Tag Archives: ma

5th Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

Thanks to some last minute donations The Boston Wounded Vet Run proudly announced the 5th honoree for the 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Ride: Marine Sgt Kirstie Ennis!
Kirstie lost her leg due to a helicopter crash in Afghanistan.
This upcoming May, we ride for her!

5th Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

 

Third Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

The Boston Wounded Vet Run proudly announced the third honoree for the 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Ride: Army Specialist Sean Pesce of West Haven, CT!
Sean was shot 13 times Afghanistan and is now paralyzed from the waist down.
This upcoming May, we ride for him!

Third Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

Second Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

The Boston Wounded Vet Run proudly announced the second honoree for the 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Ride: SSG James Clark of Hinsdale, NH!
James lost his leg and part of a foot in an 2009 Afghanistan deployment.
In 2016 we ride for him!

Second Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

Wheelchair DanceFit: A Program of Aero, Inc.

Aero, Inc. is a not-for-profit integrated mixed abilities dance company located in Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, USA.

Aero, Inc. was founded by Maryan Amaral in 1997. This nonprofit is the first integrated dance company in Greater Boston to perform in local and national venues. They lead workshops and performances in schools, colleges, parks, private and public venues.

” Everyone who wants to dance can dance.”

For more information, contact: maryan@aeroinc.org or visit the website

First Honoree For The 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Announced

The Boston Wounded Vet Run proudly announced the first honoree for the 6th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Ride: Peter Damon of Middleborough, MA!
Peter lost both his arms in Iraq.
In 2016 we ride for him!

Peter Damon

Accessible Haunted Houses in New England

According to the Websites these Haunted Houses are accessible.

Spooky World Presents Nightmare New England
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, all of our indoor attractions are accessible and have wooden floors. Please note that our outdoor attractions have paths that are grass, gravel and woodchips.

Is a Military Discount offered?
Yes – we are proud to honor our past and present men and women offering service to our country. To receive a $7 discount per ticket, please show your Military ID at any of our ticket windows when purchasing. A Military ID discount may not be combined with any other coupons or offers.

Ghoulie Manor
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, we are! If you don’t come with a wheelchair, you may need one by the time you leave.

Factory of Terror – Fall River, MA
Factory of Terror – Worcester, MA

Q. Is the Factory of Terror wheelchair accessible?
A. Yes, we have designed our attraction to make it wheelchair accessible.

Six Flags Fright Fest – Springfield, MA
Although the site does not  state it is Wheelchair accessible in the Plan Trip section it says: “7. Stop by Stroller Rental if you need a stroller, wheelchair, wooden stakes, silver bullets, garlic, or holy water.”

Canobie Lake Park Screamfest
Are the haunts wheelchair accessible?
Our haunted attractions can accommodate conventional and electric wheelchairs or electric service vehicles – although certain elements/effects will require the use of an alternate pathway. We do recommend, however, that you plan your visit with someone who is aware of your needs and can physically assist you when necessary.

Is Nightmare Vermont handicapped accessible?

Yes!  This year we are at the Memorial Auditorium which is wheelchair accessible. However, we can only make accommodations for our Thursday, Friday, Sunday and Wednesday shows.
Call 802 355-3107 two days in advance to make arrangements.

Note: You should call in advance to make sure their accommodations meet your needs.

The American Infidels Veteran Motorcycle Club

The American Infidels Veteran Motorcycle Club is a Federally recognized 501c19 War Veterans Organization.

Along with countless volunteers and patriots, we are erecting the first in the State of Massachusetts, 9/11 Mass Fallen Heroes South Shore Memorial located at 777 Plymouth Street Holbrook, Mass.

The Memorial will include a section of steel beam from the World Trade Center and lighted glass panel etched with the Names of the Massachusetts victims of 9/11, those that sacrificed during the massive rescue efforts at ground Zero, Names of warriors that made the ultimate sacrifice fighting in the global war on terror in Iraq, Afghanistan, and those that died from the invisible wounds of war.

To help fund the Memorial, we are providing the opportunity to purchase engraved memorial bricks. These bricks will be permanently installed at and around, the base of the Memorial. Future plans exist for the expansion of the memorial.

For more information please visit their website!

7th Annual Morgan’s Ride Is Tomorrow

7th Annual Morgan's Ride

Sunday September 27, 2015
9:30am – 6:00pm
Hilltop AA Club

Pottle St, Kingston, Massachusetts 02364
Please join us for this ride. A 25 mile ride thought the back roads of the South Shore. Live band, food, raffles and more.. Funds raised go to the Morgan’s Fund. To help the fight against FOP.
$20 PER PERSON.

For more information please visit the Facebook Page

Massachusetts Run For The Fallen Is On Saturday!

 Massachusetts Run For The Fallen

They are a group of runners, walkers, and support crew with a mission.

To run in honor of every Massachusetts Service Member Fallen since September 11, 2001. They run to raise awareness for the lives of those who died, to rejuvenate their memories and keep their spirits alive. MARFTF seeks to honor those who have fallen under the American Flag. For more information or to become a sponsor, contact Military Friends Foundation at 1-84-HELP-VETS or MARFTF@militaryfriends.org

Rain or Shine
Saturday, September 12, 2015
84 Eastern Avenue
Dedham, MA 02026

Not a runner? Come out and cheer on the runners and show your support for the families!

8:00 am – Registration Opens
9:00 am – Name Reading
10:00 am – Timed Run Start
10:10 am – Memorial Run Start
11:00 pm – Post Run Event

  • $30 donation (supports the cost of the event and families of the Fallen) receives a bib, limited edition MARFTF t-shirt, finishers medal and food ticket.
  • Live Music
  • Boston Marathon Tough Ruck
  • Lynn English JROTC Drill Team
  • Post-run: Family Fun including face painting, Ice Cream, raffles and more!
  • RFTF active wear for purchase to benefit Families of the Fallen

Tomorrow Is The Greater Boston Stand Down Event!

Greater Boston Stand Down Event

2nd Annual Bike Day At The Diamond

Bike Day ar the Diamond

For more information please visit the Facebook Page

Recreation Opportunities For People With Disabilities

All Out Adventures
All Out Adventures provides outdoor accessible recreational opportunities throughout Massachusetts for people of all abilities, their families and friends. Summer programs include accessible kayaking, canoeing, hiking and cycling. Winter programs include snowshoeing, x-country skiing & sit-skiing, ice skating, sled skating and snowmobile rides.

Accessible Swimming Pools
Accessible Swimming Pools outdoor swimming pool lifts are available at all of the State Parks and Recreation Department’s 20 swimming pools. The pools are free. Contact pool directly for information about other site factors affecting accessibility.

AccesSport America
AccesSport America is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the discovery of higher function, fitness, and fun for children and adults with disabilities through high-challenge sports, which include kayaking, windsurfing and water skiing.

Arcs.
Local Arcs provide a variety of social and recreational activities for children and teens with developmental disabilities.

Bostnet / Guide to Boston’s Before & After School Programs
Build the Out-of-School Time Network (BOSTnet) has built a network of out-of-school time (OST) resources and opportunities for all children and youth, including those from low-income families and youth with disabilities.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary offers nine miles of walking trails guiding through a variety of field, woodland, and wetland habitats. A quarter-mile, handicap accessible trail and boardwalk along the bank of Indian Brook. Universally accessible facilities: Nature Center, Restrooms, All Persons Trail.

BSC (Boston Sports Club) Adaptive Swim Program
On Monday and Wednesday evening, between 6:30pm and 7:30pm, BSC Waltham (840 Winter Street) offers an adaptive swim program for children, youth, adolescents and adults with disabilities in our 93 degree therapy pool. Volunteers between the ages of 16-20 from neighboring schools and organizations offer their time to pair with an individual seeking to increase range of motion, flexibility, and strength but most importantly to socialize with other individuals and families. Our adaptive swim program is offered during the school year (September thru May) in 8-week sessions at a cost of $200 per session. Our 120,000 square foot, state of the art facility can accommodate families in our men’s, women’s or family changing rooms, fully equipped with showers, lockers, restrooms, towels, and other amenities.

  • 781-522-2054
  • 781-522-2512

CAPEable Adventures
offers adaptive sports & therapeutic recreation activities to local residents and vacationers to the Cape.


Cape Cod Challenger Club

Cape Cod Challenger Club offers noncompetitive sports and recreation opportunities for children with disabilities.

Challenger Sport League
Some towns have challenger teams. The goal of the challenger team is to play with no pressure and to educate typical peers and their parents about sportsmanship. The program is available for boys and girls, ages 3 – 19 with all types of physical and developmental disabilities. Call your local town recreation department to find out if they offer challenger sports.

Children’s Physical Developmental Clinic at Bridgewater State University
BSC students from all majors have opportunities to volunteer as clinicians and work with children and youth with disabilities, ages 18 months to 18 years. Clinic dates are to the right on website’s homepage.

Choral / Community Voices
Open to individuals 16 years of age and older. Must be willing to be committed for 12 weeks. Provides a choral opportunity for adults and young adults with developmental delays. Singing in an ensemble, individuals will have the opportunity to develop and refine vocal technique, listening skills, and team-work. Repertoire will include songs from the masters, traditional and folk favorites, as well as pop and Broadway tunes. Performances are scheduled in December and June. Fee $156/fall, $243/spring.

Compelling Fitness
Compelling Fitness in Hanover provides group and / or individual physical fitness training for children and adults with special needs.

Fitness Program / Special Needs Training
Call your local YMCA.

Horseback Riding – PATH International Centers in Massachusetts
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, PATH International was formally known as North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA). Though PATH Intl. began with a focus on horseback riding as a form of physical and mental therapy, the organization and its dedicated members have since developed a multitude of different equine-related activities for therapeutic purposes, collectively known as equine-assisted activities and therapies (or EAAT).

JF&CS Sunday Respite Program
JF&CS Sunday Respite Program for Children with Developmental Disabilities including those on the Autism Spectrum. Program includes swimming, music and art therapy. The program meets at the Striar JCC in Stoughton from 1:00 -4:00. This program is run by JF&CS with additional funding from Eastern Bank.


Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S)

  • Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S) Thirteen specialized athletic programs are available. K.I.D.S. hosts dances, sports banquets, social activities and recreational events throughout the year. Serves individuals and families throughout Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. Participants range in age 5-40 and have varying disabilities. http://www.kidsinc.us/
  • info@kidsinc.us
  • 1-866-712-7799

LIAM Nation Athletics (formerly known as FOSEK, Friends of Special Education Kidz)
sports leagues for special needs children in Tewksbury and surrounding communities in Merrimack Valley. Accomodates athletes of all abilities. Bombers Baseball, Striker Soccer, Little Reds Basketball.

Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program
Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program provides outdoor recreation opportunities in Massachusetts State Parks for visitors of all abilities. Accessibility to Massachusetts State Parks is achieved through site improvements, specialized adaptive recreation equipment, and accessible recreation programs.

Massachusetts Hospital School Wheelchair Recreation & Sports Program
Wheelchair sports and recreation program for children ages 9 to 21. Horseback riding, swimming and , Wheelchair Athletes Program.

Miracle League of Massachusetts
Miracle League of Massachusetts provides baseball for special needs children. Free to participate (includes uniform). Located at Blanchard Memorial Elementary School Ball Field in Boxborough.

New England Wheelchair Athletic Association (NEWAA)
Volunteer organization that helps individuals with physcial disabilities participate in recreational
and sports activities. The NEWAA provides opportunities for athletic competition by sponsoring
regional and local meets.

Partners for Youth With Disabilities Provides mentoring programs that assist young people reach their full potential. Partners provides several types of mentoring programs including one-to-one, group mentoring and e-mentoring.

Piers Park Sailing
Piers Park Sailing provides programs for disabled youth and adults aboard 23-foot sonar sailboats on a no charge basis. Serves those with amputations, paralysis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, autism, hearing impaired, sight impaired and other disabilities. Successfully integrates youth with disabilities into summer youth sailing programs. Scholarships are available for all Adaptive sailing programs. “Yes You Can Sail” program Friday eves for $35.

  • (617) 561-6677

Senseability Gym
Senseability Gym serves special needs children in greater Hopedale area. Our mission is to provide a parent-led sensory gym, giving children with special needs a safe, fun, indoor area where they can play and accommodate their sensory needs.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports
Spaulding Adaptive Sports offers adaptive sports and recreation activities in Boston, Cape Cod and the North Shore. Includes wheelchair tennis, hand cycling, adaptive rowing, waterskiing or windsurfing.

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA)
Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) provides year round sports training and athletic competition for all persons with intellectual disabilities. Minimum age requirement is eight years of age. There is no maximum age requirement. SOMA summer games offers aquatics, athletics, gymnastics, sailing, tennis and volleyball. Go to above link to search SOMA region that covers your town.

Sudbury Adaptive Sports & Recreation
Programs for all ages and abilities.

Super Soccer Stars Shine
Our unique program uses soccer as a vehicle to teach life skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. Our innovative curriculum, designed by licensed educators and therapists, promotes the complete growth and development of each player. Our low player-to-coach ratios encourage and empower players to increase social potential with teammates, build self-awareness and confidence and advance gross and fine motor skills — all while each individual improves at his or her own pace! Located at 1 Thompson Square, Suite 301 in Charlestown. Call for information. Low pricing options and scholarship applications available.

Therapy and the Performing Arts – Cape Cod
Provides children and young adults with physical and intellectual disabilities the opportunity to enjoy various arts and recreational programs in addition to receiving therapeutic benefits from their participation. Children gain new and rewarding experiences from which they develop self-confidence, increase motor function, and have fun. Offers age appropriate programming on Cape Cod for children and young adults diagnosed with down syndrome, chromosomal abnormalies, cerebral palsy, genetic disorders and othe cognitive and physical disabilities. Classes are taught by certified instructors/ therapists with expertise in various disciplines. Programs are offered on a sliding scale fee based on the family’s ability to pay.


TILL Autism Support Center

TILL Autism Support Center has social programs for those with autism spectrum disorders. Programs include exciting Family Fun Days that include apple picking, rock climing, sledding, in-door gym time, zoo trips, holiday parties and much more.

Town Recreation Departments
Most programs are open to participants from neighboring towns. Call area town recreation department to find out if it has special programming for children with disabilities.

Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn.
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn. offers information about beach wheelchairs, biking, boating and more!

TopSoccer Program / Outreach Program for Soccer
is a community-based training and team placement program for young athletes with a mental or physical disability. For additional information or would like to start a TOPSoccer Program in your community contact:

YMCAs
YMCAs are accessible and offer a range of classes. Call your local YMCA to find out what programs are available.

The Lowell YMCA “Adaptive Aquatics Program” accommodates children with mild to moderate neurological, physical, or social challenges.

  • (978) 454-7825.

Oak Square YMCA of Greater Boston at 615 Washington St, Brighton has a new adaptive fitness room & offers Adapted Adult Speciality Fitness Partnership Program on Wednesday and Saturday 11AM – 12:30PM on the Fitness Floor.

