Tag Archives: handicap vans

How to Afford a Used Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle New England

Among people with disabilities, especially wheelchair users, one of the most talked about subjects is the price of a wheelchair accessible vehicle. A shiny new van can be out of range for many consumers on fixed incomes. But a used wheelchair van could be a possibility.

Let’s take a look at some concerns people may have:

Used vehicles have too much mileage on them.

Many used vehicles don’t have much mileage and the mobility equipment may be hardly used.

How much does a used accessible van with a ramp or lift cost?

A wheelchair accessible van less than 3 years old could start at $30,000—or thousands more. A gently used, older wheelchair van can be converted to save even more.

An older vehicle won’t last much longer.

A vehicle properly taken care of can last for decades. For added peace of mind, contact a mobility dealer who sells used wheelchair accessible vehicles and has decades of experience.

A used vehicle probably won’t have the equipment I want.

You want an in-floor ramp but you can only find fold-outs. If the price is right, you may be able to have the desired equipment installed after the sale. Do your research up front.

How can I qualify for a vehicle loan?

  • Talk to your VMi New England mobility dealer—they know the organizations, non-profits, state and federal agencies and charities that will help in financing in your area.
  • If you are a Veteran, you may be eligible for a credit towards a wheelchair accessible vehicle. For more information go to VMi New England
  • Start saving! If you get an income tax refund, put it in a special savings account.
  • Ask your family and friends to forgo gifts and donate towards your vehicle fund.

Above all, contact a mobility expert like the ones at VMi New England. They will work hand-in-hand with you on areas like what is right for you, financing options, rates, terms, manufacturer offers, incentives and benefits.

VMi New England is an advocate for mobility and accessibility for drivers with disabilities. If you need help with converting or buying a handicap accessible car, truck or van, please consider one of our adapted wheelchair vans.

Mobility Rebate Programs

Whether you’re looking for a wheelchair accessible minivan, a full-size van, or a lift/ramp for your wheelchair van, your financial investment is always going to be a major consideration. We understand the importance of the investment our customers make and we always strive to produce superior products and provide excellent service.

In today’s difficult economy, every cent counts when you’re making decisions about what you can and can’t afford to go without. Feeling that your mobility is restricted by financial constraints is discouraging, and we don’t like the idea of anyone having to face that challenge and find no answers or possibilities. That’s why we are extremely well informed and able to assist you in navigating your way through the myriad of grants, tax incentives, and rebate programs.

Every auto manufacturer offers a mobility rebate program of some type and they are definitely worth looking into. Here is some information about rebates for wheelchair vans and wheelchair lifts/ramps. For more personalized information, contact us and we will help guide you through the process of applying and receiving these rebates.

Toyota Mobility Dealer
The Toyota Mobility Program provides up to $1,000 in reimbursement for adaptive equipment (such as wheelchair lifts, assistive seating, driving aids, and more) installed on new Toyota vehicles within 12 months of the delivery date of the vehicle.

Dodge/Chrysler Automobility Dealer
Chrysler’s AutoMobility Program is similar to the program mentioned above, with reimbursements from $400-$1,000 available depending on the type of adaptive equipment installed..

Honda Mobility Dealer
The Honda Mobility Assistance Program offers reimbursement up to $1,000 for adaptive equipment installed on a new Honda!

Lexus Mobility
The Lexus Mobility Program supports the mobility needs of Lexus owners and/or family members with physical disabilities.

 If you have any questions about these programs, just give our us a call or visit us today. We’re always happy to help!

Mobility Rebate Programs

Whether you’re looking for a wheelchair accessible minivan, a full-size van, or a lift/ramp for your wheelchair van, your financial investment is always going to be a major consideration. We understand the importance of the investment our customers make and we always strive to produce superior products and provide excellent service.

In today’s difficult economy, every cent counts when you’re making decisions about what you can and can’t afford to go without. Feeling that your mobility is restricted by financial constraints is discouraging, and we don’t like the idea of anyone having to face that challenge and find no answers or possibilities. That’s why we are extremely well informed and able to assist you in navigating your way through the myriad of grants, tax incentives, and rebate programs.

Every auto manufacturer offers a mobility rebate program of some type and they are definitely worth looking into. Here is some information about rebates for wheelchair vans and wheelchair lifts/ramps. For more personalized information, contact us and we will help guide you through the process of applying and receiving these rebates.

Toyota Mobility Dealer
The Toyota Mobility Program provides up to $1,000 in reimbursement for adaptive equipment (such as wheelchair lifts, assistive seating, driving aids, and more) installed on new Toyota vehicles within 12 months of the delivery date of the vehicle.

Dodge/Chrysler Automobility Dealer
Chrysler’s AutoMobility Program is similar to the program mentioned above, with reimbursements from $400-$1,000 available depending on the type of adaptive equipment installed..

Honda Mobility Dealer
The Honda Mobility Assistance Program offers reimbursement up to $1,000 for adaptive equipment installed on a new Honda!

Lexus Mobility
The Lexus Mobility Program supports the mobility needs of Lexus owners and/or family members with physical disabilities.

 If you have any questions about these programs, just give our us a call or visit us today. We’re always happy to help!

Are You Looking To Sell Your New or Used Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle?

If you’re looking to sell a wheelchair van that is no longer being used or looking to trade in your current one, contact us today!  Live on-site inspections and a test drive by one of our technicians may be required before a final assessment and offer can be made.

Vehicle Requirements
We will accept virtually all modified (Braun, VMI, Rollx, even AMS) and non-modified vehicles that are preferably under 10 years old  with odometers at 100,000 miles or less. Since we are a full service mobility dealer and wheelchair van restoration center will even accept rusted out vehicles.

Submit Your Vehicle’s Information
The first step is to call or email us about your vehicle. The basic information you provide helps our mobility consultants create the best  deal possible for you. Be sure you include the correct VIN and mileage along with some pictures of your vehicle.

Inspection
A mobility consultant will typically give a quote as soon as your vehicle is brought in for inspection. After a price is agreed upon, we will write you a check.

All offers are based on a first hand inspection, and if a vehicle isn’t represented accurately, we reserve the right to withdraw the offer once the vehicle is personally inspected by our evaluator.

Mobility Rebate Programs

Whether you’re looking for a wheelchair accessible minivan, a full-size van, or a lift/ramp for your wheelchair van, your financial investment is always going to be a major consideration. We understand the importance of the investment our customers make and we always strive to produce superior products and provide excellent service.

In today’s difficult economy, every cent counts when you’re making decisions about what you can and can’t afford to go without. Feeling that your mobility is restricted by financial constraints is discouraging, and we don’t like the idea of anyone having to face that challenge and find no answers or possibilities. That’s why we are extremely well informed and able to assist you in navigating your way through the myriad of grants, tax incentives, and rebate programs.

Every auto manufacturer offers a mobility rebate program of some type and they are definitely worth looking into. Here is some information about rebates for wheelchair vans and wheelchair lifts/ramps. For more personalized information, contact us and we will help guide you through the process of applying and receiving these rebates.

Toyota Mobility Dealer
The Toyota Mobility Program provides up to $1,000 in reimbursement for adaptive equipment (such as wheelchair lifts, assistive seating, driving aids, and more) installed on new Toyota vehicles within 12 months of the delivery date of the vehicle.

Dodge/Chrysler Automobility Dealer
Chrysler’s AutoMobility Program is similar to the program mentioned above, with reimbursements from $400-$1,000 available depending on the type of adaptive equipment installed..

Honda Mobility Dealer
The Honda Mobility Assistance Program offers reimbursement up to $1,000 for adaptive equipment installed on a new Honda!

Lexus Mobility
The Lexus Mobility Program supports the mobility needs of Lexus owners and/or family members with physical disabilities.

 If you have any questions about these programs, just give our us a call or visit us today. We’re always happy to help!

Trade-In or Sell Your Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle

If you’re looking to trade in your current wheelchair van or looking to sell one that is no longer being used, contact us today!  Live on-site inspections and a test drive by one of our technicians may be required before a final assessment and offer can be made.

Trade In Vehicle Requirements
We will accept virtually all non-modified vehicles that are preferably under 10 years old with odometers at 100,000 miles or less. You can also trade in a converted mobility vehicle from Braun, VMI, Rollx, and, even a AMS converted handicap vans.

Submit Your Vehicle’s Information
The first step is to call or email us about your trade. The basic information you provide helps our mobility consultants create the best trade-in deal possible for you. Be sure you include the correct VIN and mileage, and submit photos of your vehicle.

Trade-in Inspection
A mobility consultant will typically give a trade-in quote as soon as your vehicle is brought in for inspection. After a price is agreed upon, we will write you a check.

All trade-in offers are based on a first hand inspection, and if a vehicle isn’t represented accurately, we reserve the right to withdraw the offer once the vehicle is personally inspected by our evaluator.

Rust Proof Your Wheelchair Van Before It’s Too Late

Winter is Coming
De-Icing the roads
Rust Proof Your Wheelchair Van Before the Road Salt Hits the Streets!

We can’t live without salt. It’s a necessary nutrient, it’s used to seed rain clouds, soften household tap water, make chemicals and is used to make ice cream!

In parts of the country with freezing winter temperatures, drivers know that warming the cars up in the morning isn’t the only inconvenience. Icy roads are, too. The same chemical reaction between ice and salt that creates creamy, delicious ice cream also keeps our roads and sidewalks free of dangerous ice during the cold winter months.

A salt and sand mixture is frequently spread over roads before or after a snow or ice storm. Salt lowers water’s freezing point, causing any ice already formed to melt even though the air temperature remains well below freezing. The sand helps keep the salt in place, plus it adds a bit of traction to wet and often slushy roads.

While road salting helps people travel safely, it has drawbacks. It can cause major body and undercarriage damage to your Wheelchair accessible vehicle unless you take extra care and precaution.

If you’re one of the many who must travel the saline streets in the land of the ice and snow, we have some great tips to help protect your mobility vehicle from the ravages of road salt.

Plan Ahead
The best time to prevent salt damage to your conversion van is in Autumn,before the first snowflake falls; a little car maintenance will help keep the rust away.

Prevent
Prevention is better than a cure. There are a number of products that can offer prevention against rust. Products are available either as oils, waxes, fluids and coatings.  The range is vast, but our rust prevention processes, product, plan and application has been found to be most effective. Our rust proofing is ever evolving and has been for over the past 25 years.

  • Our rust proofing formula does more than just cover the metal required, we apply it as a high-pressured spray, ensuring protection to your handicap accessible vehicle’s most critical areas by penetrating, displacing existing moisture and protecting the many vulnerable crevices of your automobile.

As seen in the picture below this van has heavy rust and metal fatigue due to a lack of maintenance.

IMG_0697

Once the rust is this bad there’s not much we can do other than replace the van.
So call us or come in today to rust proof your van before it’s too late.

 

 

September has been designated by Congress as National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

september has been designated by congress as national spinal cord injury awareness month newenglandwheelchairvan.com

September has been designated by Congress as National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month. Sponsored by Sen. Mark Rubio of Florida, the resolution notes:

  • the estimated 1,275,000 individuals in the United States who live with a spinal cord injury (SCI) cost society billions of dollars in health-care costs and lost wages;
  • an estimated 100,000 of those individuals are veterans who suffered the spinal cord injury while serving as members of the United States Armed Forces;
  • every 48 minutes a person will become paralyzed, underscoring the urgent need to develop new neuroprotection, pharmacological, and regeneration treatments to reduce, prevent, and reverse paralysis; and
  • increased education and investment in research are key factors in improving outcomes for victims of spinal cord injuries, improving the quality of life of victims, and ultimately curing paralysis.

“Paralyzed Veterans of America is passionate about its commitment to increasing awareness, supporting research to find a cure and advocating for exceptional quality of care for patients with spinal cord injury/disorders

Research into treating or finding a way to reverse paralysis from spinal cord injury is often expensive and hard to come by, involving specialized equipment and staff that many hospitals and research centers cannot afford. Government funding and support, as well as that of the private sector, will be crucial in the search for a treatment for paralysis.

Paralyzed Veterans of America has since its inception supported research in spinal cord science as well as educational initiatives to improve the lives of individuals with spinal cord injury—more than $100 million into research that promises new therapies, treatments and potential cures for paralysis. Top researchers supported by Paralyzed Veterans now confidently speak of a cure.

Abilities Expo Boston September 20-22

Abilities Expo  Boston September 20-22

boston abilities expo event for people with abilities september-20-22 vminnewengland.com

BOSTON, August 24, 2013 /VMiNewswire/ — VMi New England’s community of people with disabilities—which also includes families, caregivers, seniors, wounded veterans and healthcare professionals—welcomes the much-anticipated return of the Abilities Expo Boston on September 20-22, 2013 at The Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. Admission is free.

Abilities Expo Boston will take place in Boston, United States Of America for three consecutive days. In this international trade show latest and advanced disAbility products and services will be given supreme importance. The main purpose of this expo is to make the  people aware of the developmental changes which are taking place in this sector. At the same time this event will provide relevant and useful information to the disabled and senior individuals.
Abilities Expo Boston is a must attend event for the caregivers, healthcare professionals and the eminent experts related to this field. In this event they will get a chance to share their knowledge and experience with each other in this trade show.

Boston Abilities Expo September 20-22 2013

Boston Abilities Expo September 20-22

boston abilities expo event for people with abilities september-20-22 vminnewengland.com

For almost as long as we’ve been servicing and selling wheelchair vans , The Abilities Expo has been improving the lives of Americans with disAbilities, their families, caregivers and healthcare professionals. This unique forum features three days of cutting-edge products and services, compelling workshops, fun-for-the-whole-family activities and has become the leading event for the community of people with disabilities (PWDs).

Abilities Expo reaches out to all ages and all sectors of the Community including wounded veterans, persons recovering from immobilizing accidents, seniors with age-related health concerns, children with disabilities, individuals with mobility and spinal issues, people who have vision and hearing impairments, people with developmental disabilities and many more. Whether your challenges are mild or severe, this is your event.

Exhibitor Profile

Automobiles, van/conversions – Assistive technologies – Bathroom equipment – Beds, furnishings & accessories – Chairs & accessories – Clothing & apparel – Daily living aids – Durable medical equipment – Exercise, recreational, sports equipment & services – Home medical equipment & services – Incontinence products – Insurance & insurance services – Legal services – Publications – Ramps/lifts – Rehabilitative care/services – Residential programs – Seating/positioning systems & accessories – Travel & hospitality services – Wheelchairs, scooters & walkers

Boston Abilities Expo– Event for People with Abilities–Makes Boston Debut September 20-22

Abilities Expo–the Nation’s Leading Event for People with Abilities–Boston September 20-22

boston abilities expo event for people with abilities september-20-22 vminnewengland.com

BOSTON, August 22, 2013 /VMiNewswire/ — VMi New England’s community of people with disabilities—which also includes families, caregivers, seniors, wounded veterans and healthcare professionals—welcomes the much-anticipated return of the Abilities Expo Boston on September 20-22, 2013 at The Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. Admission is free.

Abilities Expo has enjoyed tremendous success in bringing life-enhancing products and services, education, resources and fun to people with disabilities in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Houston, Atlanta and San Jose each year.

The Abilities Expo Boston will feature an impressive line-up of exhibits, celebrities, workshops, events and activities to appeal to people of all ages with the full spectrum of disabilities—including physical, learning, developmental and sensory disabilities.

“We are thrilled for the opportunity to bring Abilities Expo to Boston,” said David Korse, president and CEO of Abilities Expo. “We can’t wait help people explore the possibilities and open their eyes to all the things they can do.”

The Latest Products and Services
Attendees will experience cutting-edge products and services for people with a wide range of disabilities. They will find mobility products, devices for people with developmental disabilities, medical equipment, home accessories, essential services, low-cost daily living aids, products for people with sensory impairments and much more.

Relevant Workshops
A series of compelling workshops which address pressing disability issues will be offered free-of-charge to all attendees. Sessions will focus on travel, emergency preparedness, therapeutic recreation, thriving as a parent of a unique child, home accessibility, finding the correct mobility device and that is just for starters.

Sports, Instruction, Dancing and More!
Abilities Expo does not merely inform, it engages and it entertains. Attendees of all levels of ability will learn the latest hip hop dance moves and play a host of adaptive sports like rowing, power soccer and more. And the kids will love the face painting!

