the purpose of the equipment (Please see “What equipment is eligible” above)

download the form

Mail Hyundai Your Claim
Finally, mail the completed form and the documents you’ve collected to one of the addresses below.
Be sure to make a copy of your paperwork for your records.

Hyundai Motor America
Incentives Department
P.O. Box 20850
Fountain Valley, CA 92728
(Regular Mail)

OR

Hyundai Motor America
Incentives Department
3200 Park Center Drive
Mail Center Floor #2
Costa Mesa, CA 92626
(Overnight Mail)

General Motors Mobility Rebate Information

Through the GM Mobility Reimbursement Program, new vehicle purchasers/lessees who install eligible adaptive mobility equipment on their new Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicles can receive up to a $1,000 reimbursement for the cost of the equipment.

PLUS
Two extra years of standard OnStar® service, at no additional cost on all 2011–2013 Chevrolet, Buick and GMC vehicles equipped with OnStar. The Directions & Connections® Plan is standard for six months on most 2012-2014 GM vehicles.

Taking advantage of both offers is as easy as 1, 2, 3.

  1. Buy or lease an eligible, new 2012–2014 Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicle equipped with OnStar.
Vehicles that are not eligible: All Cadillacs. 2013 Chevrolet Caprice, Captiva Sport, Spark, Volt, Buick Encore and Verano are not eligible.
  2. Purchase and install (or reinstall) your eligible adaptive mobility equipment.
  3. Apply for GM Mobility Reimbursement:
    • Download an Application Form
    • Request an Application by Mail

The purchaser and the GM dealer representative will need to complete and sign the reimbursement application, than submit the application with a paid receipt for the mobility equipment and installation.

If you’re uncertain of the eligibility of the adaptive equipment or vehicle you’re considering purchasing or leasing, call the GM Mobility Assistance Center at 1-800-323-9935.

The GM Mobility Reimbursement Program offer with OnStar is valid through 9/30/13. To qualify for the reimbursement offer, vehicles must be adapted and a claim must be submitted within 6 months from the date of purchase/lease. To take advantage of the OnStar® offer, vehicle must be equipped with OnStar. The OnStar offer has no redeemable cash value and is nontransferable. Other program rules apply. For offer details, visit your local dealer/retailer or call the GM Mobility Assistance Center at 1-800-323-9935.

OnStar Offer
OnStar®1 is more than a button you push – it’s a connection you make with the outside world. Every day. It’s powerfully simple services take care of you and take you places.

Services like Automatic Crash Response that alerts OnStar for help even if you can’t ask for it. And Turn-by-Turn Navigation that can keep you on course, whether you’re traveling around the block or across the country. And so much more.

Customers who receive GM Mobility reimbursement on an eligible vehicle get two extra years of standard OnStar service. This OnStar mobility offer is at no additional cost and is on top of the standard OnStar service included on new OnStar equipped GM vehicles. Directions & Connections® Plan is standard for six months on most 2012-2014 GM vehicles.

OnStar. Safely connecting you in ways you never thought possible. Live on.

Program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How do I apply for GM Mobility reimbursement?
Either download a printable application form or submit an online request. We’ll mail you a complete brochure including an application form.

How can I make sure my vehicle is eligible?
For the GM Mobility Reimbursement Program, in effect until September 30, 2013, you must purchase or lease1 a new and unused (not previously titled) 2012, 2013 or 2014 Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicle. To qualify for two extra years of standard OnStar® service, vehicle must be a 2012–2014 Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicle equipped with OnStar. To confirm eligibility of your vehicle, call the GM Mobility Assistance Center at 1-800-323-9935. You will need your vehicle identification number (VIN). Confirmation of vehicle eligibility does not imply claim approval.

What adaptive equipment qualifies for reimbursement?
See complete list of eligible adaptive equipment. Except for OnStar TTY equipment and safety belt extenders, GM regular production options and GM Accessories are not eligible for GM Mobility reimbursement. This includes, but is not limited to, assist steps and running boards. Repairs and adjustments to equipment are also not eligible for reimbursement. Safety belt extenders are not eligible for the OnStar offer.