Hopkinton YMCA offers seasonal specialized programs. “Aim High” archery program and “Rock On!” is an outdoor ropes course and rock climbing for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related social communication disorders.

  • 45 East Street in Hopkinton.

WaterFire Access Program
A water-taxi program at Dyer Street Dock in Providence Rhode Island which provides an unforgettable experience of the art work for children and adults with disabilities to assure that they can join in the most popular arts event in the state and share the experience with their families and friends. Reservations are required. Each Water Fire Access passenger can bring along one companion.

Waypoint Adventures
Adventures for people of all ages and abilities

Whole Children offers movement, art, recreation and music programs for infants, children and teens of all abilities. Located in Hadley.

3rd Annual Boston Motorcycle Marathon Ride

Boston Motorcycle Marathon RideFor More Information Please Visit the Facebook Page!

Veterans Assisting Veterans Comedy Night

Veterans Assisting Veterans Comedy Night

Friday May 29 at 7:00
VFW Mottolo Post in Revere
10 Garafolo Street Revere, MA

Check out the Facebook Page and join them for a great night of comedy, Pork Roast Dinner and good times to help raise funds towards two truck mounted AmeriDeck lifts. These are needed to aid in the use of Track Chairs for a couple wounded vets. We also hope to promote and raise awareness of what Veterans Assisting Veterans does and is all about. Donation of $20.00 per person collected at the door.

Memorial Day Parade! Help Surprise Veterans!

Memorial Day Parade! Help Surprise The Veterans!

When
Memorial Day – Monday, May 25
At 10:00am in Athol, Massachusetts

“Please show your support to our veterans, the parade starts at Silver Lake cemetery, and they follow Crescent st ” the same road Staretts is on ” All the way down to the Veterans monument, across from the YMCA ” Next to the bus stop! We all have the day off from work/school, why not show your support? These men and women are more than deserving of it. The best part is, these veterans are not expecting this, they are in for a huge surprise!”

For more information please visit the Facebook Page

The 5th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run Is Today! Come Say Hi!

Bosotn Wpunded Vet Run 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike Downing
All donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race Track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!
Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call with any questions: (617) 697-5080

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run Is Tomorrow!!

Boston's 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run - 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike Downing
All donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race Track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!
Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call with any questions: (617) 697-5080

Motorcycle Awareness MonthMay is Motorcycle Awareness Month.
Share The Road.

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run Is One Month Away!!

Boston's 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run - 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike Downing
All donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race Track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!
Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call with any questions: (617) 697-5080

Spring Rust Treatment

Owning any type of vehicle means that you have to commit to regular service and maintenance to keep it in good condition. Owning a wheelchair van and adaptive equipment is no different – you still need regular service to keep everything operating the way it should. However, it comes with some additional caveats – you can’t just go to any service center and ensure that you’re maintaining your wheelchair van or mobility equipment correctly.

Here at our Mobility Center, not only do we understand the importance of maintaining your mobility vehicle and adaptive equipment, but we take the needed steps to ensure that everything is always in top condition. No other mobility dealer offers the level of maintenance offered by us.

Rust Maintenance
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value.  The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

** We highly recommend that everyone gets their wheelchair accessible vehicles rust proofed at least twice a year. Once in Spring and again in the Fall. **

If you consider that new vehicles undergo thousands of spot welds and numerous bends and folds during assembly; this process damages the automobile coating systems, exposing these panels to corrosion. Besides body-panel damage, certain mechanical parts are also at risk – suspension mounts, hood-locking mechanisms, door hinges, brake cables – which are all susceptible to the damaging effects of rust on your wheelchair van.

To protect your vehicle against corrosion our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required. A rust proofing product must be applied as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

Benefits of rust treatment
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast. Our rust prevention processes, products, plan and application have been found to be very effective and developed over more than 25 years and still remain affordable.

We are the only mobility dealer in New England to offer this service.

Our rust proofing processes is ever evolving and has been for more than 25 years.

Full Service Automotive Shop

The VMi New England Mobility Center’s Team in Bridgewater, MA offers a in-house body shop in addition to a auto service department that is staffed with the most qualified technicians ready to answer your questions and address your handicap van auto repair needs. Our auto body service and car repair experts have the experience to get your wheelchair accessible van back on the road in top condition. You can come from and where in New England to have one of our specialists repair your adapted vehicles, wheelchair vehicles, used adapted vehicles, or used conversion vans, conversion van or handicapped vehicle. Call anytime to schedule an appointment, or contact our van service department if you have any additional questions.

At the VMi New England Mobility Center we provide wheelchair accessible van body repair service for all make & model vans & mobility equipment. We service and repair most all brand mobility vehicles including BraunAbility and VMI van’s We perform body shop service, rust prevention, rust repair and warranty work on all the vehicles & products we sell. We repair wheelchair lifts in vans & buses for both private and commercial customers

Wheelchair Van Body Shop
With our in house down draft spray booth we can assist you with Autobody repair as well as work with insurance companies to be sure you get the proper support in repairing damaged wheelchahir accessible vehicles .

Full Service Automotive Shop
Our team of technicians also perform Full Service Auto repair so we can offer 1 stop shopping. Instead of using 2 different mechanics for the repair of one vehicle, let our trained service team handle all of your mechanical needs

Large Selection Of Wheelchair Van Parts In-Stock
We offer a large selection of parts for wheelchair lifts and wheelchair vans including: BraunAbility, VMI, Vision & more. Our expert staff in our service department are standing by to fix your mobility van. Whether you need a single part or would like to keep your entire fleet going, we have the name brand parts available. If we don’t have the exact part your looking for, we can get almost anything within a day. Give us a call today for all your wheelchair van needs.

Massachusetts Gold Star Family Tree Dedication

Military Friends Foundation 501(C)3
Cordially Invites You To Join The
Massachusetts Gold Star Family Tree Dedication

on

December 16, 2014 (TODAY!!)
At 1:30pm
Memorial Hall
State House, Boston, MA

 Massachusetts Gold Star Family Tree Dedication

 Massachusetts Gold Star Families are invited to submit a photo of their loved one that will be displayed on the state’s Gold Star Families Tree on December 16th. Families are also invited to join at 12:30pm (prior to the 1:30pm dedication) to decorate a custom ornament. For more information and to submit a photograph, please visit www.militaryfriends.org/GoldStarTree

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run

Boston's 5th Annual Wounded Vet Run - 2015

What
Motorcycle Ride and Concert
Ceremony – Food – Music By TigerLily Band
Beer Tent – Vendors -Raffle Items – Stunt Show

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE -Everyone Welcome
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs to welcome Veterans and Bikers!

Purpose
To support four of New England’s most severely wounded Veterans:
SSG Nick Lavery
SGT Brendan Ferreira
SSG Travis Mills
SSG Mike DowningAll donations directly benefit these wounded Veterans and charities of their choosing.

When
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Rain date: May 16, 2015
Registration begins at 10am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where
Begins at:
“New” Boston Harley-Davidson
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost
$20 per rider
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins

Donate Here!!Donations can be made out to ‘Boston’s Wounded Veterans’ and sent to:
60 Paris Street
East Boston, MA 02128

Call Andrew with any questions: 903-340-9402
Vendors please call: 617-416-0782

Hope For Heroes: Homeless Veteran Drive

Hope For Heroes - Homeless Veteran Drive

Event:
Hope For Heroes
Homeless Veteran Drive
“Support those who supported U.S.”

When:
November 7-11 2014

What Can You Do?

Donate! Hope For Heroes is collecting items to be donated to homeless Veterans residing at three Massachusetts Veteran Shelters. The following items are needed:

  • Sweaters, Turtlenecks, Thermal Underwear, Belts (All Sizes)
  • Functional Computers/Software
  • Gift Cards to Supermarkets, Drug Stores and/or Department Stores
  • Toiletry Items (Shampoo, Shaving Cream, Razors)
  • Pillows, Pillow Cases, Blankets, Sheets for Twin Beds
  • Wool Knit Hats, Scarves, Gloves
  • Disposable Diapers
  • Bras (Sizes C and D Preferred)
  • Padlocks
  • Gift Wrap and Supplies
  • Gently Worn Male/Female Business Clothing (For Job Interviews)

Collection Location
Milford Nissan: (508) 422-8000
320 East Main Street (Route 16) Milford, MA 01757

Drop Off Times:

  • Friday: November 7th 8am – 6pm
  • Saturday: November 8th 8am – 5pm | 10am – 12 Noon: WMRC Radio (1490am) LIVE Remote Broadcast
  • Sunday: November 9th 12pm – 5pm
  • Monday: November 10th 8am – 8pm
  • Tuesday November 11th (Veterans Day) 8am – 8pm
    8am – 11am Chef Barry Keefe (Dinner & Co. Gourmet Catering) will provide FREE Breakfast Sandwiches to anyone making a donation.

Boston’s 5th Annual Wounded Vet Motorcycle Run

 Boston’s Annual Wounded Vet Bike Run Inspired by Cpl. Vincent Mannion Brodeur began in 2011. One of the most severely wounded veterans in the nation, Vinnie is the recipient of the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. While serving in Iraq in 2007 with the 82nd Airborne, Vinnie was critically injured by an insurgents improvised explosive device. After surviving 40 operations and a year long coma Vincent has become an inspiration for people throughout the nation. All proceeds from Vinnie’s Run went to creating a handicapped accessible living space for Vinnie. Every year Boston’s Wounded Vet Run will be dedicated to different veterans. All proceeds raised go towards housing modifications to suite a comfortable living for the disabled veteran. Besides housing modifications, funds are also used to improve the quality of life of disabled veterans. Recreational needs, cars, and basic living needs are also other fields of charity the ride is dedicated to. The event is sponsored by the Italian-American War Veterans, a federally chartered non-profit veterans organization. They fought, and we ride, a bike run honoring the wounded veteran’s of New England.

The Honorees for the 5th Annual Boston Wounded Vet Run

2015 Event Information

When?
Saturday, May 9, 2015
Registration begins at 9am.
Kickstands up 12pm

Where?
Begins at:
New Boston Harley
650 Squire Road, Revere, Ma

Ends at:
Suffolk Downs Race track
550 McClellan Hwy East Boston

Cost:
$20 per person
10$ passenger
$20 Walk-ins
Donate Here!!

Motorcycle NOT REQUIRED TO PARTICIPATE
Those who do not ride can join us at Suffolk Downs at 1:30 for ceremony, food, and entertainment.

2015 Honorees
U.S ARMY SSGT Nick Lavery
U.S ARMY SSGT Mike Downing
U.S. ARMY SGT Brendan Ferreira
U.S ARMY SSGT Travis Mills

Vendors please call:
617-416-0782

5th Annual Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Memorial Dinner

5th Annual Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Memorial Dinner
Massachusetts Fallen Heroes was created to memorialize our fallen heroes who served in the Global War on Terrorism since 2001. The organization acts as a liaison to acquire education, employment, medical, legal and financial services to military veterans, their families, and Gold Star families.

Event Information

What:
5th Annual Massachusetts Fallen Heroes Memorial Dinner

When:
Thursday, December 4, 2014

Times:
Reception starts – 6:00 PM
Dinner begins at – 7:00 PM

Location:
Seaport World Trade Center
Boston, Massachusetts

Giving Opportunities

PRESENTING SPONSOR ($50,000)
•Sponsorship exclusivity in your industry
•Recognition in all press releases
•Recognition as the “Presenting Sponsor” from podium during speaking program
•Premier listing of company name/logo on official event invitation cover
•Premier listing of company name/logo on screens during dinner
•Premier listing of company name/logo in event program
•Premier listing of company name/logo on event signage
•Premier listing of company name/logo on website
•Three tables (30 seats) in premier location for dinner

GOLD STAR FAMILY RECEPTION SPONSOR ($25,000)
•Official sponsor of the Gold Star Family reception

•Prominent listing of company name/logo on official event invitation
•Prominent listing of company name/logo on screens during dinner
•Prominent listing of company name/logo in event program
•Prominent listing of company name/logo on event signage
•Prominent listing of company name/logo on website
•Two tables (20 seats) in prominent location for dinner

LEADERSHIP SPONSOR ($15,000)
•Listing of company name on official event invitation
•Listing of company name on screens during dinner
•Listing of company name in event program
•Listing of company name on event signage
•Listing of company name on website
•One table (10 seats) for dinner

PATRON SPONSOR ($10,000)
•Listing of company name on screens during dinner

•Listing of company name in event program
•Listing of company name on event signage
•Listing of company name on website
•One table (10 seats) for dinner

FRIEND SPONSOR ($5,000)
•Listing of company name in event program

•Listing of company name on event signage
•Tickets for four (4) guests to the dinner

* If desired, disabled veterans may be seated at your table

Accessible Haunted Houses in New England

According to the Websites these Haunted Houses are accessible.

Spooky World Presents Nightmare New England
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, all of our indoor attractions are accessible and have wooden floors. Please note that our outdoor attractions have paths that are grass, gravel and woodchips.

Is a Military Discount offered?
Yes – we are proud to honor our past and present men and women offering service to our country. To receive a $7 discount per ticket, please show your Military ID at any of our ticket windows when purchasing. A Military ID discount may not be combined with any other coupons or offers.

Ghoulie Manor
Are you wheelchair accessible?
Yes, we are! If you don’t come with a wheelchair, you may need one by the time you leave.

Factory of Terror – Fall River, MA
Factory of Terror – Worcester, MA

Q. Is the Factory of Terror wheelchair accessible?
A. Yes, we have designed our attraction to make it wheelchair accessible.

Six Flags Fright Fest – Springfield, MA
Although the site does not  state it is Wheelchair accessible in the Plan Trip section it says: “7. Stop by Stroller Rental if you need a stroller, wheelchair, wooden stakes, silver bullets, garlic, or holy water.”

Canobie Lake Park Screamfest
Are the haunts wheelchair accessible?
Our haunted attractions can accommodate conventional and electric wheelchairs or electric service vehicles – although certain elements/effects will require the use of an alternate pathway. We do recommend, however, that you plan your visit with someone who is aware of your needs and can physically assist you when necessary.

Is Nightmare Vermont handicapped accessible?

Yes!  This year we are at the Memorial Auditorium which is wheelchair accessible. However, we can only make accommodations for our Thursday, Friday, Sunday and Wednesday shows.
Call 802 355-3107 two days in advance to make arrangements.

Note: You should call in advance to make sure their accommodations meet your needs.

MASSACHUSETTS RUN FOR THE FALLEN ~ A Military Friends Foundation Project

Start Date: 09/06/2014
Start Time: 09 : 00 AM
End Time: 12 : 00 AM
Location: Market Street Lynnfield – Exit 43 off Route 128/I-95
Lynnfield, Massachusetts 01940
 Name: Military Friends Foundation
Phone: (844) 357-8387
Email: Email the Event Director
Website: facebook.com/massrunforthefallen
Information for GOLD STAR FAMILIES
Are you a post 9/11 MASSACHUSETTS GOLD STAR FAMILY? Please call or email for your Gold Star Family code to waive your registration fee for four family members!