Meet the Animals
Animals have become an intrinsic part of the community of people with disabilities. Some are essential to the healing process, while others help their human partners become more independent. Expo-goers will enjoy assistance dog demos, and learn how service monkeys can help people with special needs.

Celebrity Encounters
Meet Chelsie Hill, co-founder of the dance sensation Team Hotwheelz and one of the dynamic divas of Push Girls, Sundance Channel’s award-winning, boundary-breaking docu-series that traces the lives of four women in Hollywood who happen to be in wheelchairs.

Jennifer French, silver medalist for Sailing at the 2012 Paralympian Games and the 2013 Rolex Yachtswoman of the Year, will conduct a workshop and book signing for her new autobiography, On My Feet Again.

Come to VMi New England’s Mobility Center were every day is a Ability Expo

September is National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

WILL YOU STAND UP FOR THOSE WHO CAN’T?

September is National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

september is national spinal cord injury awareness month newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Every 48 minutes someone in the U.S. is paralyzed from a spinal cord injury.  Millions worldwide are living with paralysis as a result and living with the knowledge that there is currently no cure for their injury.

In an effort to raise awareness about the critical need for better treatments and preventive measures, September has been designated National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month by the U.S. Senate, the result of a resolution co-sponsored by Sens. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Bill Nelson (D-FL).  To bolster the resolution’s message, we are launching an awareness campaign lasting the entire month of September.

The goal of the campaign is to ask “Will You Stand Up For Those Who Can’t?”  The intent is to create a national conversation about the devastation of paralysis, and to bring this condition to the forefront of public awareness.

“Paralysis does not discriminate.  People need to realize that paralysis can happen to anyone at any time,” said Nick Buoniconti.  “But the reality of today’s statistics can’t be disputed.  Every 48 minutes another person in the U.S. will become paralyzed. That is simply unacceptable. Each of us must do what we can to make a difference.  I am personally asking you, will you stand up for those who can’t and do one or more of the following?”

We are asking our friends and supporters to:

Make a donation in honor of a loved one, caregiver, scientist or organization who is working to improve the life of those injured.  If you would like to host a small fundraising party at your house, please email bfinfo@med.miami.edu and we will send you more information.

“The inspiring work of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis has touched the lives of millions of young athletes, accident victims and troops in harm’s way and I commend them for it,” said Sen. Rubio. “By designating September as National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month, I hope we can further educate the public about how crippling accidents can be prevented while promoting the important work being done to help victims walk again.”

Trade In a Vehicle Towards a Wheelchair Van

boston trade in a vehicle towards a wheelchair van newenglandwheelchairvan.com/

cash paid for your wheelchair van

VMi New England Mobility Center accepts trade-in vehicles toward the purchase of an wheelchair accessible van. Get a trade-in quote with some of the best rates in the mobility industry. Update your current  wheelchair van, or trade in a car, truck, minivan, full-size van, sports car, or accessible vehicle towards a new or used handicap accessible ramp van. We use a variety of modern up to date appraisal tools, including Kelley Blue Book, NADA, and the Manheim Market Report. We will assess your vehicle’s trade-in value and provide you with a great offer towards the purchase of new wheelchair van or a used handicap van with new or used conversion.

Trade In Vehicle Requirements

We will accept virtually all non-modified vehicles that are preferably under 10 years old with odometers at 100,000 miles or less. You can also trade in a converted mobility vehicle from Braun, VMI, Rollx, and, even a AMS converted handicap vans.

Submit Your Vehicle’s Information
The first step is to call or email us about your trade. The basic information you provide helps our mobility consultants create the best trade-in deal possible for you. Be sure you include the correct VIN and mileage, and submit photos of your vehicle.

Trade-in Inspection
A mobility consultant will typically give a trade-in quote as soon as your vehicle is brought in for inspection. After a price is agreed upon, we will write you a check. For nationwide customers, we will pick up your trade-in at the time that we deliver your new or used handicap van.

All trade-in offers are based on a first hand inspection, and if a vehicle isn’t represented accurately, we reserve the right to withdraw the offer once the vehicle is personally inspected by our evaluator.

 

United Spinal Establishes Advisory Committee of Spinal Cord Injury Experts

united-spinal-establishes-advisory-committee-of-spinal-cord-injury-experts newenglandwheelchairvan.com

United Spinal Association has appointed a new Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee (MSAC) to offer guidance and expertise in assisting people living with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D) locate the very best resources to maximize their quality of life.

The MSAC is comprised of representatives of the multidisciplinary SCI/D health care community including clinicians, scientists, researchers and other professionals.

Committee chairman, Dr. Christine Sang, states, “Our mission is to maximize the quality of life of all people living with SCI/D. We envision a world in which all people living with SCI/D have access to every opportunity that improves health and quality of life.”

The committee will work directly with United Spinal’s membership division, NSCIA and its national resource center.

The goal of the MSAC is threefold:
• Provide information and guidance in medical/other health care-related topics
• Identify and address health care policy issues that impact the SCI/D community
• Inform the SCI/D community of the latest advancements in research relevant to their health and independence

“The MSAC is reflective of United Spinal’s ongoing commitment to actively supporting the highest possible quality of life for persons living with SCI/D,” said Pat Maher, MSAC and United Spinal board member, speaking on behalf of all members of the advisory committee.

“Whether you’re managing a newly acquired injury or diagnosis, or addressing the challenges around aging and SCI, the MSAC is committed to supporting our members and the entire SCI/D community to remain informed on critical health care matters,” he added.

“In the wake of any devastating diagnosis, people and their family members need to know that the information they’re receiving is accurate. We are incredibly fortunate to have the MSAC as a resource for the SCI/D community,” said Paul J. Tobin, president and CEO of United Spinal Association.

United Spinal’s NSCIA national resource center, Spinal Cord Central, provides information and resources to meet the needs of over one million individuals with SCI/D and:

• Their families and friends
• The medical and scientific community
• Service and business professionals
• The media; students; government; elected officials; and the public.

United Spinal and The Buoniconti Fund Team Up to Improve Peer Support for People Living With SCI/D

United Spinal Association and The Buoniconti Fund today announced their plans to create a coordinated national network of peer support groups called the “Spinal Network” that will set higher standards in assisting people living with spinal cord injuries and disorders (SCI/D).

The goal of the Spinal Network is to ensure more peer support groups in cities and towns across the United States are connected to the very best resources to help people with SCI/D maintain independent and active lifestyles.

united-spinal-and-the-buoniconti-fund-team-up-to-improve-peer-support-for-people-living-with-scid

“There are a variety of SCI/D support groups out there, both new and old. Unfortunately, there is very little coordination between them and their standards can be drastically different,” said Paul J. Tobin, president and CEO of United Spinal Association.

“In many cases, a person with SCI/D who has had great peer support may move to a new community with minimal support. Even worse, someone may leave a rehab facility with no support whatsoever and no clear picture of how to overcome new challenges,” added Tobin.

To date, over thirty support groups in 20 states have received funding through grants from The Spinal Network for their commitment to improve the lives of people with SCI/D.

“We believe there is a strong need for greater support for individuals and families that are affected by spinal cord injuries and disorders. The Spinal Network will help bridge that gap between people living with SCI/D and their community so they are able to not only return home, but gain a new understanding and outlook on life,” said Marc A. Buoniconti, president of The Buoniconti Fund and one of the founding members of the Spinal Network.

The Spinal Network will address this issue by establishing a strong national peer-to-peer support base, backed by United Spinal’s membership division, National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA), and its 70-plus national chapters and extensive resource center.  Guidance will be provided on all facets of living with SCI/D, including employment, affordable housing, transportation, health care, home- and community-based independent living, education, peer support, and leisure and recreation.

Extensive tools and training will also be provided to leaders of each peer support group that joins the Spinal Network to help group participants adjust to SCI/D––from tips to improving social interactions and overcoming day-to-day challenges, to developing new self-management skills.

The Spinal Network is established through a partnership between The Buoniconti Fund; United Spinal Association and its membership program NSCIA; and tremendous support from Founding Corporate Sponsor Hollister, Inc.––a world leader in urological products.

The Spinal Network will offer grant opportunities, which are available to all support groups in the SCI/D community in the United States. Grants will be awarded bi-annually to groups who meet specific criteria.

Additional micro-grants will be awarded bi-annually based upon available funding and will encourage program innovation and outreach efforts to people newly affected by SCI/D.  Finally, the Spinal Network will work to ensure that peers can find out what they need and when they need it, as they move from one area to another.  As every person with SCI/D learns in rehab, one of the most reliable sources of information about living with SCI/D is another person who has been there.  The Spinal Network will help make those connections.

To learn more about the Spinal Network peer mentoring program, go online to: www.spinalnetwork.org or contact the NSCIA’s Resource Center at: peers@spinalcord.org or by phone:  800-962-9629.

cinemAbility disAbility, film, and changing society

If art is a reflection of life, than we should look to film to examine the progress we’ve made and the lessons we’ve learned about inclusion.

CinemAbility   Disability, Film, and Changing Society newenglandwheelchairvan.com

 

That’s exactly what a new documentary titled CinemAbility, which premiered in Los Angeles last week, seeks to do. The film, sponsored by BraunAbility and produced and directed by Jenni Gold, a longtime friend and customer, takes a detailed look at the evolution of disability in entertainment. As a wheelchair user who lives with muscular dystrophy, she was the perfect catalyst to set the project in motion.

She brought a few well-known friends along for help, including celebrities like Jamie Foxx, William H. Macy, Ben Affleck and Beau Bridges. All shared their experiences with disability in film or television and any pre-conceived notions they had about playing such a character.

Unbeknownst to each, the actors and actresses were asked the same question: What is the first portrayal of a disability that you remember in entertainment? Answers ranged from a blind Audrey Hepburn in Wait Until Dark to Daniel Day-Lewis in My Left Foot to Tom Cruise in Born on the 4th of July.

CinemAbility   Disability, Film, and Changing Society newenglandwheelchairvan.com

The common theme among each interview: we need more. We’ve come a long way from the days of black and white Charlie Chaplin films when people with physical disabilities were portrayed as carnival freak show entertainment. Hollywood doesn’t always get it right, however, and many of the industry’s notable actors, actresses and directors are intentionally seeking to change that.

CinemAbility premiered Friday, July 26th, which was, appropriately, the 23rd anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act. For a list of cities that will show the film on its national tour, visit www.cinemability.com or follow CinemAbility on Facebook.

 

Able Flight Brings Wheelchair user to the Sky

able flight brings wheelchair user to the sky boston newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Humanity has always seen flight as one of the most sublime images of freedom in motion. It seems almost unfair that our feathered friends get to move about so quickly to wherever they may please. It seems to be nothing short of magical. Piloting an aircraft was a pipedream for wheelchair users for many a year; that is, until 2006.

Charles Stites founded the non-profit group, Able Flight, for the sole purpose of giving those accustomed to wheels a new pair of wings. Able Flight works to give scholarships to people who have physical disabilities for the purpose of obtaining a Sport Pilot license. Some of the group’s funding goes to purchasing special modified aircraft for people with differing needs to have a plane to fly.

Nothing says it better than the mission statement used by foundation: Able Flight’s mission is to offer people with disabilities a unique way to challenge themselves through flight training, and by doing so, to gain greater self-confidence and self-reliance.

The program received a special boon in 2010 when a partnership with the premiere Purdue University Department of Aviation Technology took place. Able Flight offers a range of scholarships for students to go learn from the world-class flight instructors at Purdue.

Most flight instruction takes place during the months of May and June, for a total of 5 to 6 weeks. This time covers ground-based classwork and in-flight training, all leading up to the check ride tests. Most flight training is now conducted with Able Flight’s joint training program at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Career training can take place at a number of locations.

The scholarship types range from a full-ride scholarship for those looking to obtain a Sport Pilot license, to those seeking training for a career working on and with Light Sport Aircraft in either maintenance or dispatching. Another scholarship is made available for those who had a pilot’s license and are seeking to get back in the air after an injury.

To see pictures of students in training, and in flight, click here.

The requirements are basic as well. Applicants must be a U.S. citizen seventeen years or older with a disability. Recipients have had disabilities ranging from lost limbs and SCI to congenital birth disorders.

Leonardo Da Vinci captured a strong sentiment for those who admire the sky, Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.

Thanks to Purdue University and Able Flight, being in a wheelchair doesn’t mean just looking into the sky any longer.

The Ralph Braun Foundation enters new Grant Cycle

The Ralph Braun Foundation will be opening a new funding cycle on August 1, 2013.  The two month time period will be operated similarly to the past cycles with the application process closing on September 30th. The grants are awarded to those who have most of their funding secured and just need a little additional help to meet their goal.

The Ralph Braun Foundation has been awarding grants for three years with 12-15 grants being awarded annually.

Ralph Braun

The  entire application process must be completed online. The application must be filled out completely and all attachments sent electronically with the application. We will be funding mobility transportation equipment such as new or used accessible vehicles, wheelchair lifts, car-top wheelchair carriers, scooter lifts, access seats, etc. Eligible products may be funded at 25% of the cost with a grant cap of $5000.

All applicants must be working with a NMEDA (National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association) certified mobility dealer to determine and quote the proper product to meet their needs.

The grant applications will be reviewed after the process closes on September 30, 2013, and grant award letters will be sent on October 15, 2013.  All purchases must be completed and checks sent to dealers by December 15, 2013.  Please read all application rules and fill out applications completely and submit your completed application along with all requested attachments together. We are looking forward to receiving many good applications again this cycle and assisting several people with their purchases.

The Ralph Braun Foundation was created in honor of what Ralph stood for, ability for all. The Ralph Braun Foundation exists as an entity outside of BraunAbility. Funds from the grant can be used towards any mobility need from any manufacturer.

Copies of Ralph’s autobiography, “Rise Above” can be purchased from the foundation. The foundation graciously accepts donations on their site as well.

The application can be found here.

are you looking to trade or sell your wheelchair van?

Used Conversion Vans and

Non-Adaptive Autos Can be Used Toward a Down Payment

are-you-looking-to-trade-or-sell-your-wheelchair-van newenglandwheelchairvan.com

We often get phone calls or e-mails asking if we take trade-ins — or if we’re interested in purchasing a used accessible van. In some cases, the trade-in vehicle is a non-adaptive regular automobile, van, SUV  or truck. The answer in all cases is yes. For trade-ins, we can give you a fair market value for your adaptive and non-adaptive vehicle. The trade-in vehicle can be used toward a down payment on any new or used wheelchair van for sale. We do all the paperwork on your trade-in as part of the financing process. All you need is the title.

If you’re looking to trade in your current wheelchair van or looking to sell one that is no longer being used, contact us online here. We can often have a representative in your area respond within 24 hours. Live on-site inspections and a test drive by one of our technicians may be required before a final assessment and offer can be made.

What If I don’t Live Near One of Your Locations?

If you live outside of our service area and have a converted van for sale, we have national buying specialists who handles all of our out-of-area used vehicle purchases.

vmi to deliver honda odyssey with northstar to local heroes contest winner, steve herbst

vmi-to-deliver-honda-odyssey-with-northstar-to-local-heroes-contest-winner-steve-herbst newenglandwheelchairvan.com

PHOENIX, Ariz. – August 6, 2013 – Vantage Mobility International (VMI), a leader in the manufacturing and distribution of wheelchair accessible, full-size and minivan conversions, will deliver a 2013 Honda Odyssey Touring Edition with VMI Northstar conversion on August 7, 2013, at MobilityWorks in Villa Park, Ill., to Steve Herbst, a winner of the 2013 Local Heroes Contest.

The Local Heroes Contest, which provides an opportunity for people with disabilities to win a wheelchair accessible vehicle, attracted over two million people who submitted and voted for their Local Hero. The contest is a part of National Mobility Awareness Month and championed by the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA).  Herbst, a Palatine, Ill., resident was identified as one of three winners in May.

“Being a part of the Local Heroes Contest is a special way for VMI to help raise awareness of the amazing people in our communities who live with disabilities,” said Monique McGivney, director of corporate communication at VMI. “It also gives us the opportunity to help deserving families, like the Herbsts, enjoy greater independence with a wheelchair accessible van that meets their specific needs.  I’m confident the 2013 Honda Odyssey Touring Edition with VMI Northstar conversion, which has been customized specifically for Steve, will make a positive difference in his life.”

