Tag Archives: Honor

6th Annual Mass Fallen Heroes Memorial Dinner

6th Annual Mass Fallen Heroes Memorial Dinner

The WaterFire Salute to Veterans

WaterFire Salute To Veterans 2015

The WaterFire Salute to Veterans is scheduled to take place on November 7th, 2015. This is the third year for this community wide celebration of Veterans. This WaterFire will be a full WaterFire event lighting and solely devoted to saluting and honoring our Veterans and all military personnel of the United States and their families.

Much more than the bonfires, WaterFire presents a wide variety of experiences – traditional to avant-garde and experimental, bringing new audiences to art while filling the city with energy, vibrancy and a new vision for urban life. Programming around this installation varies greatly and WaterFire prides itself on being able to celebrate, champion and highlight various other forms of art, causes, other local organizations and local history. This year WaterFire is proud to honor all of our Veterans with an entire evening dedicated to their service, sacrifice and dedication.

This WaterFire event lighting will include many different activities and initiatives that highlight and celebrate, in both creative and literal representations, all Rhode Island Veterans as well as current members of the armed forces from all branches. The goal is to use the WaterFire platform as a means to educate and bring awareness to the community at large about our Veterans and Veterans Services, as well as serve as a celebration and thank you for the sacrifices that these men and women have made for our country and our community.

Throughout the WaterFire installation there will be many ceremonies and tributes planned over the course of the evening as well as many areas for displays and engagement from Waterplace Basin to Steeple Street to Memorial Park. WaterFire is excited to produce a Veteran’s Resource Fair at the heart of the installation.

Tomorrow is the New York Wounded Vet Run

New York Wounded Vet Run

National Spirit of ’45 Day

Spirit Of '45

In 2010, Congress unanimously voted in favor of a national “Spirit of ’45 Day” to preserve and honor the legacy of the men and women of the World War II generation so that their example of national unity, shared sacrifice, can do attitude, and service to their community and country continues to inspire future generations of Americans.

6th Annual Big Nick’s Ride for the Fallen Memorial Motorcycle Ride

6th Annual Big Nick's Ride for the Fallen Memorial Motorcycle Ride

Accessible Preparations for Memorial Day

Hosting a Memorial Day Party is the perfect way to kick off your summer adventures, and here are some tips on how to make sure your gathering is accessible and fun for all!

Choose Your Location
To ensure all of your guests are able to easily maneuver around your party and its surroundings, make certain there are ramps, lifts or unobstructed entryways available for guests in wheelchairs. Another thing to consider is parking. If some of your guests will be arriving in wheelchair accessible vans, they might need a little bit of extra room to deploy a lift or ramp.

You can host an accessible Memorial Day party if your home or apartment is less than wheelchair-friendly. Local parks often rent out pavilions or picnic areas for gatherings, and these areas often boast open spaces and paved paths, making them a great bet for guests in wheelchairs.

Perfect Your Spread
From grilling up veggies and even fresh fruits, to stocking up on refreshing drinks to beat the summer heat, making sure you’re serving up tasty treats is perhaps the most important part of throwing a great, memorable party. When planning your party’s spread, always take into consideration any possible allergies or food restrictions your guests might have. If you’re sending out invites, it might be a good idea to ask guests of any food requirements right on the invitation, so you’ll be armed with the right information when it comes time to shop and prep.

Don’t Forget the Entertainment
Every good party needs some entertainment. That doesn’t mean you have to go out and hire a full band though—making your own fun is easy! You could set out the board games for some old school fun or create a dance floor on your deck or living room with plenty of room. Start a game of trivia, charades or bingo, you could even break out the karaoke machine and make some hilarious and potentially embarrassing memories.

Memorial Day is a day for honoring and remembering all of the brave men and women who served (and continue to serve) in our country’s Armed Forces. As such, if you have a disabled veteran attending your party, think of ways that you can honor him/her in some special way.

#22KILL Vet Run – To Honor Those Who Serve

#22KILL Vet Run - To Honor Those Who Serve

#22KILL Vet Run Fundraiser

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

#22KILL Vet Run is a one-day motorcycle fundraising event that’s open to everyone who supports veterans. You don’t have to ride a motorcycle to come support.

Join them as they honor our nation’s military and veterans. Proceeds will benefit Veterans through 3 vetted local nonprofit organizations: Operation Once in a Lifetime, Hooves for Heroes and Center for Brain Health’s Warrior Programs.

Check-in begins at 9:00am on the day of the event at Maverick Harley-Davidson, or you can register online now.

Single rider registration is $22, or $25 with a passenger / sidecar. If you want to ride along in a vehicle, you can register for $10. Any donations simply to support are welcomed and appreciated.