Is used adaptive equipment eligible?
Yes, provided it is on the list of eligible adaptive equipment and purchased from and installed by a licensed equipment installer. The cost to transfer equipment installed in your previous vehicle to your new eligible vehicle is also reimbursable.

Are assist steps/running boards eligible for reimbursement?
Assist steps/running boards are reimbursable if they are not available as a regular GM production option or dealer-/retailer-installed accessory, regardless of whether the vehicle is bought out of dealer stock or ordered. A maximum $200 GM Mobility Reimbursement is allowed. A physician’s signature and description of your disability/limitation are required. Call the GM Mobility Assistance Center if you have questions.

Can I incorporate reimbursement into the terms of my vehicle sales contract?
It may be possible. Contact your Chevrolet, Buick or GMC dealer for details.

Can I use the reimbursement with other factory rebates and incentives?
Yes. The GM Mobility Reimbursement incentive may be combined with other publicly offered incentive programs that are in effect at the time of purchase or lease, including most fleet and commercial incentives.

How soon after I purchase/lease my new vehicle do I have to complete the equipment installation and apply for reimbursement?
To take advantage of the GM Mobility Reimbursement Program, you must have the vehicle adapted and submit a claim within 6 months of the date of purchase/lease. Other program rules apply.

Are there any other ways I can offset the cost of purchasing adaptive equipment?
The cost of durable automotive adaptive equipment for use by persons with disabilities may be offset with federal income tax credits and deductions, state sales and use tax deductions, funding through state rehabilitation vocational agencies, and medical insurance providers. Consult with your tax advisor/preparer, appropriate state social service agency, and/or insurance provider to see what benefits you might be eligible for. Your savings could be substantial.

Mobility Financial Assistance

Ally Financing
Qualified customers can finance qualified aftermarket mobility equipment with their new Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicle through Ally mobility vehicle financing programs available at local GM dealers/retailers. Ally extended-term financing or the Ally Smart Lease program may be able to make your vehicle purchase even easier.1 Visit ally.com/auto or your local GM dealer for more details.

SmartLease Eligibility (new and used vehicles)

  • Eligible adaptive conversions are limited to those that can be removed from the vehicle at lease termination without affecting the original configuration or condition of the vehicle. Examples include wheelchair storage devices and hand-brake devices.
  • If the physical structure of the vehicle must be modified to accommodate the adaptive conversion, the vehicle remains eligible for conventional retail financing but not for SmartLease. Examples include raising or lowering all or part of the floor of a van, altering the size of any of a vehicle’s door openings, cutting or reshaping any part of the body or frame of a vehicle to accommodate lifting mechanisms, etc.
  • Qualified adaptive conversions and/or their installation may be capitalized but not residualized.
  • The Addendum must be signed by the customer, stipulating that the equipment will be removed at lease termination/contract end and the vehicle returned to its original condition, subject to normal wear and tear. The addendum states that the customer will bear the costs for removal of adaptive conversions.

SmartLease Addendum

GM Mobility Reimbursement Program (new vehicles)
Financial mobility financing for eligible adaptive equipment is available through the GM Mobility Reimbursement Program. New vehicle purchasers/lessees who install or reinstall eligible adaptive mobility equipment on their new Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicles can receive a combination of financial assistance and the protection and convenience of OnStar®:

Up to $1,000 reimbursement for eligible adaptive equipment.
PLUS two additional years of standard OnStar service on qualified Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicles.

Department of Veterans Affairs
U.S. military veterans may be eligible for financial assistance through their VA benefits when equipping a vehicle with adaptive equipment. Call 1-800-827-1000 or visit www.va.gov for more information.

Are there any other ways I can offset the cost of purchasing automotive adaptive equipment?
The cost of durable automotive adaptive equipment for use by persons with disabilities may be offset with federal income tax credits and deductions, state sales and use tax deductions, funding through state rehabilitation vocational agencies, and medical insurance providers. Consult with your tax advisor/preparer, appropriate state social service agency and/or insurance provider to see what benefits you might be eligible for. Your savings could be substantial.