The black 2013 Honda Odyssey Touring Edition with VMI Northstar conversion includes the following standard features:

  • Maximum interior space for wheelchair maneuverability
  • SURE DEPLOY backup system allows users to stow or deploy the mobility ramp van conversion even in the event of complete power failure
  • Wider, usable accessible ramp surface with an ultra-low, 8.0 degree accessible ramp angle with 800lb. wheelchair ramp capacity
  • Easily accessible interior buttons, handles and switches
  • Obstruction-free doorway allows easy entry/exit for able-bodied passengers

“The Local Heroes Contest couldn’t have come at a better time,” said Herbst.  “I lost the ability to drive my previous vehicle shortly before we heard about the contest. Throughout the contest we had tremendous support from friends, family and co-workers.  We received almost 38,000 votes, which is very humbling to think about.  We’re especially grateful to VMI for being a part of this contest and providing us with their Honda Odyssey with their in-floor ramp, which was customized with the hand controls that will allow me to drive again.   VMI’s generosity will help me regain my independence and stay involved in the community, which are very important to me and my family.”

enhancing the client experience wheelchair vans in new england

enhancing-the-client-experience-wheelchair-vans-in-new-england newenglandwheelchairvan.com

VMi New England Mobility Center is always looking for ways to make the client experience more enjoyable – whether it’s coming in for service, purchasing a van or stopping buy to see which van fit the best. Below are some of things we’ve been working on to keep our clients satisfied and coming back. Getting your stamp of approval to recommend us to family and friends is a key ingredient to our success. We hope that your experience with us is always a good one.

Online

Our new website makes it easier for people to find a mobility solution that fits their needs and budget. We’ve added dozens of detailed pages on a variety of adaptive equipment options, such as scooter lifts and hand controls. We’ve recently updated our online van showroom to help visitors find the perfect handicap vans for there needs. We also have a large number of Face Book fans who follow our weekly blogs and postings. “Like Us” and see why more people are visiting every day already have!

In the Showroom

VMi New England Mobility Center has built one of the best showrooms and reception areas in the north east this past year to make our visitors feel more at home. Others are in process or being planned for. Large flatscreen televisions have been put in place.

Fresh brewed coffee is always available for our morning arrivals and comfortable seating areas let people relax while reading a book or magazine. Wireless connectivity allow for working on a laptop or wireless device. When you come to our facility, you will meet friendly people who want to help. Our clients are like family.

Consulting

We’ve added more certified mobility consultants too our staff and continue to train others who want to work in this very fulfilling industry. Consultations to discuss and demonstrate all of our mobility products are always free of charge. For those clients who want to drive with the use of mobility equipment or driving aids, we can bring in a Certified Driver Rehabilitation Specialist (CDRS) to talk about evaluations and training – or put you in contact with one nearby. Selecting the right vehicle and other optional mobility equipment, such as a turning seat, is key to be happy customer.

“Getting good advice from a consultant early in the process is critical to making the right decision. We pride ourselves on customer satisfaction – and that’s where the most important part of being happy with us and the vehicle begins.” Jim Sanders

Wheelchair Vans & Lift Options

We have one of the largest network of mobility manufacturing partners in the industry. We represent nearly every major brand of wheelchair van conversions, specialty seating, securement, scooter lifts and wheelchair lifts available. Our goal is to inform you of every choice available and to consult on which ones meet your physical needs and chair or scooter requirements. We want to enhance your life with a solution that you’re going to be comfortable with for many years to come. Solutions that make it easier for you and your family to enjoy an active life. Additionally the company is run by one of the most experienced people in the country at building High-Tech driving equipment and vans for passengers and individuals who drive from a wheelchair. He offers unmatched practical and theoretical foundation in the application of vehicle modifications for individuals with disabilities. With over 27 years experience, he continues to spearhead new and exciting technological advancements in this growing and emerging market.

In the Community

Our local staff at the VMi New England mobility center is active in various organizations and events around the country. Every week, there is an event going on where we want to participate: Fund raisers; tradeshows; bike rides, motorcycle runs; walks; expos; in-service training; socials; and many other community events. Our blog is full of stories sharing event information and photos of clients and friends. If we can’t participate, we’ll help in other ways, like posting information on our sites including our Linkedin, Face Book page and Twitter pages. If you would like us to come and speak or participate at an event near you, please let us know.

Service

We have put into place new scheduling procedures that allow for the Service Managers to get our clients in and out as quickly as possible. This allows for having the right service bays, parts and technicians ready to work on your vehicle (or lift) at the scheduled date and time you are to arrive. We’ve increased our training requirements and manufacturer communications to make sure the work is done properly with the latest instructions and components. If your van is under its original adaptive equipment warranty, or registered in our extended warranty program, we’ll identify and apply the appropriate coverage so that all costs are minimized.

Client Satisfaction

We utilize an independent survey that follows up with each of our clients – applying satisfaction scores to numerous categories. These surveys are then reviewed by our senior management and store General Managers on a weekly basis. Whether you came in for service, purchased new or used wheelchair vans, or had new hand controls installed, we take your feedback seriously and immediately correct any issues that need attention. We are proud to say our satisfaction scores are very high compared to most industry studies. We will continue working hard to keep your business.

where to buy wheelchair van in boston

where-to-buy-wheelchair-van-in-boston newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Wheelchair Conversion Vans from VMi New England and Automotive Innovations

The Honda Odyssey is known for its reliability and comfort, and it’s one of the most popular minivans on the market today. Because of this, VMI has taken the Odyssey and added its VMI Northstar conversion to create one of the most exciting new lowered floor minivans around. This wheelchair conversion van comes with lots of extra touches for your convenience and comfort, and it drives smoothly. Come test drive the converted Honda Odyssey at our Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center today!

We are your New England source for secondhand handicap accessible vans of all sorts. We offer both used VMI Northstars and Summits as well as many secondhand full size accessible vans. Every used handicap vehicle that we offer comes with the safety essentials like wheelchair tie downs, and you can also upgrade any of our vehicles with optional equipment such as an EZ Lock or handicap vehicle controls.

Celebrating 23 Years of the ADA A Message from the Acting Assistant Attorney General

celebrating-23-years-of-the-ada-a-message-from-the-acting-assistant-attorney-general newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Celebrating 23 Years of the ADA:
A Message from the Acting Assistant Attorney General

Twenty-three years ago this week, our nation committed to a comprehensive mandate to eliminate discrimination against people with disabilities by enacting the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Civil Rights Division is proud to play a critical role in enforcing the ADA, working towards a future in which all the doors are open to equality of opportunity, full participation, independent living, integration and economic self-sufficiency for persons with disabilities. In honor of the 23rd anniversary of the ADA, each day this week we have celebrated Department of Justice enforcement efforts that have opened gateways to full participation and opportunity for people with disabilities. Visit our ADA Anniversary Week webpage to learn more: http://www.ada.gov/ada-23-anni.htm.

In April 2013, the Civil Rights Division issued a report detailing recent accomplishments in enforcing federal laws that prohibit discrimination and uphold the civil and constitutional rights of all who live in America. As described in the Report, the Division achieved results for people with disabilities in over 1,600 actions under the ADA, including lawsuits, settlement agreements, and successful mediations from 2009-2012. The Report also describes the Division’s extensive ADA technical assistance and outreach program. In the past four years, Division staff helped more than 200,000 people who called our ADA Information Line to learn how the ADA applies to them. In Fiscal Year 2012, the Division answered more than 60,000 calls. Click here for links to the Accomplishments Report pages detailing disability rights enforcement efforts http://www.ada.gov/disability-rights-accomplishments.htm (html) andhttp://www.ada.gov/disability-rights-accomplishments.pdf (pdf).

Equal opportunity for those with disabilities is a vision that the Division hopes will soon extend beyond our nation’s borders. There are over 50 million Americans with disabilities, including 5.5 million veterans living abroad who frequently face barriers when they travel, conduct business, study, live or retire overseas. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities improves protections for persons with disabilities overseas, and allows the full range of U.S. accessibility rights and benefits to spread throughout the world. The Division continues to play an active role in the quest for U.S. ratification of the Convention to ensure additional gateways open for people with disabilities across the globe.

Here at home, we have come a long way in the journey for equal justice under the law for people with disabilities. We are frequently reminded, however, that — in the words of the late Senator Edward Kennedy — “the business of civil rights remains the unfinished business of America.” The Civil Rights Division plays a critical role in helping the nation realize the promise of its founding principles. Over the past 23 years, the Division has continued our nation’s journey toward equal justice. But we have more work to do. Today, on the 23rd anniversary of the ADA, I am happy to reaffirm the Division’s commitment to the promise of equal opportunity for people with disabilities in the months and years to come.

Jocelyn Samuels


ADA Home Page

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations Maine

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations in ME

maine wheelchair-van-service-considerations newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At VMi New England Mobility Center, we believe that the service you receive in Maine after you purchase a wheelchair van is just as important as the service you received during your purchasing process. Our main goal is to keep you and the other passengers in the vehicle as safe as possible, which is why our wheelchair van service offerings are unlike any others in the vehicle modification industry.

Trained Service Technicians

All VMi New England Mobility Center Technicians are certified in the mobility equipment that is sold, installed, and serviced.  We are held to the highest standards in the adaptive vehicle industry.

Some of Longest Warranties in the Vehicle Modification Industry

We want to protect our customers and make sure that we offer the best options for them.

Operational Maintenance Program

For more than 27 years we have implemented and evolved a multi-faceted operational maintenance schedule unavailable at any other facility in the country to assist you in maintaining optimum driving performance while also assessing critical component deterioration before it occurs. Our Service Technicians will provide you with list of all work performed on your wheelchair accessible vehicle and a list of any items that may require future attention. Also, we will inform you of any upcoming maintenance and service you may need done to your wheelchair accessible vehicle in order to make sure your adaptive vehicle is in top condition.

Other dealers want your old vans to rust and fall apart so they can sell you a new one.

Wheelchair van rust not at newenglandwheelchairvan.com if you bring it to us for service
a local mobility dealers idea of taking care of your wheelchair van

Operational Maintenance of Adaptive Mobility Equipment on:

  • Lowered Floor Wheelchair Van (New & Used)
  • Full-Size Wheelchair Vans (New & Used)
  • Primary and Secondary Driving Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Wheelchair Securement Systems (automatic and manual)
  • Power Seat Bases
  • Power Door Operators

Special service work or repairs to your Adaptive Equipment

Installation of new Adaptive Equipment on new and used wheelchair vans such as:

  • Hand Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Raised Doors
  • Lowered Floors
  • Specialized gas, brake, and steering systems
  • Turning Automotive Seats

Vermont Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the 2005 American Community Study by the Center for Personal Assistance Services, approximately 95,000 individuals living in Vermont are considered to be disabled in some manner. Specifically, about 2.4% of the population of Vermont have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

vermont-disability vermont-commercial-wheelchair-vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the state of Vermont including the Burlington area and Chittenden, Franklin and Grand Isle counties.

If your business needs a new or used accessible van, bus, shuttle or other commercial vehicle in Vermont, look through our online inventory to find the vehicle that’s right for you. View our commercial accessible vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and accessories or visit our commercial wheelchair van and bus inventory.

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, Vermont state regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to Vermont, to your business. We often make deliveries to Burlington, South Burlington, as well as Franklin, Grand Isle and Chittenden counties, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs, so contact us today.

Learn more about delivery information for Vermont wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the great state of Vermont.

Accessible Parking Spaces ADA Design Guide

ADA Design Guide 1 – Restriping Parking Lots

accessible-parking-spaces-ada-design-guide newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Accessible Parking Spaces

When a business, State or local government agency, or other covered entity restripes a parking lot, it must provide accessible parking spaces as required by the ADA Standards for Accessible Design. Failure to do so would violate the ADA.

In addition, businesses or privately owned facilities that provide goods or services to the public have a continuing ADA obligation to remove barriers to access in existing parking lots when it is readily achievable to do so. Because restriping is relatively inexpensive, it is readily achievable in most cases.

This ADA Design Guide provides key information about how to create accessible car and van spaces and how many spaces to provide when parking lots are restriped.

(illustration showing a woman getting out of the driver’s side of a car into a manual wheelchair)

 

Accessible Parking Spaces for Cars

Accessible parking spaces for cars have at least a 60-inch-wide access aisle located adjacent to the designated parking space. The access aisle is just wide enough to permit a person using a wheelchair to enter or exit the car. These parking spaces are identified with a sign and located on level ground.

 

Van-Accessible Parking Spaces

Van-accessible parking spaces are the same as accessible parking spaces for cars except for three features needed for vans:

a wider access aisle (96″) to accommodate a wheelchair lift;

vertical clearance to accommodate van height at the van parking space, the adjacent access aisle, and on the vehicular route to and from the van-accessible space, and

an additional sign that identifies the parking spaces as “van accessible.”

One of eight accessible parking spaces, but always at least one, must be van-accessible.

 

(illustration showing a van with a side-mounted wheelchair lift lowered onto a marked access aisle at a van-accessible parking space. A person using a wheelchair is getting out of the van. A dashed line shows the route from the lift to the sidewalk.)

Features of Accessible Parking Spaces for Cars

(plan drawing showing an accessible parking space for cars with a 96 inch wide designated parking space, a 60 inch wide min. marked access aisle and the following notes)

Sign with the international symbol of accessibility mounted high enough so it can be seen while a vehicle is parked in the space.

If the accessible route is located in front of the space, install wheelstops to keep vehicles from reducing width below 36 inches.

Access aisle of at least 60-inch width must be level (1:50 maximum slope in all directions), be the same length as the adjacent parking space(s) it serves and must connect to an accessible route to the building. Ramps must not extend into the access aisle.

Boundary of the access aisle must be marked. The end may be a squared or curved shape.

Two parking spaces may share an access aisle.

 

Three Additional Features for Van-Accessible Parking Spaces

(plan drawing showing a van-accessible parking space with a 96 inch wide designated parking space, a 96 inch wide min. marked access aisle and the following notes)

Sign with “van accessible” and the international symbol of accessibility mounted high enough so the sign can be seen when a vehicle is parked in the space

96″ min. width access aisle, level (max. slope 1:50 in all directions), located beside the van parking space

Min. 98-inch-high clearance at van parking space, access aisle, and on vehicular route to and from van space

Minimum Number of Accessible Parking Spaces

(text of following table)

Table showing the minimum number of accessible parking spaces. Text following contains contents of the table.

Total Parking decorative blank spaceTotal Minimum decorative blank spaceVan Accessible decorative blank spaceAccessible Parking

Spaces Provided decorative blank spaceNumber of Accessibledecorative blank space Parking Spacesdecorative blank space Spaces with

(per lot) decorative blank spaceParking Spaces decorative blank spacewith min. 96″ min. decorative blank space60″ wide

decorative blank space(60″ & 96″ aisles)decorative blank spacewide access decorative blank spaceaisle access aisle

 

1 to 25 1 1 0

26 to 50 2 1 1

51 to 75 3 1 2

76 to 100 4 1 3

101 to 150 5 1 4

151 to 200 6 1 5

201 to 300 7 1 6

301 to 400 8 1 7

401 to 500 9 2 7

501 to 1000 2% of total

parking provided 1/8 of Column A* 7/8 of Column A**

in each lot

1001 and over 20 plus 1 for

each 100 1/8 of Column A* 7/8 of Column A**

over 1000

one out of every 8 accessible spaces ** 7 out of every 8 accessible parking spaces

 

Location

Accessible parking spaces must be located on the shortest accessible route of travel to an accessible facility entrance. Where buildings have multiple accessible entrances with adjacent parking, the accessible parking spaces must be dispersed and located closest to the accessible entrances.

When accessible parking spaces are added in an existing parking lot, locate the spaces on the most level ground close to the accessible entrance. An accessible route must always be provided from the accessible parking to the accessible entrance. An accessible route never has curbs or stairs, must be at least 3- feet wide, and has a firm, stable, slip-resistant surface. The slope along the accessible route should not be greater than 1:12 in the direction of travel.

Accessible parking spaces may be clustered in one or more lots if equivalent or greater accessibility is provided in terms of distance from the accessible entrance, parking fees, and convenience. Van-accessible parking spaces located in parking garages may be clustered on one floor (to accommodate the 98-inch minimum vertical height requirement).