Email: MARFTF@militaryfriends.org
Ph: 1-84-HELP-VETS

About the Massachusetts Run for the Fallen
Massachusetts Run For The Fallen (MARFTF) is a Military Friends Foundation project dedicated to keeping alive the memory of our military Heroes that gave their lives to protect our freedom since September 11, 2001.

We are a group of runners, walkers and support crew whose mission is clear and simple: To run in honor every Massachusetts service member who lost there lives in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. Each mile of sweat and pain and each flag saluted, is to pay homage to one service member’s life and their family.

We run to raise awareness for the lives of those who died, to rejuvenate their memories and keep their spirits alive. We run to raise support for programs that assist the families of the fallen and to aid in the healing process for Massachusetts residents whose lives have been affected by war. MARFTF has no political affiliation or agenda, but simply honor those who have fought, and those who have fallen under the American Flag.

2014 Event Schedule
7-8:00 AM – Same Day Registration Opens
8:15 AM – Name Reading of Fallen Heroes
9:05 AM – Wheelchair Start
9:11 AM – Timed 5K Start
9:15 AM – Untimed 5K/Walker Start
9:30-12:00 – Food, Festivities and Fun!
Event Highlights
*Limited edition tshirt for the first 400 registered runners (additional shirts may be available for purchase day of event)
*Pre-run airbrush tattoo
*Post-Run lunch featuring eats from Kings Lynnfield
*Free ice cream tasting
*Great promotions for registered runners/walkers from MarketStreet stores
*Raffles
*Live music

Click here  to Register

Attention Homeless and At-Risk Veterans – We Want To Honor and Serve You

The Massachusetts Stand Down is ONE DAY ONLY on Friday August 22, 2014

Event Location
IBEW Local 103
256 Freeport Street Dorchester

Registration
Veterans MUST Bring Proof of Military Service
Hours: 8:00am 4:00pm
No Administration after registration closes

Contact Information
Call: 6175228086
Email: veteran@voamass.org
Or Log On To: www.voamass.org

Free Services Include
Housing Assistance * Job Assistance * Legal Assistance * Education * Mass Health * Medical Aid
Eye Glasses
* Hair Cuts * Foot Care * Oral Health and Dental Screening * Clothing * VA Benefits * Child Support
VA Boston Healthcare System Registration
* Mental Health Counseling * Counseling * Food Stamps
HIV/Aids Resources
* Female Veteran Programs * Voter Registration * Massachusetts ID and Driver License Renewals

What Is The Massachusetts Stand Down?
“Stand Down” is a military term referring to the brief period of time a soldier leaves an active combat area in order to rest and regain strength. Today, Stand Down refers to a grassroots, community based intervention program designed to help the nation’s homeless veteran population.

This event has served as a way of bringing a wide range of specialized resources to help the city’s veterans facing a wide range of problems, from homelessness to mental health needs and everything in between. Stand Down is a once a year opportunity for homeless and at-risk veterans to access a broad spectrum of services in one location

Volunteer
The Massachusetts Stand Down depends on a large number of volunteers to help serve over 1,000 Veterans.
Volunteer areas include:
Veteran and Volunteer Registration * Friendly Site Guide * Clothing Tent * Food Preparation and Service * Family Tent

2014 Stand Down Volunteer Application
For questions about volunteering at Stand Down, contact Melita Little at mlittle@voamass.org or 617-522-8086.

Donate
To find out how you or your business can donate time and services, please contact:

Stephanie Paauwe, Volunteers of America, spaauwe@voamass.org or 617-522-8086.

Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike

Yesterday, July 13, 2014, The Boston Wounded Vets MC Run (They Fought, We Ride) presented a brand new Harley Davidson 2014 trike to wounded Soldier Andy Kingsley from Athol.

The trike was purchased by Monies raised by the Boston Wounded Vets Motorcycle ride.
The Mobility & Adaptive Equipment was installed by us, VMi New England.

Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike1 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike2 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike9 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike10 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike11 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike3 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike12 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike4 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike13 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike5 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike14 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike6 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike7 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike15 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike16 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike8 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike17 Boston Wounded Vet MC Ride presents Andy Kingsley his New 2014 Modified Trike18

Mass. Registry of Motor Vehicles: Fees Increase

As if waiting in line at the Registry of Motor Vehicles wasn’t painful enough. Now, it’s going to cost you a little more money to conduct your business there.

Starting Today, the RMV will increase fees for road tests, one- and two-year registrations, and vehicle inspections.

The highest service price hike will be for road tests, which will increase from $20 to $35. Meanwhile, a one-year registration will increase from $25 to $30 and a two-year registration will go from $50 to $60.

And if it’s time to get your vehicle inspected, it will cost you $35 instead of $29.

According to a news release from the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, registration fees have not been changed since 2009. Inspection fees were last changed in 1999 and fees for road tests have not changed in over a decade.

MassDOT estimates the fee increase will help the agency generate $55 to $63 million for the 2015 fiscal year and close a projected $55 million budget gap. The extra revenue will also help “make customer improvements and invest in the Commonwealth’s transportation system.”

 For the full list of Mass. RMV Fees click here

Recreation Opportunities For People With Disabilities

All Out Adventures
All Out Adventures provides outdoor accessible recreational opportunities throughout Massachusetts for people of all abilities, their families and friends. Summer programs include accessible kayaking, canoeing, hiking and cycling. Winter programs include snowshoeing, x-country skiing & sit-skiing, ice skating, sled skating and snowmobile rides.

Accessible Swimming Pools
Accessible Swimming Pools outdoor swimming pool lifts are available at all of the State Parks and Recreation Department’s 20 swimming pools. The pools are free. Contact pool directly for information about other site factors affecting accessibility.

AccesSport America
AccesSport America is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to the discovery of higher function, fitness, and fun for children and adults with disabilities through high-challenge sports, which include kayaking, windsurfing and water skiing.

Arcs.
Local Arcs provide a variety of social and recreational activities for children and teens with developmental disabilities.

Bostnet / Guide to Boston’s Before & After School Programs
Build the Out-of-School Time Network (BOSTnet) has built a network of out-of-school time (OST) resources and opportunities for all children and youth, including those from low-income families and youth with disabilities.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary
Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary offers nine miles of walking trails guiding through a variety of field, woodland, and wetland habitats. A quarter-mile, handicap accessible trail and boardwalk along the bank of Indian Brook. Universally accessible facilities: Nature Center, Restrooms, All Persons Trail.

BSC (Boston Sports Club) Adaptive Swim Program
On Monday and Wednesday evening, between 6:30pm and 7:30pm, BSC Waltham (840 Winter Street) offers an adaptive swim program for children, youth, adolescents and adults with disabilities in our 93 degree therapy pool. Volunteers between the ages of 16-20 from neighboring schools and organizations offer their time to pair with an individual seeking to increase range of motion, flexibility, and strength but most importantly to socialize with other individuals and families. Our adaptive swim program is offered during the school year (September thru May) in 8-week sessions at a cost of $200 per session. Our 120,000 square foot, state of the art facility can accommodate families in our men’s, women’s or family changing rooms, fully equipped with showers, lockers, restrooms, towels, and other amenities.

  • 781-522-2054
  • 781-522-2512

CAPEable Adventures
offers adaptive sports & therapeutic recreation activities to local residents and vacationers to the Cape.


Cape Cod Challenger Club

Cape Cod Challenger Club offers noncompetitive sports and recreation opportunities for children with disabilities.

Challenger Sport League
Some towns have challenger teams. The goal of the challenger team is to play with no pressure and to educate typical peers and their parents about sportsmanship. The program is available for boys and girls, ages 3 – 19 with all types of physical and developmental disabilities. Call your local town recreation department to find out if they offer challenger sports.

Children’s Physical Developmental Clinic at Bridgewater State University
BSC students from all majors have opportunities to volunteer as clinicians and work with children and youth with disabilities, ages 18 months to 18 years. Clinic dates are to the right on website’s homepage.

Choral / Community Voices
Open to individuals 16 years of age and older. Must be willing to be committed for 12 weeks. Provides a choral opportunity for adults and young adults with developmental delays. Singing in an ensemble, individuals will have the opportunity to develop and refine vocal technique, listening skills, and team-work. Repertoire will include songs from the masters, traditional and folk favorites, as well as pop and Broadway tunes. Performances are scheduled in December and June. Fee $156/fall, $243/spring.

Compelling Fitness
Compelling Fitness in Hanover provides group and / or individual physical fitness training for children and adults with special needs.

Fitness Program / Special Needs Training
Call your local YMCA.

Horseback Riding – PATH International Centers in Massachusetts
Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, PATH International was formally known as North American Riding for the Handicapped Association (NARHA). Though PATH Intl. began with a focus on horseback riding as a form of physical and mental therapy, the organization and its dedicated members have since developed a multitude of different equine-related activities for therapeutic purposes, collectively known as equine-assisted activities and therapies (or EAAT).

JF&CS Sunday Respite Program
JF&CS Sunday Respite Program for Children with Developmental Disabilities including those on the Autism Spectrum. Program includes swimming, music and art therapy. The program meets at the Striar JCC in Stoughton from 1:00 -4:00. This program is run by JF&CS with additional funding from Eastern Bank.


Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S)

  • Kids In Disability Sports (K.I.D.S) Thirteen specialized athletic programs are available. K.I.D.S. hosts dances, sports banquets, social activities and recreational events throughout the year. Serves individuals and families throughout Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. Participants range in age 5-40 and have varying disabilities. http://www.kidsinc.us/
  • info@kidsinc.us
  • 1-866-712-7799

LIAM Nation Athletics (formerly known as FOSEK, Friends of Special Education Kidz)
sports leagues for special needs children in Tewksbury and surrounding communities in Merrimack Valley. Accomodates athletes of all abilities. Bombers Baseball, Striker Soccer, Little Reds Basketball.

Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program
Mass Dept of Conservation & Recreational Universal Access Program provides outdoor recreation opportunities in Massachusetts State Parks for visitors of all abilities. Accessibility to Massachusetts State Parks is achieved through site improvements, specialized adaptive recreation equipment, and accessible recreation programs.

Massachusetts Hospital School Wheelchair Recreation & Sports Program
Wheelchair sports and recreation program for children ages 9 to 21. Horseback riding, swimming and , Wheelchair Athletes Program.

Miracle League of Massachusetts
Miracle League of Massachusetts provides baseball for special needs children. Free to participate (includes uniform). Located at Blanchard Memorial Elementary School Ball Field in Boxborough.

New England Wheelchair Athletic Association (NEWAA)
Volunteer organization that helps individuals with physcial disabilities participate in recreational
and sports activities. The NEWAA provides opportunities for athletic competition by sponsoring
regional and local meets.

Partners for Youth With Disabilities Provides mentoring programs that assist young people reach their full potential. Partners provides several types of mentoring programs including one-to-one, group mentoring and e-mentoring.

Piers Park Sailing
Piers Park Sailing provides programs for disabled youth and adults aboard 23-foot sonar sailboats on a no charge basis. Serves those with amputations, paralysis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, autism, hearing impaired, sight impaired and other disabilities. Successfully integrates youth with disabilities into summer youth sailing programs. Scholarships are available for all Adaptive sailing programs. “Yes You Can Sail” program Friday eves for $35.

  • (617) 561-6677

Senseability Gym
Senseability Gym serves special needs children in greater Hopedale area. Our mission is to provide a parent-led sensory gym, giving children with special needs a safe, fun, indoor area where they can play and accommodate their sensory needs.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports
Spaulding Adaptive Sports offers adaptive sports and recreation activities in Boston, Cape Cod and the North Shore. Includes wheelchair tennis, hand cycling, adaptive rowing, waterskiing or windsurfing.

Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA)
Special Olympics Massachusetts (SOMA) provides year round sports training and athletic competition for all persons with intellectual disabilities. Minimum age requirement is eight years of age. There is no maximum age requirement. SOMA summer games offers aquatics, athletics, gymnastics, sailing, tennis and volleyball. Go to above link to search SOMA region that covers your town.

Sudbury Adaptive Sports & Recreation
Programs for all ages and abilities.

Super Soccer Stars Shine
Our unique program uses soccer as a vehicle to teach life skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. Our innovative curriculum, designed by licensed educators and therapists, promotes the complete growth and development of each player. Our low player-to-coach ratios encourage and empower players to increase social potential with teammates, build self-awareness and confidence and advance gross and fine motor skills — all while each individual improves at his or her own pace! Located at 1 Thompson Square, Suite 301 in Charlestown. Call for information. Low pricing options and scholarship applications available.

Therapy and the Performing Arts – Cape Cod
Provides children and young adults with physical and intellectual disabilities the opportunity to enjoy various arts and recreational programs in addition to receiving therapeutic benefits from their participation. Children gain new and rewarding experiences from which they develop self-confidence, increase motor function, and have fun. Offers age appropriate programming on Cape Cod for children and young adults diagnosed with down syndrome, chromosomal abnormalies, cerebral palsy, genetic disorders and othe cognitive and physical disabilities. Classes are taught by certified instructors/ therapists with expertise in various disciplines. Programs are offered on a sliding scale fee based on the family’s ability to pay.


TILL Autism Support Center

TILL Autism Support Center has social programs for those with autism spectrum disorders. Programs include exciting Family Fun Days that include apple picking, rock climing, sledding, in-door gym time, zoo trips, holiday parties and much more.

Town Recreation Departments
Most programs are open to participants from neighboring towns. Call area town recreation department to find out if it has special programming for children with disabilities.

Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn.
Wheelchair Sports & Recreation Assn. offers information about beach wheelchairs, biking, boating and more!

TopSoccer Program / Outreach Program for Soccer
is a community-based training and team placement program for young athletes with a mental or physical disability. For additional information or would like to start a TOPSoccer Program in your community contact:

YMCAs
YMCAs are accessible and offer a range of classes. Call your local YMCA to find out what programs are available.

The Lowell YMCA “Adaptive Aquatics Program” accommodates children with mild to moderate neurological, physical, or social challenges.

  • (978) 454-7825.

Oak Square YMCA of Greater Boston at 615 Washington St, Brighton has a new adaptive fitness room & offers Adapted Adult Speciality Fitness Partnership Program on Wednesday and Saturday 11AM – 12:30PM on the Fitness Floor.

Hopkinton YMCA offers seasonal specialized programs. “Aim High” archery program and “Rock On!” is an outdoor ropes course and rock climbing for individuals with autism spectrum disorders or related social communication disorders.

  • 45 East Street in Hopkinton.

WaterFire Access Program
A water-taxi program at Dyer Street Dock in Providence Rhode Island which provides an unforgettable experience of the art work for children and adults with disabilities to assure that they can join in the most popular arts event in the state and share the experience with their families and friends. Reservations are required. Each Water Fire Access passenger can bring along one companion.

Waypoint Adventures
Adventures for people of all ages and abilities

Whole Children offers movement, art, recreation and music programs for infants, children and teens of all abilities. Located in Hadley.

