Tag Archives: check tires

Holiday Travel Tips

Millions of people will take to the highways, skies, or rails to visit their loved ones over the upcoming holiday. With snow and sleet predicted for many parts of the country this weekend, here are some travel tips to help holiday travelers arrive safely at their destination:

Driving

  • Make sure your vehicle is in good working order. Fill your gas tank, check the air pressure in your tires and make sure you have windshield fluid.
  • Buckle up, slow down, don’t drink and drive.
  • Avoid distractions such as cell phones – don’t text and drive.
  • Make frequent stops on long trips. If you’re too tired to drive, stop and rest.
  • If you have car trouble, pull off the road as far as possible.

Flying and Riding Trains

  • It’s flu season. If you’ve been sick or been in contact with someone who is sick, consider postponing your trip. You could be contagious for a week before symptoms appear.
  • Remember that everything you touch has to be touched by someone else – luggage handlers, etc. Handle your own belongings as much as possible. Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Carry hand sanitizer and anti-bacterial wipes with you. You can use them to wash your hands or wipe down surfaces such as armrests.
  • Bring your own pillows and blankets – they can act as a shield against the seat itself.
  • Avoid touching your face or eyes. If you have to cough or sneeze, do so into a tissue or your sleeve.

Travel Tips

  • If you have diabetes or take medication using a syringe, get a signed letter from your doctor  explaining that your syringes are a medical necessity.
  • Know the generic names of your medications so you can replace them if they are lost or stolen. Your medication will have a different brand name in another country.
  • If you have any life-threatening allergies, wear a medical alert bracelet and bring an Epi-pen kit.
  • Travel light. Take only what you need and no more.
  • Make sure your children know their home address and telephone number. Show them where to go if you get separated, and review the procedure for dealing with strangers.
  • Leave the jewelry at home and reduce your risk of getting robbed. The same goes for expensive electronics such as iPods and digital cameras. Buy some disposable cameras to use.
  • Make photocopies of your passports, credit cards and other ID. Leave one copy with a relative at home, and keep another copy separate from your originals.
  • Travel with only one credit card. Bring a combination of traveller’s cheques and cash in small bills (American money is universally accepted). You should be able to use your debit card as long as the machine has the CIRRUS symbol. You will be charged for each transaction. Try to familiarize yourself with the local currency so your first transaction won’t be so confusing.
  • Bring an extra pair of glasses or contact lenses as backup. You don’t want your vacation ruined because you can’t see anything.

Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles: Summer Road Trip Preparation

Each year, the summer months bring a slew of adventurous opportunities including road trips, family outings and visits to special destinations like the beach and state parks. With these fun-filled plans in motion, the last thing you are going to want to be worrying about is car or handicap accessible vehicles maintenance. However, as the hottest season of the year, summer is also one of the most trying on your vehicle. Even if you are not exactly handy with a wrench, a quick trip to the mechanic can help you follow these trip-saving tips and make sure you reach your destination this summer.

Check tires.
Summer temperatures can significantly affect the pressure levels on your tires. Driving with an under or overinflated tire runs the risk of the tire bursting, really putting a damper on your vacation plans. To avoid getting stuck roadside, be sure to check your tire pressure regularly. Consult your car’s manual for the optimal range of pressure for your vehicle, and ensure that none of your tires falls below or over those numbers. While you are at it, also check the pressure of your spare tire, as that can make a big difference if you are in a bind.

Change oil.
Putting your car or handicapped vans through regular oil checks and changes can drastically improve your vehicle’s driving condition. From better gas mileage to an overall longer lifespan, your wheels will thank you for keeping them oiled up and ready to go. Experts recommend changing your vehicle’s oil every 3,000 miles. You can have a professional take care of it or even complete the process yourself.

Replace windshield wipers.
Although summer comes with the promise of pool days, it is also often known to spring sudden showers on unsuspecting drivers. The colder months can be quite harsh on windshield wipers with extreme temperatures, snow, ice and salt affecting the rubber blades and decreasing their efficiency. If you are finding that it takes a few swipes to clear your windshield, it is time to replace your blades.

Treat Rust.
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value. The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

Stay cool.
One of the worst things you could hear during the hotter months is that the air conditioning has stopped working. Not only does this feature add comfort, it also prevents driver fatigue due to high temperatures. A cooling system that does not function properly has probably developed a leak out, allowing the refrigerant to escape. Prevent any further damage and have a professional take a look.