 

Free Technical Assistance

Answers to technical and general questions about restriping parking lots or other ADA requirements are available by telephone on weekdays. You may also order the ADA Standards for Accessible Design and other ADA publications, including regulations for private businesses or State and local governments, at any time day or night. Information about ADA-related IRS tax credits and deductions is also available from the ADA Information Line.

Department of Justice

ADA Information Line

800-514-0301 (voice)

800-514-0383 (tty)

 

Internet

You may also review or download information on the Department’s ADA Internet site at any time. The site provides access to ADA regulations, technical assistance materials, and general ADA information. It also provides links to other Federal agencies, and updates on new ADA requirements and enforcement efforts. Internet address:

www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/index.html

 

Reference:

ADA Standards for Accessible Design (28 CFR Part 36):

§ 4.1.6 Alterations;

§ 4.1.2 Accessible Sites and Exterior Facilities: New Construction, and

§ 4.1.6 Parking and Passenger Loading Zones.

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations New Hampshire

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations in NH

New Hampshire  wheelchair-van-service-considerations newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At VMi New England Mobility Center, we believe that the service you receive in New Hampshire after you purchase a wheelchair van is just as important as the service you received during your purchasing process. Our main goal is to keep you and the other passengers in the vehicle as safe as possible, which is why our wheelchair van service offerings are unlike any others in the vehicle modification industry.

Trained Service Technicians

All VMi New England Mobility Center Technicians are certified in the mobility equipment that is sold, installed, and serviced.  We are held to the highest standards in the adaptive vehicle industry.

Some of Longest Warranties in the Vehicle Modification Industry

We want to protect our customers and make sure that we offer the best options for them.

Operational Maintenance Program

For more than 27 years we have implemented and evolved a multi-faceted operational maintenance schedule unavailable at any other facility in the country to assist you in maintaining optimum driving performance while also assessing critical component deterioration before it occurs. Our Service Technicians will provide you with list of all work performed on your wheelchair accessible vehicle and a list of any items that may require future attention. Also, we will inform you of any upcoming maintenance and service you may need done to your wheelchair accessible vehicle in order to make sure your adaptive vehicle is in top condition.

Other dealers want your old vans to rust and fall apart so they can sell you a new one.

Wheelchair van rust not at newenglandwheelchairvan.com if you bring it to us for service
a local mobility dealers idea of taking care of your wheelchair van

Operational Maintenance of Adaptive Mobility Equipment on:

  • Lowered Floor Wheelchair Van (New & Used)
  • Full-Size Wheelchair Vans (New & Used)
  • Primary and Secondary Driving Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Wheelchair Securement Systems (automatic and manual)
  • Power Seat Bases
  • Power Door Operators

Special service work or repairs to your Adaptive Equipment

Installation of new Adaptive Equipment on new and used wheelchair vans such as:

  • Hand Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Raised Doors
  • Lowered Floors
  • Specialized gas, brake, and steering systems
  • Turning Automotive Seats

ADA’s Impact on Everyday Lives

ADA’s Impact on Everyday Lives

ada-impact-on-everyday-lives newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Overview

Since its passage in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is slowly but surely changing the landscape and the lives of individuals with disabilities and their families every single day. Instead of repeatedly having to argue for their right to equal access and equal opportunity to participate in the programs, goods and services available to individuals without disabilities, children and adults with disabilities are discovering that—while the landscape is still not fully barrier free—they can usually go about their business without encountering barriers or interruption.

The articles below illustrate the ways in which the ADA impacts the lives of community members, employees, college students and families living the Southeast Region of the United States. These stories—and others—are repeated every day in communities, businesses and on campuses throughout the United States.

Index of Contents

Accessible Cities: People with Disabilities Survey Public Facilities

Over a three year period, small teams of people, with and without disabilities, visited city halls, libraries, civic centers, and parks in 14 cities in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North and South Carolina, and Tennessee. Their goal was to check the accessibility of these civic places and to see how well these public sites met the access needs of individuals with a variety of disabilities.

The intention was not to ‘catch their cities napping’ or to report them for not being in full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Instead, the goal was to examine and report on how easily—or not—people with visual, hearing, and mobility disabilities could enter a public facility and use the services available to people without disabilities.

One of the goals of the ADA is to remove access barriers and promote full and equal participation in civic life for individuals with disabilities. The cross-disability teams of people looking at access to public facilities in seven Southeast states were part of the Community Participation Research Project, conducted jointly by the Southeast ADA Center, its State Affiliates and the Burton Blatt Institute at Syracuse University. This research project was unique because it used Participatory Action Research (PAR). PAR research is developed and implemented in full collaboration between people with disabilities and researchers, focusing on their concerns and interests while still maintaining research protocols and validity.

In this study, seven teams of 5-6 researchers surveyed sites in a total of 14 cities, two cities in each state. The cities were matched in terms of demographics. The only difference was that one city had previously reached a Settlement Agreement with the Department of Justice to correct access barriers identified in one or more of its city facilities. Georgia was used as a pilot site to test the survey instruments and the way in which the local researchers were trained. Cities in the other six states were surveyed over the next two years, with state teams visiting both of their two cities within a few days of each other.

One of the things they found was that many of the public entities did not fully understand what good access means. As one local researcher explained,

“It is unfortunate that some public venues think they are providing adequate access to services, but the consumer’s experience may be quite different.”

They also found that public entities often did not realize that people with different disabilities had different access needs. For example, two local researchers—one who uses a wheelchair and one who is blind—had very different experiences when they visited the same library. Both were able to enter the library easily. However, the person using a wheelchair was able to use the library’s computer independently to locate the book he wanted while the woman who was blind discovered that she could not use the library computers with a screen reader and that the staff didn’t know how to open the software that would let her search the files by herself.

In fact, one of the study findings was that people who were blind or who had low vision found the city sites less accessible overall than did people who used wheelchairs or who were deaf.

For example, because the public restrooms in a city park were not identified in Braille and raised lettering, one man who was blind started to enter the women’s restroom by mistake. Another, more frustrating, situation took place in a public library. One researcher asked about library materials for individuals with vision-related disabilities and received little helpful information. However, in talking to another researcher later, she discovered that the library had a good collection of audiobooks.

Researchers who used wheelchairs or who were hard-of-hearing also discovered some problems. Individuals who use wheelchairs identified barriers related to parking enforcement, steep ramps, counter heights, thresholds, and door handles. Another researcher contacted a civic center prior to arriving and asked if they had an assistive listening system (ALS). He was told that they did not have an ALS but on the day of the performance when he asked again, he was given headphones without comment or delay.

As a researcher pointed out:

“Most of the places I went, there was more assistance available than I turned up beforehand [on the website or by contacting the site directly]. Perhaps people didn’t know what was available or had not been trained to answer questions about providing assistance. All public places should have a brochure or flyer printed to show what accommodations or assistance they have.”

Researchers using a TTY (Telecommunication Device for the Deaf) found many public agencies either did not have one or did not know how to use it. And, in some cases, researchers noted that absent or hard to find and see signage, for accessible entrances, emergency exits, or identifying restrooms, was frustrating and challenging. More seriously, one researcher reported that when emergency exit information was reviewed for the audience at a civic center, there was no mention of accessible emergency exits.

Despite these access issues, the researchers reported delight at the many examples of accessibility that they encountered, including some new discoveries such as accessible park benches and picnic tables. One researcher noted “this was the most accessible website I have ever seen. I could completely access the entire website and library into my screen reader.” They also noted many staff contributed to positive experiences, including demonstrating a willingness to put together a needed accommodation. One researcher reported receiving a “very prompt and helpful response” and another added “excellent facility for accessibility. Staff is knowledgeable and sensitive to persons with disability.” In fact, almost two-thirds of the time researchers found that entities had a staff member who coordinated services for people with disabilities. Even when access barriers were encountered, the willingness of staff to try to resolve the issue went a long way toward easing the researchers’ frustration.

Finally, the PAR project provided opportunities for increased understanding and appreciation of all the issues involved in providing good access. Because people with disabilities were integral to the research from start to finish, they were aware of subtle access needs that others without disabilities would likely overlook. Their participation in the project also increased their own awareness of the areas where more education and guidance were needed.

“It’s always eye opening to realize how few people take issues of accessibility truly into consideration when running public places. Clearly, much more information is needed and ways to implement them developed.”

Another commented:

“I know how to get around my own city. Know the accessible entrances and how to ask for the accommodations I need. But when I visited the other city, I was clueless. Sometimes I had to circle the building several times before I found the accessible entrance or figured out where the elevator was. How would someone visiting my city figure out how to get places? I never thought about that before.”

As a result of their involvement with the PAR project, many researchers expressed positive feelings from having engaged in the site visits, learned a good deal, and for some, left feeling a greater desire to engage in local change efforts to remove access barriers.

The researchers also noted a growing awareness on the part of city staff:

“The last person who visited the city hall was one of the research team members without a disability. As she entered the hallway near the offices, she heard a couple of individuals talking. A gentleman said, “What I want to know is, are we prepared?” A woman responded, “We have spaces for wheelchairs….” The gentleman then said, “I’m not just talking about people in chairs, I mean all types – do we have alternative formats?””

The rest of the conversation was not clear. However, the team members clearly had increased staff awareness of the full range of disability access needs.

For free, confidential information, technical assistance and answers to all questions regarding the ADA, please contact your regional ADA Center by calling 1-800-949-4232 (voice/tty).

Accessible Businesses Welcome Everyone

For most people, their major concern when running errands and shopping is whether they can fit it all they need to do into the time available. For people with disabilities, however, particularly for those with physical disabilities, their major concern is whether they can get into the stores or buildings in the first place and, once in, whether they have access to the goods and services they need.

Stores, theaters and other buildings were not intended to shut out people with disabilities—but the built environment has been highly effective in denying access to people who have limited use of hands or legs. A single step, a one-inch threshold, a heavy door, or a round doorknob can make entry into a building difficult, if not impassible. And once someone with a mobility impairment has struggled to get inside, cluttered aisles or objects blocking call buttons on elevators can significantly impede their ability to do what it is that they came inside to do, whether that is to buy a new shirt or visit a physician’s office.

“For the most part, the bigger retail stores—like Walmart, Kohls, TJ Maxx—have plenty of room for me to get around,” says Dylan Brown of Nashville, TN. “But I still run into problems with the amount of items they try to put into the very small stores in malls and strip malls. Overstocking in the small stores means that I can’t get through the aisles, so I just don’t go in.”

Dylan has quadriplegia as the result of an automobile accident in 2002 and uses a powered chair. He drives an adapted van and can usually get around Nashville and do what he wants to do except when it comes to some places that are unclear on the concept of accessibility:

“There’s a newly renovated, posh bar in town. It has access into the bar and the restrooms are accessible. But there is not one seat in the place where I would be eye-level with my peers. Even the booths have a step up. I went out to the smoking patio but that was built up also, with wood high-rise seating all around the edge. There was no way I could have a drink and be at eye level with my friends. I couldn’t even put my drink down without reaching up to the table. It’s like they went out of their way to make it inaccessible.

“I felt so uncomfortable. I know I’m in a chair but I’m always around active people, and you get going and you just forget. Then, when you get to a place that is so blatantly inaccessible, the term crippled comes back in.”

The Americans with Disabilities Act, passed nearly unanimously by both houses of Congress and signed into law by President George H.W. Bush on July 26, 1990, mandates that places that offer their goods and services to the public must be accessible to people with a variety of disabilities. Effective January 26, 1992, all places of business have been required to make their goods and services available to and useable by people with disabilities to the extent that it is readily achievable (e.g., that changes can be accomplished without much difficulty or expense). Furthermore, all new construction and renovations to existing buildings must be accessible to and usable by people with disabilities to the fullest extent possible.

Lack of access is more than an inconvenience for people with disabilities; for many, accessible stores, professional offices, theaters, libraries, state and local government offices and medical facilities can mean the difference between a life of independence and full immersion in the community and one of dependence and restrictive living situations.

Living Independence for Everyone (LIFE) of Mississippi, the statewide Center for Independence (CIL) in Mississippi, believes so strongly in promoting independence for people with disabilities that the CIL uses Americorps volunteers to do community access surveys to ensure that people leaving nursing homes or other congregate facilities will be able to move about effectively within the community. The Americorps members in Project LINC focus on those places that individuals with disabilities were most likely to want to use. When doing a Project LINC site survey, the Americorps volunteers introduce themselves to the places they want to survey, provide information about the ADA and explain that their purpose is to make places more accessible for people with disabilities, not to report anyone for failure to comply with the ADA. They then ask permission to conduct the survey and to return at a later date for a follow-up visit.

Desmeon Thomas, of Jackson, Mississippi, was both an Americorps volunteer doing the surveys and a beneficiary of increased access in his immediate community. Desmeon sustained a spinal cord injury in 2002 when he was 19 years old. He approached the LIFE Center for assistance in learning how to live with a disability. When he learned about Americorps and Project LINC, he signed up as an Americorps volunteer, receiving a stipend for his work on the project and becoming eligible for $4000 year for his two years of service to put toward his education.

As Desmeon explains, “we would survey places that are just around the corner from where someone moving into a community would be living. That means places like corner stores, dollar stores—we surveyed a lot of dollar stores; that’s where we can afford to shop!—fast food restaurants and grocery stores.

“I’m quadriplegic, so I need a lot of help with everything. I use a power chair so I can get around on my own, but I’m not the lightest person in the world, and my parents are getting older. I didn’t want to have to go into a nursing home but I knew I couldn’t stay with my parents much longer either. So I looked for a way to live on my own. LIFE hooked me up with the Medicaid Waiver* program that pays for personal attendants to help me 8 hours a day, 7 days a week. I use them for four hours in the morning to get me up and dressed and ready for the day, for four hours at night to get me ready for bed.

“Now I rent my own house, drive a Dodge Caravan and can do most of my own shopping. Grocery stores have been great! I can get around easily, and they always send someone to help me if I ask. My power chair helps raise me up so I can usually reach things on the shelves. If not, the grocery store clerks help me.

“And the other places I need to go are also pretty accessible, thanks to the survey work we did. Well, sometimes I need to go into a side or back entrance to some places…and the movie theater near me only has accessible seats right in the very front row, which is too close to the screen and makes it hard to watch without getting a stiff neck. But for the most part I can get where I need and want to go.”

*The Medicaid Waiver: Section 1915 (c) of the Social Security Act enables states to request a waiver of applicable federal Medicaid requirements to provide enhanced community support services to those Medicaid beneficiaries who would otherwise require institutional care.

Reasonable Accommodations Mean Getting the Job Done

Employees with disabilities may do a job differently—they may use adapted computers, screen reading software, large print materials or raised desks that can accommodate a wheelchair—but they get the job done like any other employee in their position. They are not asking for special treatment or to be excused from performing the essential functions of their jobs. But they do ask that they be given the tools or supports they need to perform these tasks competently.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed almost unanimously by both the House and the Senate in July 1990. It provides civil rights protections to individuals with disability and prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. Title I of the ADA requires that employers make reasonable accommodations unless making those accommodations creates significant difficulty or expense. Reasonable accommodations are changes to the workplace or the way things are customarily done; they are intended to allow qualified employees with disabilities to perform the essential functions of their jobs.

Why is the Americans with Disabilities Act Needed?

Cheri Hofmann, who has a significant hearing loss, had worked as a paralegal position for 13 years, collecting awards and superior performance reviews throughout her career. Until her job duties changed in her 14th year, she never needed any changes to her workplace or different equipment to perform her job well. When her job duties in changed, however, she asked for a few, modest changes to her workplace.

“In my 14th year, my job had additional duties that required me to be able to assist clients while others were on break and to answer phones. I asked for a mirror to be placed where I could see the door opening when clients came in, a head set for the telephone with amplification, and to re-position my desk to also have a better view of the front door. They refused the mirror, saying it would be a distraction to the other paralegals; they said to reposition my desk would cause the entire area to have to be changed; and they said they ordered a head set, but it never came. Instead they gave me a phone with a volume control but it was not effective.”

None of these changes cost more than $30, but without them, Cheri was unable to do her job and was eventually forced to leave.