Fully Accessible Playground

Fully Accessible Playground
Sudbury has a completely accessible play area that allows anyone with disabilities to be a part of a community area and develop physically, socially, and emotionally. Children and youth with an without disabilities now have an opportunity to develop tolerance, awareness, and compassion for others in a fun and socially positive atmosphere. Parents are able to walk or wheel onto the structures to play with their children and the wheelchair friendly surface allows children and parents to move about the playground with ease. The playground is located across the street from the Fairbank Community Center at Haskell Field. GPS 40 Fairbank Road Sudbury, MA 01776

Inclusive and Adaptive Recreation
The Adaptive Sports & Recreation Program at the Sudbury Park & Recreation Department is committed to providing year round, affordable, community based programming for individuals with disabilities. Offering comprehensive and varied programs of recreation activities as well as resources for residents, we truly recognize the importance of recreation and leisure in the lives of all community members. The Adaptive Sports & Recreation program strives to improve the quality of life for children and adults with disabilities through continued and successful involvement in sports and recreation programs here in their own back yard.

Program goals include:

  • To increase the participation of children and adults with disabilities in existing parks and recreation programs.
  • To provide person-centered, individualized support to meet the needs of the participating individual.
  • To enhance the physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being of children and adults with disabilities via their participation in the recreation activities provided by the department.
  • To increase the independence, confidence, and self-esteem of the children and adults with disabilities taking part in the department’s programs.
  • To provide opportunities for people with disabilities to cultivate new recreational interests, meet new people, and possibly develop new friendships.
  • To advocate for individuals with disabilities’ rights to recreation participation, community access, and community involvement.

The Bridgewater Business Association 2014 Meet & Greet

The Bridgewater Business Association 2014 meet & greet

The Bridgewater Business Association will present their 3rd Annual Meet & Greet Tonight (5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.) at Sullivan Tire and Auto Service located at 300 Bedford Street (Route 18) in Bridgewater, MA.

Please join the BBA for an evening open to all businesses in the greater Bridgewater area and beyond. This FREE event includes complimentary food and cocktails, with an evening of networking with current BBA members, local businesses, community leaders, and University representatives. Come out for a fun, informational evening, and meet some new friends and neighbors in the Bridgewater business community and beyond.

The 2014 Meet & Greet is currently sponsored by the following: Bridgewater Savings Bank, Sullivan Tire and Auto Service/Bridgewater, Rockland Trust, Claremont Companies, New England Party Supplies, Bryan Parrish Home Inspections, Chase Corporation, Avery Photography, and Joe’s Service Station.

Three Questions to Ask Your Mobility Consultant about Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles

Answer search
When beginning your search for a wheelchair van in MA, RI, CT, VT, NH & ME, it is important to know which questions to ask your Mobility Consultant.  This could be the first time that you are going through this process, and VMi New England along side Automotive Innovations wants you to have a memorable experience.

We encourage your questions to help make purchasing your wheelchair accessible vehicle enjoyable and educational. Here are five of our most frequently asked questions proposed to our Mobility Consultants:

Do you have a service department for wheelchair van repairs?
Our technicians are highly trained and certified and are able to handle any problems you may have with your wheelchair accessible van.  By adhering to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS), becoming a Quality Assurance Program (QAP) facility, Automotive Innovations has shown its dedication to improving the quality of life for people with disabilities every day.

Can I test drive a wheelchair accessible vehicle before I purchase one?
Yes you can!  Our “Try Before You Buy” program means that you can test out our vehicles before you make your purchase, so that you can determine which vehicle will suit your needs.  Please contact us for more details.

How do you determine which wheelchair accessible vehicle will be right for me?
Our consultants take every step to get to know our customers to ensure that you purchase the right wheelchair accessible vehicle for you. Our Mobility Consultants go through a detailed step-by-step process to learn about your specific needs in order to get you the proper wheelchair van type, size and modifications to your wheelchair van.This mobility update has been brought to you by Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations your Bridgewater, MA New England NMEDA Mobility Dealer – Need some information on how to make your vehicle wheelchair accessible or upgraded with the latest and most convenient features?

Road To Independence Comedy Night

Road To Independence Comedy Night
Road To Independence: Comedy Night

When?: March 28th 2014 at 7:00pm

Where?: Elks club in Middleboro – 24 High Street Middleboro MA 02346

How Much?: $25.00

Why?: For a night of food, laughter and to help out a good cause!

Massachusetts Mobility Van Resources

Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Description:
The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is the state advocacy agency for people with disabilities. MOD’s goal is to make sure that people with disabilities have the legal rights, opportunities, support services, and accommodations they need to take part in all aspects of life in Massachusetts. MOD helps people of all ages.

One of MOD’s main duties is to make sure that the state government, the local governments, and private organizations comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD informs residents about their rights under the law, investigates complaints, and works to correct any violations. MOD services are free.

Services: The Massachusetts Office of Disability has three main programs:

  • The Government Services Program provides technical assistance and advice to state and local governments on all disability-related issues. MOD makes sure that government regulations and policies meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD offers guidance to public service agencies and makes public policy recommendations on behalf of residents with disabilities.
  • The Client Services Program helps individuals who need help with disability-related problems. MOD operates an information and referral system to help residents find the services they need and learn about their legal rights. MOD also investigates complaints and helps correct civil rights violations. MOD’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) helps residents who are having problems with federally funded vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs.
  • The Community Services Program helps communities become more responsive to the needs of residents with disabilities. MOD trains individuals and community organizations to advocate for the rights of the disabled. MOD offers technical assistance and information about accessibility laws. The goal is to improve access to public and private places, programs, and services for people with all types of disabilities.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place, Room 1305
Boston, MA 02108

Telephone: 617-727-7440
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 800-322-2020
Fax: 617-727-0965

Web site: Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)

Description:
The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC) helps people with disabilities find employment and live independently. The MRC serves Massachusetts residents age 18 and older. The MRC helps people with all types of disabilities except blindness. Legally blind residents can get services from the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.

Services:
The MRC is the state agency in Massachusetts responsible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Community Services (CS), and Disability Determination Services (DDS). The MRC also assists with public benefit programs, housing, transportation, and consumer issues. Some MRC programs and services have specific eligibility requirements. Most are free.

The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program helps people with disabilities find work or go back to work. The VR program works with various organizations in the community to help create jobs for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The Office of Community Services (CS) offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities live independently in their communities:

  1. The Brain Injury and Statewide Specialized Community Services (BISSCS) program helps Massachusetts residents who have externally caused traumatic brain injuries.
  2. Protective Services tries to prevent the physical, emotional, or sexual abuse of people with disabilities by their caregivers.
  3. Independent Living Centers provide advocacy, personal care management, and independent living skills training.
  4. The T22 (Turning 22) Independent Living Support Program helps young people with physical mobility disabilities who want to live independently in their communities.
  5. The Home Care Assistance Program for disabled adults under age 60 provides help with homemaking tasks (see Home Care Assistance Program).
  6. Other in-home and community living support services are also available.
  7. The Assistive Technology (AT) Program buys and installs assistive devices and provides training and follow-up for users.
  • Disability Determination Services (DDS), funded by the Social Security Administration (SSA), determines medical eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Disability examiners use medical and vocational information to make their decisions.

MassMATCH

Web site: MassMATCH

MassMATCH is a statewide program to help Massachusetts residents with disabilities find, pay for, and use assistive technology (AT) that can make a difference in their lives. The MassMatch web site offers information and advice about:

  • assistive technology (AT) products
  • AT demonstration centers
  • AT funding sources (insurance, loans, government assistance, private charities)
  • where to buy, borrow, swap, and sell AT equipment

MassMATCH (Maximize Assistive Technology in Consumers’ Hands) is a partnership between the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, other state human services agencies, and community-based organizations.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission
Fort Point Place, Suite 600
27 Wormwood Street
Boston, MA 02210-1616

Telephone: Voice/TTY: 617-204-3600
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 1-800-245-6543
Disabled Persons Protection Hotline: 1-800-426-9009
Ombudsman: 617-204-3603
Fax: 617-727-1354

Web site: Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)

Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)

Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB) provides rehabilitation and social services to legally blind Massachusetts residents of all ages. These services help people who are legally blind live independently as active members of their communities. The MCB contacts all legally blind people in the state to offer support services.

Eye care providers in Massachusetts are required by law to report all cases of legal blindness to the MCB. The MCB keeps a confidential registry of all legally blind people in the state. The Commission issues Certificates of Legal Blindness to people on its register. These certificates allow legally blind residents to get exemptions and deductions on income tax, property tax, and auto excise tax. The Commission also issues an identification card, similar to a driver’s license, for personal identification and proof of legal blindness.

Services: The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind provides the following services:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), including diagnostic studies, counseling and guidance, individual plans for employment (IPE), restorative and training services, rehabilitation and mobility instruction, assistive technology, adaptive housing, job placement, and post-employment services
  • Assistive technology
  • Independent living social services, including homemaking assistance, assistive devices, mobility instruction, and peer support groups
  • Specialized services for blind seniors (BRIDGE program)
  • Specialized services for blind children, including referrals for early intervention, public benefits, respite care, and socialization and recreation programs
  • Specialized services for blind/deaf individuals and others with multiple disabilities
  • Rehabilitation instruction, including Braille and typing, use of low-vision devices, labeling and record keeping, food preparation, home safety, and self-care techniques
  • Orientation and mobility instruction, including guide dogs
  • MassHealth services for financially eligible people who are legally blind, including long-term care services, hospital services, personal care attendants, private duty nursing, and transportation services
  • Consumer assistance and advocacy for issues related to blindness such as housing and job discrimination, guide dog issues, or transportation problems

Most services are offered free of charge to all registered legally blind Massachusetts residents. Some services have additional eligibility requirements.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind
48 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02111

Toll-free Voice: 800-392-6450
Toll-free TDD: 800-392-6556
Fax: 617-626-7685

Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)

Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)

Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH) is the state government agency that works on behalf of Massachusetts residents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. The MCDHH serves as an advocate to make sure that deaf and hard-of-hearing residents have the same access to information, services, education, and other opportunities as the hearing population.

Services: Some of the services that the MCDHH provides are:

  • Communication access, training, and technology services
  • Case management services, including specialized services for children
  • Interpreter and CART translation services
Note: CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) service translates spoken words into a visual print display that can be read on a computer monitor or other display device.
  • Independent Living Programs, including peer mentoring, assistive technology, consumer education, self-advocacy, and other independent living skills

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
600 Washington Street 
Boston, MA 02111
Telephone: 617-740-1600 / TTY: 617-740-1700
Toll-free: Voice: 1-800-882-1155 / TTY: 1-800-530-7570
Fax: 617-740-1880
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)

The Savvy Consumer’s Guide to Hearing Loss
 MCDHH Resource Directory
Regional Offices of the MCDHH
Interpreter and CART Services
Independent Living Services

Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)

Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health is the state agency that oversees treatment programs, support services, regulations, and public policy for Massachusetts residents with mental illness. The DMH supports a community-based system of care.

The Department of Mental Health serves adults with long-term or serious mental illness, and children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbances. For adults, the mental disorder must be persistent and must interfere with the ability to carry out daily life activities. For children, the disorder must limit the child’s ability to function in family, school, or community activities.

Residents must file an application and get DMH approval before they can get services. Applications are available on the DMH web site at DMH Service Application Forms and Appeal Guidelines. Applicants can get short-term services while waiting for DMH approval for continuing care.

Services:
The DMH provides continuing care services to Massachusetts residents who cannot get needed services from other agencies or programs. DMH services include:

  • continuing care inpatient facilities
  • residential treatment centers
  • in-home treatment
  • outpatient services
  • skills training
  • supported employment
  • case management

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Central Office
25 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114

Telephone: 617-626-8000
TTY: 617-727-9842
E-mail: DMH Email
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Mental Health
DMH Local Offices: DMH Offices

Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)

Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is the state agency that provides support services to Massachusetts residents with intellectual disabilities. The DDS works with many provider agencies throughout the state to offer services to adults and children and their caregivers. Individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families play an active role in making decisions about their lives and in choosing the support services they want and need.

The DDS has an application for services that must be completed before services can be approved. The application is available on the DDS web site: Application for DDS Eligibility

Services: The DDS offers a wide range of support services for adults, including:

  • Service coordination
  • Housing options
  • Employment skills training and transportation to work
  • Non-work related skills training
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Life skills training and support (food shopping, cooking, etc.)

DDS’s services for children include:

  • Service coordination
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Partnership program for families of children with significant health care needs
  • Autism support centers
  • After-school and summer camp programs

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services
Central Office
500 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118

Telephone: Voice: 617-727-5608
TTY: 617-624-7783
Fax: 617-624-7577

Web site: Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)

Local DDS offices: DDS Area Office Locator

Disability Law Center (DLC)

Description:
The Disability Law Center (DLC) is a private non-profit law firm that gives free legal assistance to Massachusetts residents with disabilities who have been discriminated against because of their disability.

The Disability Law Center helps people with all types of disabilities, including physical, psychiatric, sensory, and cognitive. The DLC provides legal help with problems such as discrimination, abuse or neglect, or denial of services, when they are related to a person’s disability.

Services:
Services include information and referral, technical assistance, legal representation for individuals and groups, and advocacy. The Disability Law Center helps with disability-related legal problems in these areas:

  • Access to community services
  • Special education
  • Health care
  • Disability benefits
  • Rights and conditions in facilities

The DLC does not have the resources to help everyone who has a disability-related legal problem. The DLC sets priorities each year based on the needs of the community. See DLC Priorities. The DLC chooses cases that will have the most impact on the lives of people with disabilities.

Contact Information:
Disability Law Center (DLC)
11 Beacon Street, Suite 925
Boston, MA 02108

Voice telephone: 617-723-8455 / 800-872-9992
TTY: 617-227-9464 / 800-381-0577

Web site: Disability Law Center

DisabilityInfo.org

Description:
The DisabilityInfo.org web site helps people with disabilities, their families, and service providers find disability-related resources in Massachusetts. It has information on a wide variety of programs, agencies, and services for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The site is maintained by New England INDEX, a nonprofit technology group. New England INDEX collects information from over 100 members of the Massachusetts Network of Information Providers for People with Disabilities (MNIP) and puts the information on one web site for easy access.

Services:
On the DisabilityInfo.org web site, you can find:

  • disability programs, services, and agencies in Massachusetts
  • disability consultants, including advocates, educators, therapists, counselors, and other specialists
  • physicians and dentists with experience working with people with disabilities
  • local and regional offices for human service agencies
  • local disability agencies that you can call for help
  • fact sheets about many different types of disabilities
  • disability-related laws and regulations
  • disability news
  • information about assistive technology
  • other resources for people with disabilities

Contact Information:
Web site: DisabilityInfo.org

New England INDEX
200 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02452-6319

Telephone: 781-642-0248
Toll-free: Voice: 800-642-0249
Toll-free: TTY: 800-764-0200

E-mail: info@DisabilityInfo.org

Massachusetts Mobility Resources

Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)
Description:
The Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD) is the state advocacy agency for people with disabilities. MOD’s goal is to make sure that people with disabilities have the legal rights, opportunities, support services, and accommodations they need to take part in all aspects of life in Massachusetts. MOD helps people of all ages.