Mobility Resources

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA)
When selecting mobility equipment installers, shop around and inquire about their qualifications, capabilities, experience, warranty and service practices. Ask for references. Ask if they are members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) and if they are QAP-certified. NMEDA is committed to providing automotive adaptive equipment solutions for people with disabilities. In this effort, NMEDA has implemented the Quality Assurance Program (QAP), a nationally recognized accreditation program for mobility equipment dealers.

The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED)
ADED is devoted to helping individuals with disabilities locate driver evaluators and trainers who can conduct an assessment of a person’s abilities (cognitive, perceptual and physical) and adaptive equipment needs, an important step in the selection process. Call 1-866-672-9466 or visit www.driver-ed.org for more information.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
There are many variables to consider when obtaining adaptive equipment for your vehicle. We suggest you request a copy of the Department of Transportation brochure “Adapting Motor Vehicles For People With Disabilities” by calling 1-888-327-4236 or visiting www.nhtsa.gov. Following a proven process can help you avoid costly mistakes when purchasing and modifying a vehicle with adaptive equipment.

Other Resources

  • American Association of People with Disabilities
  • Attention Deficit Disorder Resource
  • Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome
  • Eastern Michigan Deaf & Hard of Hearing Information Site
  • Michigan Paralyzed Veterans of America guide to accessible gasoline stations
  • Mobility Corner
  •  National Organization on Disability

Lexus Mobility Rebate Information

 Reimburses the vehicle owner up to $1,000 cash for after-market adaptive equipment for drivers and/or passengers when installed on any eligible Lexus vehicle purchased or leased new. This applies to model years 2001 and later. For details, refer to the Assistance Guidelines and Reimbursement Application Form. Forms are also available from your local Lexus dealer or from most adaptive-equipment installers.

Lexus Financial Services Mobility Financing
Available upon credit approval through Lexus Financial Services and participating Lexus dealers. Provides flexible, extended-term financing when persons with physical disabilities or their families purchase a new Lexus vehicle with the installed adaptive equipment (including installation costs). Please contact your local participating Lexus dealer for details.

Assistance Guidelines
Lexus will reimburse the cost up to $1,000 to each eligible, original retail customer for purchasing and installation of qualifying adaptive driving or passenger equipment for transporting persons with physical disabilities. This offer applies to all Lexus vehicles purchased or leased new in 2001 or later. Leased vehicles require advance written lessor approval of adaptive-equipment installations.

  1. Only new vehicles sold or leased and delivered to a retail customer by an authorized Lexus dealer are eligible for reimbursement. Fleet incentive recipients are not eligible.
  2. The adaptive equipment must be installed within 12 months of vehicle purchase or lease. A Reimbursement Application Form must be submitted to Lexus Customer Satisfaction within 90 days of complete installation of adaptive equipment.
  3. Qualifying adaptive equipment or conversion is defined as any after-market alteration or equipment installation on an eligible Lexus vehicle that provides the disabled user with convenient access and/or the ability to drive the vehicle. Lexus factory options and Lexus accessories are NOT eligible for reimbursement.
  4. A prescription or note from a licensed medical doctor on physician’s letterhead is required for reimbursement, except as noted below. For a limited number of adaptations, such as hand controls and wheelchair or scooter hoists or ramps, no medical note or prescription is required. Running boards, alerting devices, pedal extenders and similar adaptations must have medical documentation. Running boards, trailer hitches and pedal extenders are not reimbursable if they are available as a factory option or dealer-installed accessory. For pedal-extender reimbursement, the customer must be medically diagnosed with a dwarfism condition. Questions about other adaptations should be directed to Lexus Customer Satisfaction at (800) 255-3987.
  5. The Reimbursement Application Form must be completed in its entirety and signed by the customer and the selling dealership. It should be mailed along with a copy of the vehicle sales or lease agreement, the adaptive-equipment company’s paid invoice showing payment by the vehicle’s owner, a Lessor Letter of Authorization (for leased vehicles), and a prescription or note from a licensed medical doctor on physician’s letterhead (when required) to the following address:LEXUS CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
    19001 SOUTH WESTERN AVENUE
    MAIL DROP L201
    TORRANCE, CA 90509-2991

Payment to the individual Mobility Assistance Program customer will be sent within 3-4 weeks after receipt of an approved claim form and all required documentation.