Cheri’s difficulties with her employer took place before the ADA too effect. Under Title I of the ADA now, however, employers with 15 or more employees are required to provide reasonable accommodations to qualified applicants or employees with disabilities unless to do so would result in an undue burden. Reasonable accommodations are changes to the workplace, modifications in workplace policies, or provision of assistive technology that allow a qualified employee with a disability to perform the essential functions of the job.

What are Reasonable Accommodations?

A reasonable accommodation is any change to the work environment or to the way that things are customarily done that enables an individual with a disability to enjoy equal employment opportunities. Rene Cummins, Executive Director of a Center for Independent Living in North Carolina, has low vision who relies on assistive technology every day. She uses a screen reader to read computer text and a scanner to scan print materials into the computer where they can be read back to her. Christinne Rudd has cerebral palsy and walks with a cane. Her employer in Florida provided a printer in her office so that she doesn’t have to go to the main printer to retrieve letters and other documents. Her employer has also offered to provide a scooter, if necessary, when there are employee outings and reimburses her for cab fare for her local travel on company business.

Patricia Valladares is an outreach worker for a social services agency in Tennessee. Patricia is blind and uses JAWS software that reads computer text, and the Open Book program that scans in printed material and reads it back so she can read read and save printed documents. She also asks that handouts for conferences and trainings be given to her on CDs.

John Hobgood is a social worker in Texas who recived a traumatic brain injury in a motor vehicle accident. As the result of his head injury, John has difficulty paying attention, so he uses a daytimer to keep his schedule and relies on the Outlook calendar computer software to remind him of appointments. Reading is difficult, so John uses free screen reader software from Readplease.com. Individuals with traumatic head injury often have difficulty concentrating at the end of the day. When his agency moved to a 4-day week of 10 hour days, John and another co-worker asked for a modified schedule in which they would remain on the 5-day week. Their requests were granted, and the two come into work on the 5th day, lock the door, answer phones, and catch up with their paperwork.

John Duplessis, a social worker in Alabama who became legally blind as an adult, relies on a tape recorder that is “glued to my side for dictating notes and recording conversations that I need to remember.” He uses Zoom Text software to enlarge text on his computer screen and uses its speech function to read aloud what is on the screen. John also has talking Caller I.D. on his landline and cell phones to announce the name and number of incoming calls. In addition, he uses glasses with magnification to read printed documents and to write. Even so, he notes wryly, “I don’t write quickly and my penmanship is not very good.”

Not all effective accommodations need to be provided by the employer. Many people with disabilities can use “off the shelf” assistive technology to meet their personal needs. For example, Eric Dupre who has a learning disability thrives in his fast-paced, unpredictable job as a news photojournalist. To keep himself on track, Eric carries “a small pad with me each day to write down my schedule and use an electronic pocket reminder for assignments that may be projected in the future. I use a GPS to assist me to find locations where I have to be. I purchased my own accommodations for under $100.”

Although many people with disabilities can perform all their job duties without an accommodation of any sort, others encounter workplace barriers that hinder or prevent them from performing competently on the job. By mandating reasonable accommodations and changes to the work environment as long as they do not create an undue burden, Title I of the ADA make it possible for qualified employees with disabilities to demonstrate their competence and ability to perform on the job.

Inclusion from the Start: Campus Collaboration Avoids Access Pitfalls

When changes are made to a college or university campus, planning ahead for access avoids costly errors. It also avoids the inadvertent creation of access barriers that make it difficult or impossible for students, visitors, and staff with disabilities to enjoy full use of all that the institution has to offer. One university—Florida State University (FSU) in Tallahassee—has taken steps to ensure that neither of these problems occur on their campus.

FSU’s fully collaborative process ensures that access is included from the very start when any new construction or renovation is planned. This entails coordination and collaboration among nearly 80 individuals, including the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Compliance, the Facilities Vice President, Facilities Designer, Facilities Planners, and Project Manager as well as representatives from 20 or more other campus departments. It also requires some creative thinking and planning to assure maximum access throughout all phases of what can be a lengthy period of construction.

As Amy Wagner, Assistant Director of the University’s Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Compliance explains,

“We try to proactively address construction issues prior to the initiation of any new construction efforts. However, there are times in which we have had to make adjustments during a construction build due to the length of time a project would take to complete. For instance, during a 10-month construction project, a sidewalk was opened and closed at various points and required a phasing in/out of the project. The road under construction was a half mile long and the construction was done in four phases. We discussed the impact of a phased project on students with and without disabilities. In addition, we examined the options for maintaining access during the construction period. Breaking the project into four phases allowed for access at all times during the construction process. As one section was completed, it was then re-opened to provide access while another section was closed according to the phased project schedule.”

In addition, collaboration and cooperation among all offices and departments has nurtured an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Key players are routinely invited to participate in meetings in addition to the quarterly meetings of the entire planning team to ensure that accessibility concerns are addressed early on. For example, the campus is currently undergoing new construction activity in which Ms. Wagner has been called upon by project managers to address concerns involving ADA-related access issues such as installation of sidewalks, doorways, hood vents in school laboratories, detectable warnings, signage, and accessible routes/pathways around construction zones.

Ms. Wagner prefers not to refer to a project as challenging but as one that is “unknown territory” requiring innovative thinking and creativity on the university’s part to ensure that it is ADA compliant in all of its activities.

Florida State University entered into “unknown territory” in 2011 when the FSU Flying High Circus, one of only two collegiate circuses in the United States, wanted to purchase a new tent, seating, and flooring. The Circus wanted to purchase an interlocking floor but was aware that it might present access concerns. FSU wanted to ensure that the flooring was accessible to people with disabilities and did not present the possibility of a trip-hazard or an accessibility barrier for wheelchair users in the event the interlocking pads became disengaged. Ms. Wagner spent time researching precedence and best-practices governing this type of situation. As a result, the new tent, seating areas, and paths of travel throughout the tent not only meet but exceed the ADA standards for accessible seating and paths of travel.

FSU’s intentional effort to include Ms. Wagner in all planning efforts related to new construction projects is an example of a university that is committed to ensuring full inclusion and ensuring that full access is at the forefront of any and all ventures to enhance and/or improve the campus infrastructure. Ms. Wagner reiterates the importance of her office’s collaboration with facilities and maintenance staff, construction managers, and others involved in the planning of new construction from the very start to ensure that access and full inclusion are primary considerations throughout the life of any project.

The ADA: It’s a Family Affair

In our family, if I couldn’t go, none of us could go.

Most people think of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as legislation that promotes access and equal opportunity for people with disabilities. What they often don’t realize is that the ADA also creates access and equal opportunity for families and friends as well.

Why the ADA? Just ask Sara Ezell.

“In the past 40 years, I have seen things change hugely. It’s been an exciting time because of the ADA. If not for the ADA, where would I be today?”

Sara grew up in a close-knit family. Because she was born with osteogenesis imperfecta, a bone disorder often called “brittle bone disease,” Sara used a wheelchair most of the time. When she was a child, “accessibility was an issue everywhere. Disability was not an issue in our family, but access was. When I could not get into a restaurant or a store with my brothers and parents, it was an insult to our whole family—and we didn’t go in. In our family, if I couldn’t go, none of us could go.”

When Sara became a teenager, things got to be embarrassing, especially when she went out on a blind date. Faced with the prospect of getting into an inaccessible entrance, Sara’s date would offer to lift her and her chair up the two stairs at the entrance, making an awkward situation even more uncomfortable.

When Sara entered Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, pre-ADA in 1989, no freshman dorm rooms were accessible. Vanderbilt was determined to have Sara on campus, so they turned an administration office into a dorm room. As Sara explains, “we made do with it. All of my neighbors were Deans, and I got to know them pretty well. But after 5:00 PM, no one was there. It was not too bad, but it was not a natural dorm experience, and I missed the experience of living in a dorm with other students.”

Vanderbilt continued in its efforts to provide campus-wide access, including dorm rooms, for its students with disabilities. Although the ADA had recently been passed and would be going into effect within two years, “nobody knew what to do yet. There was a two-inch thick book of scoping requirements from the US Access Board that the University used but it wasn’t clear who would pay for the changes.

“It took a lot of doing, but by the time I graduated, I was living in a hall with other students—and I had a choice of rooms to pick from! And with every dorm renovation, the University would add more rooms. After I graduated, I went to work for the ADA office at Vanderbilt. And it was fun to see the faces of incoming freshmen with disabilities when I told them you can live here or here and here…”

As Sara reflects on her experiences pre- and post-ADA, she notes that “now so many places are completely accessible. It’s amazing to see.”

It’s still a family affair

Sara’s disability has had a rippling effect across generations. Both of her brothers worked at an Easter Seals camp in East Tennessee one summer and loved it. Her oldest brother, Chase, got a degree in Recreational Therapy. Chase was interested in physical accessibility of Tennessee State Parks, so he wrote his Master’s Thesis on the topic—using Sara as a guinea pig to “try out” the steepness of ramps and the smoothness of trails. “It was not always fun,” she recalls.

As for the next generation, Sara says, “Kids get it at a level that adults just don’t.”

“My two nieces and my nephew are my pride and joy, and they are not afraid to ask questions about disability. My niece Evelyn has befriended a little girl in her classroom who has cerebral palsy. And she had a lot of questions for me, like ‘why does she have a lady with her all the time?’ My niece just wanted to understand so she could figure out how she could help her and sit with her at lunch.

“It’s been fun to teach them about accessibility. My little nephew is just now starting to discover about accessibility. When we are together and there’s some place that his Aunt Sissy cannot go, he’s annoyed to death and just doesn’t understand. There’s a generation of militant little people who are going to be just great!”

Rhode Island Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the Center for Personal Assistance Services, about 155,000 individuals living in Rhode Island were considered to have a disability in 2005. Specifically, about 2.6% of the population of Rhode Island have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

rhode-island-disability rhode-island-commercial-wheelchair-vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the state of Rhode Island including Providence and Newport, as well as Briston, Kent and Washington counties.

If your business needs a new or used accessible van, bus, shuttle or other commercial vehicle in Rhode Island, look through our online inventory to find the vehicle that’s right for you. View our commercial accessible vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and accessories or visit our commercial wheelchair van and bus inventory.

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, Rhode Island state regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to New Hampshire, to your business. We often make deliveries to Providence and Newport, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs, so contact us today.

Learn more about delivery information for Rhode Island wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the great state of Rhode Island.

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations Vermont

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations in VT

vermont wheelchair-van-service-considerations newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At VMi New England Mobility Center, we believe that the service you receive in Vermont after you purchase a wheelchair van is just as important as the service you received during your purchasing process. Our main goal is to keep you and the other passengers in the vehicle as safe as possible, which is why our wheelchair van service offerings are unlike any others in the vehicle modification industry.

Trained Service Technicians

All VMi New England Mobility Center Technicians are certified in the mobility equipment that is sold, installed, and serviced.  We are held to the highest standards in the adaptive vehicle industry.

Some of Longest Warranties in the Vehicle Modification Industry

We want to protect our customers and make sure that we offer the best options for them.

Operational Maintenance Program

For more than 27 years we have implemented and evolved a multi-faceted operational maintenance schedule unavailable at any other facility in the country to assist you in maintaining optimum driving performance while also assessing critical component deterioration before it occurs. Our Service Technicians will provide you with list of all work performed on your wheelchair accessible vehicle and a list of any items that may require future attention. Also, we will inform you of any upcoming maintenance and service you may need done to your wheelchair accessible vehicle in order to make sure your adaptive vehicle is in top condition.

Other dealers want your old vans to rust and fall apart so they can sell you a new one.

Wheelchair van rust not at newenglandwheelchairvan.com if you bring it to us for service
a local mobility dealers idea of taking care of your wheelchair van

Operational Maintenance of Adaptive Mobility Equipment on:

  • Lowered Floor Wheelchair Van (New & Used)
  • Full-Size Wheelchair Vans (New & Used)
  • Primary and Secondary Driving Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Wheelchair Securement Systems (automatic and manual)
  • Power Seat Bases
  • Power Door Operators

Special service work or repairs to your Adaptive Equipment

Installation of new Adaptive Equipment on new and used wheelchair vans such as:

  • Hand Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Raised Doors
  • Lowered Floors
  • Specialized gas, brake, and steering systems
  • Turning Automotive Seats

Maine Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the 2005 American Community Study by the Center for Personal Assistance Services, approximately 228,000 individuals living in Maine are considered to be disabled in some manner. Specifically, about 2.7% of the population of Maine have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

maine-disability maine-commercial-wheelchair-vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the state of Maine including the Portland area and Cumberland, Sagadahac and York counties.

If your business needs a new or used accessible van, bus, shuttle or other commercial vehicle in Maine, look through our online inventory to find the vehicle that’s right for you. View our commercial accessible vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and accessories or visit our commercial wheelchair van and bus inventory.

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, Maine state regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to Maine, to your business. We often make deliveries to Cumberland County, Sagadahoc County and York County, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs, so contact us today.

Learn more about delivery information for Maine wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the great state of Maine.

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations Connecticut

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations in CT

connecticut wheelchair-van-service-considerations newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At VMi New England Mobility Center, we believe that the service you receive after you purchase a wheelchair van is just as important as the service you received during your purchasing process. Our main goal is to keep you and the other passengers in the vehicle as safe as possible, which is why our wheelchair van service offerings are unlike any others in the vehicle modification industry.

Trained Service Technicians

All VMi New England Mobility Center Technicians are certified in the mobility equipment that is sold, installed, and serviced.  We are held to the highest standards in the adaptive vehicle industry.

Some of Longest Warranties in the Vehicle Modification Industry

We want to protect our customers and make sure that we offer the best options for them.

Operational Maintenance Program

For more than 27 years we have implemented and evolved a multi-faceted operational maintenance schedule unavailable at any other facility in the country to assist you in maintaining optimum driving performance while also assessing critical component deterioration before it occurs. Our Service Technicians will provide you with list of all work performed on your wheelchair accessible vehicle and a list of any items that may require future attention. Also, we will inform you of any upcoming maintenance and service you may need done to your wheelchair accessible vehicle in order to make sure your adaptive vehicle is in top condition.

Other dealers want your old vans to rust and fall apart so they can sell you a new one.

Wheelchair van rust not at newenglandwheelchairvan.com if you bring it to us for service
a local mobility dealers idea of taking care of your wheelchair van

Operational Maintenance of Adaptive Mobility Equipment on:

  • Lowered Floor Wheelchair Van (New & Used)
  • Full-Size Wheelchair Vans (New & Used)
  • Primary and Secondary Driving Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Wheelchair Securement Systems (automatic and manual)
  • Power Seat Bases
  • Power Door Operators

Special service work or repairs to your Adaptive Equipment

Installation of new Adaptive Equipment on new and used wheelchair vans such as:

  • Hand Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Raised Doors
  • Lowered Floors
  • Specialized gas, brake, and steering systems
  • Turning Automotive Seats

New York Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the Center for Personal Assistance Services, about 2,537,000 individuals living in New York were considered to have a disability in 2005. Specifically, about 2.8% of the population of New York have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

 new-york-disability new-york-commercial-wheelchair-vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the country of New York; the Metropolitan New York and Hudson Valley areas, including Suffolk, Nassau, Dutchess, Orange and Ulster counties.

If your business needs a new or used accessible van, bus, shuttle or other commercial vehicle in New York, look through our online inventory to find the vehicle that’s right for you. View our commercial accessible vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and accessories or visit our commercial wheelchair van and bus inventory.

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, New York state regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to New York, to your business. We often make deliveries to Kingston, Poughkeepsie, as well as Suffolk County, Nassau County, and New York City, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs, so contact us today.

Learn more about delivery information for New York wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the country of New York City, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs.

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations Rhode Island

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations in Rhode Island

Rhode Island wheelchair-van-service-considerations newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At VMi New England Mobility Center, we believe that the service you receive in Rhode Island after you purchase a wheelchair van is just as important as the service you received during your purchasing process. Our main goal is to keep you and the other passengers in the vehicle as safe as possible, which is why our wheelchair van service for you in RI offerings are unlike any others in the vehicle modification industry.

Trained Service Technicians

All VMi New England Mobility Center Technicians are certified in the mobility equipment that is sold, installed, and serviced.  We are held to the highest standards in the adaptive vehicle industry.

Some of Longest Warranties in the Vehicle Modification Industry

We want to protect our customers and make sure that we offer the best options for them.