One of MOD’s main duties is to make sure that the state government, the local governments, and private organizations comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD informs residents about their rights under the law, investigates complaints, and works to correct any violations. MOD services are free.

Services: The Massachusetts Office of Disability has three main programs:

  • The Government Services Program provides technical assistance and advice to state and local governments on all disability-related issues. MOD makes sure that government regulations and policies meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. MOD offers guidance to public service agencies and makes public policy recommendations on behalf of residents with disabilities.
  • The Client Services Program helps individuals who need help with disability-related problems. MOD operates an information and referral system to help residents find the services they need and learn about their legal rights. MOD also investigates complaints and helps correct civil rights violations. MOD’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) helps residents who are having problems with federally funded vocational rehabilitation and independent living programs.
  • The Community Services Program helps communities become more responsive to the needs of residents with disabilities. MOD trains individuals and community organizations to advocate for the rights of the disabled. MOD offers technical assistance and information about accessibility laws. The goal is to improve access to public and private places, programs, and services for people with all types of disabilities.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place, Room 1305
Boston, MA 02108
Telephone:617-727-7440
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 800-322-2020
Fax: 617-727-0965
Web site: Massachusetts Office on Disability (MOD)

Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC)
Description:
The Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC) helps people with disabilities find employment and live independently. The MRC serves Massachusetts residents age 18 and older. The MRC helps people with all types of disabilities except blindness. Legally blind residents can get services from the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.

Services:

  • The MRC is the state agency in Massachusetts responsible for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Community Services (CS), and Disability Determination Services (DDS). The MRC also assists with public benefit programs, housing, transportation, and consumer issues. Some MRC programs and services have specific eligibility requirements. Most are free.
  • The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program helps people with disabilities find work or go back to work. The VR program works with various organizations in the community to help create jobs for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.
  • The Office of Community Services (CS) offers a variety of services to help people with disabilities live independently in their communities:
  1. The Brain Injury and Statewide Specialized Community Services (BISSCS) program helps Massachusetts residents who have externally caused traumatic brain injuries.
  2. Protective Services tries to prevent the physical, emotional, or sexual abuse of people with disabilities by their caregivers.
  3. Independent Living Centers provide advocacy, personal care management, and independent living skills training.
  4. The T22 (Turning 22) Independent Living Support Program helps young people with physical mobility disabilities who want to live independently in their communities.
  5. The Home Care Assistance Program for disabled adults under age 60 provides help with homemaking tasks (see Home Care Assistance Program).
  6. Other in-home and community living support services are also available.
  7. The Assistive Technology (AT) Program buys and installs assistive devices and provides training and follow-up for users.
  • Disability Determination Services (DDS), funded by the Social Security Administration (SSA), determines medical eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. Disability examiners use medical and vocational information to make their decisions.

MassMATCH
MassMATCH is a statewide program to help Massachusetts residents with disabilities find, pay for, and use assistive technology (AT) that can make a difference in their lives. The MassMatch web site offers information and advice about:

  • assistive technology (AT) products
  • AT demonstration centers
  • AT funding sources (insurance, loans, government assistance, private charities)
  • where to buy, borrow, swap, and sell AT equipment

MassMATCH (Maximize Assistive Technology in Consumers’ Hands) is a partnership between the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, other state human services agencies, and community-based organizations.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission
Fort Point Place, Suite 600
27 Wormwood Street
Boston, MA 02210-1616
Telephone: Voice/TTY: 617-204-3600
Toll-free: Voice/TTY: 1-800-245-6543
Web site: MassMATCH

Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)
Description
:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB) provides rehabilitation and social services to legally blind Massachusetts residents of all ages. These services help people who are legally blind live independently as active members of their communities. The MCB contacts all legally blind people in the state to offer support services.

Eye care providers in Massachusetts are required by law to report all cases of legal blindness to the MCB. The MCB keeps a confidential registry of all legally blind people in the state. The Commission issues Certificates of Legal Blindness to people on its register. These certificates allow legally blind residents to get exemptions and deductions on income tax, property tax, and auto excise tax. The Commission also issues an identification card, similar to a driver’s license, for personal identification and proof of legal blindness.

Services: The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind provides the following services:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), including diagnostic studies, counseling and guidance, individual plans for employment (IPE), restorative and training services, rehabilitation and mobility instruction, assistive technology, adaptive housing, job placement, and post-employment services
  • Assistive technology
  • Independent living social services, including homemaking assistance, assistive devices, mobility instruction, and peer support groups
  • Specialized services for blind seniors (BRIDGE program)
  • Specialized services for blind children, including referrals for early intervention, public benefits, respite care, and socialization and recreation programs
  • Specialized services for blind/deaf individuals and others with multiple disabilities
  • Rehabilitation instruction, including Braille and typing, use of low-vision devices, labeling and record keeping, food preparation, home safety, and self-care techniques
  • Orientation and mobility instruction, including guide dogs
  • MassHealth services for financially eligible people who are legally blind, including long-term care services, hospital services, personal care attendants, private duty nursing, and transportation services
  • Consumer assistance and advocacy for issues related to blindness such as housing and job discrimination, guide dog issues, or transportation problems

Most services are offered free of charge to all registered legally blind Massachusetts residents. Some services have additional eligibility requirements.

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind
48 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02111
Toll-free Voice: 800-392-6450
Toll-free TDD: 800-392-6556
Fax: 617-626-7685
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB)
Vocational Rehabilitation Client Services Manual
Technology for the Blind
Laws and Regulations
Locations of MCB offices

Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Description:
The Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH) is the state government agency that works on behalf of Massachusetts residents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. The MCDHH serves as an advocate to make sure that deaf and hard-of-hearing residents have the same access to information, services, education, and other opportunities as the hearing population.

Services: Some of the services that the MCDHH provides are:

  • Communication access, training, and technology services
  • Case management services, including specialized services for children
  • Interpreter and CART translation services
    Note: CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) service translates spoken words into a visual print display that can be read on a computer monitor or other display device.
  • Independent Living Programs, including peer mentoring, assistive technology, consumer education, self-advocacy, and other independent living skills

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
600 Washington Street
Boston, MA 02111
Telephone: 617-740-1600 / TTY: 617-740-1700
Toll-free: Voice: 1-800-882-1155 / TTY: 1-800-530-7570
Fax: 617-740-1880
Web site: Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
The Savvy Consumer’s Guide to Hearing Loss
MCDHH Resource Directory
Regional Offices of the MCDHH
Interpreter and CART Services
Independent Living Services

Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Description:
The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health is the state agency that oversees treatment programs, support services, regulations, and public policy for Massachusetts residents with mental illness. The DMH supports a community-based system of care.

The Department of Mental Health serves adults with long-term or serious mental illness, and children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbances. For adults, the mental disorder must be persistent and must interfere with the ability to carry out daily life activities. For children, the disorder must limit the child’s ability to function in family, school, or community activities.

Residents must file an application and get DMH approval before they can get services. Applications are available on the DMH web site at DMH Service Application Forms and Appeal Guidelines. Applicants can get short-term services while waiting for DMH approval for continuing care.

Services:
The DMH provides continuing care services to Massachusetts residents who cannot get needed services from other agencies or programs. DMH services include:

  •  continuing care inpatient facilities
  • residential treatment centers
  • in-home treatment
  • outpatient services
  • skills training
  • supported employment
  • case management

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH)
Central Office
25 Staniford Street
Boston, MA 02114
Telephone: 617-626-8000
TTY: 617-727-9842
E-mail: DMH Email
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Mental Health
DMH Local Offices: DMH Offices

Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
Description
:
The Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS) is the state agency that provides support services to Massachusetts residents with intellectual disabilities. The DDS works with many provider agencies throughout the state to offer services to adults and children and their caregivers. Individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families play an active role in making decisions about their lives and in choosing the support services they want and need.

The DDS has an application for services that must be completed before services can be approved. The application is available on the DDS web site: Application for DDS Eligibility

Services: The DDS offers a wide range of support services for adults, including:

  • Service coordination
  • Housing options
  • Employment skills training and transportation to work
  • Non-work related skills training
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Life skills training and support (food shopping, cooking, etc.)

DDS’s services for children include:

  • Service coordination
  • Family support services, including respite care
  • Partnership program for families of children with significant health care needs
  • Autism support centers
  • After-school and summer camp programs

Contact Information:
Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services
Central Office
500 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA 02118
Telephone: Voice: 617-727-5608
TTY: 617-624-7783
Fax: 617-624-7577
Web site: Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
Local DDS offices: DDS Area Office Locator

Disability Law Center (DLC)
Description:
The Disability Law Center (DLC) is a private non-profit law firm that gives free legal assistance to Massachusetts residents with disabilities who have been discriminated against because of their disability.

The Disability Law Center helps people with all types of disabilities, including physical, psychiatric, sensory, and cognitive. The DLC provides legal help with problems such as discrimination, abuse or neglect, or denial of services, when they are related to a person’s disability.

Services:
Services include information and referral, technical assistance, legal representation for individuals and groups, and advocacy. The Disability Law Center helps with disability-related legal problems in these areas:

  • Access to community services
  • Special education
  • Health care
  • Disability benefits
  • Rights and conditions in facilities

The DLC does not have the resources to help everyone who has a disability-related legal problem. The DLC sets priorities each year based on the needs of the community. See DLC Priorities. The DLC chooses cases that will have the most impact on the lives of people with disabilities.

Contact Information:
Disability Law Center (DLC)
11 Beacon Street, Suite 925
Boston, MA 02108
Voice telephone: 617-723-8455 / 800-872-9992
TTY: 617-227-9464 / 800-381-0577
Web site: Disability Law Center

DisabilityInfo.org
Description:
The DisabilityInfo.org web site helps people with disabilities, their families, and service providers find disability-related resources in Massachusetts. It has information on a wide variety of programs, agencies, and services for Massachusetts residents with disabilities.

The site is maintained by New England INDEX, a nonprofit technology group. New England INDEX collects information from over 100 members of the Massachusetts Network of Information Providers for People with Disabilities (MNIP) and puts the information on one web site for easy access.

Services:
On the DisabilityInfo.org web site, you can find:

  • disability programs, services, and agencies in Massachusetts
  • disability consultants, including advocates, educators, therapists, counselors, and other specialists
  • physicians and dentists with experience working with people with disabilities
  • local and regional offices for human service agencie
  • local disability agencies that you can call for help
  • fact sheets about many different types of disabilities
  • disability-related laws and regulations
  • disability news
  • information about assistive technology
  • other resources for people with disabilities

Contact Information:
Web site: DisabilityInfo.org
Database search
Get help from a local agency
Fact sheet library
Contact us
New England INDEX
200 Trapelo Road
Waltham, MA 02452-6319
Telephone: 781-642-0248
Toll-free: Voice: 800-642-0249
Toll-free: TTY: 800-764-0200
E-mail: info@DisabilityInfo.org

Mobility Resources For Massachusetts Residents

How do I get a disabled parking placard?
If you are legally blind or cannot walk more than 200 feet without rest or assistance, you can get a disabled parking placard from the Registry of Motor Vehicles. Your doctor or other medical professional must certify your medical condition. You can get a temporary placard or a permanent placard depending on how long your condition will last. The placard is free.

You can get an application for a disabled parking placard at any RMV Branch Office or from the RMV web site: Medical Affairs Forms. You should complete and sign the first page of the application, then have your health care provider complete and sign the second page. Mail or bring the completed application to the RMV.

  • If you mail your application, allow 30 days for the Medical Affairs office to process it. Send your application to:
    Medical Affairs/ RMV
    P.O. Box 55889
    Boston, MA 02205
  • If you bring your application to the office, Medical Affairs will process it the same day. The walk-in address is:
    Medical Affairs/ RMV Office
    25 Newport Ave EXT
    Quincy MA

You are allowed to use the placard only when you are in the vehicle, or when you are being dropped off or picked up. For more information, see Disabled Parking FAQs on the RMV web site.

If you lose your placard, you can apply for a duplicate. For instructions, see Applying for a Duplicate Placard on the RMV web site.

How do I find adaptive driver’s education classes?
If you need specialized driver’s education because of your disability, you can get adaptive driving lessons at one of the schools listed on the Registry of Motor Vehicles web site at Specialized Driver’s Education Programs (at the bottom of the page). Programs are customized to meet your needs, and can be adapted for a wide range of physical, cognitive, and emotional disabilities. Vehicles with hand controls and other specialized equipment are available.

Adaptive driving programs include:

How do I get a health care proxy?
A health care proxy is a simple legal document that allows you to choose someone to make medical decisions for you, if, for any reason, you are unable to make these decisions yourself.

You can find information about health care proxies on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I get a health care proxy?

How do I make a living will?
A living will is a document in which you describe the type of medical treatment you want if you become terminally ill or permanently unconscious. It allows you to make end-of-life decisions while you are physically and mentally competent to do so.

You can find information about living wills on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I make a living will?

How do I get a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order?
You have the right to decide if you want medical workers to use CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) to try to save your life if your heart stops or if you stop breathing. This is a decision you should make with your doctor, family members, and other people you trust. If you do not want CPR to be used, you must get a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order from your doctor.

You can find information about DNRs on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I get a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order?

How do I give someone permission to see my medical records?
A federal law known as HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) protects the privacy of your medical information. HIPAA limits the ways doctors, pharmacies, other health care providers, health insurance companies, nursing homes, and Medicaid/Medicare can share your personal health information.

You can find out how to give health care providers permission to share your medical information on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link: How do I give someone permission to see my medical records?

How do I get a power of attorney?
A power of attorney is a legal document in which you give another person (your “agent”) the right to handle financial and legal matters for you.

You can find information about naming a power of attorney on our Advance Care Planning page. Please follow this link:How do I get a power of attorney?

How do I get a Massachusetts ID card?
If you do not have a driver’s license and you are a resident of Massachusetts, you can get a Massachusetts ID card to use as official identification and proof of age. You can get an ID card at any full-service Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) office.

You can find information about Massachusetts ID cards in our “How Do I …? section for seniors. Please follow this link:How do I get a Massachusetts ID card?

How do I get a service animal?
A service animal is a dog or other animal that has been specially trained to provide assistance to a person with a disability. A service animal performs tasks that the person with the disability cannot do independently. For example, service animals can be trained to help people who are blind or deaf, are mobility impaired, have diabetes or seizure disorders, are autistic, or have other physical or mental disabilities.

For a list of organizations that provide service dogs, see:

Eligibility requirements and costs vary from one organization to another. Many organizations provide service animals for free, but ask you to pay your own expenses while attending training sessions. An interview is usually required before you are accepted into a program.