There will be live music, food & drinks, and a 50/50 raffle. Don’t forget to purchase a ticket for a chance to win a #22KILL Ducati.

Route (TBD) begins at
Maverick Harley-Davidson
1845 N Interstate 35E
Carrollton, TX

And ends at
Gas Monkey Bar N Grill
10261 Technology Blvd W
Dallas, TX 75220

For questions or concerns, please contact Jimmy Mackin at
jim@veteran.me
972-835-0876

Donate

MASSACHUSETTS RUN FOR THE FALLEN ~ A Military Friends Foundation Project

Start Date: 09/06/2014
Start Time: 09 : 00 AM
End Time: 12 : 00 AM
Location: Market Street Lynnfield – Exit 43 off Route 128/I-95
Lynnfield, Massachusetts 01940
 Name: Military Friends Foundation
Phone: (844) 357-8387
Email: Email the Event Director
Website: facebook.com/massrunforthefallen
Information for GOLD STAR FAMILIES
Are you a post 9/11 MASSACHUSETTS GOLD STAR FAMILY? Please call or email for your Gold Star Family code to waive your registration fee for four family members!

Email: MARFTF@militaryfriends.org
Ph: 1-84-HELP-VETS

About the Massachusetts Run for the Fallen
Massachusetts Run For The Fallen (MARFTF) is a Military Friends Foundation project dedicated to keeping alive the memory of our military Heroes that gave their lives to protect our freedom since September 11, 2001.

We are a group of runners, walkers and support crew whose mission is clear and simple: To run in honor every Massachusetts service member who lost there lives in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. Each mile of sweat and pain and each flag saluted, is to pay homage to one service member’s life and their family.

We run to raise awareness for the lives of those who died, to rejuvenate their memories and keep their spirits alive. We run to raise support for programs that assist the families of the fallen and to aid in the healing process for Massachusetts residents whose lives have been affected by war. MARFTF has no political affiliation or agenda, but simply honor those who have fought, and those who have fallen under the American Flag.

2014 Event Schedule
7-8:00 AM – Same Day Registration Opens
8:15 AM – Name Reading of Fallen Heroes
9:05 AM – Wheelchair Start
9:11 AM – Timed 5K Start
9:15 AM – Untimed 5K/Walker Start
9:30-12:00 – Food, Festivities and Fun!
Event Highlights
*Limited edition tshirt for the first 400 registered runners (additional shirts may be available for purchase day of event)
*Pre-run airbrush tattoo
*Post-Run lunch featuring eats from Kings Lynnfield
*Free ice cream tasting
*Great promotions for registered runners/walkers from MarketStreet stores
*Raffles
*Live music

Click here  to Register

Today Is The SGT. Daniel Vasselian Motorcycle Run

SGT. Daniel Vasselian Motorcycle Run
SGT. Daniel Vasselian
Motorcycle Run

———-

What?
Bike Run – Cookout – After Party
Music Provided By: Slider & DoubleShot
Sponsored By: American Infedels

When?
Saturday, August 2rd, 2014
1:00pm – 6:00pm
Registration starts 10:00am – Kickstands up at 11:30

Where?
VFW Post 697
95 Essex Street, Whitman, MA

Why?
In Honor of Marine SGT. Danny Vasselian
Who Made The Ultimate Sacrifice
And Gave His Life Fighting For Freedom
In Helmand, Afghanistan

Proceeds
100% of All Proceeds Go Directly To The www.DannyVFund.0rg

Contact
AmericanInfidelsMC@Gmail.com

Don’t Forget SGT. Daniel Vasselian Motorcycle Run Is This Saturday!

SGT. Daniel Vasselian Motorcycle Run
SGT. Daniel Vasselian
Motorcycle Run

———-

What?
Bike Run – Cookout – After Party
Music Provided By: Slider & DoubleShot
Sponsored By: American Infedels

When?
Saturday, August 2rd, 2014
1:00pm – 6:00pm
Registration starts 10:00am – Kickstands up at 11:30

Where?
VFW Post 697
95 Essex Street, Whitman, MA

Why?
In Honor of Marine SGT. Danny Vasselian
Who Made The Ultimate Sacrifice
And Gave His Life Fighting For Freedom
In Helmand, Afghanistan

Proceeds
100% of All Proceeds Go Directly To The www.DannyVFund.0rg

Contact
AmericanInfidelsMC@Gmail.com

SGT. Daniel Vasselian Motorcycle Run

SGT. Daniel Vasselian Motorcycle Run
SGT. Daniel Vasselian
Motorcycle Run

———-

What?
Bike Run – Cookout – After Party
Music Provided By: Slider & DoubleShot
Sponsored By: American Infedels

