Tag Archives: ford

Service and Repair for Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles and/or Accessible Ramp/Lift?

Are you having trouble with your wheelchair van, ramp van, braun ability van, vantage mobility van, eldorado, amerivan, ricon lift, braun lift, grey market van, ams Legend, Edge, Edge II, Freedom, FR ?

No Worries We Can Fix It!

Even if you have had other Toyota dealer, Dodge dealer, Ford dealer, Honda dealer or a different adaptive mobility equipment dealer try and fix it. Call us, we can help.

Almost all wheelchair van and lift problems can be attributed to three main things. I would like to talk a little about each one and what you can do to be proactive in preventing problems that could stop your lift from operating.?

Reason Number 1: Operator Error. It may not be P.C. to bring it up, but many issues are caused by the user hurrying, not taking the proper precautions, or simply attempting to operate the van or lift in a situation it is not designed for. Let me expand on this a little.

We all know the obvious things an operator can do wrong. Lowering a lift on to extremely uneven ground or folding a platform into a van door that is not fully opened, if you have manual doors. The things that you need to think about are the issues that aren’t so obvious, but can still cause damage. Things like making sure you fully fold the platform when you are putting it in the stowed position. A lot of times people tend to release the fold switch too soon because the lift makes excessive noise when it cinches tight. Far from being a problem, that noise is a good thing What you’re hearing is the electric actuator “ratcheting,” which tells you that the lift is fully stowed and will not rattle as much while you’re driving. A tightly stowed platform will prevent certain lift components from wearing out prematurely, so be sure to keep the fold button pressed!

Another not-so-obvious issue is to make sure the outer roll stop deploys fully before you exit the platform. Think about it. If you are in a hurry and the roll stop is not completely down on the ground, your weight when rolling off of it is going to put excessive stress on those parts and you could cause problems that are easily avoidable. Even if the tip of the roll stop is up just a little bit, take the time to lower it completely before you exit the platform.?

Reason Number 2: Lack of Maintenance. Maintenance, maintenance, maintenance – I can’t say those words enough! Your dealer should set up a maintenance program for you and your lift should be in their shop for a regular check up at least twice a year. Every lift built after 2005 has a cycle counter on it that will tell us the total number of times you’ve used your lift, and all lifts should be maintained every 750 cycles. This is a short point. All you need to know is that if you don’t maintain your lift, something will eventually stop working!

Reason Number 3: Broken Parts. No matter what the product, we’ve all encountered that unexpected broken part that seems to go bad for no apparent reason. This actually represents a small percentage of wheelchair lift failures, and it can usually be avoided if the van or lift is maintained on a regular basis (see reason #2 above!). A typical situation might be a wiring harness that gets cut by component. This type of issue rarely happens out-of-the-blue, and with routine maintenance your dealer should be able to see the problem starting to occur and fix it before it gets worse.

That about sums it up The bottom line is that a properly operated and maintained wheelchair van or lift should give you years of reliable service. Read your manual and work closely with Automotive Innovations to make sure your lift is ready to go whenever you are. If you have any questions or are having an issue with your wheelchair van or lift feel free to call us at 508-697-6006.

Benefits of Owning an Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle

Safety
Safety is a universal concern for people with disAbilities and their caregivers. Many caregivers experience chronic back and joint pain from years of wheelchair lifts. And far too often there are stories of people fearful of loading and unloading their wheelchairs. Mobility vehicles are designed with a dedication to safety. Not only do ramp systems remove the liability, wear and tear and exhaustion of a lift, but brands like VMI adhere to the safety standards and qualifications of original equipment manufacturers like Honda, Toyota, Chrysler and Dodge.

A vehicle conversion from a company like VMI must maintain and provide the same safety ratings, post-conversion, as it did when the original model was created. That means collision safety and design is held to a very high standard. So there’s simply no reason to risk your personal safety or the livelihood of your passengers in an outdated vehicle.

Independence
If the daunting process of wheelchair lifts and transports kept you from leaving home in the past or the frustration of coordinating shuttles and third party transportation limits your lifestyle, look no further.

Mobility vehicles empower opportunity and independence. Frankly, when transportation is a possibility  rather than a limitation, the world gets a whole lot larger. Independent wheelchair users with reliable mobility vehicles hold the power to call the shots on their own life. They can drive where they need to, how they want to, when they want to. A mobility vehicle isn’t just a mechanism to take you from point A to B; A mobility vehicle is an entryway to possibility.

Increased Space and Flexibility
Most modern mobility vehicles feature side-entry and front door benefits which allow an array of seating arrangements and interior flexibility. With such added space, nearly any wheelchair — even power chairs — can fit in the cabin while still leaving room for the rest of the family.

Vehicles such as VMI’s Toyota Sienna Access360 have been engineered to promote a full range of motion and maneuverability for power chairs inside the vehicle, eliminating the need to hastily rearrange and remove seats for transports. Obstruction-free doorways and head clearance also pave the way for an enjoyable transition to and from the vehicle.

Simplicity and Ease-of-Use
Whether you are a caregiver or an independent wheelchair user, mobility vehicles have practical answers.