Massachusetts Disability Grants Handicap Funding MA
People with disabilities in Massachusetts can solve their lack of funding for handicap needs, such as a wheelchair van, through disability grants, financing programs, loans, and more. Browse the largest resource for Massachusetts disability grants to help pay for new wheelchair vans or handicap accessible van conversions. AMS Vans will deliver handicap vans to Massachusetts or nationwide.

Disability Grants in Massachusetts
The handicap funding for the disabled listed below may or may not assist in financing a handicap van. Check with the local Massachusetts grant provider for a complete list of requirements.

The Massachusetts Assistive Technology Loan Program: The Massachusetts ATLP provides people with disabilities access to low-interest cash loans to purchase handicap vans and vehicle modifications to accommodate a wheelchair.

How to Apply for Massachusetts Grants or Mobility Funding
Massachusetts residents seeking assistance with the purchase of handicap vans for sale should contact the mobility funding programs listed above about disability grants offered. We are delighted to accept all funding assistance programs to ensure your handicap needs are met. If we missed a grant program you’re familiar with, please let us know and we will add it to our list of mobility funding sources in Massachusetts.

Prepare Your Mobility Equipment For the Colder Weather

Cold temperatures not only slow wheelchair users down, but can also slow down their vans and accessible equipment. For example, if you use a hydraulic wheelchair lift, you may have noticed that the colder the weather, the slower the lift reacts. The cold thickens the fluid, making it move slower through hoses, valves and cylinders.

There’s not much you can do about that, but preparing other equipment for cold weather is important to help avoid accidents and breakdowns.

If you live in the New England area · call our Mobility Center today (508) 697-8324 · We’ll rust proof your wheelchair accessible vehicle, give you an oil change, tune-up, and/or semi-annual ramp/lift service and have any other accessible equipment checked before the temperature dips. If you ask we can also check your battery, antifreeze level, heater, brakes, defroster and thermostat.

Do It Yourself:

  • Purchase winter wiper blades that cut through snow and ice.
  • Keep the gas tank at least half full. It reduces condensation and makes your vehicle easier to start on cold mornings.
  • Buy tires that have MS, M+S, M/S or M&S on them, meaning they meet the Rubber Manufacturers Association guidelines and can bite through mud and snow.
  • For better traction and control, rotate tires so the best ones are in the front.
  • Get an electric engine block heater. It warms the engine so the motor can start. It connects to normal AC power overnight or before driving. In extremely cold climates, electrical outlets are sometimes found in public or private parking lots. 
  • Cold weather is tough on accessible van batteries. Buy one with greater starting power, higher cold cranking amps and reserve capacity for energy when the engine isn’t running.
  • Use synthetic oil to make starting a cold engine easier.

Before you drive:

  • Keep rock salt on hand to melt ice off walkways for a safer wheelchair ride.
  • Clean the snow off the roof and hood so it doesn’t “avalanche” onto the windshield and block your vision.
  • Clear the head and tail lights for best visibility.
  • Scrape the ice off mirrors and windows.

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Here at VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations we’ll service and repair your wheelchair accessible vehicle and/or equipment even if you didn’t buy it from us! So bring us your mobility van no matter the year (old or new), chassis (Honda, Dodge, Toyota, Ford, Chrysler, excreta..), or conversion (Side Entry, Rear Entry, VMI, Braun, Ricon, Rampvan, Elorado, Amerivan, excreta..)!!

wheelchair lifts: automatic and semiautomatic MA, RI, CT, VT, NH & ME

wheelchair lifts automatic and semiautomatic newenglandwheelchairvan.com

TYPES OF WHEELCHAIR LIFTS

Usage of wheelchair lift can facilitate everyday functioning, eliminating the need to lift the wheelchair and place it into the vehicle with just pulling up to the platform of the lift and be lifted up or down. It is extremely convenient, giving confidence to wheelchair users to go to the places they want to. Wheelchair lifts made a significant and positive change compared to the previous experiences when they didn’t exist.

Wheelchair lifts are advanced mobility systems that have changed the way the disabled move, work and live, being a blessing for users and caregivers equally. They are used for wheelchair accessible vans and other mobility vehicles, known also by the name platform lift, making the travel of wheelchair user much easier and more pleasant. Wheelchair lifts have multiple purposes and can help people with disabilities in many ways, even being adapted according to individual needs in as many ways you need.

Usage of wheelchair lift can facilitate everyday functioning, eliminating the need to lift the wheelchair and place it into the vehicle with just pulling up to the platform of the lift and be lifted up or down. It is extremely convenient, giving confidence to wheelchair users to go to the places they want to. Wheelchair lifts made a significant and positive change compared to the previous experiences when they didn’t exist.

They can be automatic and semi-automatic, electric and hydraulic. Automatic one takes care of the folding, unfolding, lowering and raising, while semi-automatic one needs manual operating. Electric wheelchair lifts are easier to maintain than hydraulic ones. They are flexible and easy to install and come with battery back-up. The full benefit of electric wheelchair lift can be felt together with stair and automobile lifts and van ramps. Hydraulic ones don’t need electricity and can function in the case of power failure. However, they require constant maintenance and care.

Wheelchair lifts that are usually used for vans and minivans are called rotary or “swing” lifts because their method of operation involves moving the wheelchair by swinging it up-and-down or inside and outside. There is a great choice of wheelchair lifts, so you should consider all the options, with the respect for your needs and wants, including the decision about whether you want to travel in the wheelchair or in the vehicle seat, which will also mean the difference between installing it inside or outside the van. Both options have advantages and disadvantages.

An outside wheelchair lift is intended for your personal mobile device to be installed outside of the car or wheelchair vans. It will be carried behind, but the way that the driver will have complete road visibility. If you choose an outside lift, it will require very small modifications of the vehicle. The lift is usually attached to a trailer hitch on the rear.

The type of the wheelchair lifts has to be compatible with your van. There are some special features that can make a difference in your everyday functioning, for example having a back-up lifting or lowering mechanism if the main drive system fails. When you sort out your needs, it’s easier to make a decision about the choice of the corresponding advanced mobility system.

Lifts

In this section we explain the various types of lifts available on the market. There are advantages and disadvantages to all of these lifts. It is highly recommended that you get to know the lifts available, the product lines, your nearest dealers and their qualifications. If you purchase a lift only to find that there is no one within a reasonable distance to provide service and repairs you will soon regret that purchase. Always consult experts at VMi New England Mobility Center BEFORE you buy.

There are basically two types of wheelchair lifts:

  1. Platform Lift
  2. Rotary (or Swing) Lift

In addition, these two lifts come in various types. Hydraulic, electrical mechanical, gravity and those that combine hydraulic and electrical.

The hydraulic lift uses a pump and a cylinder filled with fluid pressure, which enables the pump to raise and lower the lift along with the power from the van’s battery.

The electricall mechanical lift operates either by chain or screw rod, with power provided solely by the battery.

The gravity lift has power to lift and fold, while gravity lowers the lift platform to ground level.

All of these lifts depend, at least in part, on the battery. If your battery is weak or dead, the lifts will not work.

If you are a scooter user, measure your scooter’s length. Some scooters are longer than the standard platform on lifts. An extended platform is available to accommodate these longer scooters. Be aware, though, that this could require a raised roof, too.

Platform Lift
This lift is stored either in the side, the rear, or under the floor of a van. The lift requires two doors or a sliding door on the side of a van. The platforms have expanded metal in the upper half of the platform for better visibility when the lift is folded and the van is being driven.

Lifts stored under the van require modifications to the exhaust system, gas tank, etc., depending on the make of the van. Only the pump and motor are located inside vans using under-the-floor lifts.

Platforms may also be different, depending on the lift. There are both solid and fold-in-half platforms.  The fold-in-half platform folds to give better accessibility to the doors. Some fold-in-half platform lifts are mounted on a single post.

Be aware of the differences between automatic and semi-automatic lifts. A fully automatic lift will fold, unfold, lower and raise by operating a switch located inside (on the side of the lift) or outside (on the side of the van), and, in most cases, on the dash. A semi-automatic lift requires manual folding and unfolding of the platform. Using a hand-held pendant switch, the platform can be mechanically lowered and raised. You MUST have assistance with this type of lift, as it is designed for passengers who will not be riding alone.

Rotary Lift (or “Swing Lift”)
The platform of this type of lift never folds. Instead it “swings” inside, outside and up-and-down. The rotary lift swings into the van and the lift platform sits on the floor in the middle of the van.

Some individuals like the rotary lift because of the parking convenience. Less room is needed to enter or exit the van. Also, this lift is mounted on one post inside the van. The post controls the swinging action of the lift. One of the drawbacks to the rotary lift, though, is the cross-over bar. On some rotary lifts this bar connects the platform to the swing bar, limiting space for loading and unloading on the platform.

Switches serve very necessary functions in this lift. In most cases there are three switches on the dash. They operate the lift as well as provide an open and close function for the power door openers. The motors fit into or beside the doors and are manufactured to fit only one brand of lift.

Back-up System
You may also want to purchase a back-up system for your lift. Many government agencies require a lift to have a back-up system for use in emergencies. With a back-up system the lift can be manually manuvered and users can exit the van with assistance from an outsider. Most back-up systems are herd to operate alone, so expect to need someone’s help.

Safety Flaps
All lifts have an extension or “curb” at the edge of the platform which is approximately three-to-four inches high. This safety flap is designed specifically to prevent the wheelchair or scooter from rolling past the edge of the platform.

Finally, when purchasing a lift, be sure to check on the use of raised doors. If needed, your lift will have to be ordered for the extended doors. Determine if this is necessary before completing your vehicle equipment decisions. It will help you avoid very costly errors.

Again, be sure to consult the experts at VMi New England Mobility Center BEFORE you buy a wheelchair van or wheelchair vehicle lift to prevent costly and frustrating mistakes.

Accessible Travel Massachusetts

The Commonwealth features some unique accessible opportunities:

CAPEable Adventures was established in 2007, by Craig Bautz, to address the growing desire of physically and mentally challenged children and adults who would like the opportunity to participate in sports and outdoor recreation. CAPEable Adventures offers sports rehabilitation programs to anyone with a permanent disability. Activities include water sports, cycling, skiing, curling, fitness and special sports events.

Perkins Museum Take a multi-sensory journey through the history of blind and deafblind education over the last 200 years.

Handi Kids Camp, a non-profit, recreational facility for children and young adults with physical and cognitive disabilities.

Ironstone Farm is home to Challenge Unlimited and Ironstone Therapy, two non-profit organizations established to provide a variety of services for people with and without disabilities, using horses and the wholesome environment of a working farm.

F1 Boston features F1 cars designed specially for children with disabilities.

Forever Young Treehouse at the Institute for Developmental Disabilities Inc., the first of its kind in the state.

Salem Maritime National Historic Site now offers special audio tours.

Zoar Outdoor has kayaks with adaptive seating for paraplegics, visual signals for folks with hearing loss and special rafting trips for visually impaired people.

Arts & Culture

The Museum of Fine Arts offers Artful Healing Programs. These are theme-based tours and art making activities at area hospitals, healthcare centers, and at the MFA for children, youth, teens, and their families in a group setting or in patients’ rooms.

The Museum of Science Boston has Access Features and Programs as well.

Audio described performances are available at:
Wheelock Family Theatre
Huntington Theatre
American Repertory Theatre offers both ASL and Audio described performances.

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Outdoor Activities

Department of Conservation & Recreation (DCR)
The DCR has many adaptive programs and events throughout the year.

Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston

Mt. Greylock State Reservation, 30 Rockwell Rd., Lanesborough, 413-499-4262

• Paved ¼ mile loop trail at summit of Massachusetts’ tallest peak has spectacular views
• Meets all codes and guidelines for accessibility
• Visitor Center, Restrooms, Interpretive Program, Trail Opportunity

At 3,491 feet, Mount Greylock is the highest point in Massachusetts. Rising above the surrounding Berkshire landscape, dramatic views of 60-90 miles distant may be seen. It became Massachusetts’ first wilderness state park, acquired by the Commonwealth in 1898, to preserve its natural environment for public enjoyment. Wild and rugged yet intimate and accessible, Mount Greylock rewards the visitor exploring this special place of scenic and natural beauty. The roads to the summit are open seasonally from late-May through November 1; weather permitting into the Fall.

Pittsfield State Forest, 1041 Cascade Street, Pittsfield, 413-442-8992

• Tranquility Trail is a ½ mile paved through the forest crossing a brook and accessible by wheelchair.
• Picnic area, Restrooms, Interpretive Program, Optional Audio Tour component

Streams, waterfalls and flowering shrubs abound in Pittsfield State Forest. 65 acres of wild azalea fields are a profusion of pink blossoms in June. The forest has two camping areas, two picnic areas and a swimming beach. Fishermen frequent scenic Berry Pond, one of the highest natural water bodies in the state at 2,150 feet in elevation. The vista from the top of Berry Mountain, accessible by auto road from April to December, is a striking panorama and a great place to watch the sun set.

Savoy Mountain State Forest 260 Central Shaft Road, Florida, (413) 663-8469
A quarter mile of stabilized stonedust trail travels through woods and skirts the lake. Offers benches and views.

Ashuwillticook Rail Trail, Adams to Lanesborough, 413-442-8928

• 11.2 mile paved trail
• Accessible for handicapped
• Visitor Center, Restrooms, Picnicking

The Ashuwillticook Rail Trail is a former railroad corridor converted into a 10-foot wide paved, universally accessible, passive recreation path. It runs parallel to Route 8 through the towns of Cheshire, Lanesboro and Adams. The southern end of the rail trail begins at the entrance to the Berkshire Mall off MA Rte. 8 in Lanesboro and travels north to the center of Adams.

Vietnam Veteran’s Rink, 1292 Church Street, North Adams, (413) 664-8185

• Public skating hours
• Wheelchair accessible
• Ice-skating sleds are available

Undermountain Farm, 400 Undermountain Road, Lenox, (413) 637-3365

• Handicap accessible
• Lessons available for those with moderate disabilities

A beautiful Victorian Farm surrounded by 150 acres of pasture, forest and hay fields. A large airy indoor arena (81 x 160), a spacious outdoor arena, and access to miles of riding trails provide ample facilities for riding pleasure.

Pleasant Valley Wildlife Sanctuary, 472 West Mountain Road, Lenox, (413) 637-0320

• All-Persons Trail is a one-third-mile long and accessible to everyone.
• Restrooms , Education Center.

STRIDE Adaptive Sports offers exceptional instruction in adaptive ski & snowboard lessons in all methods at Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort in Hancock and Catamount Ski Area in South Egremont. See website for more details. The Great Race, March 16, 2013. For STRIDE participants to have the opportunity to show off what they learned through the STRIDE program. The event includes a BBQ with a DJ and fun for all!

Accessible Beaches
Accessible Camping
Accessible Pools

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Sightseeing Tours

Duck Tours The fun begins as soon as you board your “DUCK”, a W.W.II style amphibious landing vehicle. First, you’ll be greeted by one of our legendary tour ConDUCKtors, who’ll be narrating your tour. Then you’re off on a journey like you’ve never had before. The Duck Tours might be a great way to see a lot of Boston for those who cannot participate in the walking tours of Boston as some are equipped for wheelchair access, make sure you contact the company ahead of time for details: 617 450-0068.