Operational Maintenance Program

For more than 27 years we have implemented and evolved a multi-faceted operational maintenance schedule unavailable at any other facility in the country to assist you in maintaining optimum driving performance while also assessing critical component deterioration before it occurs. Our Service Technicians will provide you with list of all work performed on your wheelchair accessible vehicle and a list of any items that may require future attention. Also, we will inform you of any upcoming maintenance and service you may need done to your wheelchair accessible vehicle in order to make sure your adaptive vehicle is in top condition.

Other dealers want your old vans to rust and fall apart so they can sell you a new one.

Wheelchair van rust not at newenglandwheelchairvan.com if you bring it to us for service
a local mobility dealers idea of taking care of your wheelchair van

Operational Maintenance of Adaptive Mobility Equipment on:

  • Lowered Floor Wheelchair Van (New & Used)
  • Full-Size Wheelchair Vans (New & Used)
  • Primary and Secondary Driving Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Wheelchair Securement Systems (automatic and manual)
  • Power Seat Bases
  • Power Door Operators

Special service work or repairs to your Adaptive Equipment

Installation of new Adaptive Equipment on new and used wheelchair vans such as:

  • Hand Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Raised Doors
  • Lowered Floors
  • Specialized gas, brake, and steering systems
  • Turning Automotive Seats

New Hampshire Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the Center for Personal Assistance Services, about 174,000 individuals living in New Hampshire were considered to have a disability in 2005. Specifically, about 2.5% of the population of New Hampshire have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

new-hampshire-disability new-hampshire-commercial-wheelchair-vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

 

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the state of New Hampshire including Manchester, and Merrimack, Belknap, Rockingham and Strafford counties.

If your business needs a new or used accessible van, bus, shuttle or other commercial vehicle in New Hampshire, look through our online inventory to find the vehicle that’s right for you. View our commercial accessible vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and accessories or visit our commercial wheelchair van and bus inventory.

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, New Hampshire state regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories in New Hampshire.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to New Hampshire, to your business. We often make deliveries to Hillsborough County, Strafford County, Rockingham County, Belknap County and Merrimack County, so contact us today.

Learn more about delivery information for New Hampshire wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the great state of New Hampshire.

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations Massachusetts

Wheelchair Van Service Considerations in Massachusetts

boston wheelchair-van-service-considerations newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At VMi New England Mobility Center, we believe that the service you receive in Massachusetts after you purchase a wheelchair van is just as important as the service you received during your purchasing process. Our main goal is to keep you and the other passengers in the vehicle as safe as possible, which is why our wheelchair van service offerings are unlike any others in the vehicle modification industry.

Trained Service Technicians in MA

All VMi New England Mobility Center Technicians are certified in the mobility equipment that is sold, installed, and serviced.  We are held to the highest standards in the adaptive vehicle industry.

Some of Longest Warranties in the Vehicle Modification Industry

We want to protect our customers and make sure that we offer the best options for them.

Operational Maintenance Program

For more than 27 years we have implemented and evolved a multi-faceted operational maintenance schedule unavailable at any other facility in the country to assist you in maintaining optimum driving performance while also assessing critical component deterioration before it occurs. Our Service Technicians will provide you with list of all work performed on your wheelchair accessible vehicle and a list of any items that may require future attention. Also, we will inform you of any upcoming maintenance and service you may need done to your wheelchair accessible vehicle in order to make sure your adaptive vehicle is in top condition.

Other dealers want your old vans to rust and fall apart so they can sell you a new one.

Wheelchair van rust not at newenglandwheelchairvan.com if you bring it to us for service
a local mobility dealers idea of taking care of your wheelchair van

Operational Maintenance of Adaptive Mobility Equipment on:

  • Lowered Floor Wheelchair Van (New & Used)
  • Full-Size Wheelchair Vans (New & Used)
  • Primary and Secondary Driving Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Wheelchair Securement Systems (automatic and manual)
  • Power Seat Bases
  • Power Door Operators

Special service work or repairs to your Adaptive Equipment

Installation of new Adaptive Equipment on new and used wheelchair vans such as:

  • Hand Controls
  • Wheelchair Lifts and Scooter Lifts
  • Raised Doors
  • Lowered Floors
  • Specialized gas, brake, and steering systems
  • Turning Automotive Seats

Connecticut Commercial Wheelchair Vans

According to the 2005 American Community Study by the Center for Personal Assistance Services, approximately 408,000 individuals living in Connecticut are considered to be disabled in some manner. Specifically, about 2.3% of the population of Connecticut have difficulty with every day tasks such as taking a bath, getting dressed, moving about the house, and driving.

connecticut commercial and personal wheelchair vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

At the VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer specialized transportation products and services for private and commercial use. For more than 25 years we have been servicing the commercial and personal wheelchair vehicle needs of the state of Connecticut including the Greater Hartford, Greater Bridgeport, Greater New Haven, Torrington, and surrounding counties.

If your business needs a new or used van, bus, shuttle or other commercial accessible vehicle in Connecticut, give us a call to find the vehicle that suits your requirements. Contact us for any of your commercial wheelchair vehicles, used vans and buses, modifications and upfit needs

We can help you evaluate how many passengers you need to carry, Connecticut State regulatory requirements and other commercial considerations when buying a wheelchair van, replacement parts or accessories in Connecticut.

After VMi New England Mobility Center helps you locate the perfect commercial wheelchair van, bus, shuttle, or ambulette, we deliver! We can deliver it right to your door. We will drive, tow or trailer your wheelchair accessible vehicle to Connecticut, right to your business. We often make deliveries to Fairfield County, New Haven County, Hartford County, Tolland County, Middlesex County, and Litchfield County, so contact us today for your commercial mobility needs.

Learn more about delivery information for Connecticut wheelchair vans and parts and our commercial warranty.

We look forward to helping your business provide exceptional service to your wheelchair users, school students, group homes, and rehab centers in the great state of Connecticut.

toyota sienna rampvan wheelchair & scooter accessible van

The Toyota Sienna wheelchair and scooter accessible van offers accessibility and convenience in a sporty, streamlined package. The bold, new attitude of this popular vehicle is a refreshing take on the traditional van.

boston toyota wheelchair vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

The one touch power entry and exit system includes a power sliding side door, a power ramp, and a power auto-kneel system to reduce ramp angle and make the van easier to enter and exit for wheelchair or scooter users. The Toyota Sienna wheelchair van also features easily removable front seats to allow a wheelchair user to drive the vehicle (when properly equipped with hand controls) or to ride in the front passenger position.

The lightweight aluminum ramp extends to allow easy access to the interior for wheelchairs and scooters. A durable, non-skid powder-coated finish ensures superior traction. In the event of power failure, the ramp can be operated manually.

To make boarding even easier, most of our vans feature an integrated “kneeling” system. An actuator lowers the rear suspension while the door opens, which reduces the slope of the auto ramp.

Ramp van Standard Features

Auto Door The original door operator opens the sliding door at the touch of a button. The door can be operated with the standard remote control, or with one of the several interior control switches.

Auto Kneel The Rampvan features a “kneeling” system to make entering and exiting your vehicle even easier. An actuator lowers the rear suspension while the door opens, which reduces the slope of the automatic ramp.

Auto Ramp The lightweight ramp is offered in both In floor and Foldout versions, and offers unparalleled ease of access for wheelchair and scooter users. In the event of power failure, both the door and ramp can easily be operated manually.

Lowered Floor Up to 14.75″ lower than conventional minivans, the Ramp van’s floor is lowered from the firewall to the rear axle. With a choice of three securement positions, wheelchair users can enjoy the ride — and the view — from their chair

Removable Seating Both the driver and passenger seat can easily be removed for those who wish to ride up front or drive. By simply unlocking the seat base from the vehicle, the entire assembly can be rolled out of the vehicle via the ramp and reinstalled just as easily when needed.

The Ramp van combines sophisticated engineering with a combination of style, class, interior space and superior quality. At the heart of the Ramp van is the Toyota Sienna minivan chassis. Each Ramp van features a lowered floor to provide generous head room for wheelchair or scooter users. An integrated power sliding door and ramp enable full access to the vehicle. By offering conversions with both fold-out or in-floor ramps, we ensure that each customer gets the right conversion for his or her needs.

mobility van markets new england and beyond

VMi New England Mobility Center customers have come to us from all over the United States, from New England to Tennessee, Michigan to the District of Columbia. Our Bridgewater facility offers a unmatched capability to sell, service allow us to supply accessible commercial vehicles and personal-use wheelchair vans to clients throughout the area.

us census disability by state

Personal Conversion Wheelchair Vans

Our Bridgewater Mobility Center offers full service and sales to individuals throughout all of New England

Commercial Accessible Vans, Buses and Shuttles

We often sell, service, and deliver vehicles to the following areas:

States

Are you outside of any of these locations and still interested in a VMi New England Mobility Center conversion van or mobility product? Contact our expert sales staff, as we may still be able to assist you in finding the perfect commercial wheelchair van or accessible personal-use modification.

Commercial Use Wheelchair Vans And Buses

commercial-use-wheelchair-vans-and-buses  newenglandwheelchairvan.com

VMi New England Mobility Center provides commercial wheelchair vans and buses, shuttle vans, shuttle buses and specialized conversions such as ambulettes and non-emergency medical transportation vehicles. We provide sales, service, rentals and all necessary replacement parts and accessories.

Many commercial wheelchair van, bus and shuttle floorplans are available. Call for up to date  commercial wheelchair van, bus and shuttle inventory. Call 508-697-6006 to speak to one of our commercial wheelchair van specialists right now.

Commercial Vans, Buses and Shuttles

Whether your clients are wheelchair users, ambulatory patients, school students, nursing homes, group homes, rehab centers, or extended care facilities, all have unique commercial handicap accessible van with commercial wheelchair lift transportation needs.

Some questions you’ll want to consider:

  • How many wheelchair passengers will you transport?
  • How many ambulatory/walking passengers will you transport?
  • What will be the typical combination?
  • Do you have to meet ADA or other regulatory requirements?

Whether it is maximizing client capacity, choosing a style that will blend in a neighborhood setting, or maximizing headroom for client and staff comfort, we provide wheelchair accessible vans, buses, and shuttles that balance those needs with the same great quality the industry has come to expect.

  • View our Commercial Accessible Vehicles
  • Find out about Used Vans and Buses

Commercial Vehicle Inventory

We carry both new and used wheelchair vans, buses and shuttle vans. We also list wheelchair van conversion “shells” that have been mostly completed and are only waiting for wheelchair position, seating instructions and other final details. We do our best to seek out quality used vehicles and make all necessary repairs and modifications before offering them for sale.

Van and Bus Modifications and Accessories

Wheelchair vans, buses and shuttles must work in numerous industries, applications and working conditions while serving people who are equally diverse. The number of clients and staff that must be transported, their age and abilities, regulations and corporate image are all major factors that influence and are affected by the modifications available. To make this possible, there are many modifications and accessories that can be added to wheelchair vans buses and shuttles to customize them for the end-user’s needs. Among the van and bus modifications available are wheelchair tie-downs, lifts and entryways.

  • See what Modifications and Accessories are available

Commercial Help and Resource Center

Our Commercial Help and Resource Center will help to answer many of your most common questions. The Commercial Help and Resource Center includes resources that we feel could provide benefit to our customers. Service tips, new product information, regulatory changes and many other subjects are covered on a regular basis. Our sales, service and management teams, as well as a few “industry expert” guests, put their thoughts and experiences to work for you. We are available for any questions you may have! At VMi New England Mobility Center, we strive to ensure that our customers and dealers get the results they value the most.

Commercial Warranty Information

Warranties on commercial wheelchair vans, buses and shuttle vans can sometimes be complicated because components such as the base chassis, heating and air conditioning, body modifications and other modifications come from different manufacturers and have varying lengths and depths of warranty coverage.  Our goal is to save you time and effort and keep your costs low.

adaptive mobility equipment financing options

Adaptive equipment describes an installed device, in addition to a structural modification, that is necessary for a person with a permanent physical disability to drive or be transported in a vehicle.

adaptive mobility equipment financing options wheelchair vans newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Some equipment not thought of as typical adaptive equipment, or equipment which is not available from the factory, that serves a need to operate or ride in a vehicle for persons with disabilities such as but not limited to: assist handles, keyless entry, keyless ignition switch, lumbar support, headrest adjustment, pedal extensions power seats, remote liftgate opener, running boards, seat belt extenders, seat modifications, and special mirrors may be eligible for reimbursement and require additional documentation. You will be notified if additional documentation is needed such as a letter or prescription clearly describing the permanent physical disability requiring this equipment, prepared by a licensed or certified medical professional.

Factory installed options such as air conditioning, running boards, lumbar seats and power windows are not considered eligible under the terms of the program.

Driving is a privilege for people stroke survivors with limited mobility; it provides a sense of stability in their lives so they can regain their independence. They love the flexibility their adaptive mobility equipment provides, but they often face exorbitant costs when it comes to financing the purchase of the equipment.

“The number one reason people with disabilities don’t have access to adequate transportation is because they cannot afford it.” The good news is that funding assistance to purchase adaptive equipment is becoming increasingly available.

Sources of funding determine a person’s “buying power.” Unlike the financing options provided by original equipment manufacturers, Mobility Equipment Dealers, such as Vmi New England Mobility Center, have access to financing options specifically for adaptive equipment purchases; they offer options and solutions for the customer.

Veterans

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) offers grants enabling 100% service related disabled veterans to purchase a new or used modified vehicle and adaptive equipment. Automobile grants are available once in the service member’s lifetime and adaptive equipment grants are available for special equipment that may used more than once.  For more information, call 1-800-827-1000 or read the VA’s “Automobile and Special Adaptive Equipment Grants” fact sheet.

State Programs

  • State Vocational Rehabilitation (Voc Rehab) Agencies may be able to assist with the costs associated with purchasing an adaptive vehicle (or adding adaptive equipment to an existing one) if the vehicle is necessary in order for a person to get to and from work.
  • State Assistive Technology Loan Programs may also be able to provide assistance to help pay for modifications to the vehicle.
  • Center for Independent Living (CIL) can provide additional information on programs that may be available in your state.

Government Programs

  • Medicaid: Medicaid is a jointly administered federal and state program that helps with medical costs for some people with limited income and resources. Medicaid benefits differ by state and are approved on a case-by-case basis when a request for funding is presented through a prior approval.
  • Medicare: Medicare is a federal program and in some instances they will pay for adaptive equipment following a specialty evaluation performed by a qualified practitioner. For more information, call 1-800-633-4227.
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI): SSI offers a Plan to Achieve Self-Support program, or PASS, which helps those with disabilities pay for items or services needed to achieve a specific employment goal – to ultimately return to work.
  • Internal Revenue Service (IRS): Often sales-tax exemptions on equipment purchases and other out-of-pocket costs can qualify for tax deductions as medical expenses. Contact a tax adviser or get literature from the IRS that outlines the tax code for medical equipment by calling 1-800-829-1040 and asking for publications with extensions 3966, 907 and 502.

Workman’s Compensation:

Your insurance or workman’s compensation policies may also pay for vehicle adaptation. Check with your HR department or workman’s comp. organization for more information.

Fundraisers, Charitable Organizations/Churches

These may not be for everyone, but they can be effective and many people have successfully raised the money to pay for a wheelchair accessible vehicle and adaptive equipment using these options.

Automakers Rebate Programs

Many automobile makers are providing people with disabilities a wide range of rebates and incentive programs to cover adaptive equipment installation. Below is an overview of some programs offering rebates or reimbursements for adaptive mobility equipment.

  • Ford Motor Company: The Ford Mobility Motoring adaptive equipment reimbursement offers up to $1,000 off for a vehicle modification. You may also qualify for up to $200 for alert hearing devices, lumbar support, or running boards installed on any new Ford or Lincoln vehicle purchased or leased from a U.S. Ford or Lincoln dealer during the program period.
  • Daimler Chrysler Corporation: Once you have a 2010-2013 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT vehicle that fits your transportation needs, contact a reputable and qualified adaptive equipment installer to ensure that it can be adapted to meet your needs.
  • General Motors Company Reimbursement Program:  New vehicle purchasers/lessees who install eligible adaptive mobility equipment on their new Chevrolet, Buick or GMC vehicles can receive up to a $1,000 reimbursement for the cost of the equipment.
  • Toyota: The Toyota Mobility Assistance Program provides cash reimbursement of up to $1,000 of the cost of any aftermarket adaptive equipment or conversion, for drivers and/or passengers, when installed on any eligible purchased or leased new Toyota vehicle within 12 months of vehicle purchase or lease.