Through the addition of manual ramp systems and automated, in-floor ramp technology, transportation doesn’t have to remain a daily hassle.  Life often throws bigger dilemmas our way. Mobility vehicles make sure transportation isn’t one of those.

The Northstar E by VMI is a great example of a vehicle that was engineered with simplicity and ease-of-use at the forefront of its design. Caregivers can easily remove the vehicle’s ramp system without physical strain or contemplation. The process is intuitive and quick. Loading and unloading a van can be easily accomplished in a matter of minutes without sacrificing time or energy for the caregiver and loved one.

Mobility vehicles can even be outfitted with aftermarket additions such as remote start and keyless entry to  further simplify the transportation situation for independent wheelchair users and caregivers.

Benefits of Owning an Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle

Safety
Safety is a universal concern for people with disAbilities and their caregivers. Many caregivers experience chronic back and joint pain from years of wheelchair lifts. And far too often there are stories of people fearful of loading and unloading their wheelchairs. Mobility vehicles are designed with a dedication to safety. Not only do ramp systems remove the liability, wear and tear and exhaustion of a lift, but brands like VMI adhere to the safety standards and qualifications of original equipment manufacturers like Honda, Toyota, Chrysler and Dodge.

A vehicle conversion from a company like VMI must maintain and provide the same safety ratings, post-conversion, as it did when the original model was created. That means collision safety and design is held to a very high standard. So there’s simply no reason to risk your personal safety or the livelihood of your passengers in an outdated vehicle.

Independence
If the daunting process of wheelchair lifts and transports kept you from leaving home in the past or the frustration of coordinating shuttles and third party transportation limits your lifestyle, look no further.

Mobility vehicles empower opportunity and independence. Frankly, when transportation is a possibility  rather than a limitation, the world gets a whole lot larger. Independent wheelchair users with reliable mobility vehicles hold the power to call the shots on their own life. They can drive where they need to, how they want to, when they want to. A mobility vehicle isn’t just a mechanism to take you from point A to B; A mobility vehicle is an entryway to possibility.

Increased Space and Flexibility
Most modern mobility vehicles feature side-entry and front door benefits which allow an array of seating arrangements and interior flexibility. With such added space, nearly any wheelchair — even power chairs — can fit in the cabin while still leaving room for the rest of the family.

Vehicles such as VMI’s Toyota Sienna Access360 have been engineered to promote a full range of motion and maneuverability for power chairs inside the vehicle, eliminating the need to hastily rearrange and remove seats for transports. Obstruction-free doorways and head clearance also pave the way for an enjoyable transition to and from the vehicle.

Simplicity and Ease-of-Use
Whether you are a caregiver or an independent wheelchair user, mobility vehicles have practical answers.

Through the addition of manual ramp systems and automated, in-floor ramp technology, transportation doesn’t have to remain a daily hassle.  Life often throws bigger dilemmas our way. Mobility vehicles make sure transportation isn’t one of those.

The Northstar E by VMI is a great example of a vehicle that was engineered with simplicity and ease-of-use at the forefront of its design. Caregivers can easily remove the vehicle’s ramp system without physical strain or contemplation. The process is intuitive and quick. Loading and unloading a van can be easily accomplished in a matter of minutes without sacrificing time or energy for the caregiver and loved one.

Mobility vehicles can even be outfitted with aftermarket additions such as remote start and keyless entry to  further simplify the transportation situation for independent wheelchair users and caregivers.

Service and Repair for Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles and/or Accessible Ramp/Lift?

Service and Repair for wheelchair accessible vehicles, ramps and lifts
Are you having trouble with your wheelchair van, ramp van, braun ability van, vantage mobility van, eldorado, amerivan, ricon lift, braun lift, grey market van, ams Legend, Edge, Edge II, Freedom, FR ?

No Worries We Can Fix It!

Even if you have had other Toyota dealer, Dodge dealer, Ford dealer, Honda dealer or a different adaptive mobility equipment dealer try and fix it. Call us, we can help.

Almost all wheelchair van and lift problems can be attributed to three main things. I would like to talk a little about each one and what you can do to be proactive in preventing problems that could stop your lift from operating.?

Reason Number 1: Operator Error. It may not be P.C. to bring it up, but many issues are caused by the user hurrying, not taking the proper precautions, or simply attempting to operate the van or lift in a situation it is not designed for. Let me expand on this a little.

We all know the obvious things an operator can do wrong. Lowering a lift on to extremely uneven ground or folding a platform into a van door that is not fully opened, if you have manual doors. The things that you need to think about are the issues that aren’t so obvious, but can still cause damage. Things like making sure you fully fold the platform when you are putting it in the stowed position. A lot of times people tend to release the fold switch too soon because the lift makes excessive noise when it cinches tight. Far from being a problem, that noise is a good thing What you’re hearing is the electric actuator “ratcheting,” which tells you that the lift is fully stowed and will not rattle as much while you’re driving. A tightly stowed platform will prevent certain lift components from wearing out prematurely, so be sure to keep the fold button pressed!