When?
Saturday, August 2rd, 2014
1:00pm – 6:00pm
Registration starts 10:00am – Kickstands up at 11:30

Where?
VFW Post 697
95 Essex Street, Whitman, MA

Why?
In Honor of Marine SGT. Danny Vasselian
Who Made The Ultimate Sacrifice
And Gave His Life Fighting For Freedom
In Helmand, Afghanistan

Proceeds
100% of All Proceeds Go Directly To The www.DannyVFund.0rg

Contact
AmericanInfidelsMC@Gmail.com

11 Facts About Veterans Day

11 Facts About Veterans Day Honoring Veterans at VMi New England

How much do you really know about this national holiday honoring those who have served our country?

Here are 11 Veterans Day facts in honor of the holiday celebrated in the United States on November 11th. Thank you to all those who have served!


When was Veterans Day first celebrated?
Originally called Armistice Day, Veterans Day was celebrated on Nov. 11, 1919, which was the first anniversary of the end of the fighting of World War I. The Allies and Germany agree to an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities,on the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. (Technically WWI did not officially end until the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on June 28, 1919.)

Why do we celebrate Veterans Day?
President Woodrow Wilson said of that first observance in 1919, “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations.” That purpose has not changed as today the purpose is still to honor those who have served our nation.

When did Veterans Day become a national holiday?
Although first observed in 1919, Congress did not make it official until 1938. IN 1954, the name changed to Veterans Day. In the 1970s the date moved around in November, causing confusion, and President Gerald Ford in 1975 signed a law placing the observance on Nov. 11 and there it has remained. For more details, please see the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs History of Veterans Day and the U.S. Army’s Center for Miliary History page on History of Veterans Day.

What is the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day?
These two holidays are frequently confused but they are not the same. Memorial Day, celebrated in May, honors those who lost their lives in service to our country, and Veterans Day, celebrated in November, honors all who have served and focusing on thanking living service members, past and present. For the official answer, the Office of of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs explains, “Memorial Day is a day for remembering and honoring military personnel who died in the service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle. While those who died are also remembered, Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor ALL those who served honorably in the military – in wartime or peacetime. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for their service, to acknowledge that their contributions to our national security are appreciated, and to underscore the fact that all those who served – not only those who died – have sacrificed and done their duty.”

In what war did the largest number of Americans serve in the Armed Forces?
World War II saw more than 16 million Americans become service members, according to the 2009 Veterans Day Teacher Resource Guide. As of June 2013, CNN reported that 1.7 million WII vets were still alive.


Why do we spell it Veterans Day? Shouldn’t there be an apostrophe?
“Veterans Day does not include an apostrophe but does include an ‘s’ at the end of ‘veterans’ because it is not a day that ‘belongs’ to veterans, it is a day for honoring all veterans,” explains the Office of of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Is there a national ceremony?
In keeping with the honoring of the timing of the armistice ending the carnage of WWI, a Veterans Day National Ceremony is held each year on November 11th at Arlington National Cemetery. The VA website says that ceremony commences precisely at 11:00 a.m. with a wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknowns and continues inside the Memorial Amphitheater with a parade of colors by veterans’ organizations and remarks from dignitaries intended to honor and thank all who served in the United States Armed Forces.


Which state is home to the largest number of veterans?
California has the most, with 2 million veterans calling the Golden State home. Texas and Florida are next, with 1.6 million vets in each state, reports the Census Bureau.

How many of U.S. vets are female?
There are 1.6 million female veterans, as of 2011, according to the Census Bureau.


How many veterans are there living in the United States?
The U.S. has 21.8 million veterans, according the the Census Bureau’s Snapshot of Our Nation’s Veterans.

Do veterans ever serve in more than one war?
Yes. More than 1.3 million of America’s living veterans have served in more than one conflict, and 54,000 have served in 3 wars – WWI, Korea and Vietnam – according to the Census Bureau’s Snapshot of Our Nation’s Veterans.

Honoring All Who Served

Veterans Day 2013  VMi New England Thanks and Honors All Who Served

Veterans Day
Many Americans mistakenly believe that Veterans Day is the day America sets aside to honor American military personnel who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained from combat. That’s not quite true. Memorial Day is the day set aside to honor America’s war dead.

Veterans Day, on the other hand, honors ALL American veterans, both living and dead. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for dedicated and loyal service to their country. November 11 of each year is the day that we ensure veterans know that we deeply appreciate the sacrifices they have made in the lives to keep our country free.

Armistice Day
To commemorate the ending of the “Great War” (World War I), an “unknown soldier” was buried in highest place of honor in both England and France ( (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe). These ceremonies took place on November 11th, celebrating the ending of World War I hostilities at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). This day became known internationally as “Armistice Day”.