The decision to purchase adaptive mobility equipment stems from a need for mobility freedom for people with disabilities, including stroke survivors. The purchase process begins with selecting a reputable dealer to provide the adaptive equipment and installation, locating options to finance the purchase, and ends with insuring the adaptive equipment.

Make sure the after-market mobility modifications are professionally installed by a NMEDA mobility dealer. Once the adaptive mobility equipment is financed and installed, notify your insurance agent with a full disclosure of all adaptive mobility equipment installed in the vehicle.

Make sure your auto insurance company provides coverage for the conversion and adaptive equipment. Make sure you request coverage for “special” equipment, not just “handicapped” equipment.

  • “Handicapped equipment” covers only basic equipment such as the ramp or lift, not the lowered floor, kneeling system, lockdown system or other adaptive equipment.
  • “Special equipment” covers the conversion in its entirety. Be sure and send your insurance company an itemized list of every modification (which you can get from the mobility dealership that performed the conversion).

VMi New England Mobility Center is an advocate for mobility and accessibility for drivers with disabilities. If you need help with converting or buying a wheelchair accessible car, truck or van, please contact us at 508-697-6006  info@newenglandwheelchairvan.com

Vans and Accessible Vehicles in Massachusetts

Vans and Accessible Vehicles in Massachusetts

boston vans-and-accessible-vehicles-in-massachusetts

You can have the wheelchair accessible van you want delivered straight to your home. VMi New England Mobility Center, Inc. provides nationwide sales and delivery services to our customers across the United States from our mobility headquarters in Bridgewater, MA. Our mobility consultants can help you find the handicap van that fits your individual needs, so you can gain the mobility you desire.

VMi New England Mobility Center sells new and certified pre-owned handicap vans and accessible vehicles that have been hand-picked to ensure our customers receive a wheelchair van that will last. Each new mobility vehicle comes with a brand-new conversion and warranty. Our inspection process and safety features make our handicapped vans ideal for individuals, families, and commercial businesses. You can browse our showroom first hand and see our selection of wheelchair vans for sale to find the one you want.

Delivery of your handicap van is as easy as the selection process. VMi New England Mobility Center delivers to any Massachusetts city. You can be in Boston, Cambridge, Foxboro, or Wilmington, and we will deliver your handicap accessible van direct to your driveway. Depending on the mobility vehicle you choose, we can deliver your accessible van within 48 hours. It’s just that easy.

Once you find the new or used wheelchair van you like, the next step is to contact a mobility consultant via email or telephone. He or she will take the time to explain the process and answer any questions you may have about van selection and safety features. We are proud of our customer service and glad to say we offer our customers a low price guarantee on all newly modified mobility center conversions. You can check out the competition, and you will find that we not only have best value in wheelchair vans, but our vans last longer. Give us a call today and learn how we can help you gain freedom and independence at 508-697-6006.

 

Massachusetts Wheelchair Accessible Transportation Services

 

VMi New England wheelchair vans Boston, MA

Massachusetts Wheelchair Accessible Transportation Services

Contact our certified mobility consultants at the mobility center with any questions about purchasing wheelchair accessible vehicles.
Links to ADA Paratransit, Wheelchair Accessible Taxi, and Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Services available in Massachusetts.

 
– ADA PARATRANSIT –
– REGULAR & WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE TAXI SERVICES –

Beverly – Tri-City Taxi – Peabody, Danvers, Beverly, Salem, Marblehead

Boston – Boston Cab Dispatch – Boston
Boston – Brain Tree Taxi – Boston
Boston – Charlestown Taxi – Boston
Boston – Chelsea Taxi – Boston

Boston – East Boston Taxi – Boston
Boston – Hello Taxi – Brookline, Allston, Brighton, Boston
Boston – Hyde Park Taxi – Boston
Boston – Malden Cab – Boston
Boston – Massachusetts Cab – Boston

Boston – Metro-Cab – Wheelchair accessible vans available
Boston – Sharon Taxi – Boston
Boston – Somerville Cab – Boston
Boston – South Cab – South Boston
Cambridge – Cambridge Cab – Cambridge

Cape Cod – Cape Cab – Provincetown, Wellfleet, Chatham, Orleans
Cape Cod – Mercedes Cab – Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham
Falmouth – Falmouth Taxi – Falmouth
Hudson – Sunshine Taxi – Hudson, Westborough, Concord, London Black Cabs
Ipswich – Ipswich Taxi – Ipswich

Newton – Veterans Taxi – Newton, Needham, Weston, Wellesley, Waltham
Newton – Yellow Cab – West Newton
Plymouth – Mayflower Taxi – Plymouth
Quincy – Yellow Cab – Quincy
South Yarmouth – Barnstable Taxi – South Yarmouth

Waltham – Checker Cab – Waltham
Waltham – Patriot Taxi – Waltham
Watertown – Watertown Taxi – Watertown
Worburn – Checker Cab – Worburn
Worcester – Worcester Red Cabs – Wheelchair accessible vans available
Worcester – New Worcester Yellow Cab – Worcester
 

– NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION –

AMR – Attleboro/Taunton/Dartmouth, Brockton, Dedham, Haverhill/Hampstead, Milford, Newburyport, Plymouth, Springfield, & Worchester
CRT Cabulance – Pittfield, Berskhire County
LifeLine Ambulance Service – Arlington, Brighton, Concord, Framingham, Milford, Needham, Norwood,  Peabody, Woburn, Worchester + New Hampshire Locations
People Movers STS – Throughout New England – Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut

 

Contact our certified mobility consultants at the New England mobility center with any questions about purchasing wheelchair accessible vehicles.

Why a Toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in New England

Toyota offers some of the best options on the market when it comes to wheelchair accessible vans.  Each van offers comfort, reliability, and reasonable pricing for its conversion.   Choosing a new wheelchair van isn’t always as easy as choosing a traditional car.  There isn’t a particular one-size-fits-all van that covers every need or preference. As you make your choice, keep in mind a few practical reasons to choose an accessible Toyota.

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in new england

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in new england

Variety

Toyota’s wheelchair accessible minivan is a modified version of the Toyota Sienna and is the most popular Toyota vehicle that is converted for accessibility.  Overall, it’s an easy vehicle for the major wheelchair accessible vehicle manufacturers to convert. Toyota currently produces five different models of the Sienna that are available for modification:

  • Sienna L- the L model is the most basic model of Sienna.  It includes all the standard features and will often be the lowest priced model.
  • Sienna LE- the LE is still a fairly basic model but includes a rear-view camera and enhanced climate controls.
  • Sienna SE- Sienna SE is a mid-level option that offers enhanced navigation displays, rear-view cameras, and cross-traffic controls for ease and maneuverability.
  • Sienna XLE- Sienna XLE is outfitted with leather-trimmed driver and front passenger seats.  It also features a blind spot monitor and a power lift gate with jam guard.
  • Sienna Limited- The Sienna Limited is the final and most luxurious model of Sienna.  The Limited features many of the standard and upgraded features of the other models while offering more extras like a JBL sound system, driver and passenger leather- trimmed seats, and a dual moon roof.

Any one of these models of the Sienna can be easily modified to accommodate your specific needs.  Budgetary constraints and your individual situation will play a major part in which model you decide to purchase.  Once you’ve made that decision, VMi New England Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center will help you find a Toyota wheelchair van that combines Toyota’s infamous quality with comfort and accessibility.

Adaptability

Toyota’s wheelchair accessible vans don’t start out being adapted for accessibility.  These vans start as traditional vehicles without any modifications before being converted to accommodate individuals with disabilities.  Toyota relies on certified wheelchair conversion manufacturers, such as VMI, to fit the vehicles with lowered floors, kneeling systems, ramps, and more.

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van if you live in new england

why a toyota should be your next wheelchair van Bridgewater, MA Mobility Center

After the initial conversion is made the vehicle is sent to our Bridgewater, MA Mobility center where we can make even more adaptations to your vehicles. Mobility seating, hand controls, and pedal extensions are all available and fit beautifully inside the modified Toyota Sienna. There are even products that allow users to control the vehicle by pressing a few key buttons or by simply flipping a switch on the vehicle.

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

2013 Toyota Sienna XLE VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Though the middle row of seats is removed to accommodate a wheelchair, there are still plenty of options to satisfy your needs. Both front seats can be removed to allow the wheelchair user to ride up front and there is a full bench seat in the back for children or guests. There is also a large trunk to accommodate groceries or additional supplies.

Safety locks and straps are installed into the floor of the van to keep wheelchair passengers in place and prevent any excess movement during transit.  The lowered floors help to compensate for a wheelchair passenger’s added height.  There are countless additional features and add-ons, so it is clear that the Toyota Sienna’s adaptability and flexibility are two key factors that make it a good choice for an accessible vehicle.

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England Mobility Center

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England Mobility Center

Style

When it comes to the Sienna, you’ll be hard pressed to find a vehicle as stylish. This Toyota is available in a rainbow of colors from a vibrant cherry red to a subtle sage green. Its sleek exterior is curvier and more modern than that of some types of minivans.

The interior is stunning, and the more customizations you make, the more personal and warm the vehicle feels. Its spaciousness accommodates passengers for a ride to the store or a road trip to Disney World with the same comfort and style you’d get from a luxury vehicle. If you’re looking for an accessible vehicle that is practical and attractive, be sure to consider the Toyota Sienna for its superior style.

 

Why Choose a Toyota?

A Toyota Sienna with a VMI Northstar 360 is one of best wheelchair accessible vans on the market. The variety of options means there’s really one for everyone. It’s able to be adapted with ease and features many options to suit all your needs. And, to top it all off, it’s a beautiful vehicle that will provide its purchaser’s with a long life and a lot of fun. It has, without a doubt, cemented its place as a top-rated accessible van that will retain its value and perform under the most rigorous conditions.  If the Toyota Sienna fits what you’re looking for in an accessible van, then come take it for a spin! Contact VMi New England today to schedule a test drive by filling out our online contact form or by giving us a call at 508-697-6006.

Wheelchair Accessible Van Conversion Options New England Mobility Center

wheelchair accessible van conversion options new england mobility center

Wheelchair Accessible Van Conversion Options

We know that each individual person has their own personal desires and requirements in a wheelchair accessible van. At VMi New England Mobility Center, we offer a variety of conversion options in order to best fit your individual needs. Whether you need hand controls or an under vehicle lift (UVL), our highly trained Mobility Center Consultants are here to listen to your needs, educate you on the safest/best products available, and deliver the highest quality service in the vehicle modification industry.

VMi New England Mobility Center has access to hundreds of new and used wheelchair accessible vans ready for immediate delivery. We carry everything from minivans, to full-size vans, to commercial paratransit vans and ambulette vans, in Dodge, Chrysler, Chevrolet, Buick, Toyota, Honda, and Ford models. Our large inventory and unmatched mobility facility enables our customers to get the wheelchair accessible van they want, when they want it.

If you want to learn more about our wheelchair accessible van conversion options, contact us for a free in house consultation.

wheelchair accessible van conversion options new england mobility center

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle Rebates New England

wheelchair accessible vehicle rebates new england

Mobility Rebate Programs

Whether you’re looking for a wheelchair accessible minivan, a full-size van, or a lift/ramp for your wheelchair van, your financial investment is always going to be a major consideration. We understand the importance of the investment our customers make and we always strive to produce superior products and provide excellent service.

In today’s difficult economy, every cent counts when you’re making decisions about what you can and can’t afford to go without. Feeling that your mobility is restricted by financial constraints is discouraging, and we don’t like the idea of anyone having to face that challenge and find no answers or possibilities. That’s why we are extremely well informed and able to assist you in navigating your way through the myriad of grants, tax incentives, and rebate programs.

Every auto manufacturer offers a mobility rebate program of some type and they are definitely worth looking into. Here is some information about rebates for wheelchair vans and wheelchair lifts/ramps. For more personalized information, contact us and we will help guide you through the process of applying and receiving these rebates.

Toyota Mobility Dealer

The Toyota Mobility Program provides up to $1,000 in reimbursement for adaptive equipment (such as wheelchair lifts, assistive seating, driving aids, and more) installed on new Toyota vehicles within 12 months of the delivery date of the vehicle.

Dodge/Chrysler Automobility Dealer

Chrysler’s AutoMobility Program is similar to the program mentioned above, with reimbursements from $400-$1,000 available depending on the type of adaptive equipment installed..

Honda Mobility Dealer

The Honda Mobility Assistance Program offers reimbursement up to $1,000 for adaptive equipment installed on a new Honda!

Lexus Mobility

The Lexus Mobility Program supports the mobility needs of Lexus owners and/or family members with physical disabilities.

 If you have any questions about these programs, just give our us a call or visit us today. We’re always happy to help!

How to Afford a Used Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle New England

how to afford a used wheelchair accessible vehicle new england

Among people with disabilities, especially wheelchair users, one of the most talked about subjects is the price of a wheelchair accessible vehicle. A shiny new van can be out of range for many consumers on fixed incomes. But a used wheelchair van could be a possibility.

Let’s take a look at some concerns people may have:

Used vehicles have too much mileage on them.

Many used vehicles don’t have much mileage and the mobility equipment may be hardly used.

How much does a used accessible van with a ramp or lift cost?

A wheelchair accessible van less than 3 years old could start at $30,000—or thousands more. A gently used, older wheelchair van can be converted to save even more.

An older vehicle won’t last much longer.

A vehicle properly taken care of can last for decades. For added peace of mind, contact a mobility dealer who sells used wheelchair accessible vehicles and has decades of experience.

A used vehicle probably won’t have the equipment I want.

You want an in-floor ramp but you can only find fold-outs. If the price is right, you may be able to have the desired equipment installed after the sale. Do your research up front.

How can I qualify for a vehicle loan?

  • Talk to your VMi New England mobility dealer—they know the organizations, non-profits, state and federal agencies and charities that will help in financing in your area.
  • If you are a Veteran, you may be eligible for a credit towards a wheelchair accessible vehicle. For more information go to VMi New England
  • Start saving! If you get an income tax refund, put it in a special savings account.
  • Ask your family and friends to forgo gifts and donate towards your vehicle fund.

Above all, contact a mobility expert like the ones at VMi New England. They will work hand-in-hand with you on areas like what is right for you, financing options, rates, terms, manufacturer offers, incentives and benefits.

VMi New England is an advocate for mobility and accessibility for drivers with disabilities. If you need help with converting or buying a handicap accessible car, truck or van, please consider one of our adapted wheelchair vans.

Adapting Motor Vehicles for People with disAbilities

newenglandwheelchairvan.com boston strong

Introduction

A Proven Process for Gaining Freedom on the Road

The introduction of new technology continues to broaden opportunities for people with disabilities to drive vehicles with adaptive devices. Taking advantage of these opportunities, however, can be time consuming and, sometimes, frustrating.

The information in this brochure is based on the experience of driver rehabilitation specialists and other professionals who work with individuals who require adaptive devices for their motor vehicles. It is centered around a proven process —evaluating your needs, selecting the right vehicle, choosing a qualified dealer to modify your vehicle, being trained, maintaining your vehicle — that can help you avoid costly mistakes when purchasing and modifying a vehicle with adaptive equipment.

Also included is general information on cost savings, licensing requirements, and organizations to contact for help. Although the brochure focuses on drivers of modified vehicles, each section contains important information for people who drive passengers with disabilities.

 


 

Investigate Cost Saving Opportunities &Licensing Requirements

Cost Saving Opportunities

The costs associated with modifying a vehicle vary greatly. A new vehicle modified with adaptive equipment can cost from $20,000 to $80,000. Therefore, whether you are modifying a vehicle you own or purchasing a new vehicle with adaptive equipment, it pays to investigate public and private opportunities for financial assistance.

There are programs that help pay part or all of the cost of vehicle modification, depending on the cause and nature of the disability. For information, contact your state’s Department of Vocational Rehabilitation or another agency that provides vocational services, and, if appropriate, the Department of Veterans Affairs. You can find phone numbers for these state and federal agencies in a local phone book. Also, consider the following.