Please call Lexus Customer Satisfaction with any questions:
(800) 255-3987 or (800) 443-4999 – TDD

Steps To Mobility
Lexus supports the steps detailed in the U.S. Department of Transportation’s brochure, Adapting Motor Vehicles for People With Disabilities. Copies are available by calling (888) 327-4236 or visiting www.nhtsa.dot.gov. The process includes these five steps:

  1. Determine your state’s driver’s license requirements.
  2. Evaluate your needs.
Use the Mobility Resources below to contact your local driver-assessment specialist to help identify the adaptive equipment most suited to your needs.
  3. Select the right vehicle.
Consult with your evaluator, an adaptive-equipment installer and your local Lexus dealer to determine the Lexus model that’s best for you.
  4. Choose a qualified mobility equipment installer.
Always ask about qualifications, capabilities, experience, warranty coverage and service. Confirm they are members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has established vehicle conversion standards.
  5. Obtain training on the use of the new equipment.
When this process is complete, follow the Assistance Guidelines above, complete and submit the Reimbursement Application Form within 90 days of adaptive-equipment installation. You can recover up to $1,000 of the cost of your adaptive equipment and/or conversion. In addition to the printable version on this Web site, forms are also available from your local Lexus dealer, from an adaptive-equipment installer or upon request by calling Lexus Customer Satisfaction at (800) 255-3987.

Mobility Resources

Driver Assessment Specialists:
Contact a mobility equipment dealer in your area for advice on a driver assessment specialist to evaluate your vehicle

Tips to Save Money When Converting Honda Wheelchair Vans

New and Used Honda Odyessey wheelchair accessible vans for sale at VMi New England Mobility Center
Transforming a Honda Odyssey into an ideal wheelchair accessible van can be an overwhelming experience. Not only are you making important decisions, you are also confronting hefty price tags.

Conversions are not cheap. That is not just true with Honda vehicles either. The process involved in taking a “factory” vehicle and transforming it into safe, smart, reliable wheelchair transportation vehicle is a major undertaking. You will be dealing with skilled professionals who use the best possible equipment–and who expect to be compensated accordingly.

Fortunately, you can do a few things to keep your bill down. Your Honda wheelchair van will never be a “steal,“ but it can feel like a bargain if you follow these recommendations.

Proper Needs Assessment
You should undergo an evaluation from a licensed professional before making a purchase. They will give you a full report of the adaptations you will need in a wheelchair vehicle. They will also talk with you about those different options and what you must have, comparing that to other options.

In some cases, that report may say you will need a ramp. Obviously, you should follow the recommendation. However, the report may leave some discretion in terms of what ramp you will want to buy. Do you really need a full power option or could you function with a spring-assisted ramp? The goal here is to select adaptations that meet your needs while avoiding overspending on those that exceed your actual needs.

Remember, the average wheelchair van may only last ten years. That means you are buying the Odyssey you need now. You are not trying to “have all the bases covered” for your later years. This is not a lifetime decision.

Understanding Funding and Financing Options
You should look for every available source of funding assistance for your Honda wheelchair van. Are you eligible for a federal or state program that can help reduce costs? Is there a mobility rebate available? Did you serve in the military and follow-up on potential Veteran’s Administration assistance? Will your health insurance or worker’s compensation coverage help with the conversion bill? You may or may not find ways to decrease costs, but it is definitely worth a long look.

If you are financing, you should be certain you are getting the best possible deal on your loan. You can get financing for a Honda wheelchair van from your bank, an auto finance company, a home equity loan or a variety of other sources. You should be choosing the best option available. If you have not yet purchased your Odyssey, talk with your Honda wheelchair van dealer. They may be able to bundle the price of your conversions into your auto loan.