Get Your Vehicle Summer Ready!

Each year, the warmer months bring a slew of adventurous opportunities including road trips, family outings and visits to special destinations like the beach and state parks. With these fun-filled plans in motion, the last thing you are going to want to be worrying about is car or handicap accessible vehicles maintenance. However, as the hottest season of the year, summer is also one of the most trying on your vehicle. Even if you are not exactly handy with a wrench, a quick trip to the mechanic can help you follow these trip-saving tips and make sure you reach your destination this summer.

Check tires.
Summer temperatures can significantly affect the pressure levels on your tires. Driving with an under or overinflated tire runs the risk of the tire bursting, really putting a damper on your vacation plans. To avoid getting stuck roadside, be sure to check your tire pressure regularly. Consult your car’s manual for the optimal range of pressure for your vehicle, and ensure that none of your tires falls below or over those numbers. While you are at it, also check the pressure of your spare tire, as that can make a big difference if you are in a bind.

Change oil.
Putting your car or handicapped vans through regular oil checks and changes can drastically improve your vehicle’s driving condition. From better gas mileage to an overall longer lifespan, your wheels will thank you for keeping them oiled up and ready to go. Experts recommend changing your vehicle’s oil every 3,000 miles. You can have a professional take care of it or even complete the process yourself.

Replace windshield wipers.
Although summer comes with the promise of pool days, it is also often known to spring sudden showers on unsuspecting drivers. The colder months can be quite harsh on windshield wipers with extreme temperatures, snow, ice and salt affecting the rubber blades and decreasing their efficiency. If you are finding that it takes a few swipes to clear your windshield, it is time to replace your blades.

Treat Rust.
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value. The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

Stay cool.
One of the worst things you could hear during the hotter months is that the air conditioning has stopped working. Not only does this feature add comfort, it also prevents driver fatigue due to high temperatures. A cooling system that does not function properly has probably developed a leak out, allowing the refrigerant to escape. Prevent any further damage and have a professional take a look.

Cold Weather Tips for Your Van

Frigid temperatures not only slow us down, but can slow our van and accessible equipment. For example, if you use a hydraulic wheelchair lift, you may have noticed that the colder the weather, the slower the lift reacts. The cold thickens the fluid, making it move slower through hoses, valves and cylinders.

There’s not much you can do about that, but preparing other equipment for cold weather is important to help avoid accidents and breakdowns.

If you live in northern climates, get an oil change, tune-up, and/or semi-annual lift service and have any other accessible equipment checked before the temperature dips. A professional should also check the battery, antifreeze level, heater, brakes, defroster and thermostat.

Do It Yourself:

  • Purchase winter wiper blades that cut through snow and ice.
  • Keep the gas tank at least half full. It reduces condensation and makes your vehicle easier to start on cold mornings.
  • Buy tires that have MS, M+S, M/S or M&S on them, meaning they meet the Rubber Manufacturers Association guidelines and can bite through mud and snow.
  • For better traction and control, rotate tires so the best ones are in the front.
  • Get an electric engine block heater. It warms the engine so the motor can start. It connects to normal AC power overnight or before driving. In extremely cold climates, electrical outlets are sometimes found in public or private parking lots.
  • Cold weather is tough on accessible van batteries. Buy one with greater starting power, higher cold cranking amps and reserve capacity for energy when the engine isn’t running.
  • Use synthetic oil to make starting a cold engine easier.

Before you drive:

  • Keep rock salt on hand to melt ice off walkways for a safer wheelchair ride.
  • Clean the snow off the roof and hood so it doesn’t “avalanche” onto the windshield and block your vision.
  • Clear the head and tail lights for best visibility.
  • Scrape the ice off mirrors and windows.

Holiday Travel Tips

Millions of people will take to the highways, skies, or rails to visit their loved ones over the upcoming holiday. With snow and sleet predicted for many parts of the country this weekend, here are some travel tips to help holiday travelers arrive safely at their destination:

Driving

  • Make sure your vehicle is in good working order. Fill your gas tank, check the air pressure in your tires and make sure you have windshield fluid.
  • Buckle up, slow down, don’t drink and drive.
  • Avoid distractions such as cell phones – don’t text and drive.
  • Make frequent stops on long trips. If you’re too tired to drive, stop and rest.
  • If you have car trouble, pull off the road as far as possible.