  • Many nonprofit associations that advocate for individuals with disabilities have grant programs that help pay for adaptive devices.
  • If you have private health insurance or workers’ compensation, you may be covered for adaptive devices and vehicle modification. Check with your insurance carrier.
  • Many manufacturers have rebate or reimbursement plans for modified vehicles. When you are ready to make a purchase, find out if there is such a dealer in your area.
  • Some states waive the sales tax for adaptive devices if you have a doctor’s prescription for their use.
  • You may be eligible for savings when submitting your federal income tax return. Check with a qualified tax consultant to find out if the cost of your adaptive devices will help you qualify for a medical deduction.

Licensing Requirements

All states require a valid learner’s permit or driver’s license to receive an on–the–road evaluation. You cannot be denied the opportunity to apply for a permit or license because you have a disability. However, you may receive a restricted license, based on your use of adaptive devices.

 


 

Evaluate Your Needs

Driver rehabilitation specialists perform comprehensive evaluations to identify the adaptive equipment most suited to your needs. A complete evaluation includes vision screening and, in general, assesses:

  • Muscle strength, flexibility, and range of motion
  • Coordination and reaction time
  • Judgment and decision making abilities
  • Ability to drive with adaptive equipment

Upon completion of an evaluation, you should receive a report containing specific recommendations on driving requirements or restrictions, and a complete list of recommended vehicle modifications.

Finding a Qualified Evaluator

To find a qualified evaluator in your area, contact a local rehabilitation center or call the Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED). The phone number is in the resource section. The Association maintains a data base of certified driver rehabilitation specialists throughout the country. Your insurance company may pay for the evaluation. Find out if you need a physician’s prescription or other documen-tation to receive benefits.

Being Prepared for an Evaluation

Consult with your physician to make sure you are physically and psychologically prepared to drive. Being evaluated too soon after an injury or other trauma may indicate the need for adaptive equipment you will not need in the future. When going for an evaluation, bring any equipment you normally use, e.g., a walker or neck brace. Tell the evaluator if you are planning to modify your wheelchair or obtain a new one.

Evaluating Passengers with Disabilities

Evaluators also consult on compatibility and transportation safety issues for passengers with disabilities. They assess the type of seating needed and the person’s ability to exit and enter the vehicle. They provide advice on the purchase of modified vehicles and recommend appropriate wheelchair lifts or other equipment for a vehicle you own. If you have a child who requires a special type of safety seat, evaluators make sure the seat fits your child properly. They also make sure you can properly install the seat in your vehicle.

 


 

Select the Right Vehicle

Selecting a vehicle for modification requires collaboration among you, your evaluator, and a qualified vehicle modification dealer. Although the purchase or lease of a vehicle is your responsibility, making sure the vehicle can be properly modified is the responsibility of the vehicle modification dealer. Therefore, take the time to consult with a qualified dealer and your evaluator before making your final purchase. It will save you time and money. Be aware that you will need insurance while your vehicle is being modified, even though it is off the road.

The following questions can help with vehicle selection. They can also help determine if you can modify a vehicle you own.

  • Does the necessary adaptive equipment require a van, or will another passenger vehicle suffice?
  • Can the vehicle accommodate the equipment that needs to be installed?
  • Will there be enough space to accommodate your family or other passengers once the vehicle is modified?
  • Is there adequate parking space at home and at work for the vehicle and for loading/unloading a wheelchair?
  • Is there adequate parking space to maneuver if you use a walker?
  • What additional options are necessary for the safe operation of the vehicle?

If a third party is paying for the vehicle, adaptive devices, or modification costs, find out if there are any limitations or restrictions on what is covered. Always get a written statement on what a funding agency will pay before making your purchase.

 


 

Choose a Qualified Dealer to Modify Your Vehicle

Even a half inch change in the lowering of a van floor can affect a driver’s ability to use equipment or to have an unobstructed view of the road; so, take time to find a qualified dealer to modify your vehicle. Begin with a phone inquiry to find out about credentials, experience, and references. Ask questions about how they operate. Do they work with evaluators? Will they look at your vehicle before you purchase it? Do they require a prescription from a physician or other driver evaluation specialist? How long will it take before they can start work on your vehicle? Do they provide training on how to use the adaptive equipment?

If you are satisfied with the answers you receive, check references; then arrange to visit the dealer’s facility. Additional information to consider is listed below.

  • Are they members of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) or another organization that has vehicle conversion standards?
  • What type of training has the staff received?
  • What type of warranty do they provide on their work?
  • Do they provide ongoing service and maintenance?
  • Do they stock replacement parts?

Once you are comfortable with the dealer’s qualifications, you will want to ask specific questions, such as:

  • How much will the modification cost?
  • Will they accept third party payment?
  • How long will it take to modify the vehicle?
  • Can the equipment be transferred to a new vehicle in the future?
  • Will they need to modify existing safety features to install the adaptive equipment?

While your vehicle is being modified, you will, most likely, need to be available for fittings. This avoids additional waiting time for adjustments once the equipment is fully installed. Without proper fittings you may have problems with the safe operation of the vehicle and have to go back for adjustments.

Some State Agencies specify the dealer you must use if you want reimbursement.

 


 

Obtain Training on the Use of New Equipment

Both new and experienced drivers need training on how to safely use new adaptive equipment. Your equipment dealer and evaluator should provide information and off-road instruction. You will also need to practice driving under the instruction of a qualified driving instructor until you both feel comfortable with your skills. Bring a family member or other significant person who drives to all your training sessions. It’s important to have someone else who can drive your vehicle in case of an emergency.

Some state vocational rehabilitation departments pay for driver training under specified circumstances. At a minimum, their staff can help you locate a qualified instructor. If your evaluator does not provide on-the-road instruction, ask him or her for a recommendation. You can also inquire at your local motor vehicle administration office.

 


 

Maintain Your Vehicle

Regular maintenance is important for keeping your vehicle and adaptive equipment safe and reliable. It may also be mandatory for compliance with the terms of your warranty. Some warranties specify a time period during which adaptive equipment must be inspected. These “check ups” for equipment may differ from those for your vehicle. Make sure you or your modifier submits all warranty cards for all equipment to ensure coverage and so manufacturers can contact you in case of a recall.

For additional copies of this brochure and other important vehicle safety information, you can contact DOT’s web site at www.nhtsa.dot.gov and the DOT Auto Safety Hotline: 888-DASH-2-DOT (888-327-4236).

 


 

Resources

The Association for Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (ADED)
2425 N. Center Street # 369, Hickory, NC 28601
(866) 672-9466
www.driver-ed.org
www.aded.net

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA)
11211 N. Nebraska Ave., Suite A5, Tampa, FL 33612
(800) 833-0427 
www.nmeda.org

AAA
1000 AAA Drive, Heathrow, FL 32746-5063
(404) 444-7961
www.aaa.com

Department of Veteran Affairs
(800) 827-1000
www.va.gov

State Departments of Vocational Rehabilitation
Listed in telephone book.


The following manufacturers offer rebates or reimbursements on new vehicle modification.

Daimler Chrysler Corporation
(800) 255-9877
(TDD Users: (800) 922-3826)
www.automobility.daimlerchrysler.com

Ford Motor Company
(800) 952-2248
(TDD Users: (800) TDD-0312)
www.ford.com/mobilitymotoring

General Motors Corporation
(800) 323-9935
(TDD Users: (800) TDD-9935)
www.gmmobility.com

Saturn
(800) 553-6000, Prompt 3
(TDD Users: (800) 833-6000)
www.saturn.com

Volkswagen
(800) 822-8987
www.vw.com

Audi
(800) 822-2834
www.audiusa.com

mobility concept vehicles for wheelchair drivers

“To get something you never had, you have to do something you’ve never done.” ~Unknown

dodge wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles
Were going to change the world one person at a time
Join the revolution
Do you want a 4×4 wheelchair vehicle you can drive?
We have built 4×4 accessible vehicles going all the way back to the 80’s
Want a 4×4 SUV you can drive your wheelchair from?
Want a Ford Explorer SUV that is a wheelchair accessible vehicle?
We can and will build you a concept vehicle you can drive from a wheelchair.
 'Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.'    - -George S. Patton
‘Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.’    – -George S. Patton

One definition of resilience is “the ability to cope with shocks and keep functioning in a satisfying way”. Resilience is about the self organizing capacity of systems. This means the ability to bounce back after disaster, or the ability to transform if a bad stage has happened. Both of these forms of resilience seem relevant to explore in our times, especially in relation to Assistive Driving Technology for Wheelchair Drivers.

Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations as a company is aware of this challenge and has been working on cutting edge wheelchair driving technology since the 80’s

automotive mobility concept vehicle systems
Vmi New England and Automotive Innovations is leading in its study of ever evolving automotive wheelchair driving systems.

wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

Ford wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

The way we see it, everyone has a fundamental need to have there own personal transportation, to access anything they need like, clean water, food, fibres and many other goods and services.

For future human development it is essential to understand the contribution each person can make to human livelihoods, health, security and culture if given the chance.

wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

wheelchair driver and passenger concept vehicles

Resilience thinking is part of the solution, as it thrives at building flexibility and adaptive capacity. People and nature are interdependent. That means, we have to look for collaboration within society to find resilient solutions.

Interdependence between people and nature.

IMG_0094

Exploring the missing links in our imagination
Solutions to find new possibilities in the Assistive Driving Technology require creativity.

Creativity is the answer to missing links in our imagination, at least according to Jim Sanders. They have found a unique way to explore the relationship between current automotive designs, people and technology.
A safe operating vehicle for people in wheelchairs
“In the face of ever evolving change in transportation needs, we need to work together to find safe mobility solutions for humanity. The key is in creative mobility solutions that connect nature with people. Flexible and adaptive strategies will bring us further. By stretching our imagination, we will start to explore the unknown. And by always looking for new combinations of technology, and common sense, we will find the new solutions.” Jim Sanders 2013

Sometimes even the smallest shift in thinking or doing can create the biggest changes in someones lifecan you save trust for a rainy day?necessity is the mother of invention

IMG_1598

driven by the freedom of the choice  to explore the worlds future possibilities

 VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations is one of America’s best providers of wheelchair vans, vehicle modifications, and adaptive equipment including hand controls, wheelchair and scooter lifts, ramps, raised doors, lowered floors and specialized gas, brake and steering controls. With hundreds of accessible vehicles available to be custom built for your specific needs, from the industries best manufacturers such as VMI, Eldorado and Braun, at our New England mobility center.   Founded in 1984 and offering the best equipped mobility facility in New England with a unparalleled commitment to offering a broad selection of specialized vehicles and services to meet the needs of every customer. Our facility is also Quality Assurance Program (QAP) certified (first in Massachusetts) through the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA), resulting in Automotive Innovations being held to the highest standards in the vehicle modification industry.   We have a strong and committed Veteran sales staff with many decades of experience satisfying our customers’ needs. Feel free to browse our inventory online, visit our huge indoor showroom where every day is a ability expo, request more information about vehicles, set up a test drive or inquire about financing!   Feel free to call upon our friendly Mobility Consultants with any questions you may have about options on wheelchair vans or any of our other products. 508-697-6006We look forward to exceeding your expectations for decades to come!
concept |ˈkänˌsept|nounan abstract idea; a general notion: structuralism is a difficult concept | the concept of justice.• a plan or intention; a conception: the center has kept firmly to its original concept.• an idea or invention to help sell or publicize a commodity: a new concept in corporate hospitality.• Philosophy an idea or mental picture of a group or class of objects formed by combining all their aspects.• [ as modifier ] (of a car or other vehicle) produced as an experimental model to test the viability of new design features.ORIGIN mid 16th cent. (in the sense ‘thought, frame of mind, imagination’): from Latinconceptum ‘something conceived,’ from concept-‘conceived,’ from concipere (see conceive) .
exceed |ikˈsēd|verb [ with obj. ]be greater in number or size than (a quantity, number, or other measurable thing): production costs have exceeded $60,000.• go beyond what is allowed or stipulated by (a set limit, esp. of one’s authority): the Tribunal’s decision clearly exceeds its powers under the statute.• be better than; surpass: catalog sales have exceeded expectations.mobilitynoun1 elderly people may become socially isolated as a result ofrestricted mobility: ability to move, movability,moveableness, motility, vigour, strength, potency.2 the gleeful mobility of Billy’s face: expressiveness,eloquence, animation.3 the mobility of the product: transportability,portability, manoeuvrability.4 an increasing mobility in the workforce: adaptability,flexibility, versatility, adjustability.
freedom |ˈfrēdəm|nounthe power or right to act, speak, or think as one wants without hindrance or restraint: we do have some freedom of choice | he talks of revoking some of the freedoms.• absence of subjection to foreign domination or despotic government: he was a champion of Irish freedom.• the state of not being imprisoned or enslaved: the shark thrashed its way to freedom.• the state of being physically unrestricted and able to move easily: the shorts have a side split for freedom of movement.• (freedom from) the state of not being subject to or affected by (a particular undesirable thing):government policies to achieve freedom from want.• the power of self-determination attributed to the will; the quality of being independent of fate or necessity.• unrestricted use of something: the dog is happy having the freedom of the house when we are out.• archaic familiarity or openness in speech or behavior.

Boston, Massachusetts, Low Priced Handicap Accessible Wheelchair Vans for MA

VMi New England will offer you a low price on your next custom van purchase in Boston, Massachusetts and nationwide. We give customized assistance to help you find affordable new or used wheelchair cars with side and rear entry lowered floor van conversions. Our handicap autos are ideal for personal or commercial transportation for wheelchairs, mobility scooters, and powerchair users. We will bring you a new or used wheelchair van to Boston and still save you thousands of dollars. So get away in Boston, Massachusetts, MA, and explore the possibilities.

You can choose many options for handicap vans including the option to buy a mobility van, sell your wheelchair van to us, trade in a vehicle towards the purchase of a mobility van, convert your vehicle with van conversions for wheelchair accessibility and find adaptive mobility equipment for handicap vans.

 

2013 Toyota Sienna VMI Summit Silver VMi New England

Toyota Lowered Floor Mini Van

Get Great Deals on New and Used Mobility Vans in Boston, Massachusetts – MA

If you want or need to buy a wheel chair van in Boston, then we can help. With brands such as Volkswagen, Toyota, Honda, Dodge and Chrysler, along with our wide variety of new wheelchair vehicles with new conversions and used wheelchair vehicles with new or used conversions, you are sure to find the right disability car to meet your needs. We carry used handicap vehicles by Braun, VMI, and other brands with models such as the Braun Entervan, VMI Northstar, and many others (even maybe a AMS ). If you don’t see the specific handicap vehicle make or model that you’re looking for, please contact one of our mobility consultants today. VMi New England is committed to assisting you in your search to find the perfect adapted van that will meet your mobility needs at a price that is affordable to you.

Sell Your Disability Car in Boston, Massachusetts

VMi New England Toyota Sienna Northstar

 

Need to sell your scooter van or non-converted minivan? We buy handicap accessible vans of all types and brands from nearly all manufacturers in Massachusetts or nationwide. It’s also possible for us to purchase non-converted minivans including Chrysler, Volkswagen, and Dodge (long wheelbase only). For your convenience VMi New England now has mobility consignment programs, giving us new mobility alternatives and solutions. Also, for a very minimal cost you can sell your wheelchair lift van through our vast network of mobility classified listings online. Our previous customers can take advantage of our nationwide wheelchair van classified listing service for free.

VMi New England accepts most cars, trucks, minivans, sports cars, off road vehicles or ramp vans for trade-in when buying a wheelchair minivan. We won’t let a trade in stop you from buying a new or used wheelchair vehicle or wheelchair vehicle conversion. Come in for a quick price quote on the value of your trade-in vehicle.

Let us install a wheelchair accessible vehicle conversion into your Dodge, Chrysler, Volkswagen, or Honda minivan. VMi New England’s mobility dealership has low prices on safe, quality side and rear entry wheelchair van conversions that have been around for over 20 years.

Contact us when purchasing or installing mobility equipment in Boston, Massachusetts such as wheelchair lifts, mobility scooter and powerchair vehicle carriers, transfer seats, or other adaptive equipment. VMi New England offers popular brands of driver aids and If you don’t find the specific mobility equipment that meets your handicap van needs, we will make it special order it for you.