Shop Wisely
You should do extensive comparison shopping before making decisions about your disability equipment dealer and conversion manufacturer. You do not want to cut corners on quality or safety to save money, but you do want to be sure that you are getting the best possible deal from qualified professionals.

Making wise equipment selections based on your actual needs, investigating all funding and financing options and being a motivated, well-informed shopper who’s willing to negotiate can help you find the best possible deal.

With a little extra effort, you may be able to dramatically decrease the amount of money you spend on your Honda wheelchair van.

Accessible Vehicles And Adaptive Mobility Equipment Q&A

Accessible Vehicles and Adaptive Mobility Equipment Q&A

Rear entry vs. side entry. Buying online. Buying used. What do you need to know to get maximum benefit for minimum expense?

Good information is the key to saving money and getting the most value for the dollar when making a big-ticket purchase like a wheelchair-accessible vehicle.

With that in mind, Seek out and find experts who truly care for answers to some common questions about adaptive mobility equipment.

Q: Can I just go to a car dealer down the street or do I need a certified mobility dealer?

A: Certified mobility dealers help consumers buy the right vehicle and adaptive mobility equipment to meet their mobility needs now and in the future. Future planning is especially important for people with muscle diseases that get progressively worse over time.

“There are so many different products out there, and technology has improved so much. We just want to help people make the right decision,” says Jim Sanders, president of Automotive Innovations based in Bridgewater, MA for over 25 years.

“Many times, consumers will go to a car dealer and buy [a vehicle] that can’t be modified or one that doesn’t fit their needs. And once you buy a vehicle, normally it’s very difficult to return it.”

The National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), a nonprofit organization that provides consumer guidance and ensures quality and professionalism in the manufacturing and installation of mobility equipment. Members include mobility equipment dealers, manufacturers, driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals.

NMEDA member-dealers must follow the safety standards established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in addition to NMEDA’s own stringent guidelines.

Some dealers choose to enroll in NMEDA’s Quality Assurance Program (QAP), which requires them to adhere to national motor vehicle safety standards, and use proven quality control practices to yield the highest level of performance and safety. Automotive Innovations was the First Mobility Dealer in Massachusetts to enroll and exceed the safety standards.

“The QAP dealer is audited by an outside engineering firm to verify that technicians have been trained, make sure the dealer has insurance and make sure the facility is ADA-compliant,”

So it means the QAP dealer is going above and beyond.”

Other reasons to seek out a certified mobility equipment dealer include:

They provide a link to qualified service and repair, that it’s crucial to have done on a adapted vehicle serviced.

Some manufacturers of adapted vehicles sell directly to consumers, cutting costs by cutting out the middle man, says Jim Sanders, of VMi New England, based in Bridgewater, MA.

But expert assessment and “try before you buy” remain essentials for prospective buyers, with or without a dealer in the middle.

For example, We, a NMEDA QAP-certified member, send representatives to customers’ homes for assessment and test drives before they buy, and also offer unmatched service/maintenance to just about any modified vehicle including Rollx vans.

Q: Can I get a better price if I buy online rather than from a dealer?

A: As with any online shopping, the warning “buyer beware” rings true. Buying online without trying out different vehicles with different conversions can be a costly mistake. Furthermore there are many grey market converted vans being offered as quality conversions.

Online, clients are mostly shopping blind. Typically they have no idea how the vehicle they need will even work fro them, even if they have specific recommendations from a driver evaluator or occupational therapist.

“You definitely shouldn’t buy it online,” “There not trying to assess your needs by e-mail or over the phone. There just trying to sell you something.

Some online dealers even have a questionnaire on its Web site to try and give you the idea your getting what you need. But, it will never replace being able to go to a local mobility dealership and try the vans out first hand.

A mobility vehicle is probably the second-largest purchase after a house. You should see it, try it out, and make sure it’s something that will work for you. It’s horrible when people get something that they’re disappointed in.