Flying and Riding Trains

  • It’s flu season. If you’ve been sick or been in contact with someone who is sick, consider postponing your trip. You could be contagious for a week before symptoms appear.
  • Remember that everything you touch has to be touched by someone else – luggage handlers, etc. Handle your own belongings as much as possible. Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Carry hand sanitizer and anti-bacterial wipes with you. You can use them to wash your hands or wipe down surfaces such as armrests.
  • Bring your own pillows and blankets – they can act as a shield against the seat itself.
  • Avoid touching your face or eyes. If you have to cough or sneeze, do so into a tissue or your sleeve.

Travel Tips

  • If you have diabetes or take medication using a syringe, get a signed letter from your doctor  explaining that your syringes are a medical necessity.
  • Know the generic names of your medications so you can replace them if they are lost or stolen. Your medication will have a different brand name in another country.
  • If you have any life-threatening allergies, wear a medical alert bracelet and bring an Epi-pen kit.
  • Travel light. Take only what you need and no more.
  • Make sure your children know their home address and telephone number. Show them where to go if you get separated, and review the procedure for dealing with strangers.
  • Leave the jewelry at home and reduce your risk of getting robbed. The same goes for expensive electronics such as iPods and digital cameras. Buy some disposable cameras to use.
  • Make photocopies of your passports, credit cards and other ID. Leave one copy with a relative at home, and keep another copy separate from your originals.
  • Travel with only one credit card. Bring a combination of traveller’s cheques and cash in small bills (American money is universally accepted). You should be able to use your debit card as long as the machine has the CIRRUS symbol. You will be charged for each transaction. Try to familiarize yourself with the local currency so your first transaction won’t be so confusing.
  • Bring an extra pair of glasses or contact lenses as backup. You don’t want your vacation ruined because you can’t see anything.

Summer Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle Care

Each year, the summer months bring a slew of adventurous opportunities including road trips, family outings and visits to special destinations like the beach and state parks. With these fun-filled plans in motion, the last thing you are going to want to be worrying about is car or handicap accessible vehicles maintenance. However, as the hottest season of the year, summer is also one of the most trying on your vehicle. Even if you are not exactly handy with a wrench, a quick trip to the mechanic can help you follow these trip-saving tips and make sure you reach your destination this summer.

Check tires.
Summer temperatures can significantly affect the pressure levels on your tires. Driving with an under or overinflated tire runs the risk of the tire bursting, really putting a damper on your vacation plans. To avoid getting stuck roadside, be sure to check your tire pressure regularly. Consult your car’s manual for the optimal range of pressure for your vehicle, and ensure that none of your tires falls below or over those numbers. While you are at it, also check the pressure of your spare tire, as that can make a big difference if you are in a bind.

Change oil.
Putting your car or handicapped vans through regular oil checks and changes can drastically improve your vehicle’s driving condition. From better gas mileage to an overall longer lifespan, your wheels will thank you for keeping them oiled up and ready to go. Experts recommend changing your vehicle’s oil every 3,000 miles. You can have a professional take care of it or even complete the process yourself.

Replace windshield wipers.
Although summer comes with the promise of pool days, it is also often known to spring sudden showers on unsuspecting drivers. The colder months can be quite harsh on windshield wipers with extreme temperatures, snow, ice and salt affecting the rubber blades and decreasing their efficiency. If you are finding that it takes a few swipes to clear your windshield, it is time to replace your blades.

Treat Rust.
Vehicles today are subject to rust and corrosion due to moisture, humidity, tons of road salt and other airborne pollutants that can cause rapid deterioration of your wheelchair van. If neglected, the damages can make your mobility investment of little value. The thousands of yearly miles, environments and exposure to the elements of larger vehicles means they are a lot more likely to suffer from the effects of corrosion. Correct rust proofing on a regular basis can ensure that your vehicle does not suffer from corrosion related vehicle downtime and keep your van from falling apart.

Stay cool.
One of the worst things you could hear during the hotter months is that the air conditioning has stopped working. Not only does this feature add comfort, it also prevents driver fatigue due to high temperatures. A cooling system that does not function properly has probably developed a leak out, allowing the refrigerant to escape. Prevent any further damage and have a professional take a look.