Another not-so-obvious issue is to make sure the outer roll stop deploys fully before you exit the platform. Think about it. If you are in a hurry and the roll stop is not completely down on the ground, your weight when rolling off of it is going to put excessive stress on those parts and you could cause problems that are easily avoidable. Even if the tip of the roll stop is up just a little bit, take the time to lower it completely before you exit the platform.?

Reason Number 2: Lack of Maintenance. Maintenance, maintenance, maintenance – I can’t say those words enough! Your dealer should set up a maintenance program for you and your lift should be in their shop for a regular check up at least twice a year. Every lift built after 2005 has a cycle counter on it that will tell us the total number of times you’ve used your lift, and all lifts should be maintained every 750 cycles. This is a short point. All you need to know is that if you don’t maintain your lift, something will eventually stop working!

Reason Number 3: Broken Parts. No matter what the product, we’ve all encountered that unexpected broken part that seems to go bad for no apparent reason. This actually represents a small percentage of wheelchair lift failures, and it can usually be avoided if the van or lift is maintained on a regular basis (see reason #2 above!). A typical situation might be a wiring harness that gets cut by component. This type of issue rarely happens out-of-the-blue, and with routine maintenance your dealer should be able to see the problem starting to occur and fix it before it gets worse.

That about sums it up The bottom line is that a properly operated and maintained wheelchair van or lift should give you years of reliable service. Read your manual and work closely with Automotive Innovations to make sure your lift is ready to go whenever you are. If you have any questions or are having an issue with your wheelchair van or lift feel free to call us at 508-697-6006.

Ford Mobility Rebate Information

Program Details
The Ford Mobility Motoring adaptive equipment reimbursement of up to $1,000, or up to $200 for alert hearing devices, lumbar support or running boards, is available on any new Ford or Lincoln vehicle purchased or leased from a U.S. Ford or Lincoln dealer during the program period. Maximum reimbursement per vehicle is $1,000. Your Ford or Lincoln dealer has complete program details.

For example: If the cost of adding adaptive equipment is less than $1,000, your cash reimbursement will be for the exact amount of the adaptive equipment. Your Ford or Lincoln dealer has complete program details.

New Program Guidelines

Major structural vehicle modifications to accommodate the installation of wheelchair lift or ramp MUST be completed by a Ford Authorized Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) to be eligible for reimbursement. This change will be effective for any units modified after March 31,2011.

Raised roof and lowered floor conversions alone do not meet the eligibility requirements. 

Documentation must show that mobility adaptive equipment (such as a wheelchair lift, ramp or adaptive controls) was installed on the vehicle.

Adaptive equipment is defined as devices that make it easier for persons with permanent physical disabilities to drive or be transported in a vehicle. For more information about adaptive equipment please click on the “Adaptive Equipment Eligibility” page in the navigation bar.

Eligible Vehicles

All new model Ford or Lincoln Cars, Vans, CUVs ,SUVs and Trucks sold or leased during the program period. Eligible vehicles must have installation of the qualifying adaptive equipment within one year of reported purchase/lease date to the ultimate consumer.

New vehicles acquired from a U.S. Ford Authorized Pool Converter are eligible for the program.

Used units, including those previously in rental service, lease service or repurchased vehicles by Ford Motor Company that are available for resale, are not eligible.

Eligible Customers
Customer must be the end-user of the vehicle that requires installation of qualifying adaptive driving or assistance equipment, or passenger aid equipment. The end-user may also be defined as an organization, church, assisted living facility, nursing home, municipality, city, state or federal government.

Claims may be made for adaptive equipment required by a family member of the owner/lessee of an eligible vehicle, providing the equipment be permanently fitted to the vehicle.

*Includes all new Ford and Lincoln vehicles when purchased or leased from a U.S. Ford or Lincoln dealer during the program period.

Modification Eligibility
To be eligible for the Ford Mobility Motoring reimbursement, any/all structural modifications must in their entirety make the vehicle viably useful for the individual(s) for whom the modification is being made. Claims for modifications that may, in part, be commonly recognized as consistent with mobility modifications, but by themselves do not create a completed vehicle for use by the intended individual(s) are not eligible.

Major structural vehicle modifications to accommodate the installation of wheelchair lift or ramp MUST be completed by a Ford Authorized Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM) to be eligible for reimbursement. This change is in effect for any units modified after March 31, 2011.

Examples of major structural vehicle modifications include, but are not limited to, raised roofs or door openings and lowered floors. Non-structural vehicle adaptations (adaptive equipment) such as bolt on items or driving aids do not require the work to be completed by a Ford Quality Vehicle Modifier.

Raised roof and lowered floor conversions alone do not meet the eligibility requirements. Documentation must show that mobility adaptive equipment (such as a wheelchair lift, ramp or adaptive controls) was installed on the vehicle.

Adaptive Equipment Eligibility
Finding the Right Mobility Dealer
Choosing a company to provide your adaptive equipment is an important decision. Be sure to ask about credentials, experience, warranty coverage and service after the sale.