Every vehicle is a little bit different — such as in the dimensions, electrical and fuel systems, or suspension modifications. “If you go online and buy [based] on price, you’re not really looking at the total package.”

While buying online maybe able to save money up front, it wont over the long term.

In addition to consumers missing out on the important local service contact that a mobility equipment dealer provides, these online deals or grey market vans are worth much less when it comes time to trade it in.

Where do you want to sit? If you plan to drive from your wheelchair, then a side-entry conversion is what you’ll need, unless you can transfer to the driver’s seat (rear entry). With a rear-entry conversion, the wheelchair user typically is positioned in the back or between two mid-row captain’s seats, while a side entry offers a wheelchair user multiple seating options in the driver, front passenger and middle sections.

Q: What are some common mistakes people make when buying a modified vehicle?

A: Manufacturers and mobility dealers agree that one of the most common — and costly — mistakes is buying the vehicle first and then shopping for the conversion or adaptive mobility equipment. Not all vehicles can be converted.

For example, If you purchase a minivan from a traditional car dealership you can hit a roadblock if it doesn’t meet specific requirements to have the floor lowered for a rear- or side-entry conversion.

Q: What are some good questions to ask a dealer or manufacturer?

A: Although buying a modified vehicle can be “a daunting experience,” says VMI’s Monique McGivney, it also can be “exciting and fun when you walk in armed with good questions and information.”

Prior to getting an assessment from a mobility dealer, evaluate your needs and try answering the following questions:

  • What vehicle will fit in my garage?
  • What kind of parking issues will I encounter where I live?
  • What is the size and weight of my wheelchair?
  • What is my seated height in the wheelchair?
  • How many people will ride in the vehicle?
  • In what part of the vehicle do I want to sit?
  • Will I be able to drive with hand controls?
  • Do I want a full-size van, minivan or alternative vehicle?
  • Do I want manual or power equipment?
  • Will an in-floor ramp or fold-out ramp meet my needs?
  • What is my budget, and do I have access to supplemental funding?

The first question mobility dealers usually ask a client is: “What is your seated height in the wheelchair?” From there, the dealer can advise whether a full-size or minivan is appropriate, and what kind of conversion is needed.

Be sure to ask the dealer about the warranty and how the vehicle can be serviced.

Q: Which is better: rear entry or side entry?

A: The most important difference between a rear- and side-entry conversion is that with a rear entry, wheelchair users can’t drive from their wheelchairs nor can they ride in the front passenger seat. From there, the choice comes down to personal preference and budget.

In recent years, because of quality, convenience and cost, there’s been a shift toward side entry vehicles. Rear entry is more of a frugal modification, involves a less of conversion process and is typically a little less expensive than a side-entry conversion.

Many people prefer side entry with a in-floor conversion for many safety reasons additionally because they can park almost anywhere and not worry deploying the ramp out into traffic. Also, side entry allows the consumer to ride in the passengers front position along with maintain the rear seats in a minivan because the conversion doesn’t affect that area.

Rear entry is harder to get out of compared to a side-entry.

Anyway you look at it side-entry vehicles are more versatile. For example, side entry allows someone with a progressively worsening condition to use the vehicle for a longer period of time. A wheelchair user can start out driving from his or her chair, and then move to several other positions in the vehicle when no longer able to drive.

Side-entry conversions typically are a little more expensive than rear-entry because they’re more intrusive and labor intensive. For example, with a minivan, the entire floor and frame must be removed and replaced with a lowered floor and new frame.

Q: What’s the difference between a fold-out ramp and in-floor ramp?

A: This decision comes down to safety, aesthetics, convenience and cost.

A fold-out ramp folds up into the vehicle, takes up valuable space in the passengers front area and must be deployed whenever the door is opened.

The in-floor ramp slides under the floor, so it safer for anyone seated in the passengers front position, mid-ship position, there’s no obstruction to the door, and other passengers can enter and exit without deploying the ramp. In-floor ramps only are currently only available for side-entry minivan conversions, and there is even a manual (unpowered) option.