Freedom Trail Boston’s Freedom Trail is a walking tour that visits historical sites in downtown Boston: The State House, Granary Burial Grounds, King’s Chapel, site of the Boston Massacre, Faneuil Hall, home of Paul Revere, Old North Church, USS Constitution, and Bunker Hill. The trail begins in Boston Common where you can purchase a ticket at the visitors center and join a group or tour on your own. The trail is long and has a lot of hills but it is accessible. The Granary Burial Grounds, resting place of Sam Adams, John Hancock, Mother Goose, and Paul Revere (to name a few) is wheelchair accessible. The entrance is located on the northeast side of the cemetery (down an alley on Beacon Street).

Harvard Yard Walking Tour The student-lead Harvard Yard tour gives you a first hand account of the history behind the famous university. The tour is wheelchair accessible, and is free to the public. Wheelchairs are available with a week or more advance notice.

Cruises

Boston’s Best Cruises

The following Boston’s Best Cruises operations are fully ADA accessible:
MBTA Harbor Express – Quincy, Hull & Logan to Long Wharf North, Boston. Year-round operation.

Boston Harbor Islands – Long Wharf North to Georges and Spectacle Islands. May through Columbus Day.

Sunset Cruise – 90 minute nightly tour through Boston Harbor from Long Wharf North. May through Columbus Day.

New England Aquarium Whale Watch – Aquarium dock to Stellwagen Bank. April through October.

The Harbor Cruise vessel is not ADA accessible, but an ADA accessible Harbor Cruise can be arranged with proper notice.

Adaptive Programs

All Out Adventures. Outdoor recreation for people of all abilities.

Spaulding Adaptive Sports Centers – Boston, North Shore and Cape Cod support individuals of all abilities in leading active, healthy lives through participation in adaptive sports and recreational activities. Spaulding opened its first Adaptive Sports programs in Boston and on Cape Cod in 2001, and since that time has expanded to include the North Shore. These three sites offer a wide range of land and water based adaptive sporting activities that focus on the value of sports and fitness. At these Centers, participants living with disabilities play wheelchair tennis, hand cycle, kayak, windsurf or row in adaptive boats, and engage in a number of other activities through which they learn new life skills, make new friends and enjoy themselves as they rebuild their strength, gain a sense of independence and self-confidence. The programs are delivered under the supervision of Spaulding clinicians and adaptive sports professionals, and are open to children and adults. Staff members help each participant find the most appropriate activities to meet their capabilities and help them Find Their Strength.
877-976-7272

Community Boating. Persons with disabilities and their guests will have the use of specialized, accessible sailboats and transfer equipment, dedicated staff assistance to get in and out of the boats, and sailing instruction, all for only $1.00! Several seat configurations in the boats are available for people with various disabilities. Reserved sessions, usually an hour in length, can be customized to meet individual needs. They can consist of a short sailboat ride for therapeutic recreation or a more learn-to-sail class structure, leading to ratings and expanded sailing privileges.

Windrush Farm. Windrush expands and enriches the personal, emotional and physical abilities of all those we serve by partnering with our horses and the environment.

The Sports Club Finder connects you with community-based programs, including Paralympic Sports Clubs that have been developed to provide sports programming and physical activity opportunities for disabled Veterans along with youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of skill level. All programs and activities at these organizations are based in the community and are run by the local organization.

Holyoke Rows
THURSDAY ROWING AT Holyoke Rows. This Universal Access Program is free to people with disabilities and their families. They meet on Thursdays May – October at Holyoke Rows. Everyone is welcome from first time rowers to experienced racers. Call Stephanie at 413-320-3134 to set up a lesson.

Piers Park Sailing Center
The Adaptive Sailing Program at Piers Park Sailing Center is a nationally recognized non-profit sailing program which has served over one thousand people with disabilities since the program’s inception in 2007. In 2009, US Sailing awarded PPSC as the Best Community Program for disabled sailors. In 2010, we were honored to be designated a Paralympic Sports Club.

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Sports Venues

Banknorth Garden (home of the Boston CelticsBoston Bruins)

Fenway Park (home of the Boston Red Sox)

Gillette Stadium (home of the , New England Patriots, New England Revolution )

Transportation

Ferry to the tip of Cape Cod
The Boston to Provincetown ferry service is wheelchair accessible?
Vessels are wheelchair accessible on both the Boston and Provincetown docks. You may require the assistance of our crew depending upon the tide. Please call 617-748-1428 extension 1251 for additional information. Our high speed ferry has wheelchair accessible restrooms, our excursion service aboard the Provincetown II (which is a much older vessel) does not.

Rental Car (Wheelchair Van)

Bus
MBTA: The MBTA bus system serves the entire Boston area, and is dedicated to increasing the accessibility of all its services. All buses are accessible, and are equipped to serve the wheelchair dependent rider. Find out more information about accessibility. Visit the online subway map for a list of accessible stops or call the Office for Transportation Access with any questions: 800 533-6282.

The accommodations and attractions listed are accessible to people with disabilities and have indicated that they meet the following criteria for accessibility:

  • accessible parking, where parking is available.
  • wheelchair-accessible route from parking areas to entrance, elevator, public restroom and other public areas.
  • service animals accepted.

Additional criteria for accommodations include:

  • wheelchair-accessible guest rooms.
  • the ability to handle special requests for a text telephone or TDD; and for visual notification of fire alarm, incoming phone calls and door bell.

Before planning a trip, we strongly recommend that you call ahead to find out if accommodations and attractions meet your specific needs. Many accommodations and attractions that do not carry the access symbol, provide some, but not all, of the services listed above. For example, many historic buildings have accessibility on the first floor only.

 

2013 Swing for ALS Charity Golf Tournament Pinehills Golf Club, Plymouth, MA

2013 Swing for ALS Charity Golf Tournament Pinehills Golf Club, Plymouth, MA

Swing__pine_hills__chapter_logo swing

JUNE 11th, 2013

For more info on the SWING FOR ALS – click here!

http://webma.alsa.org/site/Calendar?id=158321&view=Detail

 

Take a swing at ALS at the fourth Annual Swing for ALS Golf Tournament!  Support the fight against Lou Gehrig’s Disease at one of Massachusetts’ finest golf courses —Pinehills Golf Club, Plymouth, MA.  The day will begin with golfer registration at 10:30 AM followed by a shot gun start at 11:00 AM.  Our evening program will begin around 5:00 PM with dinner and an exciting live/silent auction that you won’t want to miss!

 

Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Time: 11:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Address: 54 Clubhouse Drive

Plymouth, MA 02360

 

Not a golfer? Dinner-only tickets are available! Just click Buy Tickets.

 

For more information on tickets and sponsorship opportunities, or to register over the phone, please contact Susan Adler at susan.adler@als-ma.org, or call The ALS Association Massachusetts Chapter at 781-255-8884 (ext. 234) or 888-CURE-ALS (Toll Free).

Tips for Buying a Wheelchair Van / Mobility Vehicle Online

Can you buy a mobility vehicle online?
Yes. The question, however, is how to buy a vehicle appropriate for your needs, compliant with industry regulations and standards, and one with which you will be satisfied in regards to future service and warranty.

wheelchair accessible van financial aid

What do state laws say about the online purchasing process?
Some states have specific laws concerning selling a vehicle across state lines. These laws are designed to protect the consumer, so check with legal counsel regarding the laws in your state.

Will I ever personally meet a representative from an Internet seller? Will they provide references?

QUESTIONS


Probably not. Most Internet sales companies do not usually have regional sales representatives. You’ll be assigned an “in house” sales rep who will assist you but with the lack of personal interaction, they may not be able to fully assess your needs. By choosing a local seller, you can personally meet individuals who have purchased and used the services of your local retailer.

How would I obtain a license tag for a van I purchased online?

You will be able to go to your local tag office and purchase a permanent license tag. There may be a period of time when you cannot use your vehicle as temporary tags are usually not valid except within the state they are issued. Check with your local department of motor vehicles to verify.

How would I obtain a title for a van I purchase out of state?

An out of state Seller who is located in a state other than the state you reside in probably can’t obtain a title for you in your name. The seller may simply provide the title to you at the time of delivery. You would then be required to take the title to your local tag (DMV?) office and transfer it (for a fee) to your name. You should be very cautious about the titling process. Titles are complex and errors can occur. Correcting a title error is a time consuming and often complex task. Knowing the origin of your vehicle and title is extremely important.

If my van’s mechanical systems fail while I own it, who is responsible?

This is a question of warranty and depends on the OEM warranty and the warranty provided by the vehicle modifier. A more significant issue is failure of a vehicle system resulting in bodily injury or property damage. In this case, the vehicle modifier should have what is called “product liability insurance”. This insurance covers any damages to property or injury that might occur as the result of defects, which are the responsibility of the modifier. Without this coverage, the vehicle owner has no one to turn to for responsibility. Make sure to request a certificate of product liability insurance. Vehicle sellers also have what is called “garage keepers insurance” to cover the work they perform. NMEDA dealers carry both types of coverage.

If my van is involved in an accident or stolen after I have purchased it but is still in the care of the online mobility dealer, who is responsible for the damage or loss?
The answer depends on who has what insurance.  So make sure that your insurance starts upon your purchase even if you have not yet received the vehicle. It is a good idea to request a proof of insurance from the Internet seller.  Most reputable vehicle dealers have what is called Garage Keepers Liability Insurance. If they are liable for the loss or damage, this insurance should cover the cost. Sometimes there is a question as to whose insurance is primarily responsible – the Internet seller’s, the trucking company’s or yours.

What if I have substantial problems with a vehicle I purchase online?

Most states have “lemon law” statutes that address defective vehicles. However, YOUR state’s lemon law may not apply if the van was not purchased in that state. Confer with legal counsel about this question.  Aside from lawsuits, in many situations where there is a conflict, personal contact and established relationships help resolve the problem. In the case of on-line purchasing, you may never personally meet an individual from the Internet seller. See the section on Service & Warranty.

How will I know that the vehicle I purchase online will be properly converted and fit the needs of my disability?
Very important question. You really will not know until the vehicle is delivered to you. Every vehicle is different and mistakes can occur. Also, without the Internet seller meeting you personally and you having the ability to “test” the vehicle, there is no way to fully ensure that you or your loved one will properly fit in the vehicle and be able to use it as you desire. Make sure in advance that you have the right to refuse delivery of the vehicle and receive a full refund if, upon delivery, you do not like the way the van fits your needs; it fails to meet your reasonable expectations; or it does not match the description provided by the Internet seller.Come try out all the best wheelchair vans ever built at the oldest and best equipped Mobility Dealership in all of New England2013 Toyota Sienna  DS292397 Left Side View - Elias4Come and meet our all star cast of Veteran Mobility Ambassadors where everyday is a Abilities Expo just a little south of Boston at VMi New England in Bridgewater, MA

Three Questions to Ask Your Mobility Consultant about Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles

Three Questions to Ask Your Mobility Consultant about Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles

When beginning your search for a wheelchair van in MA, RI, CT, VT, NH & ME, it is important to know which questions to ask your Mobility Consultant.  This could be the first time that you are going through this process, and VMi New England and Automotive Innovations wants you to have a memorable experience.

2012 Dodge Grand Caravan CR121019 Inside Front Right Veiw View

We encourage your questions to help make purchasing your wheelchair accessible vehicle enjoyable and educational. Here are five of our most frequently asked questions proposed to our Mobility Consultants.

 Do you have a service department for wheelchair van repairs?

Our technicians are highly trained and certified and are able to handle any problems you may have with your wheelchair accessible van.  By adhering to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS), becoming a Quality Assurance Program (QAP) facility, Automotive Innovations has shown its dedication to improving the quality of life for people with disabilities every day.

Can I test drive a wheelchair accessible vehicle before I purchase one?

Yes you can!  Our “Try Before You Buy” program means that you can test out our vehicles before you make your purchase, so that you can determine which vehicle will suit your needs.  Please contact us for more details.

How do you determine which wheelchair accessible vehicle will be right for me?

Our consultants take every step to get to know our customers to ensure that you purchase the right wheelchair accessible vehicle for you. Our Mobility Consultants go through a detailed step-by-step process to learn about your specific needs in order to get you the proper wheelchair van type, size and modifications to your wheelchair van.This mobility update has been brought to you by Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations your Bridgewater, MA New England NMEDA Mobility Dealer – Need some information on how to make your vehicle wheelchair accessible or upgraded with the latest and most convenient features?

Contact us your local mobility equipment and accessibility expert!

Jim Sanders is one of of the most experienced people in the country at building High-Tech driving equipment and vans for passengers and individuals who drive from a wheelchair. He offers a unmatched practical and theoretical foundation in the application of vehicle modifications for individuals with disabilities. With over 25 years experience, he continues to spearhead new and exciting technological advancements in this growing and emerging market.

MV1 VPG Mobility Vehicle Issues. What happened and what now?

MV1 VPG Mobility Vehicle

How can we help service your VPG mobility vehicle or help you purchase another more new or pre-owned reliable mobility vehicle?

A Michigan maker of vans for the disabled that received a $50 million Energy Department loan has quietly ceased operation and laid off its staff.

Vehicle Production Group, or VPG, stopped operations after finances dipped below the minimum required as a condition of the government loan, says former CEO John Walsh. Though about 100 staff were laid off and its offices shuttered, the company has not filed for bankruptcy reorganization.

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VPG, of Allen Park, Mich., received its Energy Department loan under the same clean-energy program — now under fire by House Republicans — that originally committed $527 million to troubled plug-in hybrid carmaker Fisker Automotive and $535 million to solar start-up Solyndra, which has filed for bankruptcy reorganization. VPG was deemed eligible for the clean energy loan because some of its vans were to be fitted to run on compressed natural gas.

Walsh, who left VPG with the rest of the staff when it closed in February, says the company had raised $400 million in private capital from investors, including financier T. Boone Pickens, and built 2,500 MV-1 vans. Though VPG still had a healthy order backlog, it ran low on cash and didn’t have the dealer network that it needed, Walsh says.

In 2011, the company’s then CEO, Dave Schembri, said he hoped that it could eventually ramp up production to about 30,000 vans a year, not only for individual sales to the disabled, but for sales to taxi and limousine fleets needing handicap-accessible vehicles. The company showed a taxi version at the 2012 New York Auto Show.

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VPG stopped operations after its assets were frozen by the Energy Department, he says. “They wanted us to get the remaining capital raised, and we couldn’t get it done,” he says. The company did not announce the suspension of operations. An Energy Department spokesman could not be reached for comment, although the agency has stepped in before when borrowers fell short of loan conditions: Fisker was cut off after drawing $190 million of its loan package.

VPG Chairman Fred Drasner could not be reached for comment.