National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association
NMEDA is a non-profit organization composed of dealers, automotive manufacturers, rehabilitation professionals and mobility equipment providers that encourages professionalism and works to establish national guidelines and standards for the mobility best practices. To view a list of current members, go to www.nmeda.org. NMEDA Quality Assurance Program, QAP, is a nationally recognized accreditation program for the adaptive mobility equipment industry. As such, the companies involved have been certified to comply with NMEDA quality control processes, have the proper insurance and have obtained the applicable training from the adaptive equipment manufacturers they represent.

Carriers

Price Range : $500 – $4,000

Bumper-Mounted Carrier – allows manual wheelchairs to be mounted on bumper. Most of the bumper-mounted carriers can be removed to allow access to the trunk.

Car Top Carrier – an electric motor-driven hoist operates by switches. A steel pin lowers to pick up a manual wheelchair, which folds as it rises to the carrier.

Hitch-Mounted Carrier – tilts down when loading the wheelchair and then easily tilts up and locks into place.

Pickup Truck Carrier – stores the wheelchair in the bed of the truck after the wheelchair has been folded and picked up by an electric-driven motor. Certain manufacturers’ carriers will pick up the rigid chair, power wheelchair or a scooter not folded.


Parking Brake Extensions
Price Range : $50 – $900

Electric Parking Brake – motorized and can be set and released by a switch located within easy reach of the driver. Ideal for those with limited foot and leg strength.

Manual Parking Brake – for those with limited foot and leg strength. It is a handle attached to the parking brake and is long enough to operate by hand.

Hand Controls
Price Range : $360 – $2,000

Electrical
Electronic Hand Controls – this technology comes in two segments: Primary and Secondary Controls. Primary controls operate the gas, brake and steering functions. Products are usually combinations of joysticks and levers. Secondary controls operate all other vehicle functions. Products include voice activated controls, touch pads and power headrests. Please note: electronic controls do not fit in the price range above as each modification is unique to the individual. Please see your installer for an estimate.

Push Pull Control – brakes the vehicle when pushed toward the floor and accelerates the vehicle when pulled upward.

Push Right Angle Pull Hand Control – push the handle upward toward the instrument panel to brake and pull it downward at a right angle to accelerate.

Push Twist Control – similar to accelerating on a motorcycle. The handle is twisted to accelerate and pushed toward the floor to brake.

Quad Hand Controls – consists of an extra L–shaped bracket attached to the hand controls.

Mechanical
Push/Rotary Control – operates by pushing forward to apply the brakes and rotating backward to apply the gas.

Lifts
Price Range :$600 – $18,000

An Automatic lift will fold, unfold, lower and rise by operating a switch on either side of the lift, on the dash or outside the van. The Semi-Automatic lift operates similar to the automatic lift, but requires manual folding and unfolding of the platform.

Electrical Mechanical Lift – operates by chain or screw rod and depends upon the power provided by the battery.

Hydraulic Lift – uses a pump and cylinder to raise and lower the lift in conjunction with the van’s battery.

Outside Lift – requires installing a trailer hitch as the scooter is carried on the outside of the vehicle.

Pickup Truck Lift – picks up the scooter and stores it in the bed of the truck. It can lift a rigid chair (manual), an electric scooter or a power wheelchair.

Platform Lift – (as shown above) requires either two side doors or one sliding door on a van and is stored either on the side, the rear or under the floor of the van.

Rotary (Swing) Lift – beneficial because of the parking conveniences, due to less room needed to enter and exit the van. This device swings into the van and the lift platform sits on the floor in the middle of the van.

Trunk Lift – puts the scooter into the trunk, provided the scooter measures less than the trunk.

Under-the-Floor Lift – only pump and motor are located inside.Door Openers
Price Range : $800 – $2,000

Chain Door Opener – slide door that travels in a track, located at the top of the van.

Pivot Arm and Push/Pull Gear Door Opener – opens double–out doors outward.

Power Assist Seats
Price Range : $1,800 – $6,800

Rotating Seat – This system for lower vehicles provides easy access to an automotive seat. The seat rotates out over the doorsill, bridging the gap for a safe transfer onto the seat. Once you’re on, the seat rotates back into the vehicle. Both manual and power versions are available.

Rotating and Lift Seat – This system for higher vehicles provides easy access to an automotive seat. The seat rotates, comes out of the vehicle, and lowers toward the ground, eliminating the climbing and twisting normally required to enter a higher vehicle. Units are powered out and down; however, some models are equipped with manual rotation, while others have powered rotation.

Steering Devices
Price Range : $50 – $350

Amputee Ring – designed best for those with prosthesis. The hook of the prosthesis will fit into the ring and remain in place while driving.

“Para” Spinner Knob – consists of a base, which is adjustable, and a detachable knob that can be comfortably gripped with one hand.

Palm Grip – ideal for someone who has control of the wrist but is limited in grip strength. The hand is always held flat to the steering wheel while driving.

Quad Grip with Pin – a 3/8″ steel shaft from a stiff leather cuff that inserts into the spinner base. A stable wrist is required. The pin may be attached on a horizontal or a vertical position.