In-floor ramps in addition to being safer will generally provide more room in the vehicle because there’s nothing blocking the doorway. The ramp is “out of sight, out of mind and may last longer because it doesn’t have to be deployed each time the side passenger door opens.

Fold-out ramps generally cost a little less than in-floor, and consumers can select from manual and power versions; a power fold-out ramp still costs less than an in-floor ramp.

If an in-floor ramp system breaks down or the vehicle loses power, VMI’s in-floor ramp systems have a backup system (sure-deploy) that bypasses the vehicle’s battery.

A lot of people just feel more secure knowing there isn’t a fold-out ramp next to them in the event of a accident.

Q: I use a wheelchair, but a van or minivan just isn’t “me.” Are they my only options?

A: You have some choices.

Lowered-floor conversions with fold-out ramps can be done on the Honda Element, Chrysler PT Cruiser and Toyota Scion. The conversions are small and don’t fit as many people.

Due to them being built on a much smaller scale, the ones we have seen have not been built with the same level of quality of mini van conversion. Parts availability and repairs have been a problem, some of the companies that converted them are out of business and or have no support for “something they used to build”

For those who prefer to keep their standard car rather than purchasing a modified vehicle — and who can make the transfer from a wheelchair to a car seat — the answer may be as simple as a set of hand controls or a left foot gas pedal

Turning seats can be used in a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs and pickup trucks. A way to transport the wheelchair (like a rear lift) also is needed.

The rate at which your disease symptoms are worsening is one thing to consider when looking at turning seats — is it likely you’ll be able to transfer and ride in a car seat for many more years? Also, be sure to check with a mobility dealer to determine if your vehicle can accommodate a turning seat and a wheelchair lift.

Q: Why are modified vehicles so darned expensive?

A: A vehicle conversion can cost consumers upwards of $27,000 — and that’s just the cost for the conversion, not the vehicle. The total package can run between $45,000 and $80,000 — or more.

Besides the cost of the components, the reason it’s so pricey is that basically there is a lot of work involved to build a quality vehicle.

Modified vehicles from certified manufacturers and dealers must meet NHTSA’s Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS). That means all modified vehicles must be properly crash tested. (To learn more, visit www.nhtsa.dot.gov.)

It’s quite a labor-intensive process because of the customization. When you make structural modifications to a vehicle, you have to go through all of the crash testing, and you have to show that the vehicle is compliant again, and those tests are very expensive.

Most of the time lowering the floor in a minivan requires replacing or moving the fuel tank. Once the conversion is finished, the vehicle still has to meet the original requirements for evaporative emissions, in addition to NHTSA requirements.

Q: How can I pay less?

A: Consumers have some options.

Many consumers cut costs by purchasing pre-owned vehicles with new conversions, typically saving around $10,000 to $12,000.

The previous van owner already has absorbed the depreciation hit on a new van, which essentially occurs right after you’ve driven off the dealer’s lot.

Buying used can be beneficial for first-time buyers who want to try out a vehicle for a few years before buying new.

But if you plan to buy used, do some research and make sure the vehicle is structurally sound including the conversion. Ask for a vehicle history (CARFAX) report, and get the vehicle inspected by a mobility dealer to ensure it’s in good shape and was well taken care of.

Q: How do people manage to pay for it?

A: Many consumers used home equity loans to purchase a vehicle and adaptive equipment. But with home values decreasing.

Many dealers and manufacturers work with lending institutions that offer extended-term financing, including 10-year loans, allowing consumers to make lower, more affordable monthly payments. The downside is that consumers are locked into the vehicle for 10 years, and end up paying more in interest.

If you finance for 10 years, and you’re not going to keep the vehicle for that amount of time, you’re going to lose money when you try to sell or trade it because you haven’t paid off much of the balance.

When you buy a new vehicle, many car manufacturers offer mobility reimbursement programs (up to $1,000) to help offset the cost for the purchase and installation of adaptive equipment.