In 1921, the United States of America followed France and England by laying to rest the remains of a World War I American soldier — his name “known but to God” — on a Virginia hillside overlooking the city of Washington DC and the Potomac River. This site became known as the “Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,” and today is called the “Tomb of the Unknowns.” Located in Arlington National Cemetery, the tomb symbolizes dignity and reverence for the American veteran.

In America, November 11th officially became known as Armistice Day through an act of Congress in 1926. It wasn’t until 12 years later, through a similar act that Armistice Day became a national holiday.

The entire World thought that World War I was the “War to end all wars.” Had this been true, the holiday might still be called Armistice Day today. That dream was shattered in 1939 when World War II broke out in Europe. More than 400,000 American service members died during that horrific war.

Veterans Day
In 1947, Raymond Weeks, of Birmingham Ala., organized a “Veterans Day” parade on November 11th to honor all of America’s veterans for their loyal and dedicated service. Shortly thereafter, Congressman Edward H. Rees (Kansas) introduced legislation to change the name of Armistice Day to Veterans Day in order to honor all veterans who have served the United States in all wars.

In 1954, President Eisenhower signed a bill proclaiming November 11 as Veterans Day, and called upon Americans everywhere to rededicate themselves to the cause of peace. He issued a Presidential Order directing the head of the Veterans Administration (now called the Department of Veterans Affairs), to form a Veterans Day National Committee to organize and oversee the national observance of Veterans Day.

Congress passed legislation in 1968 to move Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. However as it became apparent that November 11th was historically significant to many Americans, in 1978, Congress reversed itself and returned the holiday to its traditional date.

Veterans Day National Ceremony
At exactly 11 a.m., each November 11th, a color guard, made up of members from each of the military branches, renders honors to America’s war dead during a heart-moving ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknowns in Arlington National Cemetery.

The President or his representative places a wreath at the Tomb and a bugler sounds Taps. The balance of the ceremony, including a “Parade of Flags” by numerous veterans service organizations, takes place inside the Memorial Amphitheater, adjacent to the Tomb.

In addition to planning and coordinating the National Veterans Day Ceremony, the Veterans Day National Committee supports a number of Veterans Day Regional Sites. These sites conduct Veterans Day celebrations that provide excellent examples for other communities to follow.

Veterans Day Observance
Veterans Day is always observed on November 11, regardless of the day of the week on which it falls. The Veterans Day National Ceremony is always held on Veterans Day itself, even if the holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday. However, like all other federal holidays, when it falls on a non-workday — Saturday or Sunday — the federal government employees take the day off on Monday (if the holiday falls on Sunday) or Friday (if the holiday falls on Saturday).

Federal government holiday observance (for federal employees, including military) is established by federal law. 5 U.S.C. 6103 establishes the following public holidays for Federal employees: New Year’s Day, Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington’s Birthday (President’s Day), Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.

This federal law does not apply to state and local governments. They are free to determine local government closings (including school closings) locally. As such, there is no legal requirement that schools close of Veterans Day, and many do not. However, most schools hold Veterans Day activities on Veterans Day and throughout the week of the holiday to honor American veterans.

Veterans Day Around the World
Many other countries honor their veterans on November 11th of each year. However, the name of the holiday and the types of ceremonies differ from the Veterans Day activities in the United States.

Canada, Australia, and Great Britain refer to their holidays as “Remembrance Day.” Canada and Australia observe the day on November 11, and Great Britain conducts their ceremonies on the Sunday nearest to November 11th.

In Canada, the observance of “Remembrance Day” is actually quite similar to the United States, in that the day is set aside to honor all of Canada’s veterans, both living and dead. One notable difference is that many Canadians wear a red poppy flower on November 11 to honor their war dead, while the “red poppy” tradition is observed in the United States on Memorial Day.

In Australia, “Remembrance Day” is very much like America’s Memorial Day, in that its considered a day to honor Australian veterans who died in war.

In Great Britain, the day is commemorated by church services and parades of ex-service members in Whitehall, a wide ceremonial avenue leading from London’s Parliament Square to Trafalgar Square. Wreaths of poppies are left at the Cenotaph, a war memorial in Whitehall, which was built after the First World War. At the Cenotaph and elsewhere in the country, a two-minute silence is observed at 11 a.m., to honor those who lost their lives in wars.

Have You Hugged Your Veteran Today?
One of the most personal and meaningful Veterans Day activities for people is to send notes or cards to hospitalized veterans or those living in veterans homes. Or, better yet, visit a veteran in a local veterans hospital or veterans home. The best way to have a “happy Veterans Day” is to do something special to make a veteran happy.