Quad Steering Cuff or Splint – a wrist cock up splint with a post attached in a
vertical or horizontal position. It is ideal for persons either lacking hand and wrist function or those unable to use the above steering devices.

Spinner Cuff – operates as the hand is held in place by a cuff and fastened with Velcro. A lockable short rod is placed in the base of the steering wheel near the palm of the hand to allow the person to steer.

Tri-Post or Tri-Pin Spinner Knob – stabilizes & secures the hand & wrist while driving.

V-Grip or U-Grip – hand controls keep the hand in an upright position and in place while driving. It is used primarily by persons who have adequate use of wrist movements.

Deep Dish Steering Wheel – used for those who have limited reach to be able to turn the wheel safely due to its smaller size.

Foot Steering Controls – for drivers who need to maneuver the vehicle by their feet.

Horizontal Steering – the steering column is easily adjusted by motorization for those drivers with limited reach.

Steering Column Extension – the steering column is extended by 2-6 inches allowing room to steer for individuals driving from their wheelchairs.

Joystick – very similar to the joystick on a wheelchair, this larger scaled version allows the driver to maneuver the vehicle.

Low Effort Steering – reduces the effort needed to steer by approximately 40 percent.

Reduced Effort Steering – for drivers who have limited use of their upper extremities.

Servo Controls – unlike the other hand controls, these operate by an auxiliary motor, rather than the pressure of an individual’s hand. It reduces the amount of strength needed by the driver.

Zero Effort Steering – reduces the effort needed to steer by approximately 70 percent.

Wheelchair Restraints
Price Range : $50 – $2,000

Electric Restraint System – consists of a device on the bottom of the chair and another device on the floor of the van. When the two devices are properly aligned, a lock will sound and the wheelchair will not move.

Manual Restraints or Tie-Downs System – requires an attendant because it cannot be operated from the wheelchair. Four straps are snugly placed around the four wheelchair wheels to help prevent rolling during vehicle movement.

Upper Torso Restraint – used in addition to the wheelchair restraints for those with weak muscles in the upper torso area and poor balance.Adaptive equipment describes an installed device, in addition to a structural modification, that is necessary for a person with a permanent physical disability to drive or be transported in a vehicle.

Some equipment not thought of as typical adaptive equipment, or equipment which is not available from the factory, that serves a need to operate or ride in a vehicle for persons with disabilities such as but not limited to: assist handles, keyless entry, keyless ignition switch, lumbar support, headrest adjustment, pedal extensions power seats, remote liftgate opener, running boards, seat belt extenders, seat modifications, and special mirrors may be eligible for reimbursement and require additional documentation. You will be notified if additional documentation is needed such as a letter or prescription clearly describing the permanent physical disability requiring this equipment, prepared by a licensed or certified medical professional.

Factory installed options such as air conditioning, running boards, lumbar seats and power windows are not considered eligible under the terms of the program.

Reimbursement Assistance
The reimbursement process is quick and easy. Once your vehicle has been purchased and adaptive equipment installation is completed, your dealer will assist you in submitting your claim. Your dealer will need the following documentation:

  • Vehicle Bill of Sale – must have the VIN included
  • Paid Adaptive Equipment Invoice – should be dated and marked paid

Your reimbursement check will then arrive directly from Ford Motor Company, usually within two to four weeks.

Frequently asked Questions

How do I apply for reimbursement?
Contact the Customer Care Center at (800) 952–2248 and a representative will assist with contacting your dealer.

What is the time period of the Ford Mobility Motoring Program and which vehicles are eligible?
Please visit your Ford or Lincoln dealer for complete program details including program effective dates and eligible vehicles.

How soon after I purchase or lease my new vehicle do I have to complete the adaptive equipment installation?
Claim must be submitted within 12 months of the reported sale date.

How do I receive my Ford Mobility Motoring financial reimbursement?
When the adaptive equipment installation has been completed on your new vehicle, either you or the adaptive equipment dealer will take the paid adaptive equipment invoice to the Ford or Lincoln dealer where you purchased or leased your new vehicle. You will receive a check mailed to you directly from Ford for up to $1,000 toward the cost of your adaptive equipment or up to $200 on after-market alert hearing devices, lumbar seats and running boards. Total reimbursement is not to exceed $1,000.

How long does it take to receive my check?
It usually takes 7-10 business days after the dealer submits the authorized claim and the claim is approved by Ford.

What adaptive equipment qualifies for the financial reimbursement?
Adaptive equipment is defined as any installed device that makes it easier for persons with disabilities to drive or be transported in a vehicle. Equipment that can be factory installed, or is considered a factory option by Ford, is not eligible. Equipment which is not clearly related to a specific medical need, such as after–market alert hearing devices, swivel seats, pedal extensions and running boards, will require original medical documentation clearly detailing the physical disability or permanent impairment for which the equipment is intended. This documentation must be prepared by a licensed, certified medical or medical–related professional.

May I go to any adaptive equipment installer or must I go to someone on your State Resource Guide listing?
You may take your vehicle to the adaptive equipment installer of your choice. The list provided for reference only and no endorsement is intended. You should verify information, check with adaptive equipment manufacturers and obtain complete references before any services are rendered.