VPG’s DOE loan was controversial. In 2011, The Washington Post raised questions about a fundraiser for President Obama and the loan. It reported that VPG was part of the portfolio of companies under Washington, D.C.-based investment firm Perseus, whose vice chairman, James Johnson, was an Obama adviser and fundraiser. Perseus said at the time that Johnson played no role in procuring the loan for VPG. The Energy Department said at the time that the loan was based entirely on merit after two years of review.

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VPG’s MV-1 purpose-built vans, which went on sale in 2011 at a starting price of $39,950, were built under contract by AM General, maker of the Army’s Humvee transports. AM General spokesman Jeff Adams declined comment on VPG’s shutdown, saying his company was only the contract builder. But he said it will supply already-sold MV-1s with parts and technical support.

Walsh says production of MV-1s was stopped about six months ago to prepare for a new model. He says VPG had about 2,300 vehicles on order at the time including a half-filled, 250-van order from New York’s City’s transit authority.

The federal loan money was spent wisely, Walsh says, and he expresses hope that it all will be repaid if the company is sold.

Walsh was CEO for about a year. “I hung in there as long as I could,” says Walsh, who is now an executive at another disabled mobility company. “I saw the handwriting on the wall months ago. We just couldn’t get the capital to keep it going.”

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May Is ALS Awareness Month : Speak Up Now To Give Hope

May is ALS Awareness month : speak up Now to Give Hope

ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is 100% fatal and has few treatments to improve the quality of life. We are committed to helping more people understand the impact that this devastating disease has on individuals and families nationwide. During ALS Awareness Month, we ask that you join us: speak up now to give hope.

Tell Your Story · Sign up · Advocate

May us ALS Awareness month: Speak up Now to Give Hope

What is ALS?
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease,” is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed.A-myo-trophic comes from the Greek language. “A” means no or negative. “Myo” refers to muscle, and “Trophic” means nourishment–”No muscle nourishment.” When a muscle has no nourishment, it “atrophies” or wastes away. “Lateral” identifies the areas in a person’s spinal cord where portions of the nerve cells that signal and control the muscles are located. As this area degenerates it leads to scarring or hardening (“sclerosis”) in the region.

As motor neurons degenerate, they can no longer send impulses to the muscle fibers that normally result in muscle movement. Early symptoms of ALS often include increasing muscle weakness, especially involving the arms and legs, speech, swallowing or breathing. When muscles no longer receive the messages from the motor neurons that they require to function, the muscles begin to atrophy (become smaller). Limbs begin to look “thinner” as muscle tissue atrophies.

Forms of ALS
Three classifications of ALS have been described:

  • Sporadic: The most common form of ALS in the United States – 90 to 95% of all cases.
  • Familial: Occurring more than once in a family lineage (genetic dominant inheritance) accounts for a very small number of cases in the United States – 5 to 10% of all cases.
  • Guamanian: An extremely high incidence of ALS was observed in Guam and the Trust Territories of the Pacific in the 1950’s.

The most common form of ALS in the United States is “sporadic” ALS. It may affect anyone, anywhere. “Familial” ALS (FALS) means the disease is inherited. Only about 5 to 10% of all ALS patients appear to have genetic or inherited form of ALS. In those families, there is a 50% chance each offspring will inherit the gene mutation and may develop the disease.

Who Gets ALS?
ALS is a disorder that affects the function of nerves and muscles. Based on U.S. population studies, a little over 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year. (That’s 15 new cases a day.) It is estimated that as many as 30,000 Americans have the disease at any given time. According to the ALS CARE Database, 60% of the people with ALS in the Database are men and 93% of patients in the Database are Caucasian.

Most people who develop ALS are between the ages of 40 and 70, with an average age of 55 at the time of diagnosis. However, cases of the disease do occur in persons in their twenties and thirties. Generally though, ALS occurs in greater percentages as men and women grow older. ALS is 20% more common in men than in women. However with increasing age, the incidence of ALS is more equal between men and women.

There are several research studies – past and present – investigating possible risk factors that may be associated with ALS.  More work is needed to conclusively determine what genetics and/or environment factors contribute to developing ALS. It is known, however, that military veterans, particularly those deployed during the Gulf War, are approximately twice as likely to develop ALS.
Half of all people affected with ALS live at least three or more years after diagnosis. Twenty percent live five years or more; up to ten percent will live more than ten years.

There is some evidence that people with ALS are living longer, at least partially due to clinical management interventions, riluzole and possibly other compounds and drugs under investigation.

Diagnosing ALS
ALS is a very difficult disease to diagnose. To date, there is no one test or procedure to ultimately establish the diagnosis of ALS. It is through a clinical examination and series of diagnostic tests, often ruling out other diseases that mimic ALS, that a diagnosis can be established. A comprehensive diagnostic workup includes most, if not all, of the following procedures:

  • electrodiagnostic tests including electomyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV)
  • blood and urine studies including high resolution serum protein electrophoresis, thyroid and parathyroid hormone levels and 24-hour urine collection for heavy metals
  • spinal tap
  • x-rays, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • myelogram of cervical spine
  • muscle and/or nerve biopsy
  • thorough neurological examination

For more information on the importance of a second opinion, click here.

These tests are done at the discretion of the physician, usually based on the results of other diagnostic tests and the physical examination. There are several diseases that have some of the same symptoms as ALS and most of these conditions are treatable. It is for this reason that The ALS Association recommends that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS “expert” – someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medial specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ExcellenceSM, ALS Clinics and contact your local ALS Association Chapter or the National Office.

Symptoms
Initial Symptoms of the Disease
At the onset of ALS the symptoms may be so slight that they are frequently overlooked. With regard to the appearance of symptoms and the progression of the illness, the course of the disease may include the following:

  • muscle weakness in one or more of the following: hands, arms, legs or the muscles of speech, swallowing or breathing
  • twitching (fasciculation) and cramping of muscles, especially those in the hands and feet
  • impairment of the use of the arms and legs
  • “thick speech” and difficulty in projecting the voice
  • in more advanced stages, shortness of breath, difficulty in breathing and swallowing

The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One person may experience tripping over carpet edges, another person may have trouble lifting and a third person’s early symptom may be slurred speech. The rate at which ALS progresses can be quite variable from one person to another. Although the mean survival time with ALS is three to five years, many people live five, ten or more years. In a small number of people, ALS is known to remit or halt its progression, though there is no scientific understanding as to how and why this happens. Symptoms can begin in the muscles of speech, swallowing or in the hands, arms, legs or feet. Not all people with ALS experience the same symptoms or the same sequences or patterns of progression. But, progressive muscle weakness and paralysis are universally experienced.

Muscle weakness is a hallmark initial sign in ALS, occurring in approximately 60% of patients. Early symptoms vary with each individual, but usually include tripping, dropping things, abnormal fatigue of the arms and/or legs, slurred speech, muscle cramps and twitches and/or uncontrollable periods of laughing or crying.

The hands and feet may be affected first, causing difficulty in lifting, walking or using the hands for the activities of daily living such as dressing, washing and buttoning clothes.

As the weakening and paralysis continue to spread to the muscles of the trunk of the body the disease, eventually affects speech, swallowing, chewing and breathing. When the breathing muscles become affected, ultimately, the patient will need permanent ventilatory support in order to survive.

Since ALS attacks only motor neurons, the sense of sight, touch, hearing, taste and smell are not affected. For many people, muscles of the eyes and bladder are generally not affected.

Facts You Should Know

  • ALS is not contagious.
  • It is estimated that ALS is responsible for nearly two deaths per hundred thousand population annually.
  • Approximately 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year. The incidence of ALS is two per 100,000 people, and it is estimated that as many as 30,000 Americans may have the disease at any given time.
  • Although the life expectancy of an ALS patient averages about two to five years from the time of diagnosis, this disease is variable and many people live with quality for five years and more.  More than half of all patients live more than three years after diagnosis.
  • About twenty percent of people with ALS live five years or more and up to ten percent will survive more than ten years and five percent will live 20 years. There are people in whom ALS has stopped progressing and a small number of people in whom the symptoms of ALS reversed.
  • ALS occurs throughout the world with no racial, ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries.
  • ALS can strike anyone.
  • The onset of ALS is insidious with muscle weakness or stiffness as early symptoms. Progression of weakness, wasting and paralysis of the muscles of the limbs and trunk as well as those that control vital functions such as speech, swallowing and later breathing generally follows.
  • There can be significant costs for medical care, equipment and home health caregiving later in the disease.  It is important to be knowledgeable about your health plan coverage and other programs for which your may be eligible, including SSA, Medicare, Medical and Veteran Affairs benefits.
  • Riluzole, the first treatment to alter the course of ALS, was approved by the FDA in late 1995. This antiglutamate drug was shown scientifically to prolong the life of persons with ALS by at least a few months. More recent studies suggest Riluzole slows the progress of ALS, allowing the patient more time in the higher functioning states when their function is less affected by ALS. Click here for more information on the drug. Many private health plans cover the cost of Riluzole. Further information on Riluzole coverage through Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit can be found in the Advocacy pages of this website.

Reports from three separate patient databases described long range experience with Riluzole. All three reports suggest a trend of increasing survival with Riluzole over time. More studies that are double blind and controlled are needed to confirm these database observations. The trend appears to indicate that longer periods of time than those used in the Riluzole clinical trials may be needed to see the long-term survival advantage of the drug. An interesting observation was that despite the fact that the Irish government provides Riluzole free of charge to people in Ireland with ALS, only two-thirds of the patients registered in the Ireland national ALS database reported taking Riluzole.

VA Nurses: Quality and Innovation in Patient Care: VMi New England and Automotive Innovations are proud to Raise Awareness for National Nurses Week.

Army nurse in uniform

Veteran Nurses Week

“Veterans and Nurses, in partnership, make a world class patient experience,” says Cathy Rick, VA Chief Nursing Officer.

Celebrate National Nurses Week with VMi New England and Automotive Innovations.

The American Nurses Association has designated this year’s National Nurses Week theme: “Delivering Quality and Innovation in Patient Care.”

Join us in celebrating the men and women who serve this country by caring for its Veterans.

80,000 Nurses Caring for America’s Veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs has one of the largest nursing staffs of any health care system in the world.

Numbering more than 80,000 nationwide, the VA integrated nursing team provides comprehensive, complex, and compassionate care to our nation’s Veterans.

The Veterans Affairs nurses are a dynamic, diverse group of respected, honored, and compassionate professionals. The VA is the leader in the creation of an organizational culture where excellence in nursing is valued as essential for quaity health care to those who served America.

“VA nursing is at the center of generating value-based innovation. Their work is a demonstration of integrity, commitment, respect and excellence as we shape efforts to ensure access to personalized, proactive health care for Veterans,” according to Cathy Rick, VA’s Chief Nursing Officer.

She adds, “I am extremely proud to call myself a VA nurse.”

National Nurses Week: Every year — May 6th through May 12. May 12 is Florence Nightingale’s birthday.

VA nursing provides the largest clinical training and cooperative education opportunities in association with undergraduate and graduate programs at numerous colleges and universities.

The VA nursing team is composed of registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPNs/LVNs), nursing assistants, and intermediate care technicians.

In the 1990s, VA provided clinical experience to one out of every four professional nursing students in the country. VA nurses are highly valued members and leaders of the health care team, contributing their expertise and knowledge to the care of patients.

In addition to clinical care, VA nursing is also a significant part of advancing research in VA and keeping up with the latest technological innovations. Nurse researchers help to promote inclusion of evidence into practice to provide quality care for Veterans.


Components of VA Nursing

Professional nursing supports the mission of the VA health care system by providing state-of-the-art, cost-effective care to patients and families as they respond to illness and health issues.

In addition to medical, surgical and psychiatric units, VA nurses work in intensive care, spinal cord injury, geriatric, dialysis, blind rehabilitation, specialty care (such as diabetes clinics), hospice, domiciliary, oncology, and organ transplant units.

VA nurses provide care across a variety of settings including primary, ambulatory, acute, geriatrics, rehabilitation, and extended care settings.

They work in outpatient clinics, community living centers, and home-based primary care programs.

VA nurses also play a considerable role in emergency planning, preparedness, response, and recovery.

VA nurses proudly serve America’s heroes by practicing the art and science of nursing in order to provide holistic, evidence-based, high quality care.

Interested in a career as VA nurse? Start here: VA Careers

2013 Toyota Sienna Wheelchair Vans MA

Need more room or want a in floor ramp? Trade your Braun Entervan in and upgrade to a Northstar

Need more room or want a in floor ramp? Trade your Braun Entervan in and upgrade to a VMI Northstar

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Having Trouble With your Braun Ramp bring it to us for service, we can fix it!

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Want the best service available in New England?

Call the SE MA’s oldest mobility dealership Automotive Innovations.

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Looking for a one stop dealership when it comes to wheelchair vans?

Give us a call at 508-697-6006

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Need hand controls, mobility seats or steering modifications for your Braun Ability Van?

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Need a left foot gas pedal for a Braun Van?

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Welcome to VMi New England’s Mobility Center!

VMi New England Automotive Innovations Mobility Center is located in Bridgewater Massachusetts. We provide our customers with access to the custom fitment, service and repair of all the leading mobility wheelchair accessible vehicles. We specialize in installing hand / foot controls and devices that can offer greater freedom and independence. Our lineup includes Vantage Mobility International products, and we have a team of Certified Mobility Consultants who are always ready to help properly fit you to your new (or existing) handicapped accessible vehicle.

''VMi New England's Indoor Showroom" 1000 Main Street Bridgewater MA 02324

”VMi New England’s Indoor Showroom”
1000 Main Street Bridgewater MA 02324

We specialize in proper fitment of important features such as transfer seats. We carry brand names such as Chrysler/DodgeFordHondaToyota and keep a selection of new and used vehicles in stock and we accept trade in vehicles as well. All of our mobility vehicles offer tie downs and other important safety features as well as the ability to be easily upgraded with EZ Locks and other equipment.

We are a member of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association. Whenever you contact one of our Certified Mobility Consultants, you can rest assured that you are contacting a professional team member who will always offer the highest quality service in the business. We adhere to the highest standards in the industry and always provide our customers with the best service possible. Veteran’s are eligible for special benefits; we work directly with the Veterans Administration and Paralyzed Veterans of America.

VMi New England in Bridgewater, Massachusetts understands what your needs and desires are. Contact us today for a demonstration on what our vehicles and equipment can offer to help make your life more mobile and convenient. Our Certified Mobility Consultants will be happy to answer all of your questions and will gladly take the time to discuss the handicapped accessible vehicles and options that you feel might be the best fit to meet and fulfill your mobility needs. We will even come to you, demonstrating our vehicles at your home or place of work.

We been designing, engineering, and installing mobility equipment like hand controls, zero effort steering, servo steering, servo gas brake left foot gas pedals and installing them for more than 25 years.

David Fowler – VMI Testimonial

David Fowler is the President of the Texas Chapter of Paralyzed Veterans of America. David and MaryLou just purchased their fourth wheelchair accessible van, however it is their first VMi! Hear what they think about their new VMi Toyota Sienna.