Is it necessary for me to visit an assessment center before I qualify for Ford Mobility Motoring reimbursement?
No. If you already have equipment you’re going to transfer, or you know what equipment you need, it is not necessary for you to have an evaluation at an assessment center. However, it could be beneficial to have an evaluation every four years.

May I use the financial reimbursement toward the purchase or lease of my vehicle?
No. The Mobility reimbursement can only happen after you have supplied your Ford or Lincoln dealer with the paid invoice for your adaptive equipment installation.

Does newly purchased used adaptive equipment qualify?
Yes. As long as you have a paid receipt, newly purchased used equipment acquired for your installation will qualify for reimbursement.

Can the Ford Mobility Motoring financial reimbursement be used in combination with other incentives or rebates?
Yes. The Ford Mobility Motoring financial reimbursement may be combined with all other public and private offers, including the “Commercial Connection Program”, in effect at the time of purchase or lease.

Are Ford Mobility Motoring benefits available if I purchase or lease a new vehicle under the Ford A, X or Z Plans?
Yes. A, X and Z Plan vehicles are eligible as long as they otherwise meet plan provisions.

Are used vehicles, or vehicles which have previously been in rental or lease service, eligible?
No. Only new models purchased or leased from a Ford or Lincoln dealer are eligible.

Will Ford Mobility Motoring cover the cost of transferring my equipment from my old vehicle to a new vehicle?
Yes. The cost of the transfer installation to your new vehicle is covered with a paid receipt.

If I have a family member who requires adaptive equipment assistance to enter or ride in my new vehicle, will Ford Mobility Motoring cover the cost of the equipment for that person?
Yes. Adaptive equipment required to transport a person with a physical disability is covered up to the maximum of $1,000 and up to $200 on after–market alert hearing devices, lumbar seats and running boards. Total reimbursement is not to exceed $1,000.

Ford Transit Connect Mobility Vans: Engineering – Redesigned

2014 Ford Transit Connect www.newenglandwheelchairvan.com 9
The 2014 Ford Transit is new from the ground up, starting with the lightweight yet durable unibody construction and continuing with five wheelbases, four roof heights and four models . The models are the cargo van, the passenger wagon, the chassis cab and the cutaway. Going well beyond your typical vehicle redesign, the new Transit is a major transformation in the full-size van you’ve been accustomed to driving. Engineered to ultra-stringent Ford commercial truck standards for durability. Built to exceed what you’ve come to expect from the leader in full-size vans.

Unibody Construction
The Transit unibody is lightweight and highly durable, engineered with high-strength and boron steel.

Roof Heights
The everyday mission of the full-size commercial van is carrying lots of cargo. Now you can match multiple cargo box sizes designated in roof height – low, medium or high – to the volume or payload your job requires. Imagine a cargo volume over 490 cubic feet – and a roof tall enough to accommodate large items in an upright position. That alone says volumes about the innovative new design of the Ford Transit.

Wheelbases
Ford Transit van and wagon models come in regular (130-inch) and long (148-inch) wheelbase lengths. There’s also a long wheelbase with extended body. Chassis cab and cutaway models offer three wheelbases: 138, 156 and 178 inches. So what does this mean? More choices in load floor length for increased capacity in the cargo van and more passenger space in the wagon. The redesign has the ability to accommodate a wide range of body types and sizes in chassis cab and cutaway models.

Model Configurations

The Ford Transit is available in four models:

  • The Transit van spacious and capable.
  • The Transit wagon – roomy and comfortable.
  • The Transit chassis cab – rugged and versatile.
  • The Transit cutaway – convenient direct cab-to-body access.

From hauling cargo to transporting passengers, the Ford Transit does it all.

Ford Transit Connect Mobility Vans: Information

Torque Vectoring Control www.newenglandwheelchairvan.com
Transit Connect Accessibility and Seating Options

With the rear tumble seat folded forward; the vehicle’s design provides a wheelchair area of 31″ wide x 50″ in length. With the rear seat in its upright position, three full-sized adults can be transported in the rear seating area, along with the driver and another passenger in the front. This new design combines the affordability of a rear entry transport van for handicap passengers with non-wheelchair passenger capabilities, transitioning from one use to the other in less than a minute.

Money Saving Fuel Efficiency

The Ford Transit Connect delivers 22-mpg city/25 mpg highway, and is one of the most affordable wheelchair accessible vehicles we offer. How’s this for gas savings – if you average driving 200 miles per day and spend $4/gal for gas, you will save $11,345 per year vs. driving a full-size van. In just three years, the Transit Connect practically pays for itself!

So if you’re looking to save money on a great vehicle that meets your needs, and continue to provide low cost of ownership, then the Transit Connect is for you. You’ll quickly come to realize why it won “Truck of the Year” awards from multiple automotive associations and publications.

Ford Transit Connect Mobility Vans

2014 Ford Transit Connect www.newenglandwheelchairvan.com 4

The Transit Connect provides a whole new option for wheelchair van passengers and caregivers. It’s sleek European style and ample interior space may be just what you’re looking for in today’s accessible van market.

For many people however, fuel economy might be its strongest selling feature. The 2010 Ford Transit Connect delivers 22 mpg city and 25 mpg highway. Not only are these vehicles economically impressive but also economically priced.

The Transit Connect is a front-wheel drive vehicle and comes in XL and XLT trim levels. It has sliding side doors in the rear like a minivan and two rear folding doors similar to a commercial van.

The power train comes with a 136 horsepower 2.0 L, 4cylinder engine with a 4-speed automatic transmission.

Its safety features include ABS, traction control, an anti-skid system and front-side airbags. they are also meet the crash test and safety requirements set forth by all federal regulation and state DOT requirements. As a member of the National Mobility Equipment Dealers Association (NMEDA) and their Quality Assurance Program (QAP), we are able to provide and safe and affordable wheelchair van that meets our customers’ needs.

Specifications

  • Overall height – 79.25″
  • Overall vehicle length – 181″
  • Rear Door Opening Height – 59.5″
  • Rear Door Opening Width – 50.5″
  • Interior Height (mid-section) – 58.5″
  • Platform Interior Length – 49.5″
  • Ramp Width – 31″
  • Ramp Length – 65″
  • Ramp Angle of Approach – 9 degrees

Transit Connect XLT Features

  • Power Mirrors, Windows, Locks
  • Cloth Interior
  • Folding 2nd Row, 60/40 Split 3-Passenger Seating
  • Cargo Side and Rear Privacy Glass
  • 2.0 L DOHC 136 HP Engine
  • 4-Speed Automatic Transmission
  • Advance Trac with RSC (Roll Stability Control)
  • P205/65R15 Tires w/Spare
  • Cruise Control
  • Front Overhead Storage
  • Power Adjustable, Heated Side view Mirrors
  • AM/FM Stereo w/Single-CD and Audio Input Jack
  • Front Disc/Rear Drum Brakes with Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
  • 15.4 Gallon Capacity Fuel Tank

2014 Ford Transit Connect: AdvanceTrac® with Roll Stability Control™

Active Safety
An electronic stability control system that helps the driver maintain vehicle control in adverse driving situations or when making evasive maneuvers on slippery pavement.

*Remember that even advanced technology cannot overcome the laws of physics. It’s always possible to lose control of a vehicle due to inappropriate driver input for the conditions.

How Ford Wheelchair Van Insurance Really Works

If you’re ever in a accident in your wheelchair van and have insurance questions or need your to have repairs made contact the experts at the Mobility Center in Bridgewater, MA with your questions 508-697-6006

2013 Ford Tuscany Wheelchair Van

Buying insurance can be a complicated process. For those of us who haven’t spent a great deal of time thinking about insurance and how it works, purchasing insurance for a wheelchair van can be rather intimidating. So here is a little information about the way Ford wheelchair van insurance really works.

Information about Coverage
Your Ford wheelchair van insurance is made up of individual elements. When one talks about vehicle insurance, they’re actually referring to a combination of different forms of insurance with different purposes.

For example, you can buy liability insurance. That will pay for any damage you might cause if you have an accident. Liability insurance is a legal requirement. Bodily injury liability coverage will defray the medical expenses of anyone who may be injured by your vehicle in an accident.

Due to the high number of people who fail to meet their state-mandated legal obligations, many Ford wheelchair van drivers purchase uninsured or underinsured motorist insurance. This feature of a policy will protect you in the event that another driver collides with you and doesn’t have adequate coverage.

There is insurance designed to cover all of our own medical expenses if you’re in an accident and most new vehicle buyers purchase comprehensive policies that cover damage caused by vandalism, weather, and virtually any other mishap. If you are still making payments on a financed vehicle, the lender will generally require proof of comprehensive coverage as a term of the loan.

Those are only a few of the different forms of coverage that may be involved in covering your Ford. Different policies have different benefits and various insurance companies offer variations on the same theme. You may be interested in hearing about some of the other forms of protection they offer when insuring your wheelchair van.

Information of Rate Determinations
Now that we’ve discussed what you’re buying, we can explore why it costs so much! Most of us find insurance rather expensive and many wonder why different people may be subject to wildly different rates. There are a number of factors at play.

The most significant factor in setting insurance rates is the driver. Insurance companies evaluate data and look at multiple variables to determine how likely you are to be in an accident or to file a claim.

That’s why a 45-year old with a perfect driving record pays less for the same coverage than an 18-year old who’s already collected numerous. Your age is just one example of the many demographic variables influencing your rates. Your driving history is another.

Unfortunately, that means you’ll pay more than most people when you insure your Ford wheelchair van. Even if you are a fantastic driver, the overall statistics do indicate that drivers with disabilities are more likely to be involved in claims and accidents. US federal law prohibits insurance companies from discrimination based on disability, but they can consider those statistics when determining rates.

Your Ford wheelchair van will also influence how much you pay for your insurance. Again, the insurance companies base their rates on all available data and they have a very good idea of how much different vehicle types cost to repair and how likely they are to be involved in a claim. That’s why a sports car will cost more to insure than a dull four-door sedan.

It’s also another reason while you will be paying more than the average for your wheelchair van insurance. Wheelchair vans tend to cost a great deal to repair and data does indicate that they are more likely than many vehicle types to be involved in insurance claims. Additionally, wheelchair van owners need to be certain that their special equipment and modifications are insured. That drives up the price of their policies even more.

Insurance can be complicated and you need to be considerate when making decisions. Having at least a basic understanding of coverage types and the factors influencing the price of insurance should help.

Prepare Your Mobility Equipment For the Colder Weather

Cold temperatures not only slow wheelchair users down, but can also slow down their vans and accessible equipment. For example, if you use a hydraulic wheelchair lift, you may have noticed that the colder the weather, the slower the lift reacts. The cold thickens the fluid, making it move slower through hoses, valves and cylinders.

There’s not much you can do about that, but preparing other equipment for cold weather is important to help avoid accidents and breakdowns.

If you live in the New England area · call our Mobility Center today (508) 697-8324 · We’ll rust proof your wheelchair accessible vehicle, give you an oil change, tune-up, and/or semi-annual ramp/lift service and have any other accessible equipment checked before the temperature dips. If you ask we can also check your battery, antifreeze level, heater, brakes, defroster and thermostat.

Do It Yourself:

  • Purchase winter wiper blades that cut through snow and ice.
  • Keep the gas tank at least half full. It reduces condensation and makes your vehicle easier to start on cold mornings.
  • Buy tires that have MS, M+S, M/S or M&S on them, meaning they meet the Rubber Manufacturers Association guidelines and can bite through mud and snow.
  • For better traction and control, rotate tires so the best ones are in the front.
  • Get an electric engine block heater. It warms the engine so the motor can start. It connects to normal AC power overnight or before driving. In extremely cold climates, electrical outlets are sometimes found in public or private parking lots. 
  • Cold weather is tough on accessible van batteries. Buy one with greater starting power, higher cold cranking amps and reserve capacity for energy when the engine isn’t running.
  • Use synthetic oil to make starting a cold engine easier.

Before you drive:

  • Keep rock salt on hand to melt ice off walkways for a safer wheelchair ride.
  • Clean the snow off the roof and hood so it doesn’t “avalanche” onto the windshield and block your vision.
  • Clear the head and tail lights for best visibility.
  • Scrape the ice off mirrors and windows.

················································

Here at VMi New England Mobility Center and Automotive Innovations we’ll service and repair your wheelchair accessible vehicle and/or equipment even if you didn’t buy it from us! So bring us your mobility van no matter the year (old or new), chassis (Honda, Dodge, Toyota, Ford, Chrysler, excreta..), or conversion (Side Entry, Rear Entry, VMI, Braun, Ricon, Rampvan, Elorado, Amerivan, excreta..)!!

Ford signs first contract with autoworkers’ union: Jun 20, 1941

After a long and bitter struggle on the part of Henry Ford against cooperation with organized labor unions, Ford Motor Company signs its first contract with the United Automobile Workers of America and Congress of Industrial Organizations (UAW-CIO) on this day in 1941.

In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt‘s allies in Congress passed the landmark National Labor Relations Act–also known as the Wagner Act, after one of its authors, Senator Robert Wagner of New York–which established workers’ rights to collective bargaining and attempted to regulate unfair practices by employers, employees and unions. By 1937, after successful sit-down strikes (during which the workers remained inside the factory so that strikebreakers were unable to enter) both General Motors and Chrysler had made deals with the fledgling UAW, and Ford was the lone holdout against the unionization of the auto industry.

Edsel Ford, president of Ford Motor, recognized that the Wagner Act had made unionization inevitable, and tried to reason with his father. The elder Ford, who despised labor unions, instead put his trust in Harry Bennett, head of Ford’s Service Department, who promised to keep the unions at bay. In the much-publicized “Battle of the Overpass” on May 26, 1937, Ford henchmen brutally beat several UAW organizers (including Walter Reuther and Richard Frankensteen) attempting to hand out leaflets at Ford’s River Rouge plant. In the aftermath of this incident, Ford Motor Company was found guilty of violating the Wagner Act, and in early 1941 the National Labor Relations Board ordered the company to stop interfering with the union’s attempts to organize.

On April 1, 1941, a walkout by Ford workers protesting the firing of several union members closed down the River Rouge plant. The strike inflamed racial tensions, as many African-American Ford employees returned to work before their white colleagues, breaking the strike. Though Henry Ford had initially threatened to shut down his plants rather than sign with the UAW-CIO, he changed his position and signed a contract with the union that June 20. Ford’s change of heart was reportedly due to the urging of his wife, Clara, who feared that more riots and bloodshed would result from her husband’s refusal to work with the unions and threatened to leave him if he did not sign the contract.

Paradoxically, Ford gave its workers more generous terms than had either GM or Chrysler: In addition to paying back wages to more than 4,000 workers who had been wrongfully discharged, the company agreed to match the highest wage rates in the industry and to deduct union dues from workers’ pay.